Christ Church, Oxford

Christ Church, Oxford

Encyclopedia
Christ Church is one of the largest constituent colleges
Colleges of the University of Oxford
The University of Oxford comprises 38 Colleges and 6 Permanent Private Halls of religious foundation. Colleges and PPHs are autonomous self-governing corporations within the university, and all teaching staff and students studying for a degree of the university must belong to one of the colleges...

 of the University of Oxford
University of Oxford
The University of Oxford is a university located in Oxford, United Kingdom. It is the second-oldest surviving university in the world and the oldest in the English-speaking world. Although its exact date of foundation is unclear, there is evidence of teaching as far back as 1096...

 in England. As well as being a college, Christ Church is also the cathedral
Cathedral
A cathedral is a Christian church that contains the seat of a bishop...

 church of the diocese of Oxford
Diocese of Oxford
-History:The Diocese of Oxford was created in 1541 out of part of the Diocese of Lincoln.In 1836 the Archdeaconry of Berkshire was transferred from the Diocese of Salisbury to Oxford...

, namely Christ Church Cathedral, Oxford
Christ Church Cathedral, Oxford
Christ Church Cathedral is the cathedral of the diocese of Oxford, which consists of the counties of Oxfordshire, Buckinghamshire and Berkshire. It is also, uniquely, the chapel of Christ Church, a college of the University of Oxford.-History:...

.

Like its sister college, Trinity College, Cambridge
Trinity College, Cambridge
Trinity College is a constituent college of the University of Cambridge. Trinity has more members than any other college in Cambridge or Oxford, with around 700 undergraduates, 430 graduates, and over 170 Fellows...

, it was traditionally considered the most aristocratic college of its university.

Christ Church has produced thirteen British prime ministers
Prime Minister of the United Kingdom
The Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is the Head of Her Majesty's Government in the United Kingdom. The Prime Minister and Cabinet are collectively accountable for their policies and actions to the Sovereign, to Parliament, to their political party and...

, which is equal to the number produced by all 45 other Oxford colleges put together and more than any Cambridge college (and two short of the total number for the University of Cambridge
University of Cambridge
The University of Cambridge is a public research university located in Cambridge, United Kingdom. It is the second-oldest university in both the United Kingdom and the English-speaking world , and the seventh-oldest globally...

, fifteen).

The college is the setting for parts of Evelyn Waugh
Evelyn Waugh
Arthur Evelyn St. John Waugh , known as Evelyn Waugh, was an English writer of novels, travel books and biographies. He was also a prolific journalist and reviewer...

's Brideshead Revisited
Brideshead Revisited
Brideshead Revisited, The Sacred & Profane Memories of Captain Charles Ryder is a novel by English writer Evelyn Waugh, first published in 1945. Waugh wrote that the novel "deals with what is theologically termed 'the operation of Grace', that is to say, the unmerited and unilateral act of love by...

, as well as Lewis Carroll
Lewis Carroll
Charles Lutwidge Dodgson , better known by the pseudonym Lewis Carroll , was an English author, mathematician, logician, Anglican deacon and photographer. His most famous writings are Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and its sequel Through the Looking-Glass, as well as the poems "The Hunting of the...

's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland
Alice's Adventures in Wonderland
Alice's Adventures in Wonderland is an 1865 novel written by English author Charles Lutwidge Dodgson under the pseudonym Lewis Carroll. It tells of a girl named Alice who falls down a rabbit hole into a fantasy world populated by peculiar, anthropomorphic creatures...

. More recently it has been used in the filming of the movies of J. K. Rowling
J. K. Rowling
Joanne "Jo" Rowling, OBE , better known as J. K. Rowling, is the British author of the Harry Potter fantasy series...

's Harry Potter
Harry Potter
Harry Potter is a series of seven fantasy novels written by the British author J. K. Rowling. The books chronicle the adventures of the adolescent wizard Harry Potter and his best friends Ron Weasley and Hermione Granger, all of whom are students at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry...

series and also the film adaptation of Philip Pullman
Philip Pullman
Philip Pullman CBE, FRSL is an English writer from Norwich. He is the best-selling author of several books, most notably his trilogy of fantasy novels, His Dark Materials, and his fictionalised biography of Jesus, The Good Man Jesus and the Scoundrel Christ...

's novel Northern Lights
Northern Lights (novel)
Northern Lights, known as The Golden Compass in North America, is the first novel in English novelist Philip Pullman's His Dark Materials trilogy...

(the film bearing the title of the US edition of the book, The Golden Compass). Distinctive features of the college's architecture have been used as models by a number of other academic institutions, including the National University of Ireland, Galway
National University of Ireland, Galway
The National University of Ireland, Galway is a constituent university of the National University of Ireland...

, which reproduces Tom Quad
Tom Quad
The Great Quadrangle, more popularly known as Tom Quad, is one of the quadrangles of Christ Church, Oxford, England. It is the largest college quad in Oxford, measuring 264 by 261 feet. Although it was begun by Cardinal Wolsey, he was unable to complete it...

. The University of Chicago
University of Chicago
The University of Chicago is a private research university in Chicago, Illinois, USA. It was founded by the American Baptist Education Society with a donation from oil magnate and philanthropist John D. Rockefeller and incorporated in 1890...

 and Cornell University
Cornell University
Cornell University is an Ivy League university located in Ithaca, New York, United States. It is a private land-grant university, receiving annual funding from the State of New York for certain educational missions...

 both have reproductions of Christ Church's dining hall (in the forms of Hutchinson Hall
Hutchinson Hall, University of Chicago
Hutchinson Hall at the University of Chicago is modelled, nearly identically, on the hall of Christ Church, one of Oxford University's constituent colleges. It is located at 5700 S. University Avenue in Chicago, Illinois and is currently used as a dining hall and lounge for students and professors...

 and the dining hall of Risley Residential College
Risley Residential College
Prudence Risley Residential College for the Creative and Performing Arts, commonly known as Risley Residential College, Risley Hall, or just Risley, is a program house at Cornell University...

, respectively). ChristChurch Cathedral in New Zealand, after which the City of Christchurch
Christchurch
Christchurch is the largest city in the South Island of New Zealand, and the country's second-largest urban area after Auckland. It lies one third of the way down the South Island's east coast, just north of Banks Peninsula which itself, since 2006, lies within the formal limits of...

 is named, is itself named after Christ Church, Oxford. Stained glass windows in the cathedral and other buildings are by the Pre-Raphaelite William Morris
William Morris
William Morris 24 March 18343 October 1896 was an English textile designer, artist, writer, and socialist associated with the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood and the English Arts and Crafts Movement...

 group with designs by Edward Burne-Jones
Edward Burne-Jones
Sir Edward Coley Burne-Jones, 1st Baronet was a British artist and designer closely associated with the later phase of the Pre-Raphaelite movement, who worked closely with William Morris on a wide range of decorative arts as a founding partner in Morris, Marshall, Faulkner, and Company...



Christ Church is also partly responsible for the creation of University College Reading, which later gained its own Royal Charter and became the University of Reading
University of Reading
The University of Reading is a university in the English town of Reading, Berkshire. The University was established in 1892 as University College, Reading and received its Royal Charter in 1926. It is based on several campuses in, and around, the town of Reading.The University has a long tradition...

.

The college has admitted female students since 1978.

Organisation


Christ Church, formally titled "The Dean, Chapter and Students of the Cathedral Church of Christ in Oxford of the Foundation of King Henry the Eighth", is the only college in the world which is also a cathedral
Cathedral
A cathedral is a Christian church that contains the seat of a bishop...

, the seat (cathedra
Cathedra
A cathedra or bishop's throne is the chair or throne of a bishop. It is a symbol of the bishop's teaching authority in the Catholic Church and the Orthodox Church, and has in some sense remained such in the Anglican Communion and in Lutheran churches...

) of the Bishop of Oxford
Bishop of Oxford
The Bishop of Oxford is the diocesan bishop of the Church of England Diocese of Oxford in the Province of Canterbury; his seat is at Christ Church Cathedral, Oxford...

. The Visitor
Visitor
A Visitor, in United Kingdom law and history, is an overseer of an autonomous ecclesiastical or eleemosynary institution , who can intervene in the internal affairs of that institution...

 of Christ Church is the reigning British sovereign, and the Bishop of Oxford is unique among English bishops in not being the Visitor of his own cathedral.

The head of the college is the Dean of Christ Church, who is a clergyman appointed by the crown as dean
Dean (religion)
A dean, in a church context, is a cleric holding certain positions of authority within a religious hierarchy. The title is used mainly in the Anglican Communion and the Roman Catholic Church.-Anglican Communion:...

 of the cathedral church. There is a senior and a junior censor (formally titled the Censor Moralis Philosphiæ and the Censor Naturalis Philosophiæ) the former of whom is responsible for academic matters, the latter for undergraduate discipline. A Censor Theologiæ is also appointed to act as the Dean's deputy.

The form "Christ Church College" is considered incorrect, in part because it ignores the cathedral, although it has historically been deemed acceptable.

Governing body




The governing body of Christ Church consists of the dean and chapter
Chapter (religion)
Chapter designates certain corporate ecclesiastical bodies in the Roman Catholic, Anglican and Nordic Lutheran churches....

 of the cathedral, together with the "Students of Christ Church", who are not students, but rather the equivalent of the fellows of the other colleges
Colleges of the University of Oxford
The University of Oxford comprises 38 Colleges and 6 Permanent Private Halls of religious foundation. Colleges and PPHs are autonomous self-governing corporations within the university, and all teaching staff and students studying for a degree of the university must belong to one of the colleges...

. Until the 19th century, the students differed from fellows by the fact that they had no governing powers in their own college.

History


In 1525, at the height of his power, Thomas Wolsey, Lord Chancellor
Lord Chancellor
The Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain, or Lord Chancellor, is a senior and important functionary in the government of the United Kingdom. He is the second highest ranking of the Great Officers of State, ranking only after the Lord High Steward. The Lord Chancellor is appointed by the Sovereign...

 of England and Cardinal
Cardinal (Catholicism)
A cardinal is a senior ecclesiastical official, usually an ordained bishop, and ecclesiastical prince of the Catholic Church. They are collectively known as the College of Cardinals, which as a body elects a new pope. The duties of the cardinals include attending the meetings of the College and...

 Archbishop of York
Archbishop of York
The Archbishop of York is a high-ranking cleric in the Church of England, second only to the Archbishop of Canterbury. He is the diocesan bishop of the Diocese of York and metropolitan of the Province of York, which covers the northern portion of England as well as the Isle of Man...

, suppressed the Priory of St Frideswide in Oxford and founded Cardinal College on its lands, using funds from the dissolution of Wallingford Priory
Wallingford Priory
Wallingford Priory was a Benedictine priory dedicated to the Holy Trinity in Wallingford in the English county of Berkshire .Nothing remains of Holy Trinity Priory, which is believed to have stood on the site of the Bullcroft recreation ground off the High Street...

 and other minor priories. He planned the establishment on a magnificent scale, but fell from grace in 1529, with the buildings only three-quarters complete - as they were to remain for 140 years.

In 1531 the college was itself suppressed, and refounded in 1532 as King Henry VIII's College by Henry VIII
Henry VIII of England
Henry VIII was King of England from 21 April 1509 until his death. He was Lord, and later King, of Ireland, as well as continuing the nominal claim by the English monarchs to the Kingdom of France...

, to whom Wolsey's property had escheat
Escheat
Escheat is a common law doctrine which transfers the property of a person who dies without heirs to the crown or state. It serves to ensure that property is not left in limbo without recognised ownership...

ed. Then in 1546 the King, who had broken from the Church of Rome
Roman Catholic Church
The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the world's largest Christian church, with over a billion members. Led by the Pope, it defines its mission as spreading the gospel of Jesus Christ, administering the sacraments and exercising charity...

 and acquired great wealth through the dissolution of the monasteries in England, refounded the college as Christ Church as part of the re-organisation of the Church of England
Church of England
The Church of England is the officially established Christian church in England and the Mother Church of the worldwide Anglican Communion. The church considers itself within the tradition of Western Christianity and dates its formal establishment principally to the mission to England by St...

, making the partially-demolished Priory church the cathedral of the recently created diocese of Oxford.

Christ Church's sister college in the University of Cambridge is Trinity College, Cambridge
Trinity College, Cambridge
Trinity College is a constituent college of the University of Cambridge. Trinity has more members than any other college in Cambridge or Oxford, with around 700 undergraduates, 430 graduates, and over 170 Fellows...

, founded the same year by Henry VIII. Since the time of Queen Elizabeth I
Elizabeth I of England
Elizabeth I was queen regnant of England and Ireland from 17 November 1558 until her death. Sometimes called The Virgin Queen, Gloriana, or Good Queen Bess, Elizabeth was the fifth and last monarch of the Tudor dynasty...

 the college has also been associated with Westminster School
Westminster School
The Royal College of St. Peter in Westminster, almost always known as Westminster School, is one of Britain's leading independent schools, with the highest Oxford and Cambridge acceptance rate of any secondary school or college in Britain...

, which continues to supply a significant number of undergraduates to the college. The Dean remains to this day an ex officio member of the school's governing body.

Major additions have been made to the buildings through the centuries, and Wolsey's Great Quadrangle was crowned with the famous gate-tower designed by Sir Christopher Wren
Christopher Wren
Sir Christopher Wren FRS is one of the most highly acclaimed English architects in history.He used to be accorded responsibility for rebuilding 51 churches in the City of London after the Great Fire in 1666, including his masterpiece, St. Paul's Cathedral, on Ludgate Hill, completed in 1710...

. To this day the bell in the tower, Great Tom, is rung 101 times at 9 p.m. Oxford time (9:05 p.m. GMT/BST
British Summer Time
Western European Summer Time is a summer daylight saving time scheme, 1 hour ahead of Coordinated Universal Time. It is used in the following places:* the Canary Islands* Portugal * Ireland...

) every night for the 100 original scholars of the college (plus one added in 1664). In former times this was done at midnight, signalling the close of all college gates throughout Oxford. Since it took 20 minutes to ring the 101, Christ Church gates, unlike those of other colleges, did not close until 12.20. When the ringing was moved back to 9 p.m., Christ Church gates still remained open until 12.20, 20 minutes later than any other college. Although the clock itself now shows GMT/BST, Christ Church still follows Oxford time in the timings of services in the cathedral.

King Charles I
Charles I of England
Charles I was King of England, King of Scotland, and King of Ireland from 27 March 1625 until his execution in 1649. Charles engaged in a struggle for power with the Parliament of England, attempting to obtain royal revenue whilst Parliament sought to curb his Royal prerogative which Charles...

 made the Deanery his palace and held his Parliament in the Great Hall during the English Civil War
English Civil War
The English Civil War was a series of armed conflicts and political machinations between Parliamentarians and Royalists...

. In the evening of May 29, 1645, during the second siege of Oxford
Siege of Oxford
The Siege of Oxford was a Parliamentarian victory late in the First English Civil War. Whereas the title of the event may suggest a single siege, there were in fact three individual engagements that took place over a period of three years....

, a "bullet of IX lb. weight" shot from the Parliamentarians
Roundhead
"Roundhead" was the nickname given to the supporters of the Parliament during the English Civil War. Also known as Parliamentarians, they fought against King Charles I and his supporters, the Cavaliers , who claimed absolute power and the divine right of kings...

 warning-piece at Marston fell against the wall of the north side of the Hall.

Student life


As well as rooms for accommodation, the buildings of Christ Church include the cathedral, one of the smallest in England, which also acts as the college chapel, a great hall, two libraries, two bars, and common room
Common room
The phrase common room is used especially in British and Canadian English to describe a type of shared lounge, most often found in dormitories, at universities, colleges, military bases, hospitals, rest homes, hostels, and even minimum-security prisons. It is generally connected to several...

s for dons, graduates and undergraduates. There are also gardens and a neighbouring sportsground and boat-house.

Accommodation is usually provided for all undergraduates, and for some graduates, although some accommodation is off-site. Accommodation is generally spacious with most rooms equipped with sinks and fridges. Many undergraduate rooms comprise 'sets' of bedrooms and living areas. Members are generally expected to dine in hall, where there are two sittings every evening, one informal and one formal (where jackets, ties and gowns are worn and Latin grace is read). The buttery
Buttery (shop)
In the Middle Ages, a buttery was a storeroom for liquor, the name being derived from the Latin and French words for bottle or, to put the word into its simpler form, a butt, that is, a cask. A butler, before he became able to take charge of the ewery, pantry, cellar, and the staff, would be in...

 next to the Hall serves drinks around dinner time. There is also a college bar (known as the Undercroft), as well as a Junior Common Room (JCR) and a Graduate Common Room (GCR).

There is a college lending library which supplements the university libraries (many of which are non-lending). Law students have the additional facility of the college law library, which has received large financial supplements from Christ Church law graduates. Most undergraduate tutorials are carried out in the college, though for some specialist subjects undergraduates may be sent to tutors in other colleges.

Croquet
Croquet
Croquet is a lawn game, played both as a recreational pastime and as a competitive sport. It involves hitting plastic or wooden balls with a mallet through hoops embedded into the grass playing court.-History:...

 is played in the Masters' Garden in the summer. The sports ground is mainly used for cricket
Cricket
Cricket is a bat-and-ball game played between two teams of 11 players on an oval-shaped field, at the centre of which is a rectangular 22-yard long pitch. One team bats, trying to score as many runs as possible while the other team bowls and fields, trying to dismiss the batsmen and thus limit the...

, tennis
Tennis
Tennis is a sport usually played between two players or between two teams of two players each . Each player uses a racket that is strung to strike a hollow rubber ball covered with felt over a net into the opponent's court. Tennis is an Olympic sport and is played at all levels of society at all...

, rugby
Rugby football
Rugby football is a style of football named after Rugby School in the United Kingdom. It is seen most prominently in two current sports, rugby league and rugby union.-History:...

 and soccer. Rowing
Sport rowing
Rowing is a sport in which athletes race against each other on rivers, on lakes or on the ocean, depending upon the type of race and the discipline. The boats are propelled by the reaction forces on the oar blades as they are pushed against the water...

 and punting is carried out by the boat-house across Christ Church Meadow
Christ Church Meadow, Oxford
Christ Church Meadow is a famous flood-meadow, and popular walking and picnic spot in Oxford, England.Roughly triangular in shape it is bounded by the River Thames , the River Cherwell, and Christ Church. It provides access to many of the college boat houses which are on an island at the confluence...

. The college owns its own punts which may be borrowed by students or dons.

The college beagle
Beagling
Beagling is the hunting of hares, rabbits, and occasionally foxes with beagles. A beagle pack is usually followed on foot. However, there is one pack of beagles in the U.S. which are distinguished as being the only hunting pack to hunt fox and be followed on horseback...

 pack (Christ Church and Farley Hill Beagles), which was formerly one of several undergraduate packs in Oxford, is no longer formally connected with the college or the university, but continues to be staffed and followed by undergraduates from across Oxford.

Buildings



Christ Church has a number of architecturally significant buildings. These include:
  • Christ Church Library
    Christ Church Library
    Christ Church Library is a Georgian building which forms the south side of Peckwater Quadrangle in Christ Church, Oxford, England. It houses the college's modern lending library and early printed books on two floors....

  • Peckwater Quadrangle
    Peckwater Quadrangle
    The Peckwater Quadrangle is one of the quadrangles of Christ Church, Oxford, England. It is on the site of a medieval inn, which was run by the Peckwater family and given to St Frideswide's Priory in 1246. The buildings, including the Library, date from the eighteenth century. They are built in...

  • The Great Quadrangle or Tom Quad
    Tom Quad
    The Great Quadrangle, more popularly known as Tom Quad, is one of the quadrangles of Christ Church, Oxford, England. It is the largest college quad in Oxford, measuring 264 by 261 feet. Although it was begun by Cardinal Wolsey, he was unable to complete it...

     including Tom Tower
    Tom Tower
    Tom Tower is a bell tower in Oxford, England, named for its bell, Great Tom. It is over Tom Gate, on St Aldates, the main entrance of Christ Church, Oxford, which leads into Tom Quad. This square tower with an octagonal lantern and facetted ogee dome was designed by Christopher Wren and built 1681–82...

  • Blue Boar Quadrangle
    Blue Boar Quadrangle
    The Blue Boar Quadrangle is a quadrangle at the University of Oxford's Christ Church. It was designed by Hidalgo Moya and Philip Powell, and built between 1965 and 1968. The quadrangle has been described as "One of the best buildings of its kind during the expansion of higher education" by Lord...

  • Canterbury Quadrangle
  • The Old Library
  • Christ Church Hall
  • The Meadow Building
    The Meadow Building
    The Meadow Building is part of Christ Church, Oxford, England, looking out onto Christ Church Meadow. It was built in 1863 to the designs of Sir Thomas Deane in the Venetian style...

  • Christ Church Cathedral
    Christ Church Cathedral, Oxford
    Christ Church Cathedral is the cathedral of the diocese of Oxford, which consists of the counties of Oxfordshire, Buckinghamshire and Berkshire. It is also, uniquely, the chapel of Christ Church, a college of the University of Oxford.-History:...

  • Christ Church Picture Gallery
    Christ Church Picture Gallery
    Christ Church Picture Gallery is an art museum at Christ Church, one of the colleges of Oxford University in England. The gallery holds an important collection of about 300 Old Master paintings and nearly 2,000 drawings. It is one of the most important private collections in the United Kingdom...


Cathedral Choir



Christ Church is unique in that it has both a Cathedral Choir (Director Stephen Darlington) and a College Choir (Director Georgia Gibson-Smith). The Cathedral Choir comprises twelve men and sixteen boys. The men are made up of lay clerks and choral scholars, or academical clerks. The boys, whose ages range from eight to thirteen, are chosen for their musical ability and attend Christ Church Cathedral School
Christ Church Cathedral School
Christ Church Cathedral School is a Prep and Pre-Prep, fee-paying boarding and day school for approximately 140 pupils based in Oxford, England. Steeped in music and history, the School was founded by Henry VIII in 1546 to provide choristers for Christ Church Cathedral and College. Now a Church of...

. Aside from the director, there is also a sub-organist and two organ scholars. The College Choir, on the other hand, is always a student run society, and sings Evensong once a week in term time. In the vacation, services are sung by The Cathedral Singers of Christ Church (Director John Padley) - a choir drawn from semi-professional singers in and around Oxford. The Cathedral also hosts visiting choirs from time to time during vacations.

Throughout its history, the Cathedral Choir has attracted many distinguished composers and organists - from its first director, John Taverner
John Taverner
John Taverner was an English composer and organist, regarded as the most important English composer of his era.- Career :...

, appointed by Cardinal Wolsey in 1526, to William Walton
William Walton
Sir William Turner Walton OM was an English composer. During a sixty-year career, he wrote music in several classical genres and styles, from film scores to opera...

. The present director of music (known as the Organist), is Stephen Darlington
Stephen Darlington
Stephen Darlington is a British choral director and conductor, and president of the Royal College of Organists from 1999-2001.During the early 1970s Darlington was organ scholar at Christ Church, Oxford, studying under Simon Preston...

. In recent years, the Choir has commissioned recorded works by contemporary composers such as John Tavener
John Tavener
Sir John Tavener is a British composer, best known for such religious, minimal works as "The Whale", and "Funeral Ikos"...

, William Mathias
William Mathias
William Mathias CBE was a Welsh composer.-Brief biography:Mathias was born in Whitland, Carmarthenshire. A child prodigy, he started playing the piano at the age of three and composing at the age of five. He studied at the Royal Academy of Music under Lennox Berkeley, where he was elected a fellow...

 and Howard Goodall
Howard Goodall
210px|thumb|Howard Goodall at St. John the Baptist Church in Devon, United Kingdom, May 2009Howard Lindsay Goodall CBE is a British composer of musicals, choral music and music for television...

, also patron of Christ Church Music Society.

The Choir, which broadcasts regularly, has many award-winning recordings to its credit and was recently the subject of a Channel 4 television documentary, Howard Goodall's Great Dates. The film was nominated at the prestigious Montreux TV Festival in the Arts Programme category - and has since been seen throughout the world. The Choir's collaboration with Goodall has also led to their singing his TV themes for Mr Bean and The Vicar of Dibley. They appeared in Howard Goodall's Big Bangs, broadcast in the United Kingdom on Channel 4
Channel 4
Channel 4 is a British public-service television broadcaster which began working on 2 November 1982. Although largely commercially self-funded, it is ultimately publicly owned; originally a subsidiary of the Independent Broadcasting Authority , the station is now owned and operated by the Channel...

 in March 2000. Treasures of Christ Church is the choir's most recent recording, and debuted as the highest new entry in the UK Specialist Classical chart. The disc featured on BBC Radio 3’s ‘In Tune’ on Monday 26 September, and on Radio 3’s Breakfast Show on Tuesday 27 September.

College arms


The college arms, adopted (as with those of most Oxford colleges) apparently without authority, are those of Cardinal Wolsey, and are blazoned: Sable, on a cross engrailed argent, between four leopards' faces azure a lion passant gules; on a chief or between two Cornish choughs proper a rose gules barbed vert and seeded or. The arms are depicted beneath a red cardinal's hat with fifteen tassels on either side, and sometimes in front of two crossed croziers.

Cathedral arms


There are also arms in use by the cathedral, which were confirmed in a visitation of 1574. They are emblazoned: Between quarterly, 1st & 4th, France modern (azure three fleurs-de-lys or), 2nd & 3rd, England (gules in pale three lions passant guardant or), on a cross argent an open Bible proper edged and bound with seven clasps or, inscribed with the words "" and imperially crowned or.

Graces



The college preprandial grace reads:


A translation reads:
"We unhappy and unworthy men do give thee most reverent thanks, Almighty God, our heavenly Father, for the victuals which thou hast bestowed on us for the sustenance of the body, at the same time beseeching thee that we may use them soberly, modestly and gratefully.

And above all we beseech thee to impart to us the food of angels, the true bread of heaven, the eternal Word of God, Jesus Christ our Lord, so that the mind of each of us may feed on him and that through his flesh and blood we may be sustained, nourished and strengthened. Amen."


The first part of the grace is read by a scholar or exhibitioner of the House before formal Hall each evening, ending with the words Per Iēsum Christum Dominum nostrum ("Through Jesus Christ our Lord.") The remainder of the grace, replacing Per Iēsum Christum, etc., is usually only read on special occasions:

There is also a long postprandial grace intended for use after meals, but this is rarely used. When High Table rises (by which time the Hall is largely empty), the senior member on High Table simply says
Benedictō benedīcātur ("Let the Blessed One be blessed", or "Let a blessing be given by the Blessed One"), instead of the college postprandial grace:

Versicle:

Response:


Christ Church references


"Midnight has come and the great Christ Church bell

And many a lesser bell sound through the room;

And it is All Souls' Night..." — W B Yeats, All Souls' Night, Oxford (1920)

"The wind had dropped. There was even a glimpse of the moon riding behind the clouds. And now, a solemn and plangent token of Oxford's perpetuity, the first stroke of Great Tom sounded." — Max Beerbohm
Max Beerbohm
Sir Henry Maximilian "Max" Beerbohm was an English essayist, parodist and caricaturist best known today for his 1911 novel Zuleika Dobson.-Early life:...

, Chapter 21, Zuleika Dobson
Zuleika Dobson
Zuleika Dobson, full title Zuleika Dobson, or, an Oxford love story, is a 1911 novel by Max Beerbohm, a satire of undergraduate life at Oxford. It was his only novel, but was nonetheless very successful...

(1922)

"I must say my thoughts wandered, but I kept turning the pages and watching the light fade, which in Peckwater, my dear, is quite an experience – as darkness falls the stone seems positively to decay under one's eyes. I was reminded of some of those leprous facades in the vieux port at Marseille, until suddenly I was disturbed by such a bawling and caterwauling as you never heard, and there, down in the little piazza, I saw a mob of about twenty terrible young men, and do you know what they were chanting We want Blanche. We want Blanche! in a kind of litany." — Evelyn Waugh
Evelyn Waugh
Arthur Evelyn St. John Waugh , known as Evelyn Waugh, was an English writer of novels, travel books and biographies. He was also a prolific journalist and reviewer...

, Brideshead Revisited
Brideshead Revisited
Brideshead Revisited, The Sacred & Profane Memories of Captain Charles Ryder is a novel by English writer Evelyn Waugh, first published in 1945. Waugh wrote that the novel "deals with what is theologically termed 'the operation of Grace', that is to say, the unmerited and unilateral act of love by...

(1945)

"Those twins / Of learning that he [Wolsey] raised in you,

Ipswich and Oxford! one of which fell with him,

Unwilling to outlive the good that did it;

The other, though unfinish'd, yet so famous,

So excellent in art, and still so rising,

That Christendom shall ever speak his virtue." — William Shakespeare
William Shakespeare
William Shakespeare was an English poet and playwright, widely regarded as the greatest writer in the English language and the world's pre-eminent dramatist. He is often called England's national poet and the "Bard of Avon"...

, Henry VIII
Henry VIII of England
Henry VIII was King of England from 21 April 1509 until his death. He was Lord, and later King, of Ireland, as well as continuing the nominal claim by the English monarchs to the Kingdom of France...



"By way of light entertainment, I should tell the Committee that it is well known that a match between an archer and a golfer can be fairly close. I spent many a happy evening in the centre of Peckwater Quadrangle
Peckwater Quadrangle
The Peckwater Quadrangle is one of the quadrangles of Christ Church, Oxford, England. It is on the site of a medieval inn, which was run by the Peckwater family and given to St Frideswide's Priory in 1246. The buildings, including the Library, date from the eighteenth century. They are built in...

 at Christ Church, with a bow and arrow, trying to put an arrow over the Kilcannon building into the Mercury Pond in Tom Quad
Tom Quad
The Great Quadrangle, more popularly known as Tom Quad, is one of the quadrangles of Christ Church, Oxford, England. It is the largest college quad in Oxford, measuring 264 by 261 feet. Although it was begun by Cardinal Wolsey, he was unable to complete it...

. On occasion, the golfer would win and, on occasion, I would win. Unfortunately, that had to stop when I put an arrow through the bowler hat of the head porter. Luckily, he was unhurt and bore me no ill will. From that time on he always sent me a Christmas card which was signed 'To Robin Hood from the Ancient Briton'" — Lord Crawshaw, House of Lords
House of Lords
The House of Lords is the upper house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. Like the House of Commons, it meets in the Palace of Westminster....

 Hansard
Hansard
Hansard is the name of the printed transcripts of parliamentary debates in the Westminster system of government. It is named after Thomas Curson Hansard, an early printer and publisher of these transcripts.-Origins:...

, Tuesday 8 July 1997

King Henry VIII's College

  • 1532: John Hygdon
    John Hygdon
    John Hygdon , President of Magdalen College, Oxford , became the first dean of Cardinal College, Oxford and from 1532–3 of its successor, King Henry VIII's College . From 1502–4, he had served as vicar of Upper Beeding, Sussex.-References:...

  • 1533: John Oliver
    John Oliver (Dean of Christ Church)
    John Oliver was an English churchman, canon lawyer, courtier and Dean of Christ Church, Oxford.-Life:He graduated in the University of Oxford. His degrees were B.C.L. on 30 June 1516, B.Can.L. and D.Can.L. on 20 May 1522, D.C.L. on 11 Oct. 1522. He received vnumerous preferments in the church...


Christ Church



  • 1546: Richard Cox
    Richard Cox (bishop)
    Richard Cox was an English clergyman, who was Dean of Westminster and Bishop of Ely.-Biography:Cox was born of obscure parentage at Whaddon, Buckinghamshire, in 1499 or 1500....

  • 1553: Richard Marshall
    Richard Marshall (priest)
    Richard Marshall D.D. was an English clergyman and academic administrator at the University of Oxford.Marshall was elected Dean of Christ Church, Oxford in 1553, a post he held until 1559.He was Vice-Chancellor of Oxford University during 1552–4....

  • 1559: George Carew
  • 1561: Thomas Sampson
    Thomas Sampson
    Thomas Sampson was an English Puritan theologian. A Marian exile, he was one of the Geneva Bible translators. On his return to England, he had trouble with conformity to the Anglican practices...

  • 1565: Thomas Godwin
    Thomas Godwin (bishop)
    Thomas Godwin was an English bishop, who presided over the Diocese of Bath and Wells.Thomas Godwin was both born and died in Wokingham in Berkshire.From 1567 to 1584 he was Dean of Canterbury....

  • 1567: Thomas Cooper
    Thomas Cooper (bishop)
    Thomas Cooper was an English bishop, lexicographer, and writer.-Life:He was born in Oxford, where he was educated at Magdalen College...

  • 1570: John Piers
    John Piers
    John Piers was Archbishop of York between 1589–1594. Previous to that he had been Bishop of Rochester and Bishop of Salisbury.-Life:...

  • 1576: Tobie Matthew
    Tobie Matthew
    Sir Tobie Matthew , born in Salisbury, was an English member of parliament and courtier who converted to Roman Catholicism and became a priest...

  • 1584: William James
  • 1596: Thomas Ravis
    Thomas Ravis
    Thomas Ravis was a Church of England clergyman and academic.-Early life:He was born at Old Malden in Surrey, probably in 1560, and was educated at Westminster School...

  • 1605: John King
    John King (bishop)
    John King was an English churchman, patron of the Church of Pertenhall in Bedfordshire....

  • 1611: William Goodwin
  • 1620: Richard Corbet
    Richard Corbet
    Richard Corbet was an English bishop in the Church of England. He was also a poet of the metaphysical school who, although highly praised in his own lifetime, is relatively obscure today.-Life:...

  • 1629: Brian Duppa
    Brian Duppa
    Brian Duppa was an English bishop, a noted Royalist and adviser to Charles I of England.-Life:He was educated at Westminster School and Christchurch, Oxford, graduating B.A. in 1609. He was a Fellow of All Souls College, Oxford in 1612, and Vice-Chancellor of the University of Oxford in 1632...

  • 1638: Samuel Fell
    Samuel Fell
    Samuel Fell D.D. was an English academic and clergyman, Dean of Christ Church, Oxford and Vice-Chancellor of the University of Oxford during the First English Civil War.-Life:...

  • 1648: Edward Reynolds
    Edward Reynolds
    Edward Reynolds was a bishop of Norwich in the Church of England and an author.He was born in Holyrood parish Southampton, the son of Augustine Reynolds, one of the customers of the city, and his wife, Bridget....

  • 1651: John Owen
    John Owen (theologian)
    John Owen was an English Nonconformist church leader, theologian, and academic administrator at the University of Oxford.-Early life:...

  • 1659: Edward Reynolds
    Edward Reynolds
    Edward Reynolds was a bishop of Norwich in the Church of England and an author.He was born in Holyrood parish Southampton, the son of Augustine Reynolds, one of the customers of the city, and his wife, Bridget....

  • 1660: George Morley
    George Morley
    George Morley D.D. was an English bishop.-Life:He was born in London, England, and educated at Westminster school and the University of Oxford. In 1640, he was presented to the sinecure living of Hartfield, Sussex, and in the following year he was made canon of Christ Church, Oxford and exchanged...

  • 1660: John Fell
  • 1686: John Massey
  • 1689: Henry Aldrich
    Henry Aldrich
    Henry Aldrich was an English theologian and philosopher.-Life:Aldrich was educated at Westminster School under Dr Richard Busby. In 1662, he entered Christ Church, Oxford, and in 1689 was made Dean in succession to the Roman Catholic John Massey, who had fled to the Continent. In 1692, he...

  • 1711: Francis Atterbury
    Francis Atterbury
    Francis Atterbury was an English man of letters, politician and bishop.-Early life:He was born at Milton Keynes in Buckinghamshire, where his father was rector. He was educated at Westminster School and Christ Church, Oxford, where he became a tutor...


  • 1713: George Smalridge
    George Smalridge
    -Life:George Smalridge was born at Lichfield, son of the Sheriff of Lichfield Thomas Smalridge, George received his early education, this being completed at Westminster School and at Christ Church, Oxford....

  • 1719: Hugh Boulter
    Hugh Boulter
    Hugh Boulter was the Church of Ireland Archbishop of Armagh, the Primate of All Ireland, from 1724 until his death. He also served as the chaplain to George I from 1719.-Background and education:...

  • 1724: William Bradshaw
    William Bradshaw (bishop)
    William Bradshaw was an English churchman, Dean of Christ Church, Oxford and bishop of Bristol.-Life:He was born at Abergavenny in Monmouthshire on 10 April 1671. He was educated at New College, Oxford, taking his degree of B.A. 14 April 1697, and proceeding M.A. 14 January 1700...

  • 1733: John Conybeare
    John Conybeare
    John Conybeare DD was Bishop of Bristol and one of the most notable theologians of the 18th century.Conybeare was born at Pinhoe, where his father was vicar, and educated at Blundell's School and Exeter College, Oxford. He was elected a Probationary Fellow of Exeter College in 1710, took his B.A...

  • 1756: David Gregory
  • 1767: William Markham
  • 1777: Lewis Bagot
    Lewis Bagot
    Lewis Bagot MA was an English cleric, the fifth son of Sir Walter Wagstaffe Bagot of Blithfield Hall, Staffordshire, and younger brother of William, Lord Bagot....

  • 1783: Cyril Jackson
    Cyril Jackson
    Cyril Jackson was Dean of Christ Church, Oxford 1783–1809.Jackson was born in Yorkshire, and educated at Manchester Grammar School, Westminster School and the University of Oxford. In 1771 he was chosen to be sub-preceptor to the two eldest sons of King George III, but in 1776 he was dismissed,...

  • 1809: Charles Hall
  • 1824: Samuel Smith
  • 1831: Thomas Gaisford
    Thomas Gaisford
    Thomas Gaisford was an English classical scholar.He was born at Iford Manor, Wiltshire, and entered the University of Oxford in 1797, becoming successively student and tutor of Christ Church. In 1811, he was appointed Regius Professor of Greek in the University...

  • 1855: Henry Liddell
    Henry Liddell
    Henry George Liddell was Vice-Chancellor of Oxford University, dean of Christ Church, Oxford, headmaster of Westminster School , author of A History of Rome , and co-author of the monumental work A Greek-English Lexicon, which is still used by students of Greek...

  • 1892: Francis Paget
    Francis Paget
    The Right Reverend Francis Paget was the 33rd Bishop of Oxford from 1901 until his death. He was the second son of the noted surgeon Sir James Paget, 1st Baronet, and brother of Luke Paget, Bishop of Chester. He was educated at St Marylebone Grammar School,Shrewsbury and Christ Church, Oxford...

  • 1901: Thomas Strong
  • 1920: Julian White
  • 1934: Alwyn Williams
    Alwyn Williams
    Alwyn Terrell Petre Williams was Bishop of Durham and then Bishop of Winchester ....

  • 1939: John Lowe
  • 1959: Cuthbert Simpson
  • 1969: Henry Chadwick
    Henry Chadwick (theologian)
    Henry Chadwick KBE was a British academic and Church of England clergyman. A former Dean of Christ Church Cathedral, Oxford — and as such also head of Christ Church, Oxford — he also served as Master of Peterhouse, Cambridge, becoming the first person in four centuries to have headed a college at...

  • 1979: Eric Heaton
  • 1991: John Drury
  • 2003: Christopher Lewis


Notable members


Listed alphabetically by surname (or peerage if best known by that).

British Prime Ministers
  • George Grenville
    George Grenville
    George Grenville was a British Whig statesman who rose to the position of Prime Minister of Great Britain. Grenville was born into an influential political family and first entered Parliament in 1741 as an MP for Buckingham...

     (1712–1770)
  • William Petty, 2nd Earl of Shelburne
    William Petty, 2nd Earl of Shelburne
    William Petty-FitzMaurice, 1st Marquess of Lansdowne, KG, PC , known as The Earl of Shelburne between 1761 and 1784, by which title he is generally known to history, was an Irish-born British Whig statesman who was the first Home Secretary in 1782 and then Prime Minister 1782–1783 during the final...

     (1737–1805)
  • William Cavendish-Bentinck, 3rd Duke of Portland
    William Cavendish-Bentinck, 3rd Duke of Portland
    William Henry Cavendish-Bentinck, 3rd Duke of Portland, KG, PC was a British Whig and Tory statesman, Chancellor of the University of Oxford and Prime Minister. He was known before 1762 by the courtesy title Marquess of Titchfield. He held a title of every degree of British nobility—Duke,...

     (1738–1809)
  • William Wyndham Grenville, 1st Baron Grenville
    William Wyndham Grenville, 1st Baron Grenville
    William Wyndham Grenville, 1st Baron Grenville PC, PC was a British Whig statesman. He served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1806 to 1807 as head of the Ministry of All the Talents.-Background :...

     (1759–1834)
  • George Canning
    George Canning
    George Canning PC, FRS was a British statesman and politician who served as Foreign Secretary and briefly Prime Minister.-Early life: 1770–1793:...

     (1770–1827)
  • Robert Jenkinson, 2nd Earl of Liverpool
    Robert Jenkinson, 2nd Earl of Liverpool
    Robert Banks Jenkinson, 2nd Earl of Liverpool KG PC was a British politician and the longest-serving Prime Minister of the United Kingdom since the Union with Ireland in 1801. He was 42 years old when he became premier in 1812 which made him younger than all of his successors to date...

     (1770–1828)
  • Sir Robert Peel
    Robert Peel
    Sir Robert Peel, 2nd Baronet was a British Conservative statesman who served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 10 December 1834 to 8 April 1835, and again from 30 August 1841 to 29 June 1846...

     (1788–1850)
  • Edward Smith-Stanley, 14th Earl of Derby
    Edward Smith-Stanley, 14th Earl of Derby
    Edward George Geoffrey Smith-Stanley, 14th Earl of Derby, KG, PC was an English statesman, three times Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, and to date the longest serving leader of the Conservative Party. He was known before 1834 as Edward Stanley, and from 1834 to 1851 as Lord Stanley...

     (1799–1869)
  • William Ewart Gladstone
    William Ewart Gladstone
    William Ewart Gladstone FRS FSS was a British Liberal statesman. In a career lasting over sixty years, he served as Prime Minister four separate times , more than any other person. Gladstone was also Britain's oldest Prime Minister, 84 years old when he resigned for the last time...

     (1809–1898)
  • Robert Gascoyne-Cecil, 3rd Marquess of Salisbury
    Robert Gascoyne-Cecil, 3rd Marquess of Salisbury
    Robert Arthur Talbot Gascoyne-Cecil, 3rd Marquess of Salisbury, KG, GCVO, PC , styled Lord Robert Cecil before 1865 and Viscount Cranborne from June 1865 until April 1868, was a British Conservative statesman and thrice Prime Minister, serving for a total of over 13 years...

     (1830–1903)
  • Archibald Primrose, 5th Earl of Rosebery
    Archibald Primrose, 5th Earl of Rosebery
    Archibald Philip Primrose, 5th Earl of Rosebery, KG, PC was a British Liberal statesman and Prime Minister. Between the death of his father, in 1851, and the death of his grandfather, the 4th Earl, in 1868, he was known by the courtesy title of Lord Dalmeny.Rosebery was a Liberal Imperialist who...

     (1847–1929)
  • Anthony Eden, 1st Earl of Avon
    Anthony Eden
    Robert Anthony Eden, 1st Earl of Avon, KG, MC, PC was a British Conservative politician, who was Prime Minister from 1955 to 1957...

     (1897–1977)
  • Sir Alec Douglas-Home, Baron Home of the Hirsel
    Alec Douglas-Home
    Alexander Frederick Douglas-Home, Baron Home of the Hirsel, KT, PC , known as The Earl of Home from 1951 to 1963 and as Sir Alec Douglas-Home from 1963 to 1974, was a British Conservative politician who served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from October 1963 to October 1964.He is the last...

     (1903–1995)


Politics and Government
  • Sir Antony Acland (1930–), Head of the Diplomatic Service
  • Jonathan Aitken
    Jonathan Aitken
    Jonathan William Patrick Aitken is a former Conservative Member of Parliament in the United Kingdom, and British government minister. He was convicted of perjury in 1999 and received an 18-month prison sentence, of which he served seven months...

     (1942–), Conservative politician
  • Henry William Paget, 1st Marquess of Anglesey (1768–1854), soldier and politician
  • Henry Bennet, 1st Earl of Arlington
    Henry Bennet, 1st Earl of Arlington
    Henry Bennet, 1st Earl of Arlington KG, PC was an English statesman.- Background and early life :He was the son of Sir John Bennet of Dawley, Middlesex, and of Dorothy Crofts. He was the younger brother of John Bennet, 1st Baron Ossulston; his sister was Elizabeth Bennet who married Robert Kerr,...

     (1618–1685), diplomat and statesman
  • Robert Armstrong, Baron Armstrong of Ilminster
    Robert Armstrong, Baron Armstrong of Ilminster
    Robert Temple Armstrong, Baron Armstrong of Ilminster GCB, CVO , son of the musician Sir Thomas Armstrong, is a British life peer and former civil servant.-Life:...

     (1927–), Head of the Civil Service
  • Zulfikar Ali Bhutto
    Zulfikar Ali Bhutto
    Zulfikar Ali Bhutto was 9th Prime Minister of Pakistan from 1973 to 1977, and prior to that, 4th President of Pakistan from 1971 to 1973. Bhutto was the founder of the Pakistan Peoples Party — the largest and most influential political party in Pakistan— and served as its chairman until his...

     (1928–1979), Pakistani statesman, Founder chairman Pakistan Peoples Party
  • Sir Charles Brickdale
    Charles Brickdale
    Sir Charles Fortescue Brickdale was a British barrister and civil servant best known for his reform of HM Land Registry as Chief Registrar.-Life:...

     (1857–1944), Chief Registrar of HM Land Registry
    HM Land Registry
    Land Registry is a non-ministerial government department and executive agency of the Government of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1862 to register the ownership of land and property in England and Wales...

  • George Nugent-Temple-Grenville, 1st Marquess of Buckingham
    George Nugent-Temple-Grenville, 1st Marquess of Buckingham
    George Nugent-Temple-Grenville, 1st Marquess of Buckingham, KG, PC was a British statesman. He was the second son of George Grenville and a brother of the 1st Baron Grenville.-Career:...

     (1753–1813), statesman
  • Frederick Alexander Lindemann, 1st Viscount Cherwell (1886–1957), physicist and cabinet minister
  • Alan Clark
    Alan Clark
    Alan Kenneth Mackenzie Clark was a British Conservative MP and diarist. He served as a junior minister in Margaret Thatcher's governments at the Departments of Employment, Trade, and Defence, and became a privy counsellor in 1991...

     (1928–1999), politician and diarist
  • Charles Abbot, 1st Baron Colchester
    Charles Abbot, 1st Baron Colchester
    Charles Abbot, 1st Baron Colchester PC, FRS was a British barrister and statesman. He served as Speaker of the House of Commons between 1802 and 1817.-Background and education:...

     (1757–1829), Speaker of the House of Commons
  • William Dowdeswell (1721–1775), Chancellor of the Exchequer
  • Maharaja Meghrajji III of Dhrangadhra-Halvad
    Meghrajji III of Dhrangadhra-Halvad
    Maharaja Mayurdwajsinhji Meghrajji III was the last ruling Maharaja of Dhrangadhra Halvad. He was a well-known academic, politician, member of several distinguished academic bodies, and one of the last surviving rulers of the former princely states of the Indian Empire...

     (1923–2010), Uprajprajpramukh (and sometime Acting Rajpramukh) of Saurashtra; Academician
  • Tom Driberg, Baron Bradwell
    Tom Driberg, Baron Bradwell
    Thomas Edward Neil Driberg, Baron Bradwell , generally known as Tom Driberg, was a British journalist, politician and High Anglican churchman who served as a Member of Parliament from 1942 to 1955 and from 1959 to 1974...

     (1905–1976), politician and writer
  • John Carteret, 2nd Earl Granville
    John Carteret, 2nd Earl Granville
    John Carteret, 2nd Earl Granville, 7th Seigneur of Sark, KG, PC , commonly known by his earlier title as Lord Carteret, was a British statesman and Lord President of the Council from 1751 to 1763.-Family:...

     (1690–1763), diplomat and statesman
  • Granville George Leveson-Gower, 2nd Earl Granville (1815–1891), politician and Foreign Secretary
  • Quintin McGarel Hogg, Baron Hailsham of St Marylebone (1907–2001), Lord Chancellor
  • Michael Hicks-Beach, 1st Earl St Aldwyn (1837–1916), Chancellor of the Exchequer
  • Henry Richard Vassall-Fox, 3rd Baron Holland (1773–1840), Whig politician and minister
  • Frederick Curzon, 7th Earl Howe
    Frederick Curzon, 7th Earl Howe
    Frederick Richard Penn Curzon, 7th Earl Howe is a Conservative front bench member of the House of Lords, and is a Parliamentary Under Secretary of State at the Department of Health-Political and professional career:...

    , prominent Conservative Party statesman, was Defence Minister, Agriculture Minister, among others
  • Edward (Ted) Bigelow Jolliffe
    Ted Jolliffe
    Edward Bigelow "Ted" Jolliffe, QC was a Canadian social democratic politician and lawyer from Ontario. He was the first leader of the Ontario section of the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation and leader of the Official Opposition in the Ontario Legislature during the 1940s and 1950s...

     (1909–1998), Leader of the Opposition
    Leader of the Opposition (Ontario)
    The Leader of the Opposition in Ontario is usually leader of the largest party in the Ontario legislature which is not the government. The current official opposition is formed by the Ontario Progressive Conservative Party, and Tim Hudak is the current Leader of the Opposition.Ontario's first...

     in the Legislative Assembly of Ontario
    Legislative Assembly of Ontario
    The Legislative Assembly of Ontario , is the legislature of the Canadian province of Ontario, and is the second largest provincial legislature of Canada...

  • John Wodehouse, 1st Earl of Kimberley
    John Wodehouse, 1st Earl of Kimberley
    John Wodehouse, 1st Earl of Kimberley KG , PC , known as the Lord Wodehouse from 1846 to 1866, was a British Liberal politician...

     (1826–1902), politician and Foreign Secretary
  • Nigel Lawson, Baron Lawson
    Nigel Lawson
    Nigel Lawson, Baron Lawson of Blaby, PC , is a British Conservative politician and journalist. He was a Member of Parliament representing the constituency of Blaby from 1974–92, and served as the Chancellor of the Exchequer in the government of Margaret Thatcher from June 1983 to October 1989...

     (1932–), politician and Chancellor of the Exchequer
  • Francis Godolphin Osborne, 5th Duke of Leeds (1759–1799), politician and Foreign Secretary
  • Sir George Cornewall Lewis
    George Cornewall Lewis
    Sir George Cornewall Lewis, 2nd Baronet PC was a British statesman and man of letters.-Family:He was born in London, the son of Thomas Frankland Lewis of Harpton Court, Radnorshire and his wife Harriet Cornewall...

     (1806–1863), writer, Foreign Secretary and Home Secretary
  • Edward Pakenham, 6th Earl of Longford
    Edward Pakenham, 6th Earl of Longford
    Edward Arthur Henry Pakenham, 6th Earl of Longford was an Irish peer, politician, and littérateur.-Family and education:...

     (1902–1961)
  • Francis Pakenham, 7th Earl of Longford (1905–2001), politician and social reformer
  • Nicholas Walter Lyell, Baron Lyell of Markyate (1938–2010), Attorney General
  • Richard Lyons, 1st Viscount Lyons
    Richard Lyons, 1st Viscount Lyons
    Richard Bickerton Pemell Lyons, 1st Viscount Lyons, GCB, GCMG, PC, DCL was an eminent British diplomat.-Biography:...

     (1817–1877), diplomat
  • Sir William Miles, 1st Baronet
    Sir William Miles, 1st Baronet
    Sir William Miles, 1st Baronet was an English politician, agriculturalist and landowner. He was educated at Eton College and Christ Church, Oxford and was created Baronet on April 19, 1859, of Leigh Court, Somerset....

     (1797–1878), politician
  • William Murray, 1st Earl of Mansfield
    William Murray, 1st Earl of Mansfield
    William Murray, 1st Earl of Mansfield, SL, PC was a British barrister, politician and judge noted for his reform of English law. Born to Scottish nobility, he was educated in Perth, Scotland before moving to London at the age of 13 to take up a place at Westminster School...

     (1705–1793), Lord Chief Justice and Chancellor of the Exchequer
  • Sir Gilbert Murray
    Gilbert Murray
    George Gilbert Aimé Murray, OM was an Australian born British classical scholar and public intellectual, with connections in many spheres. He was an outstanding scholar of the language and culture of Ancient Greece, perhaps the leading authority in the first half of the twentieth century...

     (1866–1957), classical scholar and diplomat
  • Charles Cotesworth Pinckney
    Charles Cotesworth Pinckney
    Charles Cotesworth “C. C.” Pinckney , was an early American statesman of South Carolina, Revolutionary War veteran, and delegate to the Constitutional Convention. He was twice nominated by the Federalist Party as their presidential candidate, but he did not win either election.-Early life and...

     (1746–1825), early American statesman, diplomat and presidential candidate
  • Thomas Pinckney
    Thomas Pinckney
    Thomas Pinckney was an early American statesman, diplomat and veteran of both the American Revolutionary War and the War of 1812.-Early life in the military:...

     (1750–1828), early American statesman and diplomat
  • Edward Eliot, 3rd Earl of St Germans
    Edward Eliot, 3rd Earl of St Germans
    Edward Granville Eliot, 3rd Earl of St Germans GCB , DL, LL.D, PC , styled Lord Elliot from 1823 to 1845, was a British politician and diplomat.-Background and education:...

     (1798–1877), politician
  • Robert Gascoyne-Cecil, 7th Marquess of Salisbury
    Robert Gascoyne-Cecil, 7th Marquess of Salisbury
    Robert Michael James Gascoyne-Cecil, 7th Marquess of Salisbury, PC, DL , is a British Conservative politician. During the 1990s, he was Leader of the House of Lords under his courtesy title of Viscount Cranborne...

     (1946–), Conservative politician
  • Anthony Ashley Cooper, 7th Earl of Shaftesbury (1801–1885), politician and philanthropist
  • Roger Mellor Makins, 1st Baron Sherfield (1904–1996), diplomat
  • William Wingfield
    William Wingfield (MP)
    William Wingfield KC, MP , was an attorney, judge, and Member of Parliament in 19th century England.-Early years:...

     (1772–1858), MP, Chief Justice of the Brecon Circuit
  • Bilawal Bhutto Zardari
    Bilawal Bhutto Zardari
    Bilawal Zardari Bhutto is the Chairman of the Pakistan Peoples Party. He is the only son of President Asif Ali Zardari and former Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto.-Early life and education:...

     (Born 1988), Chairman of Pakistan Peoples Party
    Pakistan Peoples Party
    The Pakistan Peoples Party , is a democratic socialist political party in Pakistan affiliated with Socialist International. Pakistan People's Party is the largest political party of Pakistan...

    , grandson of Zulfikar Ali Bhutto
    Zulfikar Ali Bhutto
    Zulfikar Ali Bhutto was 9th Prime Minister of Pakistan from 1973 to 1977, and prior to that, 4th President of Pakistan from 1971 to 1973. Bhutto was the founder of the Pakistan Peoples Party — the largest and most influential political party in Pakistan— and served as its chairman until his...

     and son of Benazir Bhutto
    Benazir Bhutto
    Benazir Bhutto was a democratic socialist who served as the 11th Prime Minister of Pakistan in two non-consecutive terms from 1988 until 1990 and 1993 until 1996....


Philosophy
  • Sir Alfred Ayer
    Alfred Ayer
    Sir Alfred Jules "Freddie" Ayer was a British philosopher known for his promotion of logical positivism, particularly in his books Language, Truth, and Logic and The Problem of Knowledge ....

     (1910–1989), philosopher
  • John Theophilus Desaguliers
    John Theophilus Desaguliers
    John Theophilus Desaguliers was a natural philosopher born in France. He was a member of the Royal Society of London beginning 29 July 1714. He was presented with the Royal Society's highest honour, the Copley Medal, in 1734, 1736 and 1741, with the 1741 award being for his discovery of the...

     (1683–1744), philosopher
  • Sir Michael Dummett
    Michael Dummett
    Sir Michael Anthony Eardley Dummett FBA D.Litt is a British philosopher. He was, until 1992, Wykeham Professor of Logic at the University of Oxford...

     (1925–), philosopher
  • John Locke
    John Locke
    John Locke FRS , widely known as the Father of Liberalism, was an English philosopher and physician regarded as one of the most influential of Enlightenment thinkers. Considered one of the first of the British empiricists, following the tradition of Francis Bacon, he is equally important to social...

     (1632–1704), philosopher
  • John Rawls
    John Rawls
    John Bordley Rawls was an American philosopher and a leading figure in moral and political philosophy. He held the James Bryant Conant University Professorship at Harvard University....

    , (1921–2002), philosopher
  • Gilbert Ryle
    Gilbert Ryle
    Gilbert Ryle , was a British philosopher, a representative of the generation of British ordinary language philosophers that shared Wittgenstein's approach to philosophical problems, and is principally known for his critique of Cartesian dualism, for which he coined the phrase "the ghost in the...

     (1900–1976), philosopher
  • John Searle
    John Searle
    John Rogers Searle is an American philosopher and currently the Slusser Professor of Philosophy at the University of California, Berkeley.-Biography:...

     (1932–), philosopher
  • Daniel Dennett
    Daniel Dennett
    Daniel Clement Dennett is an American philosopher, writer and cognitive scientist whose research centers on the philosophy of mind, philosophy of science and philosophy of biology, particularly as those fields relate to evolutionary biology and cognitive science. He is currently the Co-director of...

     (1942–), philosopher


Viceroys and Governors General
  • William Pitt Amherst, 1st Earl Amherst (1773–1857), Governor-General of India
  • George Eden, 1st Earl of Auckland
    George Eden, 1st Earl of Auckland
    George Eden, 1st Earl of Auckland, GCB, PC was a British Whig politician and colonial administrator. He was thrice First Lord of the Admiralty and also served as Governor-General of India between 1836 and 1842....

     (1784–1849), politician and Governor-General of India
  • Lord William Bentinck
    Lord William Bentinck
    Lieutenant-General Lord William Henry Cavendish-Bentinck GCB, GCH, PC , known as Lord William Bentinck, was a British soldier and statesman...

     (1774–1839), soldier and Governor-General of India
  • Charles John Canning, 1st Earl Canning (1812–1862), politician and Governor-General of India
  • James Andrew Broun-Ramsay, 1st Marquess of Dalhousie (1812–1860), politician and Governor-General of India
  • Frederick Hamilton-Temple-Blackwood, 1st Marquess of Dufferin and Ava
    Frederick Hamilton-Temple-Blackwood, 1st Marquess of Dufferin and Ava
    Frederick Hamilton-Temple-Blackwood, 1st Marquess of Dufferin and Ava, KP, GCB, GCSI, GCMG, GCIE, PC was a British public servant and prominent member of Victorian society...

     (1826–1902), Governor-General of Canada and Viceroy of India
  • James Bruce, 8th Earl of Elgin
    James Bruce, 8th Earl of Elgin
    Sir James Bruce, 8th Earl of Elgin and 12th Earl of Kincardine, KT, GCB, PC , was a British colonial administrator and diplomat...

     (1811–1863), Governor-General of Canada and Viceroy of India
  • Edward Wood, 1st Earl of Halifax (1881–1959), Foreign Secretary and Viceroy of India
  • Gilbert Elliot-Murray-Kynynmound, 1st Earl of Minto
    Gilbert Elliot-Murray-Kynynmound, 1st Earl of Minto
    Gilbert Elliot-Murray-Kynynmound, 1st Earl of Minto PC , known as Sir Gilbert Elliott between 1777 and 1797 and as The Lord Minto between 1797 and 1813, was a Scottish politician diplomat....

     (1751–1814), politician and Governor-General of India
  • Thomas George Baring, 1st Earl of Northbrook (1826–1904), Viceroy of India and First Lord of the Admiralty
  • Richard Wellesley, 1st Marquess Wellesley
    Richard Wellesley, 1st Marquess Wellesley
    Richard Colley Wesley, later Wellesley, 1st Marquess Wellesley, KG, PC, PC , styled Viscount Wellesley from birth until 1781, was an Anglo-Irish politician and colonial administrator....

     (1760–1842), Foreign Secretary and Governor-General of India


Theology
  • Lancelot Blackburne
    Lancelot Blackburne
    Lancelot Blackburne , was an English clergyman, who became Archbishop of York, and – in popular belief – a pirate....

     1658–1743), reputed pirate and 'jolly' Archbishop of York
  • Adam Blakeman
    Adam Blakeman
    Rev. Adam Blakeman was born in Gnosall, Staffordshire, England, June 10, 1596. His birthplace is frequently misspelled in websites due to transcription errors from old records....

     (1596–1665), preacher and American settler
  • Bernard Gilpin
    Bernard Gilpin
    Bernard Gilpin , was an Oxford theologian and then an influential clergyman in the emerging Church of England spanning the reigns of Henry VIII, Edward VI, Mary and Elizabeth I...

     (1517–1583), 'Apostle of the North'
  • Percy Dearmer
    Percy Dearmer
    Percy Dearmer, was an English priest and liturgist best known as the author of The Parson's Handbook, a liturgical manual for Anglican clergy. A lifelong socialist, he was an early advocate of the public ministry of women and concerned with social justice...

     (1867–1936), priest and liturgist
  • Trevor Huddleston
    Trevor Huddleston
    Ernest Urban Trevor Huddleston CR, KCMG was an English Anglican bishop. He was most well known for his anti-apartheid activism and his 'Prayer for Africa'...

     (1913–1998), Archbishop of Mauritius and anti-Apartheid campaigner
  • George William Kitchin
    George William Kitchin
    George William Kitchin was the first Chancellor of the University of Durham, from the institution of the role in 1908 till his death in 1912. He was also the last Dean of Durham Cathedral to govern the university....

     (1827–1912), theologian and Dean of Durham Cathedral
  • Edward Bouverie Pusey
    Edward Bouverie Pusey
    Edward Bouverie Pusey was an English churchman and Regius Professor of Hebrew at Christ Church, Oxford. He was one of the leaders of the Oxford Movement.-Early years:...

     (1800–1882), churchman and progenitor of the Oxford Movement
    Oxford Movement
    The Oxford Movement was a movement of High Church Anglicans, eventually developing into Anglo-Catholicism. The movement, whose members were often associated with the University of Oxford, argued for the reinstatement of lost Christian traditions of faith and their inclusion into Anglican liturgy...

  • John Macquarrie
    John Macquarrie
    John Macquarrie FBA TD was a Scottish theologian and philosopher, the author of Principles of Christian Theology and Jesus Christ in Modern Thought...

     (1919–2007), Christian Existentialist
  • Peter Martyr Vermigli
    Pietro Martire Vermigli
    Peter Martyr Vermigli , sometimes simply Peter Martyr, was an Italian theologian of the Reformation period.-Life:...

     (1499–1562), theologian
  • Eric Lionel Mascall
    Eric Lionel Mascall
    Eric Lionel Mascall OGS was a leading theologian and priest in the Anglo-Catholic tradition of the Church of England. He was a philosophical exponent of the Thomist tradition and was Professor of Historical Theology at King's College London . His name was styled as E.L...

     (1905–1993), Anglo-Catholic theologian
  • John Charles Ryle
    John Charles Ryle
    John Charles Ryle was the first Anglican bishop of Liverpool.-Life:Ryle was born at Macclesfield, and was educated at Eton and at Christ Church, Oxford, where he was Craven Scholar in 1836...

     (1816–1900), evangelical Anglican leader and first Bishop of Liverpool
    Bishop of Liverpool
    The Bishop of Liverpool is the Ordinary of the Church of England Diocese of Liverpool in the Province of York.The diocese stretches from Southport in the north, to Widnes in the south, and from the River Mersey to Wigan in the east. Its see is in the City of Liverpool at the Cathedral Church of...

  • Charles Wesley
    Charles Wesley
    Charles Wesley was an English leader of the Methodist movement, son of Anglican clergyman and poet Samuel Wesley, the younger brother of Anglican clergyman John Wesley and Anglican clergyman Samuel Wesley , and father of musician Samuel Wesley, and grandfather of musician Samuel Sebastian Wesley...

     (1707–1788), Methodist preacher and hymnist
  • John Wesley
    John Wesley
    John Wesley was a Church of England cleric and Christian theologian. Wesley is largely credited, along with his brother Charles Wesley, as founding the Methodist movement which began when he took to open-air preaching in a similar manner to George Whitefield...

     (1703–1791), leader of the Methodist movement
  • Rowan Williams
    Rowan Williams
    Rowan Douglas Williams FRSL, FBA, FLSW is an Anglican bishop, poet and theologian. He is the 104th and current Archbishop of Canterbury, Metropolitan of the Province of Canterbury and Primate of All England, offices he has held since early 2003.Williams was previously Bishop of Monmouth and...

     (1950–), Archbishop of Canterbury


Academia
  • Spencer Barrett
    Spencer Barrett
    Spencer Barrett FBA, was an English classical scholar, Fellow and Sub-Warden of Keble College, Oxford, and Reader in Greek Literature in the University of Oxford...

     (1914–2001), classical scholar
  • Robert Blake, Baron Blake
    Robert Blake, Baron Blake
    Robert Norman William Blake, Baron Blake was an English historian. He is best known for his 1966 biography of Benjamin Disraeli, 1st Earl of Beaconsfield, and for The Conservative Party from Peel to Churchill, which grew out of his 1968 Ford lectures...

     (1916–2003), historian
  • Robert Burchfield
    Robert Burchfield
    Robert William Burchfield CNZM CBE was a scholar, writer, and lexicographer.Born in Wanganui, New Zealand, he studied at Wanganui Technical College and Victoria University in Wellington...

     (1923–2004) scholar, writer, and lexicographer
  • Ronald Montagu Burrows
    Ronald Montagu Burrows
    Ronald Montagu Burrows was a British academic who served as Principal of King's College London from 1913-1920....

     (1867–1920), Principal of King's College London
    King's College London
    King's College London is a public research university located in London, United Kingdom and a constituent college of the federal University of London. King's has a claim to being the third oldest university in England, having been founded by King George IV and the Duke of Wellington in 1829, and...

     (1913–1920)
  • William Camden
    William Camden
    William Camden was an English antiquarian, historian, topographer, and officer of arms. He wrote the first chorographical survey of the islands of Great Britain and Ireland and the first detailed historical account of the reign of Elizabeth I of England.- Early years :Camden was born in London...

     (1551–1623), antiquarian and historian
  • Richard Carew (1555–1620), translator and antiquary
  • Sir Raymond Carr
    Raymond Carr
    Sir Albert Raymond Maillard Carr FBA FRHS FRSL , known as Raymond Carr, is an English historian specializing in the history of Spain, Latin America, and Sweden who was Warden of St Antony's College, Oxford, from 1968 to 1987....

     (1919–), historian
  • Sir William Deakin
    William Deakin
    Frederick William Dampier Deakin, Sir William Deakin was a historian, World War II veteran, and literary assistant to Winston Churchill....

     (1913–2005), historian and diplomat
  • Edmund Gunter
    Edmund Gunter
    Edmund Gunter , English mathematician, of Welsh descent, was born in Hertfordshire in 1581.He was educated at Westminster School, and in 1599 was elected a student of Christ Church, Oxford. He took orders, became a preacher in 1614, and in 1615 proceeded to the degree of bachelor in divinity...

     (1581–1626), mathematician
  • Sir Roy Harrod
    Roy Harrod
    Sir Henry Roy Forbes Harrod was an English economist. He is best known for his biography of John Maynard Keynes and the development of the Harrod–Domar model, which he and Evsey Domar developed independently...

     (1900–1978), economist
  • Sir Michael Howard
    Michael Howard (historian)
    Sir Michael Eliot Howard, OM, CH, CBE, MC, FBA is a British military historian, formerly Chichele Professor of the History of War and Regius Professor of Modern History at Oxford University, and Robert A...

     (1922–), historian
  • Richard William Jelf
    Richard William Jelf
    Richard William Jelf was the fourth Principal of King's College London.He was educated at Eton College and Christ Church, Oxford, and was subsequently made a Fellow of Oriel College, Oxford...

     (1798–1871), Principal of King's College London
    King's College London
    King's College London is a public research university located in London, United Kingdom and a constituent college of the federal University of London. King's has a claim to being the third oldest university in England, having been founded by King George IV and the Duke of Wellington in 1829, and...

     (1843–1868)
  • Sir Hugh Lloyd-Jones
    Hugh Lloyd-Jones
    Sir Peter Hugh Jefferd Lloyd-Jones FBA was a British classical scholar and Regius Professor of Greek at Oxford....

     (1922– ) classical scholar
  • Jan Morris
    Jan Morris
    Jan Morris CBE is a Welsh nationalist, historian, author and travel writer. She is known particularly for the Pax Britannica trilogy, a history of the British Empire, and for portraits of cities, notably Oxford, Venice, Trieste, Hong Kong, and New York City.With an English mother and Welsh father,...

     (1926–), writer and historian
  • Prince Dmitriy Obolensky
    Dimitri Obolensky
    Sir Dimitri Obolensky was born Prince Dmitriy Dmitrievich Obolensky to Prince Dimitri Alexandrovich Obolensky and Countess Maria Shuvalov . He was descended from Rurik, Igor, Svyatoslav, St Vladimir of Kiev, St Michael of Chernigov, and Prince Mikhail Semyonovich Vorontsov...

     (1918–2001), historian
  • A. L. Rowse
    A. L. Rowse
    Alfred Leslie Rowse, CH, FBA , known professionally as A. L. Rowse and to friends and family as Leslie, was a British historian from Cornwall. He is perhaps best known for his work on Elizabethan England and his poetry about Cornwall. He was also a Shakespearean scholar and biographer...

     (1903–1997), historian
  • Hugh Trevor-Roper, Baron Dacre (1914–2003), historian


Science
  • Sir Joseph Banks
    Joseph Banks
    Sir Joseph Banks, 1st Baronet, GCB, PRS was an English naturalist, botanist and patron of the natural sciences. He took part in Captain James Cook's first great voyage . Banks is credited with the introduction to the Western world of eucalyptus, acacia, mimosa and the genus named after him,...

     (1743–1820), botanist
  • William Buckland
    William Buckland
    The Very Rev. Dr William Buckland DD FRS was an English geologist, palaeontologist and Dean of Westminster, who wrote the first full account of a fossil dinosaur, which he named Megalosaurus...

     (1784–1856), geologist, palaeontologist and omnivore
  • Sir Richard Doll
    Richard Doll
    Sir William Richard Shaboe Doll CH OBE FRS was a British physiologist who became the foremost epidemiologist of the 20th century, turning the subject into a rigorous science. He was a pioneer in research linking smoking to health problems...

     (1912–2005), epidemiologist
  • Albert Einstein
    Albert Einstein
    Albert Einstein was a German-born theoretical physicist who developed the theory of general relativity, effecting a revolution in physics. For this achievement, Einstein is often regarded as the father of modern physics and one of the most prolific intellects in human history...

     (elected to a 5-year Research Studentship
    Studentship
    United StatesIn the US a studentship is similar to a scholarship but involves summer work on a research project. The amount paid to the recipient is normally tax-free, but the recipient is required to fulfill work requirements. Types of studentships vary among universities and countries....

     in 1931)
  • John Freind
    John Freind
    John Freind , FRS, was an English physician.-Life:He was younger brother of Robert Freind , headmaster of Westminster School, and was born at Croton in Northamptonshire...

     (1675–1728), physician and chemist
  • Sir Archibald Garrod
    Archibald Garrod
    Sir Archibald Edward Garrod KCMG, FRS was an English physician who pioneered the field of inborn errors of metabolism.- Education and Personal Life :...

     (1857–1936), physician and pioneer molecular geneticist
  • Robert Hooke
    Robert Hooke
    Robert Hooke FRS was an English natural philosopher, architect and polymath.His adult life comprised three distinct periods: as a scientific inquirer lacking money; achieving great wealth and standing through his reputation for hard work and scrupulous honesty following the great fire of 1666, but...

     (1635–1703), scientist and inventor
  • John Kidd (1775–1851), physician, chemist and geologist
  • Sir John Maddox
    John Maddox
    Sir John Royden Maddox, FRS was a British science writer. He was an editor of Nature for 22 years, from 1966–1973 and 1980-1995.-Career:...

     (1925–2009), science writer
  • Sir Martin Ryle
    Martin Ryle
    Sir Martin Ryle was an English radio astronomer who developed revolutionary radio telescope systems and used them for accurate location and imaging of weak radio sources...

     (1918–1984, radio astronomer
  • Sir Francis Simon
    Francis Simon
    Sir Francis Simon, born Franz Eugen Simon , was a German and later British physical chemist and physicist who devised the method, and confirmed its feasibility, of separating the isotope Uranium-235 and thus made a major contribution to the creation of the atomic bomb.-Early life:He was born to a...

     (1893–1956), physicist
  • Sir Denys Wilkinson
    Denys Wilkinson
    Sir Denys Haigh Wilkinson FRS is a British nuclear physicist. He was educated at Loughborough Grammar School and Jesus College, Cambridge. He holds the higher degree of ScD, an HonFilDr degree and an HonLLD degree...

     (1922–), nuclear physicist
  • Thomas Willis
    Thomas Willis
    Thomas Willis was an English doctor who played an important part in the history of anatomy, neurology and psychiatry. He was a founding member of the Royal Society.-Life:...

     (1621–1675), physician and neurologist
  • Sir Martin Wood
    Martin Wood
    Martin Wood is a Canadian television director who has been directing since the mid 1990s. Specializing in science fiction, where he is best known for his work as a director and producer on Stargate SG-1 , as well as its spin-off series Stargate Atlantis .-Career:Martin Wood began his television...

     (1927–), engineer


Other
  • Prince Abbas Hilmi
    Prince Abbas Hilmi
    Prince Abbas Hilmi is an Egyptian prince and financial manager. A member of the Muhammad Ali Dynasty, he is the only son of Prince Muhammad Abdel Moneim and his Ottoman wife Princess Neslişah.-Early life:...

     (1941–), Egyptian prince and financial manager
  • John Boyd (1718–1800), art collector and sugar merchant
  • James Thomas Brudenell, 7th Earl of Cardigan (1797–1868), Soldier and Commander of the Light Brigade at Balaclava
  • Edward VII (1841–1910), King of the United Kingdom
    Monarchy of the United Kingdom
    The monarchy of the United Kingdom is the constitutional monarchy of the United Kingdom and its overseas territories. The present monarch, Queen Elizabeth II, has reigned since 6 February 1952. She and her immediate family undertake various official, ceremonial and representational duties...

     and Emperor of India
    Emperor of India
    Emperor/Empress of India was used as a title by the last Mughal emperor Bahadur Shah II, and revived by the colonial British monarchs during the British Raj in India....

  • Laurence Shirley, 4th Earl Ferrers
    Laurence Shirley, 4th Earl Ferrers
    Laurence Shirley, 4th Earl Ferrers was the last member of the House of Lords hanged in England.The 4th Earl Ferrers, descendant of an ancient and noble family, was the eldest son of Hon. Laurence Ferrers, himself a younger son of the Robert Shirley, 1st Earl Ferrers-a descendant of Robert...

     (1720–1760), last member of the House of Lords
    House of Lords
    The House of Lords is the upper house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. Like the House of Commons, it meets in the Palace of Westminster....

     hanged in England
  • General Thomas Graham, 1st Baron Lynedoch
    Thomas Graham, 1st Baron Lynedoch
    General Thomas Graham, 1st Baron Lynedoch, GCB, GCMG, GCTE was a Scottish aristocrat, politician and British Army officer....

     (1748–1843), commander in the Peninsular War
    Peninsular War
    The Peninsular War was a war between France and the allied powers of Spain, the United Kingdom, and Portugal for control of the Iberian Peninsula during the Napoleonic Wars. The war began when French and Spanish armies crossed Spain and invaded Portugal in 1807. Then, in 1808, France turned on its...

  • Jonathan Hancock
    Jonathan Hancock
    Jonathan Bruce Hancock is the Founder of The Junior Memory Championship. A two-time Guinness World Record-Holder and former World Memory Champion, he also spent fifteen years working as a radio presenter on BBC Radio Oxford...

     (1972–), Memory champion
  • William Penn
    William Penn
    William Penn was an English real estate entrepreneur, philosopher, and founder of the Province of Pennsylvania, the English North American colony and the future Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. He was an early champion of democracy and religious freedom, notable for his good relations and successful...

     (1644–1718), founder of Pennsylvania
  • Charles Portal, 1st Viscount Portal of Hungerford
    Charles Portal, 1st Viscount Portal of Hungerford
    Marshal of the Royal Air Force Charles Frederick Algernon Portal, 1st Viscount Portal of Hungerford KG GCB OM DSO & Bar MC was a senior Royal Air Force officer and an advocate of strategic bombing...

     (1893–1971) Marshal of the Royal Air Force and Chief of the Air Staff, Second World War
  • Ambrose St. John
    Ambrose St. John
    The Reverend Father Ambrose St. John was an English Oratorian and convert to Catholicism. He is now best known as the lifetime companion of Dr. John Henry Cardinal Newman.-Early life:...

     (1815–1875), close companion of John Henry Newman
  • Jonny Searle
    Jonny Searle
    Jonathan William C. Searle MBE is a British rower. Along with his brother Gregory, and coxswain Garry Herbert, Searle won the gold medal in the coxed pair event at the Olympic Games in Barcelona....

     MBE (1969–), Gold Medallist, Coxed Pair, 1992 Summer Olympics
    1992 Summer Olympics
    The 1992 Summer Olympic Games, officially known as the Games of the XXV Olympiad, were an international multi-sport event celebrated in Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain, in 1992. The International Olympic Committee voted in 1986 to separate the Summer and Winter Games, which had been held in the same...

  • Cameron
    Cameron Winklevoss
    Cameron Howard Winklevoss is an American rower and entrepreneur. He competed in the men's pair rowing event at the 2008 Beijing Olympics with his identical twin brother and rowing partner Tyler Winklevoss. Cameron and his brother are known for co-founding HarvardConnection along with Harvard...

     and Tyler Winklevoss
    Tyler Winklevoss
    Tyler Howard Winklevoss is an American rower and entrepreneur. He competed in the men's pair rowing event at the 2008 Beijing Olympics with his identical twin brother and rowing partner Cameron Winklevoss...

     (1981-), twins associated with the founding of Facebook
    Facebook
    Facebook is a social networking service and website launched in February 2004, operated and privately owned by Facebook, Inc. , Facebook has more than 800 million active users. Users must register before using the site, after which they may create a personal profile, add other users as...



Arts and media
  • Sir Harold Acton
    Harold Acton
    Sir Harold Mario Mitchell Acton CBE was a British writer, scholar and dilettante perhaps most famous for being wrongly believed to have inspired the character of "Anthony Blanche" in Evelyn Waugh's novel Brideshead Revisited...

     (1904–1994) writer and scholar
  • Sir Thomas Armstrong (1898–1994), musician
  • W. H. Auden
    W. H. Auden
    Wystan Hugh Auden , who published as W. H. Auden, was an Anglo-American poet,The first definition of "Anglo-American" in the OED is: "Of, belonging to, or involving both England and America." See also the definition "English in origin or birth, American by settlement or citizenship" in See also...

     (1907–1973), poet
  • F. W. Bain
    F. W. Bain
    Francis William Bain was a British writer of fantasy stories that he claimed were translated from Sanskrit.-Biography:...

     (1863–1940), writer of fantasy stories
  • Sir Adrian Boult
    Adrian Boult
    Sir Adrian Cedric Boult CH was an English conductor. Brought up in a prosperous mercantile family he followed musical studies in England and at Leipzig, Germany, with early conducting work in London for the Royal Opera House and Sergei Diaghilev's ballet company. His first prominent post was...

     (1889–1983), conductor
  • Kenneth Barnes
    Kenneth Barnes
    Sir Kenneth Ralph Barnes, KGB, CBE was director of the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art in London, from 1909 until 1955.He was born in Heavitree, near Exeter, one of six siblings...

     (1878–1957), Director of R.A.D.A.
  • Robert Burton
    Robert Burton (scholar)
    Robert Burton was an English scholar at Oxford University, best known for the classic The Anatomy of Melancholy. He was also the incumbent of St Thomas the Martyr, Oxford, and of Segrave in Leicestershire.-Life:...

     (1577–1640), writer of 'The Anatomy of Melancholy'
  • Lewis Carroll
    Lewis Carroll
    Charles Lutwidge Dodgson , better known by the pseudonym Lewis Carroll , was an English author, mathematician, logician, Anglican deacon and photographer. His most famous writings are Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and its sequel Through the Looking-Glass, as well as the poems "The Hunting of the...

     (1832–1898), (real name, Charles Lutwidge Dodgson), writer, clergyman and mathematician
  • Apsley Cherry-Garrard
    Apsley Cherry-Garrard
    Apsley George Benet Cherry-Garrard was an English explorer of Antarctica. He was a survivor of the Terra Nova Expedition and is acclaimed for his historical account of this expedition, The Worst Journey in the World....

     (1886–1959), Antarctic explorer and writer
  • Laurence Cummings
    Laurence Cummings
    Laurence Cummings , MA , ARCM, FRCO, HonRAM is a British harpsichordist, organist, and conductor. Cummings was educated at Solihull School, Christ Church, Oxford and the Royal College of Music...

     - conductor, organist, harpsichordist
  • Richard Curtis
    Richard Curtis
    Richard Whalley Anthony Curtis, CBE is a New Zealand-born British screenwriter, music producer, actor and film director, known primarily for romantic comedy films such as Four Weddings and a Funeral, Bridget Jones's Diary, Notting Hill, Love Actually and The Girl in the Café, as well as the hit...

     (1956–), comedy writer
  • David Dimbleby
    David Dimbleby
    David Dimbleby is a British BBC TV commentator and a presenter of current affairs and political programmes, most notably the BBC's flagship political show Question Time, and more recently, art, architectural history and history series...

     (1938–), broadcaster
  • John Dowland
    John Dowland
    John Dowland was an English Renaissance composer, singer, and lutenist. He is best known today for his melancholy songs such as "Come, heavy sleep" , "Come again", "Flow my tears", "I saw my Lady weepe" and "In darkness let me dwell", but his instrumental music has undergone a major revival, and has...

     (1563–1626), lutenist and composer
  • Sheridan Hamilton-Temple-Blackwood, 5th Marquess of Dufferin and Ava
    Sheridan Hamilton-Temple-Blackwood, 5th Marquess of Dufferin and Ava
    Sheridan Frederick Terence Hamilton-Temple-Blackwood, 5th Marquess of Dufferin and Ava was a British patron of the arts...

     (1938–1988), art patron
  • Giles Farnaby
    Giles Farnaby
    Giles Farnaby was an English composer and virginalist of the Renaissance and Baroque periods.-Life:Giles Farnaby was born about 1563, perhaps in Truro, Cornwall, England or near London. His father, Thomas, was a Cittizen and Joyner of London, and Giles may have been related to Thomas Farnaby , the...

     (c. 1563–1640), composer and virginalist
  • Geoffrey Faber
    Geoffrey Faber
    Sir Geoffrey Cust Faber was a British academic, publisher and poet.Geoffrey Cust Faber was educated at Rugby School and Christ Church, Oxford...

     (1889–1961), publisher
  • Michael Flanders
    Michael Flanders
    Michael Henry Flanders OBE, was an English actor, broadcaster, and writer and performer of comic songs. He is best known to the general public for his partnership with Donald Swann performing as the duo Flanders and Swann....

     (1922–1975), actor, writer and broadcaster
  • Peter Fleming (1907–1971), traveller and writer
  • Howard Goodall
    Howard Goodall
    210px|thumb|Howard Goodall at St. John the Baptist Church in Devon, United Kingdom, May 2009Howard Lindsay Goodall CBE is a British composer of musicals, choral music and music for television...

     (1958–), composer and broadcaster
  • Charles Greville
    Charles Cavendish Fulke Greville
    Charles Cavendish Fulke Greville was an English diarist and an amateur cricketer who played first-class cricket from 1819 to 1827...

     (1794–1865), diarist and cricketer
  • Bryan Guinness 2nd Lord Moyne (1905–1992), poet and brewer.
  • Desmond Guinness
    Desmond Guinness
    Hon. Desmond Guinness is an Irish author on Georgian art and architecture and a conservationist.He was the second son of the author and brewer Bryan Guinness, 2nd Baron Moyne and Diana Mitford...

     (1931–), conservationist and author.
  • Richard Hakluyt
    Richard Hakluyt
    Richard Hakluyt was an English writer. He is principally remembered for his efforts in promoting and supporting the settlement of North America by the English through his works, notably Divers Voyages Touching the Discoverie of America and The Principal Navigations, Voiages, Traffiques and...

     (1552–1616), writer
  • Henry Hitchings
    Henry Hitchings
    Henry Hitchings is an author, reviewer and critic, specializing in narrative non-fiction, with a particular emphasis on language and cultural history...

     (1974-), author and critic
  • Barney Hoskyns
    Barney Hoskyns
    Barney Hoskyns is a British music critic and editor of the online music journalism archive Rock's Backpages.Hoskyns graduated from Oxford with a First Class degree in English. He began writing about music for Melody Maker and New Musical Express, quitting his job as staff writer at NME to research...

     (1959-) acclaimed music journalist
  • Anthony Howard
    Anthony Howard (journalist)
    Anthony Michell Howard, CBE was a prominent British journalist, broadcaster and writer. He was the editor of the New Statesman, The Listener and the deputy editor of The Observer...

     (1934–2010), journalist and broadcaster
  • Marina Hyde
    Marina Hyde
    Marina Hyde is an English columnist who writes articles on topics such as current affairs, politics, celebrity and sport for The Guardian newspaper...

    , journalist
    Journalist
    A journalist collects and distributes news and other information. A journalist's work is referred to as journalism.A reporter is a type of journalist who researchs, writes, and reports on information to be presented in mass media, including print media , electronic media , and digital media A...

     at The Guardian
    The Guardian
    The Guardian, formerly known as The Manchester Guardian , is a British national daily newspaper in the Berliner format...

  • Sir Ludovic Kennedy
    Ludovic Kennedy
    Sir Ludovic Henry Coverley Kennedy was a British journalist, broadcaster, humanist and author best known for re-examining cases such as the Lindbergh kidnapping and the murder convictions of Timothy Evans and Derek Bentley, and for his role in the abolition of the death penalty in the United...

     (1919–2009), broadcaster and writer
  • Lennie Lee
    Lennie Lee
    Lennie Lee is a South African conceptual artist who lives and works in London.-Life and career:Lennie Lee is a British artist born in Johannesburg, South Africa. He moved to the UK in 1960. He was educated at Dulwich college in London before winning a scholarship to study philosophy at Christ...

     (1958–), artist
  • Matthew Gregory Lewis
    Matthew Gregory Lewis
    Matthew Gregory Lewis was an English novelist and dramatist, often referred to as "Monk" Lewis, because of the success of his classic Gothic novel, The Monk.-Family:...

     (1775–1818), novelist and dramatist
  • Harry Lloyd
    Harry Lloyd
    Harry Lloyd is an English actor. He played Will Scarlet in the first two seasons of the BBC drama Robin Hood which began in 2006...

     (1983–), actor
  • S. P. B. Mais (1885–1975), author, journalist and broadcaster
  • Sir John Masterman
    John Cecil Masterman
    Sir John Cecil Masterman was a noted academic, sportsman and author. However, he was best known as chairman of the Twenty Committee, which during World War II ran the Double Cross System, the scheme that controlled double agents in Britain.-Academic background:Masterman was educated at the Royal...

     (1891–1977), academic, sportsman, author and spymaster
  • Adrian Mitchell
    Adrian Mitchell
    Adrian Mitchell FRSL was an English poet, novelist and playwright. A former journalist, he became a noted figure on the British anti-authoritarian Left. For almost half a century he was the foremost poet of the country's anti-Bomb movement...

     (1932–2008), poet, novelist and playwright
  • David Ogilvy(1929–) Iconic advertisement guru; known as the 'Pope of Advertising', he founded Ogilvy & Mather
  • Norman Painting
    Norman Painting
    Norman Painting, OBE was an actor who played Phil Archer in the BBC Radio 4 soap opera The Archers since the pilot episodes were aired on the BBC Midlands Home Service in summer 1950. The series went national on 1 January 1951...

     (1924–2009), radio actor
  • Clere Parsons
    Clere Parsons
    Clere Parsons was an English poet, born in India.He was educated at Christ Church, University of Oxford, and edited the 1928 edition of Oxford Poetry.His only collection, Poems, was published after his death by Faber & Faber...

     (1908–1931), poet
  • Hugh Quarshie
    Hugh Quarshie
    - Early and Personal Life :Quarshie is of mixed Ghanaian, English and Dutch ancestry and was born in Accra, Ghana, to Emma Wilhelmina and Richard Quarshie, and emigrated with his family to the United Kingdom when he was aged three...

     (1954–), actor
  • John Ruskin
    John Ruskin
    John Ruskin was the leading English art critic of the Victorian era, also an art patron, draughtsman, watercolourist, a prominent social thinker and philanthropist. He wrote on subjects ranging from geology to architecture, myth to ornithology, literature to education, and botany to political...

     (1819–1900), critic, poet and artist
  • Sir Philip Sidney
    Philip Sidney
    Sir Philip Sidney was an English poet, courtier and soldier, and is remembered as one of the most prominent figures of the Elizabethan Age...

     (1554–1586), poet and soldier
  • Philip Stanhope, 5th Earl Stanhope
    Philip Stanhope, 5th Earl Stanhope
    Philip Henry Stanhope, 5th Earl Stanhope FRS , styled Viscount Mahon between 1816 and 1855, was a British politician and historian...

    (1805–1875), founder of the National Portrait Gallery
  • J. I. M. Stewart
    J. I. M. Stewart
    John Innes Mackintosh Stewart was a Scottish novelist and academic. He is equally well-known for the works of literary criticism and contemporary novels published under his real name and for the crime fiction published under the pseudonym of Michael Innes...

     (Michael Innes) (1906–1994), literary critic and novelist
  • Donald Swann
    Donald Swann
    Donald Ibrahím Swann was a British composer, musician and entertainer. He is best known to the general public for his partnership of writing and performing comic songs with Michael Flanders .-Life:...

     (1923–1994), composer, musician and entertainer
  • John Taverner
    John Taverner
    John Taverner was an English composer and organist, regarded as the most important English composer of his era.- Career :...

     (1490–1545), composer
  • Sir William Walton
    William Walton
    Sir William Turner Walton OM was an English composer. During a sixty-year career, he wrote music in several classical genres and styles, from film scores to opera...

     (1902–1983), composer
  • James Twining
    James Twining
    James Twining is a British thriller writer.- Life :Although born in London, Twining spent most of his childhood in France after his family moved to Paris when he was four...

     (1972–), novelist
  • Peter Warlock
    Peter Warlock
    Peter Warlock was a pseudonym of Philip Arnold Heseltine , an Anglo-Welsh composer and music critic. He used the pseudonym when composing, and is now better known by this name....

     (1894–1930), composer and critic
  • Auberon Waugh
    Auberon Waugh
    Auberon Alexander Waugh was a British author and journalist, son of the novelist Evelyn Waugh. He was known to his family and friends as Bron Waugh.-Life and career:...

     (1939–2001), author and journalist
  • Stanley Weyman (1855–1928), novelist


Business
  • Russi Mody
    Russi Mody
    Russi Mody was former Chairman and Managing Director of Tata Steel and a leading member of the Tata Group.-Early years:...

     (1918-), Chairman and Managing Director, Tata Steel (formerly TISCO), India


See also :Category: Alumni of Christ Church, Oxford and Students (i.e. Fellows) of Christ Church, Oxford

External links



Main Website

History of the cathedral

Cathedral website

Other sites

Virtual Tours