University of Washington

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University of Washington is a public research university
University
A university is an institution of higher education and research, which grants academic degrees in a variety of subjects. A university is an organisation that provides both undergraduate education and postgraduate education...

, founded in 1861 in Seattle, Washington, United States
United States
The United States of America is a federal constitutional republic comprising fifty states and a federal district...

. The UW is the largest university in the Northwest
Northwestern United States
The Northwestern United States comprise the northwestern states up to the western Great Plains regions of the United States, and consistently include the states of Oregon, Washington, Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, to which part of southeast Alaska is also sometimes included...

 and the oldest public university on the West Coast. The university has three campuses, with its largest campus in the University District, Seattle, and two other campuses in Tacoma and Bothell
University of Washington, Bothell
The University of Washington Bothell is a four-year undergraduate and graduate campus in northeast King County, one of the three campuses of the public University of Washington...

. Its operating expenses for fiscal year 2010 was more than US$ 5.0 billion. The UW occupies over 500 buildings, with over 20 million gross square footage of space, including the latest University of Washington Plaza consisting of the 325 ft tall UW Tower and conference center.

In 2011, the University of Washington was ranked 16th worldwide by the Academic Ranking of World Universities
Academic Ranking of World Universities
The Academic Ranking of World Universities , commonly known as the Shanghai ranking, is a publication that was founded and compiled by the Shanghai Jiaotong University to rank universities globally. The rankings have been conducted since 2003 and updated annually...

, 23rd worldwide by the Times Higher Education World University Rankings
Times Higher Education World University Rankings
The Times Higher Education World University Rankings is an international ranking of universities published by the British magazine Times Higher Education in partnership with Thomson Reuters, which provided citation database information...

. UW is considered a Public Ivy
Public Ivy
Public Ivy is a term coined by Richard Moll in his 1985 book Public Ivies: A Guide to America's best public undergraduate colleges and universities to refer to universities which "provide an Ivy League collegiate experience at a public school price." Public Ivies are considered, according to the...

 university.

History


The city of Seattle was one of several settlements in the mid to late 19th century vying for primacy in the newly formed Washington Territory
Washington Territory
The Territory of Washington was an organized incorporated territory of the United States that existed from February 8, 1853, until November 11, 1889, when the final extent of the territory was admitted to the Union as the State of Washington....

. In 1854, territorial governor Isaac Stevens
Isaac Stevens
Isaac Ingalls Stevens was the first governor of Washington Territory, a United States Congressman, and a brigadier general in the Union Army during the American Civil War until his death at the Battle of Chantilly...

 recommended the establishment of a university in Washington. Several prominent Seattle-area residents, chief among them Methodist preacher Daniel Bagley, saw the siting of this University as a chance to add to the city's prestige. They were able to convince early founder of Seattle and member of the territorial legislature Arthur A. Denny
Arthur A. Denny
Arthur Armstrong Denny was present at the founding of Seattle, Washington, the acknowledged leader of the pioneer Denny Party, and later the city's wealthiest citizen and a 9-term member of the territorial legislature...

 of the importance of Seattle winning the school. The legislature initially chartered two universities, one in Seattle and one in Lewis County
Lewis County, Washington
Lewis County is a county located in the U.S. state of Washington. As of 2010, the population was 75,455. The county seat is at Chehalis, and its largest city is Centralia....

, but later repealed its decision in favor of a single university in Lewis County, provided locally donated land could be found. When no site emerged, the legislature, encouraged by Denny, relocated the university to Seattle in 1858.


In 1861, scouting began for an appropriate 10 acres (4 ha) site in Seattle to serve as the campus for a new university. Denny, along with fellow pioneers Edward Lander and Charlie Terry, donated a site on "Denny's Knoll" in downtown Seattle. This tract was bounded by 4th and 6th Avenues on the west and east and Union and Seneca Streets on the north and south.

UW opened officially on November 4, 1861, as the Territorial University of Washington. The following year, the legislature passed articles formally incorporating the University and establishing a Board of Regents. The school struggled initially, closing three times: in 1863 for lack of students, and again in 1867 and 1876 due to shortage of funds. However, Clara Antoinette McCarty Wilt
Clara Antoinette McCarty Wilt
Clara Antoinette McCarty Wilt was the first graduate of the University of Washington and the first woman superintendent of the Pierce County School District.-Early life:...

 became the first graduate of UW in 1876 when she graduated from UW with a bachelor's degree
Bachelor's degree
A bachelor's degree is usually an academic degree awarded for an undergraduate course or major that generally lasts for three or four years, but can range anywhere from two to six years depending on the region of the world...

 in science. By the time Washington entered the Union
United States
The United States of America is a federal constitutional republic comprising fifty states and a federal district...

 in 1889, both Seattle and the University had grown substantially. Enrollment had increased from an initial 30 students to nearly 300, and the relative isolation of the campus had given way to encroaching development. A special legislative committee headed by UW graduate Edmond Meany was created for the purpose of finding a new campus better able to serve the growing student population. The committee selected a site on Union Bay northeast of downtown, and the legislature appropriated funds for its purchase and subsequent construction.


The University relocated from downtown to the new campus in 1895, moving into the newly built Denny Hall. The regents tried and failed to sell the old campus, and eventually settled on leasing the area. The University still owns what is now called the Metropolitan Tract
Metropolitan Tract (Seattle)
The Metropolitan Tract is an area of land in downtown Seattle owned by the University of Washington. Originally covering , the 1962 purchase of land for a garage for the Olympic Hotel expanded the plot to ....

. In the heart of the city, it is among the most valuable pieces of real estate
Real estate
In general use, esp. North American, 'real estate' is taken to mean "Property consisting of land and the buildings on it, along with its natural resources such as crops, minerals, or water; immovable property of this nature; an interest vested in this; an item of real property; buildings or...

 in Seattle and generates millions of dollars
United States dollar
The United States dollar , also referred to as the American dollar, is the official currency of the United States of America. It is divided into 100 smaller units called cents or pennies....

 in revenue annually.

The original Territorial University building was torn down in 1908 and its former site currently houses the Fairmont Olympic Hotel. The sole surviving remnants of UW's first building are four 24 feet (7.3 m), white, hand-fluted cedar, Ionic columns. They were salvaged by Edmond S. Meany
Edmond S. Meany
Edmond S. Meany was a professor of botany and history at the University of Washington and a UW alumnus, having graduated as the valedictorian of his class in 1885...

--one of the University's first graduates and the former head of the history department. Meany and his colleague, Dean Herbert T. Condon, dubbed each of the columns "Loyalty," "Industry," "Faith" and "Efficiency," or "LIFE." The columns now stand in the Sylvan Grove Theater.


Organizers of the 1909 Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition
Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition
The Alaska–Yukon–Pacific Exposition was a world's fair held in Seattle in 1909, publicizing the development of the Pacific Northwest.It was originally planned for 1907, to mark the 10th anniversary of the Klondike Gold Rush, but the organizers found out about the Jamestown Exposition being held...

 eyed the still largely undeveloped campus as a prime setting for their world's fair
World's Fair
World's fair, World fair, Universal Exposition, and World Expo are various large public exhibitions held in different parts of the world. The first Expo was held in The Crystal Palace in Hyde Park, London, United Kingdom, in 1851, under the title "Great Exhibition of the Works of Industry of All...

. They came to an agreement with the Board of Regents that allowed them to use the campus grounds for the exposition. In exchange, the University would be able to take advantage of the development of the campus for the fair after its conclusion. This included a detailed site plan and several buildings. The plan for the A-Y-P Exposition prepared by John Charles Olmsted
John Charles Olmsted
John Charles Olmsted , the nephew and adopted son of Frederick Law Olmsted, was an American landscape architect. With his brother, Frederick Law Olmsted, Jr., he founded Olmsted Brothers, a landscape design firm in Brookline, Massachusetts. The firm is famous for designing many urban parks,...

 was later incorporated into the overall campus master plan and permanently affected the layout of the campus.

Both World War
World war
A world war is a war affecting the majority of the world's most powerful and populous nations. World wars span multiple countries on multiple continents, with battles fought in multiple theaters....

s brought the military to the campus, with certain facilities temporarily loaned to the federal government. The subsequent post-war periods were times of dramatic growth for the University. The period between the wars saw significant expansion on the upper campus. Construction of the liberal arts
Liberal arts
The term liberal arts refers to those subjects which in classical antiquity were considered essential for a free citizen to study. Grammar, Rhetoric and Logic were the core liberal arts. In medieval times these subjects were extended to include mathematics, geometry, music and astronomy...

 quadrangle
Quadrangle (architecture)
In architecture, a quadrangle is a space or courtyard, usually rectangular in plan, the sides of which are entirely or mainly occupied by parts of a large building. The word is probably most closely associated with college or university campus architecture, but quadrangles may be found in other...

, known to students as "The Quad," began in 1916 and continued in stages until 1939. The first two wings of Suzzallo Library
Suzzallo Library
Suzzallo Library is the central library of the University of Washington in Seattle, and perhaps the most recognizable building on campus. It is named for Henry Suzzallo, who was president of the University of Washington until he stepped down in 1926, the same year the first phase of the library's...

, considered the architectural centerpiece of the University, were built in 1926 and 1935, respectively. Further growth came with the end of World War II
World War II
World War II, or the Second World War , was a global conflict lasting from 1939 to 1945, involving most of the world's nations—including all of the great powers—eventually forming two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis...

 and passage of the G.I. Bill. Among the most important developments of this period was the opening of the medical school in 1946. It would eventually grow into the University of Washington Medical Center
University of Washington Medical Center
The University of Washington Medical Center is a nationally renowned hospital located along the Montlake Cut and Portage Bay in the University District of Seattle, Washington, USA. It is one of the teaching hospitals affiliated with the University of Washington School of Medicine. UW Medical Center...

, now ranked by U.S. News and World Report among the top ten hospitals in the United States
United States
The United States of America is a federal constitutional republic comprising fifty states and a federal district...

. It was during this era in University of Washington history in which many Japanese Americans were sent away from the university to internment camps along the West-coast of the United States as part of Executive Order 9066
Executive Order 9066
United States Executive Order 9066 was a United States presidential executive order signed and issued during World War II by U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt on February 19, 1942 authorizing the Secretary of War to prescribe certain areas as military zones...

 following the attacks on Pearl Harbor
Pearl Harbor
Pearl Harbor, known to Hawaiians as Puuloa, is a lagoon harbor on the island of Oahu, Hawaii, west of Honolulu. Much of the harbor and surrounding lands is a United States Navy deep-water naval base. It is also the headquarters of the U.S. Pacific Fleet...

. As a result, many Japanese American "soon-to-be" graduates were unable to receive their diplomas and be recognized for their accomplishment at the university until the University of Washington's commemoration ceremony for the Japanese Americans entitled The Long Journey Home
The Long Journey Home
The Long Journey Home was a ceremonial event held at the main campus of the University of Washington on May 18, 2008, commemorating the Japanese American students who, due to the passage of Executive Order 9066 in 1942, were forced to leave the school and live in internment camps in the western...

 held on May 18, 2008 at the main campus.

In the early 1950s, the University of Washington Police Department was established. It currently has jurisdiction over the University of Washington campus and University-owned housing, except for the Radford Court apartments in Sand Point
Sand Point, Seattle, Washington
Sand Point is a neighborhood in Seattle, Washington, United States, named after and consisting mostly of the Sand Point peninsula that juts into Lake Washington, which is itself largely given over to Magnuson Park. Its southern boundary can be said to be N.E. 65th Street, beyond which are...

.

The 1960s and 1970s are known as the "golden age" of the university due to the tremendous growth in students, facilities, operating budget and prestige under the leadership of Charles Odegaard
Charles Odegaard
Charles Edwin Odegaard was the 19th president of the University of Washington from 1958–1973. Odegaard is credited in transforming the University of Washington from an average state university to one among the top public universities in the United States.-Background:Odegaard was born in 1911 in...

 from 1958 to 1973. Enrollment at UW more than doubled—from around 16,000 to 34,000—as the baby boom generation came of age. As was the case at many American universities, this era was marked by high levels of student activism
Student activism
Student activism is work done by students to effect political, environmental, economic, or social change. It has often focused on making changes in schools, such as increasing student influence over curriculum or improving educational funding...

, with much of the unrest focused around opposition to the Vietnam War
Vietnam War
The Vietnam War was a Cold War-era military conflict that occurred in Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia from 1 November 1955 to the fall of Saigon on 30 April 1975. This war followed the First Indochina War and was fought between North Vietnam, supported by its communist allies, and the government of...

. Odegaard instituted a vision of building a "community of scholars" and convinced the state of Washington legislatures to increase their investments towards the university. Additionally, Washington senators
United States Senate
The United States Senate is the upper house of the bicameral legislature of the United States, and together with the United States House of Representatives comprises the United States Congress. The composition and powers of the Senate are established in Article One of the U.S. Constitution. Each...

, Henry M. Jackson
Henry M. Jackson
Henry Martin "Scoop" Jackson was a U.S. Congressman and Senator from the state of Washington from 1941 until his death...

 and Warren G. Magnuson
Warren G. Magnuson
Warren Grant "Maggie" Magnuson was a United States Senator of the Democratic Party from Washington from 1944 until 1981. Upon leaving the Senate, he was the most senior member of the body...

 used their political clout to funnel federal research monies to the University of Washington and to this day, UW is among the top recipients of federal research funds in the United States. The results included an operating budget increase of $37 million in 1958, to over $400 million in 1973, and 35 new buildings that doubled the floor space of the university.

The University opened campuses in Bothell
University of Washington, Bothell
The University of Washington Bothell is a four-year undergraduate and graduate campus in northeast King County, one of the three campuses of the public University of Washington...

 and Tacoma
University of Washington, Tacoma
The University of Washington Tacoma is a four-year undergraduate, graduate, and post-graduate campus in downtown Tacoma, Washington. Students can choose majors in business, education, nursing, computer science, information technology, criminal justice, social work, environmental science, urban...

 in 1990. Initially, these campuses offered curricula for students seeking bachelor's degree
Bachelor's degree
A bachelor's degree is usually an academic degree awarded for an undergraduate course or major that generally lasts for three or four years, but can range anywhere from two to six years depending on the region of the world...

s who have already completed two years of higher education, but both schools have transitioned to four year universities, accepting the first freshman class in the fall of 2006. Both campuses offer master's degree
Master's degree
A master's is an academic degree granted to individuals who have undergone study demonstrating a mastery or high-order overview of a specific field of study or area of professional practice...

 programs as well. In 2009 the University opened an office in the spanish
Spain
Spain , officially the Kingdom of Spain languages]] under the European Charter for Regional or Minority Languages. In each of these, Spain's official name is as follows:;;;;;;), is a country and member state of the European Union located in southwestern Europe on the Iberian Peninsula...

 city of León
León, Spain
León is the capital of the province of León in the autonomous community of Castile and León, situated in the northwest of Spain. Its city population of 136,985 makes it the largest municipality in the province, accounting for more than one quarter of the province's population...

 in collaboration with the local university.

Campus


The University of Washington, Seattle campus is situated on the shores of Union and Portage Bay
Portage Bay
Portage Bay is an arm of Seattle, Washington's Lake Union and is part of the Lake Washington Ship Canal. Its western limit can be said to be the Ship Canal Bridge, which carries Interstate 5 over the water; North Passage Point Park and South Passage Point Park sit on opposite shores between the...

s, with views of the Cascade Range
Cascade Range
The Cascade Range is a major mountain range of western North America, extending from southern British Columbia through Washington and Oregon to Northern California. It includes both non-volcanic mountains, such as the North Cascades, and the notable volcanoes known as the High Cascades...

 to the east and the Olympic Mountains
Olympic Mountains
The Olympic Mountains is a mountain range on the Olympic Peninsula of western Washington in the United States. The mountains, part of the Pacific Coast Ranges, are not especially high - Mount Olympus is the highest at - but the western slopes of the Olympics rise directly out of the Pacific...

 to the west. The main campus is bounded on the west by 15th Avenue N.E., on the north by N.E. 45th Street, on the east by Montlake Boulevard N.E., and on the south by N.E. Pacific Street. East Campus stretches east of Montlake Boulevard to Laurelhurst
Laurelhurst, Seattle, Washington
Laurelhurst is a residential neighborhood in Seattle, Washington, USA. It is bounded on the northeast by Ivanhoe Place N.E., beyond which is Windermere; on the northwest by Sand Point Way N.E. and N.E...

 and is largely taken up by wetland
Wetland
A wetland is an area of land whose soil is saturated with water either permanently or seasonally. Wetlands are categorised by their characteristic vegetation, which is adapted to these unique soil conditions....

s and sports fields. South Campus occupies the land between Pacific Street and the Lake Washington Ship Canal
Lake Washington Ship Canal
The Lake Washington Ship Canal, which runs through the City of Seattle, Washington, connects the fresh water body of Lake Washington with the salt water inland sea of Puget Sound. The Ship Canal includes a series of locks, modeled after the Panama Canal, to accommodate the different water levels...

 which used to be a golf course
Golf course
A golf course comprises a series of holes, each consisting of a teeing ground, fairway, rough and other hazards, and a green with a flagstick and cup, all designed for the game of golf. A standard round of golf consists of playing 18 holes, thus most golf courses have this number of holes...

 and is given over to the health sciences, oceanography
Oceanography
Oceanography , also called oceanology or marine science, is the branch of Earth science that studies the ocean...

, fisheries
Fisheries science
Fisheries science is the academic discipline of managing and understanding fisheries. It is a multidisciplinary science, which draws on the disciplines of oceanography, marine biology, marine conservation, ecology, population dynamics, economics and management to attempt to provide an integrated...

, and the University of Washington Medical Center
University of Washington Medical Center
The University of Washington Medical Center is a nationally renowned hospital located along the Montlake Cut and Portage Bay in the University District of Seattle, Washington, USA. It is one of the teaching hospitals affiliated with the University of Washington School of Medicine. UW Medical Center...

. West Campus is less of a separate entity than the others, many of its facilities being on city streets, and stretches between 15th Avenue and Interstate 5
Interstate 5
Interstate 5 is the main Interstate Highway on the West Coast of the United States, running largely parallel to the Pacific Ocean coastline from Canada to Mexico . It serves some of the largest cities on the U.S...

 from the Ship Canal to N.E. 41st Street. University Way, known locally as "The Ave
The Ave
University Way NE, colloquially The Ave , is the commercial heart of the University District and the off-campus extension of the University of Washington in Seattle. Once "a department store eight blocks long," The Ave has gradually turned into what now resembles an eight-block-long global food...

", lies nearby and is a focus for much student life at the university.

The oldest building on campus is Denny Hall. Built of Tenino
Tenino, Washington
Tenino is a city in Thurston County, Washington, United States. The population was 1,695 at the 2010 census.-History:Tenino was officially incorporated on July 24, 1906, though it existed as a rural community since the mid-19th century...

 sandstone
Sandstone
Sandstone is a sedimentary rock composed mainly of sand-sized minerals or rock grains.Most sandstone is composed of quartz and/or feldspar because these are the most common minerals in the Earth's crust. Like sand, sandstone may be any colour, but the most common colours are tan, brown, yellow,...

 in 1895, it is in the French Renaissance
French Renaissance
French Renaissance is a recent term used to describe a cultural and artistic movement in France from the late 15th century to the early 17th century. It is associated with the pan-European Renaissance that many cultural historians believe originated in northern Italy in the fourteenth century...

 style and named in honor of Seattle pioneers Arthur A.
Arthur A. Denny
Arthur Armstrong Denny was present at the founding of Seattle, Washington, the acknowledged leader of the pioneer Denny Party, and later the city's wealthiest citizen and a 9-term member of the territorial legislature...

 and Mary Denny. It served as the core of the University for many years. The Theodore Jacobsen Observatory
Theodore Jacobsen Observatory
The Theodor Jacobsen Observatory is the on-campus observatory of the University of Washington. Built in 1895, it is the second oldest building on campus and was constructed using the remaining Tenino sandstone blocks from Denny Hall, the oldest and first building on campus...

, the on campus observatory situated just north of Denny Hall, was built from the left over sandstone
Sandstone
Sandstone is a sedimentary rock composed mainly of sand-sized minerals or rock grains.Most sandstone is composed of quartz and/or feldspar because these are the most common minerals in the Earth's crust. Like sand, sandstone may be any colour, but the most common colours are tan, brown, yellow,...

 used in the construction of Denny Hall. Although it is rarely used today, the observatory is the second oldest building on campus. After other structures were erected near Denny Hall with apparently little overall planning, the Board of Regents determined that a master plan was needed. Early plans, including a preliminary proposal by John Charles Olmsted
John Charles Olmsted
John Charles Olmsted , the nephew and adopted son of Frederick Law Olmsted, was an American landscape architect. With his brother, Frederick Law Olmsted, Jr., he founded Olmsted Brothers, a landscape design firm in Brookline, Massachusetts. The firm is famous for designing many urban parks,...

, stepson of renowned landscape architect
Landscape architecture
Landscape architecture is the design of outdoor and public spaces to achieve environmental, socio-behavioral, or aesthetic outcomes. It involves the systematic investigation of existing social, ecological, and geological conditions and processes in the landscape, and the design of interventions...

 Frederick Law Olmsted
Frederick Law Olmsted
Frederick Law Olmsted was an American journalist, social critic, public administrator, and landscape designer. He is popularly considered to be the father of American landscape architecture, although many scholars have bestowed that title upon Andrew Jackson Downing...

, had little impact.
Instead, it was the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition
Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition
The Alaska–Yukon–Pacific Exposition was a world's fair held in Seattle in 1909, publicizing the development of the Pacific Northwest.It was originally planned for 1907, to mark the 10th anniversary of the Klondike Gold Rush, but the organizers found out about the Jamestown Exposition being held...

 that defined much of the campus' future layout. The exposition plan, also designed by John C. Olmsted, defined the University's major axis on the lower campus. Oriented to the southeast, it provides the University with its primary vista of Mount Rainier
Mount Rainier
Mount Rainier is a massive stratovolcano located southeast of Seattle in the state of Washington, United States. It is the most topographically prominent mountain in the contiguous United States and the Cascade Volcanic Arc, with a summit elevation of . Mt. Rainier is considered one of the most...

 on clear days. Most of the University's science
Science
Science is a systematic enterprise that builds and organizes knowledge in the form of testable explanations and predictions about the universe...

 and engineering
Engineering
Engineering is the discipline, art, skill and profession of acquiring and applying scientific, mathematical, economic, social, and practical knowledge, in order to design and build structures, machines, devices, systems, materials and processes that safely realize improvements to the lives of...

 buildings line this axis.

After the exposition, the Board of Regents sought a master plan that would unite the newly developed lower campus with the original buildings of the upper campus including Denny Hall. Rejecting a further proposal from Olmsted, the regents instead turned to local architects Carl F. Gould and Charles H. Bebb
Charles Bebb
Charles Herbert Bebb was a leading Seattle architect, who participated in two of the city's most important partnerships, Bebb and Mendel from 1901 to 1914, and Bebb and Gould from 1914 to 1939...

. Their proposal was accepted, and came to be called the Regents' Plan. It specified a northeast-southwest axis on upper campus around which would be centered the University's liberal arts
Liberal arts
The term liberal arts refers to those subjects which in classical antiquity were considered essential for a free citizen to study. Grammar, Rhetoric and Logic were the core liberal arts. In medieval times these subjects were extended to include mathematics, geometry, music and astronomy...

 departments. This axis joins the lower campus axis laid down during the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition at an open space left behind after a large temporary structure built for the fair was torn down. This space was later paved with a distinctive red brick and has come to be known as Red Square
Red Square (University of Washington)
Red Square, officially Central Plaza, is a large open square on the campus of the University of Washington that serves as a hub for two of the University's major axes, connecting the campus's northern Liberal Arts Quadrangle with the science and engineering buildings found on the lower campus...

. Some of the buildings from the exposition were kept by the university and have been retrofitted over the years since. One of these is Architecture Hall.

Bebb and Gould's plan also called for all future construction to adhere to a Collegiate Gothic style. This style is best exemplified on the University campus by the early wings of Suzzallo Library
Suzzallo Library
Suzzallo Library is the central library of the University of Washington in Seattle, and perhaps the most recognizable building on campus. It is named for Henry Suzzallo, who was president of the University of Washington until he stepped down in 1926, the same year the first phase of the library's...

, the University's central library.
New construction in the 1960s saw a deviation from the Collegiate Gothic style as specified in the Regents' Plan. Business facilities on the upper campus, science and engineering structures on lower campus, and a new wing of Suzzallo Library, were all built in a modernist style, as was a unique, glass-walled building housing an experimental nuclear reactor
Nuclear reactor
A nuclear reactor is a device to initiate and control a sustained nuclear chain reaction. Most commonly they are used for generating electricity and for the propulsion of ships. Usually heat from nuclear fission is passed to a working fluid , which runs through turbines that power either ship's...

. The reactor opened in 1961; a small radiation
Radioactive contamination
Radioactive contamination, also called radiological contamination, is radioactive substances on surfaces, or within solids, liquids or gases , where their presence is unintended or undesirable, or the process giving rise to their presence in such places...

 leak in 1972 resulted only in a temporary shutdown, but security concerns eventually led to it being decommissioned. It was deactivated in 1988, dismantled in 2006, and as of 2008 the building is being considered for demolition.

An apparent attempt to harmonize future development with the Regents' Plan can be seen in the University's most recent construction, including the 1990 Kenneth Allen
Paul Allen
Paul Gardner Allen is an American business magnate, investor, and philanthropist. Allen co-founded Microsoft with Bill Gates...

 wing of the central library and a new generation of medical, science and engineering buildings. Significant funding came from Microsoft
Microsoft
Microsoft Corporation is an American public multinational corporation headquartered in Redmond, Washington, USA that develops, manufactures, licenses, and supports a wide range of products and services predominantly related to computing through its various product divisions...

 co-founders Paul Allen
Paul Allen
Paul Gardner Allen is an American business magnate, investor, and philanthropist. Allen co-founded Microsoft with Bill Gates...

 and Bill Gates
Bill Gates
William Henry "Bill" Gates III is an American business magnate, investor, philanthropist, and author. Gates is the former CEO and current chairman of Microsoft, the software company he founded with Paul Allen...

, who have strong family connections to the university but did not attend UW. Mary Gates Hall
Mary Maxwell Gates
Mary Maxwell Gates was an American businessperson. Gates served 18 years on the University of Washington board of regents...

 opened in May 2000, and in September 2003, the UW law school relocated to the $74 million William H. Gates Hall on the northwest corner of campus, and the $90 million UW Medical Center
University of Washington Medical Center
The University of Washington Medical Center is a nationally renowned hospital located along the Montlake Cut and Portage Bay in the University District of Seattle, Washington, USA. It is one of the teaching hospitals affiliated with the University of Washington School of Medicine. UW Medical Center...

 surgery pavilion opened for operation. The $72 million Paul G. Allen Center for Computer Science & Engineering opened in October 2003. In March 2006, the $150 million William H. Foege
William Foege
William Herbert Foege M.D., M.P.H. is an American epidemiologist who is credited with "devising the global strategy that led to the eradication of smallpox in the late 1970s"....

 bioengineering and genome sciences building was dedicated by Bill Gates
Bill Gates
William Henry "Bill" Gates III is an American business magnate, investor, philanthropist, and author. Gates is the former CEO and current chairman of Microsoft, the software company he founded with Paul Allen...

 and former U.S. president Jimmy Carter
Jimmy Carter
James Earl "Jimmy" Carter, Jr. is an American politician who served as the 39th President of the United States and was the recipient of the 2002 Nobel Peace Prize, the only U.S. President to have received the Prize after leaving office...

.

In September 2006, then President Mark Emmert announced that the University had finalized the purchase of the neighboring 22-story Safeco Plaza (a University District landmark) as well as several adjacent buildings for the sum of $130 million. At present, plans are being finalized to relocate UW administration and support services to the complex, leaving the main campus (two blocks away) for teaching and research.

Most of the streets and major walkways on campus are named after the state's counties. Major exceptions are Memorial Way and George Washington
George Washington
George Washington was the dominant military and political leader of the new United States of America from 1775 to 1799. He led the American victory over Great Britain in the American Revolutionary War as commander-in-chief of the Continental Army from 1775 to 1783, and presided over the writing of...

 Lane. Memorial Way is named in honor of members of the UW community who died in World War I
World War I
World War I , which was predominantly called the World War or the Great War from its occurrence until 1939, and the First World War or World War I thereafter, was a major war centred in Europe that began on 28 July 1914 and lasted until 11 November 1918...

 and also features a flagpole engraved at its base with the members of the UW community who died in World War II
World War II
World War II, or the Second World War , was a global conflict lasting from 1939 to 1945, involving most of the world's nations—including all of the great powers—eventually forming two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis...

.

Other attractions on campus include the Henry Art Gallery
Henry Art Gallery
The Henry Art Gallery is the art museum of the University of Washington in Seattle, Washington, USA. Located on the west edge of the university's campus along 15th Avenue N.E. in the University District, it was founded in 1927 and was the first public art museum in the state of Washington. The...

 and the Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture
Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture
The Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture has been a Washington state museum since 1899. It is located at the University of Washington campus at the intersection of N.E. 45th Street and 17th Avenue N.E. in Seattle, Washington, USA, in the University District. It is the only major natural...

. The Washington Park Arboretum
Washington Park Arboretum
Washington Park is a public park in Seattle, Washington, USA, most of which is taken up by the Washington Park Arboretum, a joint project of the University of Washington, the Seattle Department of Parks and Recreation, and the nonprofit Arboretum Foundation. Washington Park also includes a...

, south of main campus across Union Bay
Union Bay (Seattle)
Union Bay is that part of Lake Washington in Seattle that is west of a line drawn between Webster Point in the Laurelhurst neighborhood to the north and Foster Point in the Madison Park neighborhood to the south...

, is run by the university, though owned by the city of Seattle. The Warren G. Magnuson Health Sciences Center
Warren G. Magnuson Health Sciences Building
The Warren G. Magnuson Health Sciences Building is part of the University of Washington in Seattle, Washington and the world's largest single university building with a total floor area of . Although the building is made up of over 20 wings built over more than 50 years, the interior hallways are...

 is also an interesting attraction. The building, at 5740200 square feet (533,282 m²), is the second largest office building in the United States.

Several major motion picture films were filmed on campus or used it as a backdrop, including The Sixth Man
The Sixth Man
The 6th Man is a supernatural sports comedy starring Marlon Wayans and Kadeem Hardison. The film was directed by Randall Miller. The film features real NCAA schools, although the rosters are fictitious...

, WarGames
WarGames
WarGames is a 1983 American Cold War suspense/science-fiction film written by Lawrence Lasker and Walter F. Parkes and directed by John Badham. The film stars Matthew Broderick and Ally Sheedy....

, and What the Bleep!?: Down the Rabbit Hole.

Organization and administration



The current President of the University of Washington is Michael K. Young. Phyllis Wise, who had previously served as Provost and Executive Vice President and for a year as Interim President, was named the Chancellor of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
The University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign is a large public research-intensive university in the state of Illinois, United States. It is the flagship campus of the University of Illinois system...

 in August of 2011.

The University is governed by ten regents, one of whom is a student. Its most notable current regent is likely William H. Gates, Sr.
William H. Gates, Sr.
William Henry Gates, Sr. is a retired American attorney and philanthropist and author of the book Showing Up for Life: Thoughts on the Gifts of a Lifetime. He is the father of Microsoft founder Bill Gates.-Life and career:Gates was born in Bremerton, Washington, to William Henry Gates I or Sr...

, father of Bill Gates
Bill Gates
William Henry "Bill" Gates III is an American business magnate, investor, philanthropist, and author. Gates is the former CEO and current chairman of Microsoft, the software company he founded with Paul Allen...

. The undergraduate student government is the Associated Students of the University of Washington
Associated Students of the University of Washington
The Associated Students of the University of Washington is one of two Student Governments on campus at the University of Washington, the other being the Graduate and Professional Student Senate...

 (ASUW) and the graduate student government is the Graduate and Professional Student Senate
Graduate and Professional Student Senate
The University of Washington Graduate and Professional Student Senate is the official student government for graduate and professional students at the University of Washington. GPSS is made up of two senators from each degree-granting department, four officers and several staff members...

 (GPSS).

The University offers bachelor's
Bachelor's degree
A bachelor's degree is usually an academic degree awarded for an undergraduate course or major that generally lasts for three or four years, but can range anywhere from two to six years depending on the region of the world...

, master's
Master's degree
A master's is an academic degree granted to individuals who have undergone study demonstrating a mastery or high-order overview of a specific field of study or area of professional practice...

 and doctoral degrees through its 140 departments, themselves organized into various colleges and schools:
  • College of Arts and Sciences
    University of Washington College of Arts and Sciences
    The University of Washington College of Arts and Sciences is the liberal arts and sciences unit of the University of Washington. The CAS has 27,500 students and offers 5,600 different classes.-External links:*...

    • Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies
  • College of Built Environments
    University of Washington College of Built Environments
    The College of Built Environments or CBE at the University of Washington is the new name, as of January 1, 2009, of the college formerly called the College of Architecture and Urban Planning. The old name was adopted in 1957-58 when the college had only two departments, architecture and planning...

  • Michael G. Foster School of Business
    University of Washington Business School
    The University of Washington Michael G. Foster School of Business is the business school at the University of Washington, Seattle. It was founded in 1917 and is the second oldest institution of management education on the West Coast...

  • School of Dentistry
    University of Washington School of Dentistry
    The University of Washington School of Dentistry is located in Seattle, and is the only school of dentistry in Washington State. The school emphasizes research in anxiety, orofacial pain, tissue repair and regeneration, immune response to bacteria, and practice based research.- History :A part of...

  • College of Education
    Education
    Education in its broadest, general sense is the means through which the aims and habits of a group of people lives on from one generation to the next. Generally, it occurs through any experience that has a formative effect on the way one thinks, feels, or acts...

  • College of Engineering
    University of Washington College of Engineering
    The University of Washington College of Engineering is the engineering unit of the University of Washington. The college has ten departments with 5,500 students and 237 faculty.- Departments in the College of Engineering :* * Bioengineering* *...

  • College of the Environment
    Environment variable
    Environment variables are a set of dynamic named values that can affect the way running processes will behave on a computer.They can be said in some sense to create the operating environment in which a process runs...

  • The Graduate School
  • Information School
    University of Washington Information School
    The Information School at the University of Washington is an undergraduate and graduate school that offers BS, MLIS, MSIM, and PhD degrees...

  • School of Law
    University of Washington School of Law
    The University of Washington School of Law is the law school of the University of Washington, located on the northwest corner of the main campus in Seattle, Washington.The most recent 2012 U.S...

  • School of Medicine
    University of Washington School of Medicine
    The University of Washington School of Medicine is a public medical school located in Seattle, Washington.-Overview:UWSOM is a graduate school affiliated with the University of Washington, and is the only medical school in the states of Washington, Wyoming, Alaska, Montana, and Idaho...

  • School of Nursing
    Nursing
    Nursing is a healthcare profession focused on the care of individuals, families, and communities so they may attain, maintain, or recover optimal health and quality of life from conception to death....

  • School of Pharmacy
    Pharmacy
    Pharmacy is the health profession that links the health sciences with the chemical sciences and it is charged with ensuring the safe and effective use of pharmaceutical drugs...

  • Daniel J. Evans School of Public Affairs
    Daniel J. Evans School of Public Affairs
    The Daniel J. Evans School of Public Affairs at the University of Washington in Seattle is a school of public policy in the Northwest....

  • School of Public Health
  • School of Social Work
    Social work
    Social Work is a professional and academic discipline that seeks to improve the quality of life and wellbeing of an individual, group, or community by intervening through research, policy, community organizing, direct practice, and teaching on behalf of those afflicted with poverty or any real or...


  • Academics and research


    In 2006, the University of Washington research budget passed the $1 billion milestone. Virtually all of the funding came from peer-reviewed research proposals. UW research budget consistently ranks among the top 5 in both public and private universities in the United States
    United States
    The United States of America is a federal constitutional republic comprising fifty states and a federal district...

    . UW is also the largest recipient of federal research funding among public universities and second among all public and private universities in the country, a position that the university has held each year since 1974. The university is an elected member of the Association of American Universities
    Association of American Universities
    The Association of American Universities is an organization of leading research universities devoted to maintaining a strong system of academic research and education...

    .

    In 2009, the University of Washington admitted 61% of applicants. As of the 2006–07 autumn term, the university had 40,216 students, making it the largest university (in terms of student population) on the west coast. In 2007, the average high school GPA of incoming freshmen was 3.75, and the average SAT
    SAT
    The SAT Reasoning Test is a standardized test for college admissions in the United States. The SAT is owned, published, and developed by the College Board, a nonprofit organization in the United States. It was formerly developed, published, and scored by the Educational Testing Service which still...

     (math and critical reading) score was 1,251. About 33% of all undergraduates are members of minority group
    Minority group
    A minority is a sociological group within a demographic. The demographic could be based on many factors from ethnicity, gender, wealth, power, etc. The term extends to numerous situations, and civilizations within history, despite the misnomer of minorities associated with a numerical statistic...

    s.

    Among the faculty, there are five winners of Albert Lasker Award for Clinical Medical Research
    Albert Lasker Award for Clinical Medical Research
    Lasker~DeBakey Clinical Medical Research Award is awarded by the Lasker Foundation for the understanding, diagnosis, prevention, treatment, and cure of disease. The award was renamed in 2008 in honor of Michael E. DeBakey...

    , one winner of the Fields Medal
    Fields Medal
    The Fields Medal, officially known as International Medal for Outstanding Discoveries in Mathematics, is a prize awarded to two, three, or four mathematicians not over 40 years of age at each International Congress of the International Mathematical Union , a meeting that takes place every four...

    , eight winners of the Gairdner Foundation International Award
    Gairdner Foundation International Award
    The Gairdner Foundation International Award is given annually at a special dinner to three to six people for outstanding discoveries or contributions to medical science. Receipt of the Gairdner is traditionally considered a precursor to winning the Nobel Prize in Medicine; as of 2007, 69 Nobel...

    , twelve MacArthur Fellows, two winners of the National Book Award
    National Book Award
    The National Book Awards are a set of American literary awards. Started in 1950, the Awards are presented annually to American authors for literature published in the current year. In 1989 the National Book Foundation, a nonprofit organization which now oversees and manages the National Book...

    , one winner of the National Medal of Arts
    National Medal of Arts
    The National Medal of Arts is an award and title created by the United States Congress in 1984, for the purpose of honoring artists and patrons of the arts. It is the highest honor conferred to an individual artist on behalf of the people. Honorees are selected by the National Endowment for the...

    , five winners of the National Medal of Science
    National Medal of Science
    The National Medal of Science is an honor bestowed by the President of the United States to individuals in science and engineering who have made important contributions to the advancement of knowledge in the fields of behavioral and social sciences, biology, chemistry, engineering, mathematics and...

    , six Nobel Prize
    Nobel Prize
    The Nobel Prizes are annual international awards bestowed by Scandinavian committees in recognition of cultural and scientific advances. The will of the Swedish chemist Alfred Nobel, the inventor of dynamite, established the prizes in 1895...

     laureates, nineteen winners of the Presidential Early Career Awards in Science and Engineering, and two Pulitzer Prize
    Pulitzer Prize
    The Pulitzer Prize is a U.S. award for achievements in newspaper and online journalism, literature and musical composition. It was established by American publisher Joseph Pulitzer and is administered by Columbia University in New York City...

     winners. Additionally, among UW faculty are fifty-eight members of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences
    American Academy of Arts and Sciences
    The American Academy of Arts and Sciences is an independent policy research center that conducts multidisciplinary studies of complex and emerging problems. The Academy’s elected members are leaders in the academic disciplines, the arts, business, and public affairs.James Bowdoin, John Adams, and...

    , four members of the American Philosophical Society
    American Philosophical Society
    The American Philosophical Society, founded in 1743, and located in Philadelphia, Pa., is an eminent scholarly organization of international reputation, that promotes useful knowledge in the sciences and humanities through excellence in scholarly research, professional meetings, publications,...

    , thirteen Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigators, forty-eight members of the Institute of Medicine
    Institute of Medicine
    The Institute of Medicine is a not-for-profit, non-governmental American organization founded in 1970, under the congressional charter of the National Academy of Sciences...

    , fifteen members of the National Academy of Engineering
    National Academy of Engineering
    The National Academy of Engineering is a government-created non-profit institution in the United States, that was founded in 1964 under the same congressional act that led to the founding of the National Academy of Sciences...

    , and sixty members of the National Academy of Sciences
    United States National Academy of Sciences
    The National Academy of Sciences is a corporation in the United States whose members serve pro bono as "advisers to the nation on science, engineering, and medicine." As a national academy, new members of the organization are elected annually by current members, based on their distinguished and...

    .


    The University of Washington library system
    University of Washington Libraries
    The University of Washington Libraries are among the largest academic research libraries in North America and winner of the 2004 "Excellence in Academic Libraries Award"...

     is among the largest academic libraries in the United States
    United States
    The United States of America is a federal constitutional republic comprising fifty states and a federal district...

    , with holdings of more than 7.3 million volumes. The Association of Research Libraries ranked the UW library system between the top fifth and fifteenth in various categories.

    UW is also the host university of ResearchChannel
    ResearchChannel
    The Research Channel was an educational television network based at the University of Washington in Seattle, Washington, and operated by a consortium of leading research and academic institutions who contribute science-related programming to viewers in the United States and in other countries via...

     program, the only TV channel in the United States dedicated solely for the dissemination of research from academic institutions and research organizations. Current participation of ResearchChannel includes 36 universities, 15 research organizations, two corporate research centers and many other affiliates. UW also disseminates knowledge through its proprietary UWTV channel and online.

    To promote equal academic opportunity, especially for people of low income, UW launched Husky Promise in 2006. Families of income up to 65 percent of state median income or 235 percent of federal poverty level are eligible. With this, up to 30 percent of undergraduate students may be eligible. The cut-off income level that UW set is the highest in the nation, making top quality education available to more people. Then UW President, Mark Emmert, simply said that being "elitist is not in our DNA". "Last year, the University of Washington moved to a more comprehensive approach [to admissions], in which the admissions staff reads the entire application and looks at grades within the context of the individual high school, rather than relying on computerized cutoffs."

    Since 1977, there has been a Transition School and Early Entrance Program
    Transition School and Early Entrance Program
    The Transition School and Early Entrance Program is an early college entrance program located on the University of Washington campus at the Halbert and Nancy Robinson Center for Young Scholars. The program was begun in 1977 by the late Halbert Robinson, who recognized the need for extremely...

     on campus. "The Early Entrance Program is the Robinson Center’s original early university entrance program. Recognized as one of the most prestigious early university entrance programs in the nation, this program facilitates early entry to the University of Washington for a carefully selected group of sixteen highly-capable young students younger than fifteen (15) years old. As mandated by state law, students must have completed 6th grade in order to enroll in the Transition School." This Robinson Center also has a program called the UW Academy for Young Scholars
    Academy for Young Scholars
    UW Academy for Young Scholars is a prestigious early-college entrance program located at the University of Washington. Founded in 2001, after the creation of Early Entrance Program , the Robinson Center and the University of Washington Honors Program partnered to create the UW Academy for Young...

    : "The UW Academy is the premier early university entrance program for high school students in Washington State. A small cohort of up to thirty-five academically advanced and highly motivated students are admitted to the UW Academy each year. Students apply to the UW Academy during their 10th grade year, and if accepted, withdraw from high school at the end of 10th grade to enroll as freshmen at the University of Washington." All Academy students are automatically admitted into the UW Honors Program.

    Rankings


    In 2011, the University of Washington was ranked 16th worldwide by the Academic Ranking of World Universities
    Academic Ranking of World Universities
    The Academic Ranking of World Universities , commonly known as the Shanghai ranking, is a publication that was founded and compiled by the Shanghai Jiaotong University to rank universities globally. The rankings have been conducted since 2003 and updated annually...

    ,

    In 2010, the University of Washington was ranked 23rd worldwide by the Times Higher Education World University Rankings
    Times Higher Education World University Rankings
    The Times Higher Education World University Rankings is an international ranking of universities published by the British magazine Times Higher Education in partnership with Thomson Reuters, which provided citation database information...



    In 2006, the University of Washington ranked 22nd internationally by Newsweek
    Newsweek
    Newsweek is an American weekly news magazine published in New York City. It is distributed throughout the United States and internationally. It is the second-largest news weekly magazine in the U.S., having trailed Time in circulation and advertising revenue for most of its existence...

    "Top 100 Global Universities". In 2011, the University of Washington ranked 42nd in the nation according to U.S. News & World Report
    U.S. News & World Report
    U.S. News & World Report is an American news magazine published from Washington, D.C. Along with Time and Newsweek it was for many years a leading news weekly, focusing more than its counterparts on political, economic, health and education stories...

    .

    The UW School of Medicine
    University of Washington School of Medicine
    The University of Washington School of Medicine is a public medical school located in Seattle, Washington.-Overview:UWSOM is a graduate school affiliated with the University of Washington, and is the only medical school in the states of Washington, Wyoming, Alaska, Montana, and Idaho...

     is ranked No.1 in primary care and No.9 in research. The graduate program in nursing is ranked No.1 in the nation. The UW Graduate School of Nursing has been ranked No.1 in the nation since 1984, when the first survey of graduate nursing schools was conducted. The School of Public Health and Community Medicine is as well ranked fourth by US News.

    The graduate program in social work is ranked third, the pharmacy school fifth, the Library and Information School fourth, the graduate program in computer science seventh, the graduate school of education seventh, the school of engineering 21st, and the UW School of Law
    University of Washington School of Law
    The University of Washington School of Law is the law school of the University of Washington, located on the northwest corner of the main campus in Seattle, Washington.The most recent 2012 U.S...

     34th.

    The Performance Ranking of Scientific Research Papers of World Universities ranked UW 4th internationally in terms of overall research productivity.

    Human Resources & Labor Review, the human competitiveness index & analysis published in Chasecareer Network, ranked the university 13th internationally in 2011; tied with Cornell University in term of total points.

    The Faculty Scholarly Productivity Index created by Academic Analytics ranks University of Washington overall at No.19.

    G Factors ranked UW No.7 internationally in 2006.

    A private review by the National Opinion Research Center
    National Opinion Research Center
    NORC at the University of Chicago, established in 1941 as the National Opinion Research Center, is one of the largest and most highly respected social research organizations in the United States. Its corporate headquarters are located on the University of Chicago campus...

    , and published in the Washington Monthly, ranked the university 14th in the United States for 2006.

    The Top American Research Universities report from the Center at Arizona State ranked UW eleventh overall and third among public institutions.

    Global Language Monitor, produced at Austin that ranks college based on media presence, placed University of Washington at No.16 in the nation.

    University of Washington ranks No.1 in Peace Corps
    Peace Corps
    The Peace Corps is an American volunteer program run by the United States Government, as well as a government agency of the same name. The mission of the Peace Corps includes three goals: providing technical assistance, helping people outside the United States to understand US culture, and helping...

     volunteers in 2007 and No.3 throughout the years.

    Kiplinger ranked the University of Washington #7 of the top 100 colleges in early 2009 as one of the Best values in Public Colleges.

    In 2012, UW's undergraduate program was ranked 42nd among "national universities" and 10th among public universities by U.S. News and World Report.

    Student life


    The student newspaper is The Daily of the University of Washington
    The Daily of the University of Washington
    The Daily of the University of Washington, usually referred to in Seattle simply as The Daily, is the student newspaper of the University of Washington in Seattle, USA.-History:...

    , usually referred to as simply The Daily. It is the second largest daily in Seattle and is published every day school is in session during Fall, Winter and Spring quarters, and weekly during Summer quarter.

    The Daily earned the 2007, 2008, 2009 and 2010 Apple Award for the best four-year college newspaper (tabloid) in the United States at the CMA Spring Convention in New York City. It has also been recognized with the 2007, 2008 & 2009 Mark of Excellence Award for the Best All-Around Newspaper in Region X by the Society of Professional Journalists (Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Montana and Alaska). It was a finalist for the 2009 Pacemaker Newspaper of the Year, and earned second place for Best of Show at the National College Media Conference held in Austin, Texas.

    The Daily launched a half-hour weekly television magazine show, "The Daily's Double Shot" in 2010. It is shown on UWTV, Channel 27, and is available to two million cable subscribers across the state of Washington.

    The IMA (intramural activities) Center underwent a $41 million remodel and expansion project in 2001 and reopened in fall 2003. The original 40000 ft2 facility constructed in 1968 was upgraded and expanded with a 95000 ft2 addition to its northwest.
    North of the building, the project eliminated three of the nine outdoor tennis courts with the expansion, but included an all-weather FieldTurf
    FieldTurf
    FieldTurf is a brand of artificial turf playing surface. It is manufactured and installed by the FieldTurf Tarkett division of Tarkett Inc., based in Calhoun, Georgia, USA. In the late 1990s, the artificial surface changed the industry with a design intended to replicate real grass...

     surface for an existing intramurals field.

    Athletics


    UW students, sports teams, and alumni are called Washington Huskies
    Washington Huskies
    Washington Huskies is the nickname of the University of Washington's athletic teams. The school is a member of the Pacific-12 Conference. The athletic program is made up of 9 men's sports and 10 women's sports Washington Huskies is the nickname of the University of Washington's athletic teams. The...

    , and often referred to metonymically
    Metonymy
    Metonymy is a figure of speech used in rhetoric in which a thing or concept is not called by its own name, but by the name of something intimately associated with that thing or concept...

     as "Montlake," due to the campus's location on Montlake Boulevard N.E. (It should be noted that the traditional bounds of the Montlake neighborhood
    Montlake, Seattle, Washington
    Montlake is an affluent residential neighborhood in central Seattle. It is bounded to the north by Portage Bay and the Montlake Cut section of the Lake Washington Ship Canal, to the east by the Washington Park Arboretum, and to the south and west by Interlaken Park. Capitol Hill is on its south and...

     do not extend north of the Montlake Cut
    Montlake Cut
    The Montlake Cut is the easternmost section of the Lake Washington Ship Canal, which passes through the city of Seattle, linking Lake Washington to Puget Sound. It is approximately long and wide. The center channel is wide and deep....

     to include the campus.) The husky
    Husky
    Husky is a general name for a type of dog originally used to pull sleds in northern regions, differentiated from other sled dog types by their fast hard pulling style...

     was selected as the school mascot by student committee in 1922. It replaced the "Sun Dodger," an abstract reference to the local weather that was quickly dropped in favor of something more tangible. The costumed "Harry the Husky" performs at sporting and special events, and a live Alaskan Malamute
    Alaskan Malamute
    The Alaskan Malamute is a generally large breed of domestic dog originally bred for use as a utilitarian dog and later an Alaskan sled dog. They are sometimes mistaken for a Siberian Husky, but in fact are quite different in many ways...

    , currently named Dubs, has traditionally led the UW football
    American football
    American football is a sport played between two teams of eleven with the objective of scoring points by advancing the ball into the opposing team's end zone. Known in the United States simply as football, it may also be referred to informally as gridiron football. The ball can be advanced by...

     team onto the field at the start of games. The school colors of purple
    Purple
    Purple is a range of hues of color occurring between red and blue, and is classified as a secondary color as the colors are required to create the shade....

     and gold
    Gold (color)
    Gold, also called golden, is one of a variety of orange-yellow color blends used to give the impression of the color of the element gold....

     were adopted in 1892 by student vote. The choice was purportedly inspired by the first stanza
    Stanza
    In poetry, a stanza is a unit within a larger poem. In modern poetry, the term is often equivalent with strophe; in popular vocal music, a stanza is typically referred to as a "verse"...

     of Lord Byron's The Destruction of Sennacherib
    The Destruction of Sennacherib
    The Destruction of Sennacherib is a poem by Lord Byron first published in 1815 in his Hebrew Melodies. It is based on an event described in the Bible during the campaign by Assyrian king Sennacherib to capture Jerusalem...

    :
    The Assyria
    Assyria
    Assyria was a Semitic Akkadian kingdom, extant as a nation state from the mid–23rd century BC to 608 BC centred on the Upper Tigris river, in northern Mesopotamia , that came to rule regional empires a number of times through history. It was named for its original capital, the ancient city of Assur...

    n came down like the wolf on the fold,
    And his cohorts were gleaming in purple and gold;
    And the sheen of their spears was like stars on the sea,
    When the blue wave rolls nightly on deep Galilee
    Sea of Galilee
    The Sea of Galilee, also Kinneret, Lake of Gennesaret, or Lake Tiberias , is the largest freshwater lake in Israel, and it is approximately in circumference, about long, and wide. The lake has a total area of , and a maximum depth of approximately 43 m...

    .


    The sports teams participate in the National Collegiate Athletic Association
    National Collegiate Athletic Association
    The National Collegiate Athletic Association is a semi-voluntary association of 1,281 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States...

    's Division I-A and in the Pacific-12 Conference. Among its facilities on campus are Husky Stadium
    Husky Stadium
    Husky Stadium is an outdoor athletic stadium on the campus of the University of Washington in Seattle, Washington, United States. It is the home of the Washington Huskies...

     (football and track & field), the Alaska Airlines Arena at Hec Edmundson Pavilion (basketball, volleyball, and gymnastics), Husky Ballpark
    Husky Ballpark
    Husky Ballpark at Chaffey Field is a college baseball stadium on the campus of the University of Washington in Seattle, Washington. It is the home field of the Washington Huskies of the Pac-12 conference....

     (baseball), Husky Softball Stadium, The Bill Quillian Tennis Stadium, The Nordstrom
    Nordstrom
    Nordstrom, Inc. is an upscale department store chain in the United States, founded by John W. Nordstrom and Carl F. Wallin. Initially a shoe retailer, the company today also sells clothing, accessories, handbags, jewelry, cosmetics, fragrances, and in some locations, home furnishings...

     Tennis Center, Dempsey Indoor (Indoor track & field, football) and the Conibear Shellhouse (rowing). The golf
    Golf
    Golf is a precision club and ball sport, in which competing players use many types of clubs to hit balls into a series of holes on a golf course using the fewest number of strokes....

     team plays at the Washington National Golf Club and the swimming
    Swimming (sport)
    Swimming is a sport governed by the Fédération Internationale de Natation .-History: Competitive swimming in Europe began around 1800 BCE, mostly in the form of the freestyle. In 1873 Steve Bowyer introduced the trudgen to Western swimming competitions, after copying the front crawl used by Native...

     team calls the Weyerhaeuser
    Weyerhaeuser
    Weyerhaeuser is one of the largest pulp and paper companies in the world. It is the world's largest private sector owner of softwood timberland; and the second largest owner of United States timberland, behind Plum Creek Timber...

     Aquatic Center and the Husky pool home.

    The University football team
    Washington Huskies football
    College football has a long history at the University of Washington. The Washington Huskies have won 15 Pacific-10 Conference championships, seven Rose Bowl titles, and three national championships. Washington's all-time record of 653-398-50 ranks 20th by all-time winning percentage and 21st by...

     is traditionally competitive, having won a share of the 1991 national title with the University of Miami
    University of Miami
    The University of Miami is a private, non-sectarian university founded in 1925 with its main campus in Coral Gables, Florida, a medical campus in Miami city proper at Civic Center, and an oceanographic research facility on Virginia Key., the university currently enrolls 15,629 students in 12...

    , to go along with eight Rose Bowl victories and an Orange Bowl title. From 1907 to 1917, Washington football teams were unbeaten in 63 consecutive games, an NCAA
    National Collegiate Athletic Association
    The National Collegiate Athletic Association is a semi-voluntary association of 1,281 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States...

     record. Tailgating
    Tailgate party
    In the United States, a tailgate party is a social event held on and around the open tailgate of a vehicle. Tailgating often involves consuming alcoholic beverages and grilling food. Tailgate parties usually occur in the parking lots at stadiums and arenas, before and occasionally after games and...

     by boat has been a Husky Stadium tradition since 1920 when the stadium was first built on the shores of Lake Washington
    Lake Washington
    Lake Washington is a large freshwater lake adjacent to the city of Seattle. It is the largest lake in King County and the second largest in the state of Washington, after Lake Chelan. It is bordered by the cities of Seattle on the west, Bellevue and Kirkland on the east, Renton on the south and...

    . The Apple Cup
    Apple Cup
    The Apple Cup is the trophy awarded to the winner of an American college football rivalry game played annually by the teams of the two largest universities in the U.S. state of Washington: the University of Washington Huskies and the Washington State University Cougars...

     game is an annual game against cross-state rival Washington State University
    Washington State University
    Washington State University is a public research university based in Pullman, Washington, in the Palouse region of the Pacific Northwest. Founded in 1890, WSU is the state's original and largest land-grant university...

     that was first contested in 1900 with UW leading the all-time series, 65 wins to 31 losses and 6 ties. Steve Sarkisian
    Steve Sarkisian
    Steve Sarkisian is an American football coach and former player of American and Canadian football. He is currently the head football coach at the University of Washington, a position he has held since the 2009 season...

     is the current head football coach.
    The men's basketball team has been moderately successful, though recently the team has enjoyed a resurgence under coach Lorenzo Romar
    Lorenzo Romar
    -References:1. http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/FocusOnTheFamilyDailyBroadcast/~3/dnPdyF5PmG0/ffd_20110314.mp3-External links:*...

    . With Romar as head coach, the team has been to six NCAA tournaments
    NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Championship
    The NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Championship is a single-elimination tournament held each spring in the United States, featuring 68 college basketball teams, to determine the national championship in the top tier of college basketball...

     (2003–2004, 2004–2005, 2005–2006, 2008–2009, 2009–2010 and 2010-2011 seasons), 2 consecutive top 16 (sweet sixteen) appearances, and secured a #1 seed in 2005. On December 23, 2005, the men's basketball team won their 800th victory in Hec Edmundson Pavilion, the most wins for any NCAA team in its current arena.

    Rowing
    College rowing (United States)
    Rowing is one of the oldest intercollegiate sports in the United States. However, rowers comprise only 2.2% of total college athletes. This may be in part because of the status of rowing as an amateur sport and because not all universities have access to suitable bodies of water. In the 2002-03...

     is a longstanding tradition at the University of Washington dating back to 1901. The Washington men's crew gained international prominence by winning the gold medal
    Gold medal
    A gold medal is typically the medal awarded for highest achievement in a non-military field. Its name derives from the use of at least a fraction of gold in form of plating or alloying in its manufacture...

     at the 1936 Summer Olympics
    1936 Summer Olympics
    The 1936 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XI Olympiad, was an international multi-sport event which was held in 1936 in Berlin, Germany. Berlin won the bid to host the Games over Barcelona, Spain on April 26, 1931, at the 29th IOC Session in Barcelona...

     in Berlin
    Berlin
    Berlin is the capital city of Germany and is one of the 16 states of Germany. With a population of 3.45 million people, Berlin is Germany's largest city. It is the second most populous city proper and the seventh most populous urban area in the European Union...

    , defeating the German
    Germany
    Germany , officially the Federal Republic of Germany , is a federal parliamentary republic in Europe. The country consists of 16 states while the capital and largest city is Berlin. Germany covers an area of 357,021 km2 and has a largely temperate seasonal climate...

     and Italian
    Italy
    Italy , officially the Italian Republic languages]] under the European Charter for Regional or Minority Languages. In each of these, Italy's official name is as follows:;;;;;;;;), is a unitary parliamentary republic in South-Central Europe. To the north it borders France, Switzerland, Austria and...

     crews much to the chagrin of Adolf Hitler
    Adolf Hitler
    Adolf Hitler was an Austrian-born German politician and the leader of the National Socialist German Workers Party , commonly referred to as the Nazi Party). He was Chancellor of Germany from 1933 to 1945, and head of state from 1934 to 1945...

     who was in attendance. In 1958, the men's crew furthered their lore with a shocking win over Leningrad
    Saint Petersburg
    Saint Petersburg is a city and a federal subject of Russia located on the Neva River at the head of the Gulf of Finland on the Baltic Sea...

     Trud
    Trud
    Trud, translated from Bulgarian, Russian and other Slavic languages as "Labour", may refer to:*Trud, one of Russia's largest-circulation newspapers*Dneven Trud, commonly known as Trud; one of Bulgaria's largest-circulation newspapers...

    's world champion rowers in Moscow
    Moscow
    Moscow is the capital, the most populous city, and the most populous federal subject of Russia. The city is a major political, economic, cultural, scientific, religious, financial, educational, and transportation centre of Russia and the continent...

    , resulting in the first American
    United States
    The United States of America is a federal constitutional republic comprising fifty states and a federal district...

     sporting victory on Soviet soil, and certainly the first time a Russia
    Russia
    Russia or , officially known as both Russia and the Russian Federation , is a country in northern Eurasia. It is a federal semi-presidential republic, comprising 83 federal subjects...

    n crowd gave any American team a standing ovation during the Cold War
    Cold War
    The Cold War was the continuing state from roughly 1946 to 1991 of political conflict, military tension, proxy wars, and economic competition between the Communist World—primarily the Soviet Union and its satellite states and allies—and the powers of the Western world, primarily the United States...

    . The men's crew have won 15 national titles (14 Intercollegiate Rowing Association
    Intercollegiate Rowing Association
    The Intercollegiate Rowing Association runs the IRA Championship Regatta, which is considered to be the United States collegiate national championship of rowing. Since 1995, it has been held on the Cooper River in Pennsauken, New Jersey, and includes both men's and women's events for sweep boats...

    , 1 National Collegiate Rowing Championship
    National Collegiate Rowing Championship
    The now defunct National Collegiate Rowing Championship was a quasi-official national championship for men's collegiate rowing, held in Cincinnati, Ohio, between 1983 and 1996. It pitted the winners of the Eastern Sprints, the Pac-10s, the Intercollegiate Rowing Association, and the Harvard-Yale...

    ), 15 Olympic gold medals, two silver and five bronze. The women have 10 national titles and two Olympic gold medals. The Husky men are the 2011 national champions.

    Recent national champions include the softball
    Washington Huskies softball
    The Washington Huskies softball team is a NCAA Division I college softball team and part of the Pac-10 Conference. They play their home games at Husky Softball Stadium in Seattle, Washington. They won the national championship in 2009.-History:...

     team (2009
    2009 Women's College World Series
    The 2009 Women's College World Series was held May 28 through June 3, 2009 in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Eight NCAA Division I college softball teams met after having advanced through a 64-team bracket to play in the World Series at ASA Hall of Fame Stadium. The official host for the event is the...

    ), the men's rowing team (2011, 2009, 2007), NCAA Division I women's cross country
    Cross country running
    Cross country running is a sport in which people run a race on open-air courses over natural terrain. The course, typically long, may include surfaces of grass and earth, pass through woodlands and open country, and include hills, flat ground and sometimes gravel road...

     team (2008), and the women's volleyball
    Volleyball
    Volleyball is a team sport in which two teams of six players are separated by a net. Each team tries to score points by grounding a ball on the other team's court under organized rules.The complete rules are extensive...

     team (2005
    2005 NCAA Division I Women's Volleyball Tournament
    The 2005 NCAA Division I Women's Volleyball Tournament began on December 1, 2005 with 64 teams and concluded on December 17, 2005, when Washington defeated Nebraska 3 games to 0 in San Antonio, Texas for the program's first NCAA title....

    ). Individually, Scott Roth was the 2011 NCAA men's Outdoor Pole Vault
    Pole vault
    Pole vaulting is a track and field event in which a person uses a long, flexible pole as an aid to leap over a bar. Pole jumping competitions were known to the ancient Greeks, as well as the Cretans and Celts...

     and 2011 & 2010 NCAA men's Indoor Pole Vault champion. James Lepp
    James Lepp
    James Lepp is a Canadian professional golfer.Lepp was born in Abbotsford, British Columbia. He began his collegiate golf career at the University of Illinois. In 2005, he won the NCAA Division I Championship while playing for the University of Washington, the first Canadian male to do so...

     was the 2005 NCAA men's golf
    Golf
    Golf is a precision club and ball sport, in which competing players use many types of clubs to hit balls into a series of holes on a golf course using the fewest number of strokes....

     champion. Ryan Brown (men's 800 meters) and Amy Lia (women's 1500 meters) won individual titles at the 2006 NCAA Track & Field
    Track and field
    Track and field is a sport comprising various competitive athletic contests based around the activities of running, jumping and throwing. The name of the sport derives from the venue for the competitions: a stadium which features an oval running track surrounding a grassy area...

     Championships. Brad Walker was the 2005 NCAA men's Outdoor and Indoor Pole Vault champion.

    Husky Stadium is one of several places that may have been the birthplace of the crowd phenomenon known as "The Wave
    Audience wave
    The wave or the Mexican wave is an example of metachronal rhythm achieved in a packed stadium when successive groups of spectators briefly stand and raise their arms...

    ". It is claimed that the wave was invented in October 1981 by Husky graduate Robb Weller and UW band director Bill Bissel. Their opponent that night was Stanford.

    On May 1, 2009, the athletic department announced it was discontinuing both men's and women's swimming programs effective immediately due to budget cuts.

    Husky Stadium




    The new Husky Stadium is the first and primary income source of a completely remodeled athletic district. This major remodel of the athletic village will take decades to complete, as it will take place at the same time as a massive project by the Washington State Department of Transportation on nearby highways and bridges. The stadium project consists of a new grand concourse, underground light-rail station, enclosed west end of the stadium, replacement of bleachers with individual seating, removal of track and Huskytron, new press box, private box seating, lowering of the field, football offices, permanent seating in the east end zone that does not block the view of Lake Washington, and new and improved amenities, concession stands and bathrooms throughout. In addition, the concession areas will be constructed to face inward, allowing spectators to view the game through the main concourse which will circle around the field. Along with the Husky Stadium remodel, new parking garages will be constructed and renovated facilities throughout the athletic village.

    The stadium has developed numerous structural problems, particularly in the lower bowl, caused by age and the continually moist weather. Renovation plans are slated to begin in November of 2011. The project was approved by University of Washington regents in November of 2010 at a cost of $250 million.

    Several drawings by Populous (formerly HOK Sport) have been released depicting what the future Husky Stadium might look like.

    Services for students


    Student Services
    The UW offers many services for its students and alumni, even beyond the standard offered by most colleges and universities. Its "Student Life" division houses 16 departments and offices that serve students directly and indirectly, including those below and overseen by Vice President and Vice Provost, Eric Godfrey.
    • The UW Career Center
    • Counseling Center
    • Disability Resource Center
    • Fraternity & Sorority Life
    • Health & Wellness Programs
    • Housing & Food Services
    • Student Admissions
    • Office of Ceremonies
    • Office of the University Registrar
    • Department of Recreational Sports (IMA)
    • Student Activities & Union Facilities
    • Student Financial Aid
    • Student Publications (The Daily)
    • Campus Police

    Student housing


    New building construction and renovations are scheduled to take place through 2020. The plan includes the construction of three six-story residence halls and two apartment complexes in the west section of campus, near the existing Terry and Lander Halls
    Terry and Lander Halls
    Terry and Lander Halls are two connected residential towers on the south campus of the University of Washington. The set of buildings was named for Charles and Mary Terry and Judge Edward Lander who contributed part of the land for the original Territorial University's Seattle campus in...

    , in Phase I, the renovation of six existing residence halls in Phase II, and additional new construction in Phase III. The projects will result in a net gain of approximately 2,400 beds.

    In addition to on-campus housing the undergraduate student government, Associated Students of the University Washington, provides a free service to students, faculty, and staff looking to live off-campus called Off-Campus Housing Affairs. They provide a free online search engine to local housing and resources to assist first time renters.

    Student organizations


    Many of the sustainable changes at the University of Washington have resulted from campus activism. Several environmental-activism groups on campus include:
    • Students Expressing Environmental Dedication (SEED): SEED works with Housing and Food Services to increase the sustainability of the residence halls and dining areas.
    • UW Earth Club: The Earth Club is interested in promoting the expression of environmental attitudes and consciousness through specialized events.
    • UW Farm: The UW farm grows crops on campus and advocates urban farming in the UW community.
    • Washington Public Interest Research Group (WashPIRG): WashPIRG engages students in a variety of activism causes, including environmental projects on campus and the community.
    • UW Sierra Student Coalition: SSC is dedicated to many larger environmental issues on campus and providing related opportunities to students.
    • UW Delta Delta Sigma Pre-Dental Society (DDS): This is a club dedicated to serving pre-dental students and it provides a forum for discussion of dental related topics.

    Song


    The University of Washington Husky Marching Band
    Marching band
    Marching band is a physical activity in which a group of instrumental musicians generally perform outdoors and incorporate some type of marching with their musical performance. Instrumentation typically includes brass, woodwinds, and percussion instruments...

     performs at many Husky sporting events including all football
    American football
    American football is a sport played between two teams of eleven with the objective of scoring points by advancing the ball into the opposing team's end zone. Known in the United States simply as football, it may also be referred to informally as gridiron football. The ball can be advanced by...

     games. The band was founded in 1929, and today it is a cornerstone of Husky spirit. The band marches using a traditional high step, and it is one of only a few marching bands left in the United States to do so. Like many college bands, the Husky band has several traditional songs that it has played for decades, including the official fight song
    Fight song
    A fight song is primarily an American and Canadian sports term, referring to a song associated with a team. In both professional and amateur sports, fight songs are a popular way for fans to cheer for their team...

     "Bow Down to Washington
    Bow Down to Washington
    Bow Down to Washington is the official fight song of the University of Washington. It was written by Lester Wilson in 1915 for a competition requesting a new song for the university; the competition, sponsored by The Daily, had a grand prize of US$25...

    " and "Tequila
    Tequila (song)
    "Tequila" is a 1958 Latin-flavored rock and roll song recorded by the group, the Champs. The title of the song constitutes the entirety of the lyrics, and is spoken a total of three times during the course of the song. "Tequila" became a #1 hit on both the pop and R&B charts at the time of its...

    ", as well as fan-favorite "Africano". In addition to athletic events, the band also plays at various other events such as commencement
    Graduation
    Graduation is the action of receiving or conferring an academic degree or the ceremony that is sometimes associated, where students become Graduates. Before the graduation, candidates are referred to as Graduands. The date of graduation is often called degree day. The graduation itself is also...

     and convocation
    Convocation
    A Convocation is a group of people formally assembled for a special purpose.- University use :....

    .

    Mascot


    The University of Washington's mascot is Harry the Husky
    Harry the Husky
    Harry the Husky is a body-suit mascot for the University of Washington, one of two mascots the University's athletic program currently uses.-History:...

    . The University of Washington has hosted a long line of Alaskan Malamute
    Alaskan Malamute
    The Alaskan Malamute is a generally large breed of domestic dog originally bred for use as a utilitarian dog and later an Alaskan sled dog. They are sometimes mistaken for a Siberian Husky, but in fact are quite different in many ways...

    s as mascots. The 13 dogs thus far have been:
    • Frosty I (1922–29)
    • Frosty II (1930–36)
    • Wasky (1946)
    • Wasky II (1947–53)
    • Ski (1954–57)
    • Denali (1958)
    • King Chinook (1959–68)
    • Regent Denali (1969–80)
    • Sundodger (1981–91)
    • King Redoubt (1992–97)
    • Prince Redoubt (1998)
    • Spirit (1999–2008)
    • Dubs (2009–)


    Originally the dogs were cared for by the Sigma Alpha Epsilon
    Sigma Alpha Epsilon
    Sigma Alpha Epsilon is a North American Greek-letter social college fraternity founded at the University of Alabama on March 9, 1856. Of all existing national social fraternities today, Sigma Alpha Epsilon is the only one founded in the Antebellum South...

     fraternity, followed by a 49 year tradition (1959–2008) of care by the Cross family (a UW professor followed by his son).

    Sustainability


    Then UW President Emmert signed the American College & University Presidents Climate Commitment. To help follow through on this promise, the UW has created a Climate Action Team. He has also created an Environmental Stewardship Advisory Committee (ESAC), which recently created an inventory of UW's greenhouse gas emissions, an environmental stewardship coordinator position, and has formalized a policy on environmental stewardship to give full institutional support to the cause of campus sustainability.

    As of February 2006, the UW joined a partnership with Seattle City Light as part of their Green Up Program. All of Seattle campus' electricity is purchased from renewable sources. Housing and Food Services (HFS) spends several million dollars annually on locally produced, organic, and natural foods. HFS does not use styrofoam containers for any of its facilities on campus, instead using compostable cups, plates, utensils, and packaging whenever possible. Students Expressing Environmental Concern (SEED) is funded by HFS and is responsible for most of the sustainable changes made to HFS. Several new residence halls are planned for 2020, all of which are expected to meet silver or gold LEED standards. All new state-funded buildings and major renovations must meet a LEED
    Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design
    Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design consists of a suite of rating systems for the design, construction and operation of high performance green buildings, homes and neighborhoods....

     standard of at least Silver. The University of Washington was one of only six universities to receive the highest grade on the Sustainable Endowments Institute's College Sustainability Report Card 2008, an "A-".
    The report card identified the UW as one of 15 Overall College Sustainability Leaders among the 300 institutions surveyed.

    In film


    • 1979: The Changeling
      The Changeling (film)
      The Changeling is a 1980 horror film directed by Peter Medak and starring George C. Scott and Trish Van Devere . The story is based upon events that writer Russell Hunter said he experienced while he was living in the Henry Treat Rogers Mansion of Denver, Colorado.-Plot:Scott stars as Dr...

      , directed by Peter Medak
      Peter Medak
      Peter Medak is a Hungarian-born film director of British and American films.-Early life:He was born in Budapest, Hungary to a Jewish family, but in 1956 fled his native country for England due to the Hungarian Revolution...

    • 1983: WarGames
      WarGames
      WarGames is a 1983 American Cold War suspense/science-fiction film written by Lawrence Lasker and Walter F. Parkes and directed by John Badham. The film stars Matthew Broderick and Ally Sheedy....

      , directed by John Badham
      John Badham
      - External links :...

    • 1992: Singles
      Singles
      Singles may refer to:In society:* Single persons and associated businesses and discussionsIn retail commerce:* United States one-dollar bills, particularly when requesting change from, or implicitly comparing to, larger denomination bills...

      , directed by Cameron Crowe
      Cameron Crowe
      Cameron Bruce Crowe is an American screenwriter and film director. Before moving into the film industry, Crowe was a contributing editor at Rolling Stone magazine, for which he still frequently writes....

    • 1997: Prefontaine, directed by Steve James
      Steve James (producer)
      Steve James is an American film producer and director of several documentaries, including the award-winning Hoop Dreams and Stevie. He is also the director of the 1997 feature film Prefontaine...

    • 1997: The Sixth Man
      The Sixth Man
      The 6th Man is a supernatural sports comedy starring Marlon Wayans and Kadeem Hardison. The film was directed by Randall Miller. The film features real NCAA schools, although the rosters are fictitious...

      , directed by Randall Miller
      Randall Miller
      Randall Miller is an American film director. He has directed numerous films from 1992 to 2008. His 2008 film Bottle Shock was self-distributed...

    • 1999: 10 Things I Hate About You
      10 Things I Hate about You
      10 Things I Hate About You is a 1999 American teen romantic comedy film. It is directed by Gil Junger and stars Heath Ledger, Julia Stiles, Joseph Gordon-Levitt, Larisa Oleynik, David Krumholtz, and Larry Miller...

      , directed by Gil Junger
      Gil Junger
      Gil Junger is an American director for Touchstone Pictures, most famous for 10 Things I Hate About You, his directorial film debut...

    • 2007: Dan in Real Life
      Dan in Real Life
      Dan in Real Life is a 2007 American comedy-drama film directed by Peter Hedges, starring Steve Carell and Juliette Binoche.-Plot:Dan Burns is a newspaper advice columnist, a widower, and a controlling father to his children Jane, Cara and Lilly in the New Jersey suburbs. His column is in...

      , directed by Peter Hedges
      Peter Hedges
      Peter Hedges is an American novelist, screenwriter, and film director.Hedges grew up in West Des Moines, Iowa, and attended Valley High School, where he was involved in the theater department, including the improv group and the mime troupe, "The Bakers Dozen". He later went to the North Carolina...

    • 2011: 21 and over, directed by Jon Lucas
      Jon Lucas
      Jon Lucas is an American screenwriter. He is a graduate of Yale University as well as an alumnus of Pingry School. He wrote several 2009 films, including The Hangover and Ghosts of Girlfriends Past.-Film Credits:*2005: Rustin...


    See also


    • Friday Harbor Laboratories
      Friday Harbor Laboratories
      Friday Harbor Laboratories , is a marine biology field station of the University of Washington, located in Friday Harbor, San Juan Island, Washington, USA. FHL was founded in 1904 by University of Washington Zoology Professor Trevor Kincaid...

    • Internationales Kulturinstitut
      Internationales Kulturinstitut
      The Internationales Kulturinstitut is an educational institution based in Vienna, Austria. A non-profit organisation, it specialises in teaching German as a foreign language and is one of Vienna's most renowned language schools. Each month, between 250 and 350 students from throughout the world...

    • List of forestry universities and colleges
    • Manastash Ridge Observatory
      Manastash Ridge Observatory
      The Manastash Ridge Observatory is an astronomical observatory built in 1972 by the University of Washington. The observatory is approximately and includes a 30" Boller and Chivens cassegrain telescope. The observatory is mostly used by undergraduate students for basic observational skills...

    • Theodore Jacobsen Observatory
      Theodore Jacobsen Observatory
      The Theodor Jacobsen Observatory is the on-campus observatory of the University of Washington. Built in 1895, it is the second oldest building on campus and was constructed using the remaining Tenino sandstone blocks from Denny Hall, the oldest and first building on campus...

    • University of Washington Educational Outreach
      University of Washington Educational Outreach
      | class="wikitable" border="2"The University of Washington Educational Outreach is the continuing education and professional development unit of the University of Washington , in Seattle, Washington....

    • University of Washington firebombing incident
      University of Washington firebombing incident
      The University of Washington firebombing incident was an arson which took place in the early morning hours of May 21, 2001 when a firebomb was set off at Merill Hall, a part of the University of Washington's Center for Urban Horticulture, causing an estimated $1.5 to $4.1 million in damages...


    External links