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Fordham University

Fordham University

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Fordham University is a private
Private university
Private universities are universities not operated by governments, although many receive public subsidies, especially in the form of tax breaks and public student loans and grants. Depending on their location, private universities may be subject to government regulation. Private universities are...

, nonprofit, coeducational research university in the United States, with three campuses in and around New York City. It was founded by the Roman Catholic Diocese of New York
Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New York
The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New York covers New York, Bronx, and Richmond counties in New York City , as well as Dutchess, Orange, Putnam, Rockland, Sullivan, Ulster, and Westchester counties in New York state. There are 480 parishes...

 in 1841 as St. John's College, placed in the care of the Society of Jesus
Society of Jesus
The Society of Jesus is a Catholic male religious order that follows the teachings of the Catholic Church. The members are called Jesuits, and are also known colloquially as "God's Army" and as "The Company," these being references to founder Ignatius of Loyola's military background and a...

 shortly thereafter, and has since become an independent institution
Independent school
An independent school is a school that is independent in its finances and governance; it is not dependent upon national or local government for financing its operations, nor reliant on taxpayer contributions, and is instead funded by a combination of tuition charges, gifts, and in some cases the...

 under a lay
Laity
In religious organizations, the laity comprises all people who are not in the clergy. A person who is a member of a religious order who is not ordained legitimate clergy is considered as a member of the laity, even though they are members of a religious order .In the past in Christian cultures, the...

 Board of Trustee
Trustee
Trustee is a legal term which, in its broadest sense, can refer to any person who holds property, authority, or a position of trust or responsibility for the benefit of another...

s, which describes the University as "in the Jesuit
Society of Jesus
The Society of Jesus is a Catholic male religious order that follows the teachings of the Catholic Church. The members are called Jesuits, and are also known colloquially as "God's Army" and as "The Company," these being references to founder Ignatius of Loyola's military background and a...

 tradition."

Enrollment at Fordham includes approximately 8,000 undergraduate
Undergraduate education
Undergraduate education is an education level taken prior to gaining a first degree . Hence, in many subjects in many educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a bachelor's degree, such as in the United States, where a university entry level is...

 and 7,000 graduate students
Graduate school
A graduate school is a school that awards advanced academic degrees with the general requirement that students must have earned a previous undergraduate degree...

 spread over three campuses in New York State
New York
New York is a state in the Northeastern region of the United States. It is the nation's third most populous state. New York is bordered by New Jersey and Pennsylvania to the south, and by Connecticut, Massachusetts and Vermont to the east...

: Rose Hill in the Bronx
The Bronx
The Bronx is the northernmost of the five boroughs of New York City. It is also known as Bronx County, the last of the 62 counties of New York State to be incorporated...

, Lincoln Center in Manhattan
Manhattan
Manhattan is the oldest and the most densely populated of the five boroughs of New York City. Located primarily on the island of Manhattan at the mouth of the Hudson River, the boundaries of the borough are identical to those of New York County, an original county of the state of New York...

, and Westchester in West Harrison
Harrison, New York
Harrison is a village and town in Westchester County, New York, United States, located approximately northeast of Manhattan. The population was 27,472 at the 2010 census.-Establishment:...

. In addition, the University operates two centers abroad, one in the People's Republic of China
People's Republic of China
China , officially the People's Republic of China , is the most populous country in the world, with over 1.3 billion citizens. Located in East Asia, the country covers approximately 9.6 million square kilometres...

 and one in the United Kingdom. Fordham awards bachelor's
Bachelor's degree
A bachelor's degree is usually an academic degree awarded for an undergraduate course or major that generally lasts for three or four years, but can range anywhere from two to six years depending on the region of the world...

 (BA
Bachelor of Arts
A Bachelor of Arts , from the Latin artium baccalaureus, is a bachelor's degree awarded for an undergraduate course or program in either the liberal arts, the sciences, or both...

, BFA
Bachelor of Fine Arts
In the United States and Canada, the Bachelor of Fine Arts degree, usually abbreviated BFA, is the standard undergraduate degree for students seeking a professional education in the visual or performing arts. In some countries such a degree is called a Bachelor of Creative Arts or BCA...

, and BS
Bachelor of Science
A Bachelor of Science is an undergraduate academic degree awarded for completed courses that generally last three to five years .-Australia:In Australia, the BSc is a 3 year degree, offered from 1st year on...

), master's
Master's degree
A master's is an academic degree granted to individuals who have undergone study demonstrating a mastery or high-order overview of a specific field of study or area of professional practice...

, and doctoral degree
Doctorate
A doctorate is an academic degree or professional degree that in most countries refers to a class of degrees which qualify the holder to teach in a specific field, A doctorate is an academic degree or professional degree that in most countries refers to a class of degrees which qualify the holder...

s.

Ranked among the top 60 national universities by US News & World Report, Fordham is composed of four undergraduate schools and six graduate schools, including the Graduate School of Social Service
Fordham Graduate School of Social Service
The Fordham Graduate School of Social Service is a United States graduate school within Fordham University, in New York. Established in 1916, it provides instruction at three campuses in the New York City area. The school was ranked 18th in the nation by US News & World Report in 2009...

, the Graduate School of Education, the Graduate School of Business
Fordham Graduate School of Business
The Fordham Graduate School of Business Administration is a business school within Fordham University in the United States. It is a graduate school focused on business administration, and should not be confused with the University's undergraduate Gabelli School of Business...

, and the School of Law
Fordham University School of Law
Fordham University School of Law is a part of Fordham University in the United States. The School is located in the Borough of Manhattan in New York City, and is one of eight ABA-approved law schools in that city.-Overview:According to the U.S. News & World Report, 1,516 J.D. students attend...

. It also offers a five-year BA/BS engineering program in cooperation with Columbia University
Columbia University
Columbia University in the City of New York is a private, Ivy League university in Manhattan, New York City. Columbia is the oldest institution of higher learning in the state of New York, the fifth oldest in the United States, and one of the country's nine Colonial Colleges founded before the...

 and Case Western Reserve University
Case Western Reserve University
Case Western Reserve University is a private research university located in Cleveland, Ohio, USA...

 and a BFA program in dance in partnership with the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater
Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater
The Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater is a modern dance company based in New York, New York. It was founded in 1958 by choreographer and dancer Alvin Ailey...

.

Fordham Preparatory School
Fordham Preparatory School
Fordham Preparatory School is a private Jesuit all-boys high school located in the Bronx, New York City, with an enrollment of approximately 950 students. It is located on the Rose Hill campus of Fordham University....

, a four-year, all-male
Single-sex education
Single-sex education, also known as single-gender education, is the practice of conducting education where male and female students attend separate classes or in separate buildings or schools. The practice was predominant before the mid-twentieth century, particularly in secondary education and...

 college preparatory school
University-preparatory school
A university-preparatory school or college-preparatory school is a secondary school, usually private, designed to prepare students for a college or university education...

, was once integrated with the University and shares its founding. It became legally independent in 1972 and moved to its own facilities on the northwest corner of the Rose Hill campus; however, it remains connected to the University in many ways.

1841–1900



Fordham University was originally founded as St. John's College in 1841 by the Irish
Ireland
Ireland is an island to the northwest of continental Europe. It is the third-largest island in Europe and the twentieth-largest island on Earth...

-born coadjutor bishop
Coadjutor bishop
A coadjutor bishop is a bishop in the Roman Catholic or Anglican churches who is designated to assist the diocesan bishop in the administration of the diocese, almost as co-bishop of the diocese...

 (later archbishop
Archbishop
An archbishop is a bishop of higher rank, but not of higher sacramental order above that of the three orders of deacon, priest , and bishop...

) of the Diocese of New York, the Most Reverend John Joseph Hughes
John Hughes (archbishop)
John Joseph Hughes , was an Irish-born clergyman of the Roman Catholic Church. He was the fourth Bishop and first Archbishop of the Archdiocese of New York, serving between 1842 and his death in 1864....

. The college was the first Catholic institution of higher education
Higher education
Higher, post-secondary, tertiary, or third level education refers to the stage of learning that occurs at universities, academies, colleges, seminaries, and institutes of technology...

 in the northeastern United States
Northeastern United States
The Northeastern United States is a region of the United States as defined by the United States Census Bureau.-Composition:The region comprises nine states: the New England states of Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island and Vermont; and the Mid-Atlantic states of New...

. Bishop
Bishop
A bishop is an ordained or consecrated member of the Christian clergy who is generally entrusted with a position of authority and oversight. Within the Catholic Church, Eastern Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox Churches, in the Assyrian Church of the East, in the Independent Catholic Churches, and in the...

 Hughes purchased most of Rose Hill Manor and Estate in Fordham
Fordham, Bronx
Fordham is a neighborhood of New York City, United States, located in the West Bronx. The neighborhood is part of Bronx Community Board 5. It is bordered by Fordham Road to the north, Webster Avenue to the east, East 183rd Street to the south, and Jerome Avenue to the west...

, the Bronx, at a little less than $30,000 for the purpose of establishing St. Joseph's Seminary
St. Joseph's Seminary, Dunwoodie
St. Joseph's Seminary and College, sometimes referred to as Dunwoodie, after the Yonkers, New York neighborhood it is located in, is the major seminary of the Archdiocese of New York. Its primary mission is to form men for the priesthood in the Catholic Church...

 in September 1840. "Rose Hill" was the name originally given to the site in 1787 by its owner, Robert Watts
Robert Watts
Robert Watts is a British film producer who is best known for his involvement with the Star Wars and Indiana Jones film series. His half brother is Jeremy Bulloch, who played Boba Fett in the original Star Wars trilogy.-Chichester University Visit:...

, a wealthy New York merchant, in honor of his family's ancestral home in Scotland
Scotland
Scotland is a country that is part of the United Kingdom. Occupying the northern third of the island of Great Britain, it shares a border with England to the south and is bounded by the North Sea to the east, the Atlantic Ocean to the north and west, and the North Channel and Irish Sea to the...

. The seminary was paired with St. John's College, which opened at Rose Hill with a student body of six on June 21, 1841. The Reverend John McCloskey (later Archbishop of New York and eventually the first American Cardinal
Cardinal (Catholicism)
A cardinal is a senior ecclesiastical official, usually an ordained bishop, and ecclesiastical prince of the Catholic Church. They are collectively known as the College of Cardinals, which as a body elects a new pope. The duties of the cardinals include attending the meetings of the College and...

) was its first president, and the faculty were secular priests
Secular clergy
The term secular clergy refers to deacons and priests who are not monastics or members of a religious order.-Catholic Church:In the Catholic Church, the secular clergy are ministers, such as deacons and priests, who do not belong to a religious order...

 and lay
Laity
In religious organizations, the laity comprises all people who are not in the clergy. A person who is a member of a religious order who is not ordained legitimate clergy is considered as a member of the laity, even though they are members of a religious order .In the past in Christian cultures, the...

 instructors. The college went through a succession of four diocesan priests in five years as presidents, including Fr. James Roosevelt Bayley
James Roosevelt Bayley
James Roosevelt Bayley was an American prelate of the Catholic Church. He served as the first Bishop of Newark and the eighth Archbishop of Baltimore .-Early life and education:...

, a distant cousin of Theodore
Theodore Roosevelt
Theodore "Teddy" Roosevelt was the 26th President of the United States . He is noted for his exuberant personality, range of interests and achievements, and his leadership of the Progressive Movement, as well as his "cowboy" persona and robust masculinity...

 and Franklin Roosevelt and nephew of St. Elizabeth Seton. In 1845, the seminary church, Our Lady of Mercy, was built. The same year, Bishop Hughes convinced Jesuits from St. Mary's College in Maryland
Maryland
Maryland is a U.S. state located in the Mid Atlantic region of the United States, bordering Virginia, West Virginia, and the District of Columbia to its south and west; Pennsylvania to its north; and Delaware to its east...

 and St. Mary's College
St. Mary's College (Kentucky)
St. Mary's College was an institution established in 1821 by William Byrne.St. Mary's was still a functioning college in 1899.St. Mary's College closed in 1976.-Notable alumni:*Clement S. Hill, U.S. Congressman from Kentucky...

 in Kentucky
Kentucky
The Commonwealth of Kentucky is a state located in the East Central United States of America. As classified by the United States Census Bureau, Kentucky is a Southern state, more specifically in the East South Central region. Kentucky is one of four U.S. states constituted as a commonwealth...

 to staff the new school.

In 1846, St. John's College received its charter
Charter
A charter is the grant of authority or rights, stating that the granter formally recognizes the prerogative of the recipient to exercise the rights specified...

 from the New York state legislature
New York Legislature
The New York State Legislature is the term often used to refer to the two houses that act as the state legislature of the U.S. state of New York. The New York Constitution does not designate an official term for the two houses together...

, and about three months later, the first Jesuits began to arrive. Bishop Hughes deeded the college over but retained title to the seminary property of about nine acres. In 1847, Fordham's first school in Manhattan
Manhattan
Manhattan is the oldest and the most densely populated of the five boroughs of New York City. Located primarily on the island of Manhattan at the mouth of the Hudson River, the boundaries of the borough are identical to those of New York County, an original county of the state of New York...

 opened. The school became the independently chartered College of St. Francis Xavier in 1861. It was also in 1847 that the American poet Edgar Allan Poe
Edgar Allan Poe
Edgar Allan Poe was an American author, poet, editor and literary critic, considered part of the American Romantic Movement. Best known for his tales of mystery and the macabre, Poe was one of the earliest American practitioners of the short story and is considered the inventor of the detective...

 arrived in the village of Fordham and began a friendship with the Jesuits that would last throughout his lifetime. In 1849, he published "The Bells
The Bells
"The Bells" is a heavily onomatopoeic poem by Edgar Allan Poe which was not published until after his death in 1849. It is perhaps best known for the diacopic repetition of the word "bells." The poem has four parts to it; each part becomes darker and darker as the poem progresses from "the jingling...

," to which some traditions credit the college's church bells as the inspiration.

The college's early curriculum consisted of a junior division (i.e. the prep school
University-preparatory school
A university-preparatory school or college-preparatory school is a secondary school, usually private, designed to prepare students for a college or university education...

), requiring four years of study in Latin, Greek, grammar, literature, history, geography, mathematics, and religion, and a senior division (i.e. the college), requiring three years study in "poetry" (humanities
Humanities
The humanities are academic disciplines that study the human condition, using methods that are primarily analytical, critical, or speculative, as distinguished from the mainly empirical approaches of the natural sciences....

), rhetoric, and philosophy. Colonel Robert Gould Shaw
Robert Gould Shaw
Robert Gould Shaw was an American officer in the Union Army during the American Civil War. As colonel, he commanded the all-black 54th Regiment, which entered the war in 1863. He was killed in the Second Battle of Fort Wagner, near Charleston, South Carolina...

, famed commander of the all-Black 54th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry
54th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry
The 54th Regiment Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment that saw extensive service in the Union Army during the American Civil War. The regiment was one of the first official black units in the United States during the Civil War...

 American Civil War regiment, attended the junior division. An Artium Baccalaureus degree was earned for completion of both curricula, and an additional year of philosophy would earn a Magister Artium
Master of Arts (postgraduate)
A Master of Arts from the Latin Magister Artium, is a type of Master's degree awarded by universities in many countries. The M.A. is usually contrasted with the M.S. or M.Sc. degrees...

degree. There was also a "commercial" track similar to a modern college of business
Business
A business is an organization engaged in the trade of goods, services, or both to consumers. Businesses are predominant in capitalist economies, where most of them are privately owned and administered to earn profit to increase the wealth of their owners. Businesses may also be not-for-profit...

, which was an alternative to the Classical
Classical education movement
The Classical education movement advocates a form of education based in the traditions of Western culture, with a particular focus on education as understood and taught in the Middle Ages. The curricula and pedagogy of classical education was first developed during the Middle Ages by Martianus...

, Latin-based curriculum and resulted in a certificate instead of a degree. In 1855, the first student stage production, Henry IV
Henry IV, Part 1
Henry IV, Part 1 is a history play by William Shakespeare, believed to have been written no later than 1597. It is the second play in Shakespeare's tetralogy dealing with the successive reigns of Richard II, Henry IV , and Henry V...

, was presented. The seminary was closed in 1859, and the property was sold to the Jesuits in 1860 for $40,000.

A Congressional act
Act of Congress
An Act of Congress is a statute enacted by government with a legislature named "Congress," such as the United States Congress or the Congress of the Philippines....

 creating instruction in military science and tactics at the college level resulted in St. John's College bringing a cadet corps
Corps
A corps is either a large formation, or an administrative grouping of troops within an armed force with a common function such as Artillery or Signals representing an arm of service...

 to the campus. From 1885-1890, a veteran of the 7th U.S. Cavalry, Lt. Herbert C. Squires, built a cadet battalion to a strength of 200, which would provide the foundation for the modern ROTC unit at Fordham. The college built a science building in 1886, lending more legitimacy to science in the curriculum. In addition, a three-year Bachelor of Science degree was created. In 1897, academic regalia for students at Commencement
Graduation
Graduation is the action of receiving or conferring an academic degree or the ceremony that is sometimes associated, where students become Graduates. Before the graduation, candidates are referred to as Graduands. The date of graduation is often called degree day. The graduation itself is also...

 was first adopted. The process of consolidating the Westchester towns that eventually comprised the borough of the Bronx began in 1874, bringing St. John's College within the official limits of New York City.

1901–1950



With the addition of a law school and medical school in 1905, St. John's College became Fordham University in 1907. The name Fordham ("ford
Ford (crossing)
A ford is a shallow place with good footing where a river or stream may be crossed by wading or in a vehicle. A ford is mostly a natural phenomenon, in contrast to a low water crossing, which is an artificial bridge that allows crossing a river or stream when water is low.The names of many towns...

 by the hamlet
Hamlet (place)
A hamlet is usually a rural settlement which is too small to be considered a village, though sometimes the word is used for a different sort of community. Historically, when a hamlet became large enough to justify building a church, it was then classified as a village...

") refers to the Fordham
Fordham, Bronx
Fordham is a neighborhood of New York City, United States, located in the West Bronx. The neighborhood is part of Bronx Community Board 5. It is bordered by Fordham Road to the north, Webster Avenue to the east, East 183rd Street to the south, and Jerome Avenue to the west...

 neighborhood of the Bronx
The Bronx
The Bronx is the northernmost of the five boroughs of New York City. It is also known as Bronx County, the last of the 62 counties of New York State to be incorporated...

 in which the Rose Hill campus is located. This neighborhood was named either as a reference to its location near a shallow crossing of the Bronx River
Bronx River
The Bronx River, approximately long, flows through southeast New York in the United States. It is named after colonial settler Jonas Bronck. The Bronx River is the only fresh water river in New York City....

 or as a reference to Rev. John Fordham, an Anglican priest.

In 1908, Fordham University Press
Fordham University Press
The Fordham University Press is a publishing house, a division of Fordham University, that publishes primarily in the humanities and the social sciences...

 was established.

In 1912, the University opened the College of Pharmacy, which offered a three-year program in pharmacy
Pharmacy
Pharmacy is the health profession that links the health sciences with the chemical sciences and it is charged with ensuring the safe and effective use of pharmaceutical drugs...

 and did not require its students to obtain bachelor's degrees until the late 1930s. The college had a mainly Jewish student body, and in recognition of that, students were exempt from the then-required course in Catholic theology. The school's longtime dean, Jacob Diner, was also Jewish.

The College of St. Francis Xavier was closed in 1913, and various Fordham colleges were opened at the Woolworth Building
Woolworth Building
The Woolworth Building is one of the oldest skyscrapers in New York City. More than a century after the start of its construction, it remains, at 57 stories, one of the fifty tallest buildings in the United States as well as one of the twenty tallest buildings in New York City...

 in Manhattan to fill the void. They were later moved to 302 Broadway
Broadway (New York City)
Broadway is a prominent avenue in New York City, United States, which runs through the full length of the borough of Manhattan and continues northward through the Bronx borough before terminating in Westchester County, New York. It is the oldest north–south main thoroughfare in the city, dating to...

.

The University closed its medical school in 1919, citing a lack of endowment for the school and reduced University funds overall due to the First World War.

The Gabelli School of Business began in 1920 in Manhattan as the School of Accounting.

In 1944, the School of Professional and Continuing Studies was established.

1951–2000



In 1961, the Lincoln Center campus opened as part of the Lincoln Square
Lincoln Square, New York
Lincoln Square is the name of both a square and the surrounding neighborhood within the Upper West Side of the New York City borough of Manhattan...

 Renewal Project. The campus originally housed only Fordham Law School, but the colleges at 302 Broadway were moved to the campus in 1969. At the Rose Hill campus, the all-female Thomas More College began instruction in 1964.

In 1967, Bensalem College, an experimental college with no set curriculum or requirements and no grades, was created by University President Leo McLaughlin, S.J. It was conceived of and led by poet Elizabeth Sewell. The college was studied by a wide array of educators and reported on by such large-circulation publications of the day as Look
Look (American magazine)
Look was a bi-weekly, general-interest magazine published in Des Moines, Iowa from 1937 to 1971, with more of an emphasis on photographs than articles...

, Esquire
Esquire (magazine)
Esquire is a men's magazine, published in the U.S. by the Hearst Corporation. Founded in 1932, it flourished during the Great Depression under the guidance of founder and editor Arnold Gingrich.-History:...

, and the Saturday Review. The school closed in 1974.

In 1969, the board of trustees was reorganized to include a majority of non-clergy
Clergy
Clergy is the generic term used to describe the formal religious leadership within a given religion. A clergyman, churchman or cleric is a member of the clergy, especially one who is a priest, preacher, pastor, or other religious professional....

 members, which officially made the University an independent institution. The College of Pharmacy closed due to declining enrollment in 1972. Fordham College at Rose Hill merged with Thomas More College in 1974, becoming coeducational.

In 1993, a twenty-story residence hall was added to the Lincoln Center campus to house 850 graduate and undergraduate students. In 1996, the undergraduate college at Lincoln Center changed its name to "Fordham College at Lincoln Center," having been called "The Liberal Arts College" and subsequently "The College at Lincoln Center" since its creation in 1968.

2001–present



Marymount College
Marymount College, Tarrytown
Marymount College of Fordham University was a women's college in the United States, eventually to become part of Fordham University. The Marymount campus was located in Tarrytown, New York. Enrollment peaked at 1,112 in 1978, but by 2004 it enrolled 844 students...

, an independent women's college
Women's college
Women's colleges in higher education are undergraduate, bachelor's degree-granting institutions, often liberal arts colleges, whose student populations are composed exclusively or almost exclusively of women...

 founded by the Religious of the Sacred Heart of Mary
Religious of the Sacred Heart of Mary
The Religious of the Sacred Heart of Mary are a global Roman Catholic community of about 900 apostolic religious women, connected by personal contact, local, provincial and general meetings, telephone, e-mail and many websites to one another with a hope of promoting the integral development and...

 (R.S.H.M.) in 1907, was consolidated into Fordham University in July 2002. The college had been steeped in financial hardship since the 1970s. Located 25 miles (40 km) north of New York City in Tarrytown, New York, the school remained open, and its campus received a branch of the School of Professional and Continuing Studies as well as extensions of the Graduate Schools of Education, Social Service, and Business Administration.

In 2005, Fordham announced that Marymount would be phased out; it awarded degrees to its final undergraduate class in May 2007. University administrators announced that the campus would remain open for Fordham graduate programs in several disciplines.

In the autumn of 2007, however, the University announced its intention to seek buyers for the Marymount campus. Administrators stated that the expenses required to support the programs on the campus far exceeded their demand. University officials estimated that the revenue gained from the proposed sale would not be greater than the expenses Fordham incurred maintaining and improving the campus since its merger with Marymount. President Father McShane nonetheless stated that the University's decision was a "painful" one. Fordham then announced its intention to move the remaining programs from the Marymount campus to a new location in Harrison, New York
Harrison, New York
Harrison is a village and town in Westchester County, New York, United States, located approximately northeast of Manhattan. The population was 27,472 at the 2010 census.-Establishment:...

 by the autumn of 2008. On February 17, 2008, Fordham announced the sale of the campus for $27 million to EF Schools, a chain of private language-instruction schools.

In 2003, Fordham announced the creation of the Toward 2016 Integrated Strategic Plan, to be implemented by the University's sesquicentennial in 2016. The $500-million plan aims to enhance the University's profile, increase research among faculty members, make capital improvements to both the Rose Hill and Lincoln Center campuses, increase the competitiveness of varsity athletic programs, and enlarge the University's endowment, among other things. As of November 2010, Fordham is expected to meet almost all of the plan's objectives on time.

In 2009, Fordham was approached by New York Medical College
New York Medical College
New York Medical College, aka New York Med or NYMC, is a private graduate health sciences university based in Westchester County, New York, a suburb of New York City and a part of the New York Metropolitan Area...

 about a possible merger of the two schools. The University declined the offer due to NYMC's financial difficulties, a decision that has sparked controversy among administrators, students, and alumni.

Academics


Fordham University's academic ideals are drawn from its Jesuit influences. The University promotes the Jesuit principles of cura personalis
Cura personalis
"Cura Personalis" is a Latin phrase that translates as "Care for the Entire Person". “Cura Personalis” suggests individualized attention to the needs of the other, distinct respect for his or her unique circumstances and concerns, and an appropriate appreciation for his or her particular gifts and...

, which fosters a faculty and administrative respect for the individual student and his or her uniqueness; magis
Magis
For the Organization founded by Robert Spitzer, SJ go to Magis Institute.Magis is a Jesuit phrase that means "the more." It is taken from Ad majorem Dei gloriam, a Latin phrase meaning "for the greater glory of God." Magis refers to the philosophy of doing more, for Christ, and therefore for...

, which encourages students to strive for excellence in all aspects of life, not simply the academic; and "men and women for others," which intends to inspire service among members of the Fordham community.

Core Curriculum



All undergraduates at Fordham are required to complete the Core Curriculum
Core Curriculum
The Core Curriculum was originally developed as the main curriculum used by Columbia University's Columbia College. It began in 1919 with "Contemporary Civilization," about the origins of western civilization. It became the framework for many similar educational models throughout the United States...

, a distribution of 17–20 courses (depending on foreign language proficiency) in nine disciplines. Based on the curriculum established by the Society of Jesus
Society of Jesus
The Society of Jesus is a Catholic male religious order that follows the teachings of the Catholic Church. The members are called Jesuits, and are also known colloquially as "God's Army" and as "The Company," these being references to founder Ignatius of Loyola's military background and a...

 in the sixteenth century, the Core is shared by Jesuit schools all over the world and is intended to provide a sound liberal arts
Liberal arts
The term liberal arts refers to those subjects which in classical antiquity were considered essential for a free citizen to study. Grammar, Rhetoric and Logic were the core liberal arts. In medieval times these subjects were extended to include mathematics, geometry, music and astronomy...

 education. It is distributed as follows:
  • One course in English composition/rhetoric
    Composition studies
    Composition Studies is the professional field of writing research and instruction, focusing especially on writing at the college level in the United States...

     and two in literature
    Literature
    Literature is the art of written works, and is not bound to published sources...

  • Two courses each in philosophy
    Philosophy
    Philosophy is the study of general and fundamental problems, such as those connected with existence, knowledge, values, reason, mind, and language. Philosophy is distinguished from other ways of addressing such problems by its critical, generally systematic approach and its reliance on rational...

     and theology
    Theology
    Theology is the systematic and rational study of religion and its influences and of the nature of religious truths, or the learned profession acquired by completing specialized training in religious studies, usually at a university or school of divinity or seminary.-Definition:Augustine of Hippo...

  • Two courses each in history
    History
    History is the discovery, collection, organization, and presentation of information about past events. History can also mean the period of time after writing was invented. Scholars who write about history are called historians...

    , social science, and natural science
    Natural science
    The natural sciences are branches of science that seek to elucidate the rules that govern the natural world by using empirical and scientific methods...

  • One course each in mathematics
    Mathematics
    Mathematics is the study of quantity, space, structure, and change. Mathematicians seek out patterns and formulate new conjectures. Mathematicians resolve the truth or falsity of conjectures by mathematical proofs, which are arguments sufficient to convince other mathematicians of their validity...

     and fine arts
  • Foreign language
    Foreign language
    A foreign language is a language indigenous to another country. It is also a language not spoken in the native country of the person referred to, i.e. an English speaker living in Japan can say that Japanese is a foreign language to him or her...

     through an advanced level (1 to 4 courses)
  • A senior seminar in values


Most of these requirements can be fulfilled by a wide array of courses. In addition to these requirements, there are several distributive requirements that can be met in tandem with the requirements above. A student is expected to complete most of the Core by the end of his or her sophomore year. Students pursuing a Bachelor of Science degree take a modified version of the Core.

Colleges and schools


Fordham University consists of four undergraduate schools and six graduate schools, which are as follows:

Undergraduate schools


  • Fordham College at Rose Hill (1841)
  • Gabelli School of Business
    Gabelli School of Business
    The Gabelli School of Business is the undergraduate business school of Fordham University, the Jesuit University of New York.The Gabelli School of Business was established in 1920 in the financial district of lower Manhattan, and is presently located on Fordham's Rose Hill campus in the Bronx...

     (1920)
  • School of Professional and Continuing Studies (1944)
  • Fordham College at Lincoln Center (1968)


In addition to its undergraduate schools, Fordham offers a number of special academic programs for its undergraduate students, some of which are listed below:
  • Pre-Medical and Health Professions Program, in conjunction with the Albert Einstein College of Medicine
    Albert Einstein College of Medicine
    Albert Einstein College of Medicine is a graduate school of Yeshiva University. It is a not-for-profit, private, nonsectarian medical school located on the Jack and Pearl Resnick Campus in the Morris Park neighborhood of the borough of the Bronx of New York City...

     at Yeshiva University
    Yeshiva University
    Yeshiva University is a private university in New York City, with six campuses in New York and one in Israel. Founded in 1886, it is a research university ranked as 45th in the US among national universities by U.S. News & World Report in 2012...

  • Pre-professional programs in law, architecture, and criminal justice
  • 3-3 Law Program, in conjunction with the School of Law
  • 3-2 Engineering Program, in conjunction with Columbia University and Case Western Reserve University
  • Five-year Teacher Certification Program, in conjunction with the Graduate School of Education
  • CPA, CFA, and dual-degree business programs, in conjunction with the School of Law and the Graduate School of Business
  • BFA program in dance, in conjunction with the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater
    Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater
    The Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater is a modern dance company based in New York, New York. It was founded in 1958 by choreographer and dancer Alvin Ailey...

  • Joint course offerings with the Juilliard School
    Juilliard School
    The Juilliard School, located at the Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts in New York City, United States, is a performing arts conservatory which was established in 1905...

     for advanced music students

Graduate schools

  • School of Law
    Fordham University School of Law
    Fordham University School of Law is a part of Fordham University in the United States. The School is located in the Borough of Manhattan in New York City, and is one of eight ABA-approved law schools in that city.-Overview:According to the U.S. News & World Report, 1,516 J.D. students attend...

     (1905)
  • Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (1916)
  • Graduate School of Education (1916)
  • Graduate School of Social Service
    Fordham Graduate School of Social Service
    The Fordham Graduate School of Social Service is a United States graduate school within Fordham University, in New York. Established in 1916, it provides instruction at three campuses in the New York City area. The school was ranked 18th in the nation by US News & World Report in 2009...

     (1916)
  • Joseph Martino Graduate School of Business Administration
    Fordham Graduate School of Business
    The Fordham Graduate School of Business Administration is a business school within Fordham University in the United States. It is a graduate school focused on business administration, and should not be confused with the University's undergraduate Gabelli School of Business...

     (1969)
  • Graduate School of Religion and Religious Education (1969)


Fordham participates in the New York City Graduate School Consortium and other course-sharing initiatives, which allow graduate students to take classes at a number of schools in the New York metropolitan area.

Libraries



The Fordham University Library System contains over 2.4 million volumes, subscribes to over 50,000 serials and electronic journals, and is a depository for United States Government documents. In addition, the Interlibrary Loan office provides students and faculty with virtually unlimited access to the over 20 million volumes in the New York Public Library System as well as access to media from libraries around the world. The system consists of the William D. Walsh Family Library
Walsh Family Library
The William D. Walsh Family Library, which opened in 1997, is located at Fordham University's Rose Hill Campus in the Bronx. In its 2004 edition of The Best 351 Colleges, the Princeton Review ranked Fordham’s William D. Walsh Family Library fifth in the country, ahead of Yale, Harvard, and Columbia...

, ranked in 2004 as the fifth best collegiate library in the country, and the Science Library at the Rose Hill campus, the Gerald M. Quinn and the Leo T. Kissam Memorial Law Libraries at the Lincoln Center campus, and the Reading Room at the Westchester campus. In addition to the University's formal library system, several academic departments and research institutes maintain their own collections. The Rose Hill campus's Duane Library, despite its name, is no longer a library, though it still contains reading and study space for students.

Research


The Carnegie Foundation classifies Fordham as a high-research doctoral university (RU/H), with approximately $7 million in research expenditures in 2010. Major facilities on campus for scientific research include the Louis Calder Center, a biological field station in Armonk, NY, and the William Spain Seismic Observatory. In addition, Fordham collaborates with several institutions in New York City and around the world, such as the New York Botanical Garden
New York Botanical Garden
- See also :* Education in New York City* List of botanical gardens in the United States* List of museums and cultural institutions in New York City- External links :* official website** blog*...

, the American Museum of Natural History
American Museum of Natural History
The American Museum of Natural History , located on the Upper West Side of Manhattan in New York City, United States, is one of the largest and most celebrated museums in the world...

, and the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, for the purposes of conducting research.

The Fordham Museum of Greek, Etruscan, and Roman Art is located at the Rose Hill campus and contains more than 200 artifacts from Classical antiquity. A gift from alumnus William D. Walsh, it is the largest collection of its kind in the New York metropolitan area
New York metropolitan area
The New York metropolitan area, also known as Greater New York, or the Tri-State area, is the region that composes of New York City and the surrounding region...

. Similarly, the University maintains a sizable collection of medieval manuscripts and other rare literary works in the O'Hare Special Collections Room at the Walsh Family Library.

Fordham University Press
Fordham University Press
The Fordham University Press is a publishing house, a division of Fordham University, that publishes primarily in the humanities and the social sciences...

, an affiliate of Oxford University Press
Oxford University Press
Oxford University Press is the largest university press in the world. It is a department of the University of Oxford and is governed by a group of 15 academics appointed by the Vice-Chancellor known as the Delegates of the Press. They are headed by the Secretary to the Delegates, who serves as...

, is the University's official publishing house. It publishes primarily in philosophy and theology, the humanities, and the social sciences.

Honor societies and programs


Fordham's undergraduate schools all offer honors programs for their students. The programs' curricula are modified versions of the regular Fordham Core Curriculum with seminar-style classes. Most honors students are selected to join at the beginning of their freshman year, though some are selected at the beginning of their sophomore year. Alpha House, a 24-hour study lounge at the Rose Hill campus, is reserved for use by honors students. Those who complete the programs receive the designation of in cursu honorum on their diploma and transcripts.

In addition to its honors programs, Fordham has chapters of several honor societies on campus, including but not limited to the following:
  • Phi Beta Kappa and Phi Kappa Phi
    Phi Kappa Phi
    The Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi is an honor society established 1897 to recognize and encourage superior scholarship without restriction as to area of study and to promote the "unity and democracy of education"...

  • Alpha Sigma Nu
    Alpha Sigma Nu
    Alpha Sigma Nu was founded at Marquette University in 1915 by John Danihy, S.J., Dean of Journalism. In his travels and reading, Father Danihy had encountered and admired honor societies...

     (Jesuit)
  • Sigma Pi Sigma
    Sigma Pi Sigma
    Sigma Pi Sigma is the National Physics Honor Society. It strives to promote physics at all stages, to promote fraternity between those who excel at physics, and to promote service among its members. It is closely associated with the Society of Physics Students .- External links :*...

     (physics)
  • Phi Alpha Theta
    Phi Alpha Theta
    Phi Alpha Theta is an American honor society for undergraduate and graduate students and professors of history.The society is a charter member of the Association of College Honor Societies and has over 350,000 members, with about 9,500 new members joining each year through 860 local chapters.-...

     (history)
  • Alpha Kappa Delta
    Alpha Kappa Delta
    Alpha Kappa Delta is an international sociology honor society.Founded in 1920 by Emory S. Bogardus, of the University of Southern California sociology department, the name is derived from the Greek anthrôpos meaning mankind, katamanthanô, meaning to examine closely or acquire knowledge, and...

     (sociology)
  • Psi Chi
    Psi Chi
    Psi Chi is the International Honor Society in Psychology, founded in 1929 for the purposes of encouraging, stimulating, and maintaining excellence in scholarship, and advancing the science of psychology. With over 1,050 chapters, Psi Chi is one of the largest honor societies in the United States...

     (psychology)
  • Sigma Delta Pi
    Sigma Delta Pi
    Sigma Delta Pi, the National Collegiate Hispanic Honor Society , was established on November 14, 1919, at the University of California at Berkeley. Its insignia is the royal seal of Fernando and Isabel, representing Castille, León and Aragón...

     (Spanish)
  • Beta Alpha Psi
    Beta Alpha Psi
    ΒΑΨ is a national honors business organization for highly successful accounting, finance and information systems students and professionals. It was founded on February 12, 1919 at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and is currently headquartered in Durham, North Carolina...

     (finance, accounting)
  • Phi Sigma Tau
    Phi Sigma Tau
    Phi Sigma Tau is an international honor society for philosophers. Its essential purpose is to promote ties among philosophy departments in accredited institutions and students in philosophy nationally...

     (philosophy)
  • Omicron Delta Epsilon
    Omicron Delta Epsilon
    Omicron Delta Epsilon is an international honor society in the field of economics. Resulting from the merger of Omicron Delta Gamma and Omicron Chi Epsilon, ODE was founded in 1963 . Its board of trustees includes well-known economists such as Robert Lucas, Kenneth Arrow, and Robert Solow...

     (economics)
  • Lambda Pi Eta
    Lambda Pi Eta
    Lambda Pi Eta is the official communication studies honor society of the National Communication Association . As a member of the Association of College Honor Societies , Lambda Pi Eta has over 400 active chapters at four-year colleges and universities worldwide.Lambda Pi Eta was founded in 1985 at...

     (communications)
  • Alpha Sigma Lambda
    Alpha Sigma Lambda
    Alpha Sigma Lambda is a national honor society for non-traditional undergraduate students who achieve and maintain outstanding scholastic standards and leadership characteristics while adroitly handling additional responsibilities of work and family .The founding chapter was established by Dr...

     (continuing education)

The Campion Institute is Fordham's office for academic fellowships
Fellow
A fellow in the broadest sense is someone who is an equal or a comrade. The term fellow is also used to describe a person, particularly by those in the upper social classes. It is most often used in an academic context: a fellow is often part of an elite group of learned people who are awarded...

 and scholarships. Its function is to raise awareness about fellowships among the student body, provide resources for students to discover appropriate opportunities, counsel students about their eligibility for various programs, and advise students through the application process.

The Matteo Ricci
Matteo Ricci
Matteo Ricci, SJ was an Italian Jesuit priest, and one of the founding figures of the Jesuit China Mission, as it existed in the 17th-18th centuries. His current title is Servant of God....

 Society is an honor society for Fordham students who are likely candidates for academic fellowships. Students are invited to join based on academic success and other factors. Faculty assist members in preparing applications for fellowships. The society coordinates internships and provides funding for certain research opportunities. The Rev. William E. Boyle, S.J. Society is a parallel organization exclusively for business students.

Study Abroad


The International and Study Abroad Programs Office at Fordham offers over 130 study abroad opportunities around the world. These programs range in duration from six weeks to a full academic year and vary in focus from cultural and language immersion to internship and service learning. Specific opportunities include faculty-led programs in Spain and South Africa; exchange programs in Brazil, South Korea, and Mexico; and direct enroll programs at the Universities of Oxford
University of Oxford
The University of Oxford is a university located in Oxford, United Kingdom. It is the second-oldest surviving university in the world and the oldest in the English-speaking world. Although its exact date of foundation is unclear, there is evidence of teaching as far back as 1096...

 and Cambridge
University of Cambridge
The University of Cambridge is a public research university located in Cambridge, United Kingdom. It is the second-oldest university in both the United Kingdom and the English-speaking world , and the seventh-oldest globally...

 in the United Kingdom.

In addition to ISAP, the Graduate School of Business Administration and the Gabelli School of Business both offer a host of study abroad programs related to business. Destinations include Spain, Belgium, India, and China.

Rankings


The 2012 "Best Colleges" edition of U.S. News & World Report
U.S. News & World Report
U.S. News & World Report is an American news magazine published from Washington, D.C. Along with Time and Newsweek it was for many years a leading news weekly, focusing more than its counterparts on political, economic, health and education stories...

lists Fordham as a top-tier, more selective national university; it ranks the University's undergraduate program 53rd in the country, on the same level as Boston University. Bloomberg/BusinessWeek ranked Fordham's Gabelli School of Business 52nd in the nation in 2011, a drop of 11 spots from the previous two years. U.S. News & World Report, however, ranked the business school 71st nationally, up nine spots from 2007. In 2011, the Washington Monthly rankings, created as a public-interest alternative to the U.S. News rankings, placed Fordham 37th in the country.

U.S. News & World Report ranked the daytime division of Fordham's School of Law 30th in the nation and the evening division 2nd in 2010. The publication also placed the Graduate School of Social Service 17th and the Graduate School of Education 58th nationally.

The most recent ranking by the École des Mines de Paris placed Fordham 63rd in the world. The ranking measures the ability of universities to place their students in leading professional positions. Similarly, in 2011, Fordham ranked 6th in US News & World Reports ranking of "Universities Producing the Most Interns."

Kaplan
Kaplan, Inc.
Kaplan, Inc. is a for-profit corporation headquartered in New York City and was founded in 1938 by Stanley Kaplan. Kaplan provides higher education programs, professional training courses, test preparation materials and other services for various levels of education...

/
Newsweek
Newsweek
Newsweek is an American weekly news magazine published in New York City. It is distributed throughout the United States and internationally. It is the second-largest news weekly magazine in the U.S., having trailed Time in circulation and advertising revenue for most of its existence...

s 2008 edition of the How to Get Into College Guide includes Fordham as one of the "25 Hottest Schools in America," designating it the "Hottest Catholic School." Likewise, in 1962, Time recognized Fordham as a "Catholic Ivy."

In 2011, The Chronicle of Higher Education
The Chronicle of Higher Education
The Chronicle of Higher Education is a newspaper and website that presents news, information, and jobs for college and university faculty, staff members and administrators....

listed Fordham as one of the top producers of Fulbright scholars among research universities in the United States, the third year in a row that it has received this designation.

In addition to rankings, Fordham participates in the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU)'s University and College Accountability Network (U-CAN).

Campuses


Fordham University has three main campuses in and around New York City: Rose Hill in the Bronx, Lincoln Center in Manhattan, and Westchester in West Harrison. In addition, it maintains facilities throughout New York State and around the world.

Rose Hill



The Rose Hill campus, established in 1841, is home to Fordham College at Rose Hill, the Gabelli School of Business, and a division of the School of Professional and Continuing Studies, as well as the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences and the Graduate School of Religion and Religious Education. Situated on 85 acres (340,000 m2) in North Bronx, the campus is among the largest privately owned green spaces in New York City. It is located next to the New York Botanical Garden and the Bronx Zoo, with which Fordham is affiliated, and the Belmont neighborhood of the Bronx, also known as the "Real Little Italy." Rose Hill's Collegiate Gothic architecture, expansive lawns, ivy-covered buildings, and cobblestone streets were featured in MSNBC's 2008 edition of America's Prettiest College Campuses. In addition, the campus has been the setting of a number of films throughout the years.

Rose Hill is home to the University Church, which was built in 1845 as a seminary chapel and parish church for the surrounding community. The Gothic-style church is an official New York City landmark; it contains the original altar from the old St. Patrick's Cathedral and stained glass windows intended for the cathedral from King Louis-Philippe of France
Louis-Philippe of France
Louis Philippe I was King of the French from 1830 to 1848 in what was known as the July Monarchy. His father was a duke who supported the French Revolution but was nevertheless guillotined. Louis Philippe fled France as a young man and spent 21 years in exile, including considerable time in the...

. The windows are also notable for their connection to a workshop in Sèvres, France, where the earliest stages of the Gothic Revival took place. There are 10 residence halls on campus, including four residential colleges and six Integrated Learning Communities for such disciplines as science, business, and leadership. In addition, the campus contains three Jesuit residences; Murray-Weigel Hall, the infirmary for the New York Province of the Society of Jesus; and Ciszek Hall, one of only three Jesuit scholastic
Scholastic
Scholastic may refer to:* Scholastic * Scholastic Corporation, a book publisher* Scholasticism, a form of theology and philosophy* School, a place of learning* A junior member of a religious order, such as the Jesuits...

 residences in the United States. The William Spain Seismic Observatory, located at Rose Hill, was the first seismic station in the United States to record ground waves from the atomic bombings in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. It is part of a national network of seismic stations that report data to the U.S. Geological Survey in Boulder, Colorado.

The campus is served by the Fordham station
Fordham (Metro-North station)
The Fordham Metro-North Railroad station serves the residents of the Fordham neighborhood of the Bronx, New York via the Harlem Line and New Haven Line. It is the only Harlem Line stop in the Bronx that is an express station. It is 8.9 miles from Grand Central Terminal...

 of the Metro-North Railroad
Metro-North Railroad
The Metro-North Commuter Railroad , trading as MTA Metro-North Railroad, or, more commonly, Metro-North, is a suburban commuter rail service that is run and managed by the Metropolitan Transportation Authority , an authority of New York State. It is the busiest commuter railroad in the United...

 (the tracks run along the boundary fence), which ends at Grand Central Terminal
Grand Central Terminal
Grand Central Terminal —often incorrectly called Grand Central Station, or shortened to simply Grand Central—is a terminal station at 42nd Street and Park Avenue in Midtown Manhattan in New York City, United States...

 in Manhattan. Public transit buses stop adjacent to campus exits, and New York City Subway stations are within walking distance. The University also provides a shuttle service between the three main campuses, which is known as the "Ram Van." About 7,000 undergraduates and graduates take classes at Rose Hill.

As part of the Toward 2016 Integrated Strategic Plan, Fordham recently added two new residence halls to the Rose Hill campus. In addition, it is currently working on renovations to the Gabelli School of Business, and it intends to add a new student union, recreation center, and science building to Rose Hill in the coming years.

Located near the Rose Hill campus is the Riverdale neighborhood of the Bronx, noted for the large number of Fordham faculty and staff who live there.

Lincoln Center



The Lincoln Center campus, created as part of the Lincoln Square Renewal Project in 1961, is home to Fordham College at Lincoln Center and a division of the School of Professional and Continuing Studies, as well as the School of Law
Fordham University School of Law
Fordham University School of Law is a part of Fordham University in the United States. The School is located in the Borough of Manhattan in New York City, and is one of eight ABA-approved law schools in that city.-Overview:According to the U.S. News & World Report, 1,516 J.D. students attend...

, the Graduate School of Business Administration
Fordham Graduate School of Business
The Fordham Graduate School of Business Administration is a business school within Fordham University in the United States. It is a graduate school focused on business administration, and should not be confused with the University's undergraduate Gabelli School of Business...

, the Graduate School of Education, and the Graduate School of Social Service. The 8 acres (32,374.9 m²) campus occupies the area from West 60th Street to West 62nd Street between Columbus and Amsterdam Avenues, placing it in the cultural heart of Manhattan. Across the street from the campus is one of the world's great cultural centers, Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts
Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts
Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts is a complex of buildings in the Lincoln Square neighborhood of New York City's Upper West Side. Reynold Levy has been its president since 2002.-History and facilities:...

; nearby are Central Park
Central Park
Central Park is a public park in the center of Manhattan in New York City, United States. The park initially opened in 1857, on of city-owned land. In 1858, Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux won a design competition to improve and expand the park with a plan they entitled the Greensward Plan...

, Carnegie Hall
Carnegie Hall
Carnegie Hall is a concert venue in Midtown Manhattan in New York City, United States, located at 881 Seventh Avenue, occupying the east stretch of Seventh Avenue between West 56th Street and West 57th Street, two blocks south of Central Park....

, Rockefeller Center
Rockefeller Center
Rockefeller Center is a complex of 19 commercial buildings covering between 48th and 51st streets in New York City, United States. Built by the Rockefeller family, it is located in the center of Midtown Manhattan, spanning the area between Fifth Avenue and Sixth Avenue. It was declared a National...

 and Radio City Music Hall
Radio City Music Hall
Radio City Music Hall is an entertainment venue located in New York City's Rockefeller Center. Its nickname is the Showplace of the Nation, and it was for a time the leading tourist destination in the city...

, Fifth Avenue, Broadway
Broadway (New York City)
Broadway is a prominent avenue in New York City, United States, which runs through the full length of the borough of Manhattan and continues northward through the Bronx borough before terminating in Westchester County, New York. It is the oldest north–south main thoroughfare in the city, dating to...

, and Columbus Circle
Columbus Circle
Columbus Circle, named for Christopher Columbus, is a major landmark and point of attraction in the New York City borough of Manhattan, located at the intersection of Eighth Avenue, Broadway, Central Park South , and Central Park West, at the southwest corner of Central Park. It is the point from...

. The campus is served by public transit buses; the A,B,C,D, and 1 trains of the New York City Subway; and the University's "Ram Van" shuttle.

Approximately 8,000 undergraduate and graduate students take classes at the Lincoln Center campus, of which about 1000 live in University housing either on campus or in Midtown, Manhattan. The campus currently consists of the Leon Lowenstein Building, McMahon Hall, the Gerald M. Quinn Library, and the Doyle Building and has two outdoor basketball and tennis courts.

The Lincoln Center campus has two grassy plazas, built one level up from the street over the Quinn Library. The larger plaza was once a barren cement landscape known as "Robert Moses Plaza;" the smaller plaza is known as "St. Peter's Garden." A memorial to Fordham students and alumni who died in the September 11, 2001 attacks
September 11, 2001 attacks
The September 11 attacks The September 11 attacks The September 11 attacks (also referred to as September 11, September 11th or 9/119/11 is pronounced "nine eleven". The slash is not part of the pronunciation...

 stands in St. Peter's Garden.

The Toward 2016 Strategic Plan calls for the complete reconfiguration of the Lincoln Center campus in order to make room for a new Law School building, designed by the noted architectural firm Pei Cobb Freed & Partners, as well as additional residence halls, classrooms, and offices. Ground was broken on the project at the beginning of the Spring 2011 academic semester.

Westchester


The Westchester campus is home to divisions of the School of Professional and Continuing Studies and the Graduate Schools of Business, Education, and Social Service. It consists of a three-story, 62500 square feet (5,806.4 m²) building on 32 acres (129,499.5 m²) landscaped with a stream and pond. Fordham signed a 20-year lease for the facility, which includes 26 "smart" classrooms, faculty and administrative offices, a reading room, a food service facility, and indoor and outdoor meeting areas. In 2008, the University spent over $8 million renovating the building to increase its sustainability.

The campus is served by the White Plains station
White Plains (Metro-North station)
The White Plains Metro-North Railroad station serves the residents of White Plains, New York via the Harlem Line. It is 22.3 miles from Grand Central Terminal, and the average travel time varies between 30 and 44 minutes...

 of the Metro-North Railroad
Metro-North Railroad
The Metro-North Commuter Railroad , trading as MTA Metro-North Railroad, or, more commonly, Metro-North, is a suburban commuter rail service that is run and managed by the Metropolitan Transportation Authority , an authority of New York State. It is the busiest commuter railroad in the United...

, approximately 4 miles (6 km) away in White Plains
White Plains, New York
White Plains is a city and the county seat of Westchester County, New York, United States. It is located in south-central Westchester, about east of the Hudson River and northwest of Long Island Sound...

. The White Plains station and the campus are both served by the Westchester County Bus System ("The Bee-Line
Bee-Line Bus System
The Bee-Line Bus System, branded on the buses in lowercase as the bee-line system, is a bus system serving Westchester County, New York. The system is owned by the County's Department of Public Works and Transportation and operated, on contract , by Yonkers-based Liberty Lines Transit, Inc...

"). The University's "Ram Van" shuttle also stops on campus.

Other facilities


Fordham maintains a biological field station 30 miles (48.3 km) north of New York City in Armonk, NY. The Louis Calder Center
Louis Calder Center
The Louis Calder Center is Fordham University's biological field station. The Calder Center is a protected forest preserve located north of New York City in Armonk, New York, and is the only full-time ecological research field station in the New York metropolitan area.- History :The Louis Calder...

 consists of 114 acre (0.46134204 km²) forested, a 10 acres (40,468.6 m²) lake, and 19 buildings, which house laboratories and offices, educational programs, equipment storage, a research library, and residences. The station is the middle site along a 130 kilometres (80.8 mi) urban-forest transect, the Urban-Rural Gradient Experiment (URGE), and supports the longest running ecological field study of Lyme Disease in the country.

The Fordham University London Centre is located on the campus of Heythrop College
Heythrop College
Heythrop College is the specialist philosophy and theology constituent college of the University of London situated in Kensington Square, Kensington, London. It offers undergraduate and postgraduate degrees in philosophy, theology and psychology, as well as research in related fields.It was founded...

, the Jesuit philosophy and theology school of the University of London. It is home to several undergraduate business and liberal arts programs as well as Fordham College at Lincoln Center's London Dramatic Academy.

Several of Fordham's graduate schools maintain satellite facilities for easy access by commuting students and faculty.

Town and gown relations


Relations between Fordham and the neighborhoods that surround it vary according to campus. At Rose Hill, the University actively recruits students from disadvantaged backgrounds through the Higher Education Opportunity Program. In addition, about 80% of students participate in community service. The surrounding neighborhood seems to respond positively to these initiatives.

The relationship between the Lincoln Center campus and the Upper West Side, however, is significantly cooler. Recently, the New York State Supreme Court dismissed a lawsuit against Fordham brought by the Alfred Condominium Complex. The suit was filed in response to the University’s expansion plans at Lincoln Center and their expected visual and auditory impact on the surrounding community.

Student activities


Fordham University sponsors over 135 clubs and organizations for its undergraduate and graduate students, some of which are described below:

Athletics


The University supports 23 men's and women's varsity teams and various club teams and has an extensive intramural sports program. Fordham athletic teams are known as the "Rams
Bighorn Sheep
The bighorn sheep is a species of sheep in North America named for its large horns. These horns can weigh up to , while the sheep themselves weigh up to . Recent genetic testing indicates that there are three distinct subspecies of Ovis canadensis, one of which is endangered: Ovis canadensis sierrae...

," and their colors are maroon
Maroon (color)
Maroon is a dark red color.-Etymology:Maroon is derived from French marron .The first recorded use of maroon as a color name in English was in 1789.-Maroon :...

 and white. The Fordham Rams compete in the NCAA Division I Atlantic 10 Conference in most sports. A notable exception is football
College football
College football refers to American football played by teams of student athletes fielded by American universities, colleges, and military academies, or Canadian football played by teams of student athletes fielded by Canadian universities...

, in which they are an associate member of the Patriot League
Patriot League
The Patriot League is a college athletic conference which operates in the northeastern United States. It participates in the NCAA's Division I) for a number of sports; in football, it participates in the Football Championship Subdivision...

.

The Rams football program boasts a National Championship title (1929), two bowl game appearances (1941 and 1942), two divisional championships (2002 and 2007), two FCS playoff appearances (2002 and 2007), and the 15th most wins of all college football programs. It is probably most known, however, for the "Seven Blocks of Granite
Seven Blocks of Granite
The Seven Blocks of Granite was a nickname given to the Fordham University football team's offensive line under head coach "Sleepy" Jim Crowley and line coach Frank Leahy. The most famous Seven Blocks of Granite were: Leo Paquin, Johnny Druze, Alex Wojciechowicz, Ed Franco, Al Babartsky, Natty...

," a name given to the team's 1928 and 1936 offensive lines. The 1936 team was coached by "Sleepy" Jim Crowley, one of the University of Notre Dame
University of Notre Dame
The University of Notre Dame du Lac is a Catholic research university located in Notre Dame, an unincorporated community north of the city of South Bend, in St. Joseph County, Indiana, United States...

's legendary "Four Horsemen," and included Vince Lombardi
Vince Lombardi
Vincent Thomas "Vince" Lombardi was an American football coach. He is best known as the head coach of the Green Bay Packers during the 1960s, where he led the team to three straight league championships and five in seven years, including winning the first two Super Bowls following the 1966 and...

, arguably the most famous professional football coach in history. This team is credited with inspiring the term "Ivy League
Ivy League
The Ivy League is an athletic conference comprising eight private institutions of higher education in the Northeastern United States. The conference name is also commonly used to refer to those eight schools as a group...

" after New York Tribune
New York Tribune
The New York Tribune was an American newspaper, first established by Horace Greeley in 1841, which was long considered one of the leading newspapers in the United States...

sportswriter Caswell Adams compared it to the Princeton
Princeton University
Princeton University is a private research university located in Princeton, New Jersey, United States. The school is one of the eight universities of the Ivy League, and is one of the nine Colonial Colleges founded before the American Revolution....

 and Columbia University
Columbia University
Columbia University in the City of New York is a private, Ivy League university in Manhattan, New York City. Columbia is the oldest institution of higher learning in the state of New York, the fifth oldest in the United States, and one of the country's nine Colonial Colleges founded before the...

 football teams, two powerhouses of the day. Adams remarked disparagingly of Princeton and Columbia, saying that they were "only Ivy League." There are currently four Rams in the National Football League
National Football League
The National Football League is the highest level of professional American football in the United States, and is considered the top professional American football league in the world. It was formed by eleven teams in 1920 as the American Professional Football Association, with the league changing...

. Moreover, the St. Louis Rams
St. Louis Rams
The St. Louis Rams are a professional American football team based in St. Louis, Missouri. They are currently members of the West Division of the National Football Conference in the National Football League . The Rams have won three NFL Championships .The Rams began playing in 1936 in Cleveland,...

 NFL franchise was named in honor of Fordham's football heritage.

Fordham's men's basketball program also has an impressive heritage, boasting four NCAA tournament and 16 NIT appearances. During the 1970 season, the team was coached by Digger Phelps
Digger Phelps
Richard "Digger" Phelps is a former American college basketball coach, most notably of the Notre Dame Fighting Irish men's basketball team from 1971 to 1991. Since 1993, he has served as an analyst on ESPN.-Career:...

, who subsequently rose to national prominence as the head coach of the University of Notre Dame
University of Notre Dame
The University of Notre Dame du Lac is a Catholic research university located in Notre Dame, an unincorporated community north of the city of South Bend, in St. Joseph County, Indiana, United States...

's men's basketball program. Fordham basketball plays in the Rose Hill Gymnasium (also known as "the Prairie"), the oldest on-campus venue currently in use by an NCAA Division I basketball team. The team has fared poorly of late, with just two wins in the 2009 season, but it defeated St. John's University and the University of Massachusetts along with five other teams this past season.

The Rams have had great success in other sports as well. They have launched the careers of dozens of professional baseball
Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball is the highest level of professional baseball in the United States and Canada, consisting of teams that play in the National League and the American League...

 players, including Hall of Fame inductee Frankie Frisch
Frankie Frisch
Francis “Frankie” Frisch , nicknamed the "Fordham Flash" or "The Old Flash", was a German American Major League Baseball player of the early twentieth century....

 (also known as "The Fordham Flash"). They also claim among their ranks Tom Courtney
Tom Courtney
Thomas William Courtney is a former American athlete, winner of two gold medals at the 1956 Summer Olympics....

, an Olympic gold medalist in the 800m and a member of Fordham's world record-setting two-mile relay team. Fordham Crew has won several national championships during its almost 100 years in existence. Rowing out of the Peter Jay Sharp boathouse on the Harlem River, it makes regular appearances at such prestigious regattas as the Henley Royal Regatta in the United Kingdom and the San Diego Crew Classic. The Fordham sailing team, headquartered at the Morris Yacht and Beach Club on City Island, and the Fordham golf team, which plays out of the Winged Foot Golf Club in Mamaroneck, NY, also have notable successes.

Most of Fordham's athletic programs are housed at the Rose Hill campus; however, some maintain additional facilities elsewhere, including, in addition to those previously mentioned, the hockey, tennis, and track and field teams.

Athletic booster clubs

  • The Sixth Man Club supports the Fordham University men's and women's basketball programs. It was founded in the early 1990s by a group of seniors at the Rose Hill campus. In 2005, it was awarded "Club of the Year."

  • The Twelfth Man Club supports the Fordham football team. It was founded during the Rams' 2007 football season.

The Ram


The Ram is the weekly newspaper for the Rose Hill campus. It serves as the University’s official journal of record and is published and edited by Fordham students through University funding.

First published in 1918, The Ram’s mission states that it is devoted to serving both campus and community, acting as a means of club networking and cooperation, and “providing a forum for the free and open exchange of ideas in service to the community.”

Staff of The Ram have gone on to achieve great success in the news and media industry. Famous Ram alumni include former Associated Press President & CEO Louis Boccardi; New York Times sportswriter Arthur Daley ('26), who was the first sportswriter to win a Pulitzer Prize; sports announcer Vin Scully ('49); author Robert Daley ('51); Emmy Award-winning news anchor Shiela Stainback ('72); and author and New York Times writer and columnist Jim Dwyer ('79), a Pulitzer Prize winner.

The Observer


The Observer is the student newspaper for the Lincoln Center campus, with distribution to the Rose Hill campus as well. First published in 1981, it is the fourth in a lineage of newspapers at Lincoln Center, after The Curved Horn, The Review, and Evex.

The Observer has received multiple accolades, including the following:
  • National College Newspaper’s Convention, First Place (2008) and Honorable Mention (2007)
  • American Scholastic Press Association, Most Outstanding University Newspaper in the category of Four Year, Non-Weekly (2005–2006 and 2006–2007)
  • Associated Collegiate Press’ Newspaper of the Year Contest, Second Place (2005)
  • American Scholastic Press Association’s Newspaper Review, First Place (2005)
  • New York Press Association’s Better Newspaper Contest, Third Place in the Editorial category (2004) and Third Place in the Editorial and Photography categories (2003)


In addition, four Observer staff received the Mark of Excellence Award for Sports Photography from the Society of Professional Journalists (Region 1) in 2008.

Other publications

  • Fordham Law Review, the most widely cited of the School of Law's six scholarly journals
    Law review
    A law review is a scholarly journal focusing on legal issues, normally published by an organization of students at a law school or through a bar association...

     and the twelfth-most cited law review in the country. It serves the legal community and the public by discussing current issues in the field of law.
  • the paper, Fordham's "journal of news, analysis, comment, and review." the paper is the alternative newspaper at the Rose Hill campus.
  • The Ampersand is the only entirely student-run literary magazine at Fordham. It is published once a year for the University community. It "provides students with an outlet for creativity and expression through fiction, personal essays, photography, cartoons, poetry, graphic arts, etc." The Ampersand also publishes a monthly supplement called The Vagabond, which features short prompts and art (made by members) based on a specific theme.
  • Bricolage, the Literary Studies program's yearly journal, consisting of student scholarly essays, poetry, short stories, and photography. Submissions are accepted in multiple languages.
  • FURJ, a student-run scholarly journal that features peer-reviewed, original research conducted by undergraduate students in the sciences, humanities, and social sciences.
  • Fordham Political Review, the University's journal of domestic and international affairs.

Broadcasting

  • WFUV
    WFUV
    WFUV, 90.7 FM in New York City, is Fordham University's 50,000-watt, non-commercial radio station, with studios on campus and its antenna atop nearby Montefiore Medical Center. First broadcast in 1947, WFUV has an airstaff which includes such New York radio veterans as Pete Fornatale , Dennis...

    (90.7 FM
    FM broadcasting
    FM broadcasting is a broadcasting technology pioneered by Edwin Howard Armstrong which uses frequency modulation to provide high-fidelity sound over broadcast radio. The term "FM band" describes the "frequency band in which FM is used for broadcasting"...

    ) is Fordham’s 50,000-watt radio station, with studios located in Keating Hall at the Rose Hill campus and the transmitter located on the roof of the Montefiore Medical Group building. Broadcasting since 1947, the station serves approximately 280,000 listeners weekly in Greater New York
    New York metropolitan area
    The New York metropolitan area, also known as Greater New York, or the Tri-State area, is the region that composes of New York City and the surrounding region...

     and thousands more on the Web
    World Wide Web
    The World Wide Web is a system of interlinked hypertext documents accessed via the Internet...

    . It is a National Public Radio affiliate and has an Adult Alternative format on weekdays; however, it adheres to a variety format on weekends, during which time it plays folk music
    Folk music
    Folk music is an English term encompassing both traditional folk music and contemporary folk music. The term originated in the 19th century. Traditional folk music has been defined in several ways: as music transmitted by mouth, as music of the lower classes, and as music with unknown composers....

    , jazz
    Jazz
    Jazz is a musical style that originated at the beginning of the 20th century in African American communities in the Southern United States. It was born out of a mix of African and European music traditions. From its early development until the present, jazz has incorporated music from 19th and 20th...

    , and Irish music and broadcasts live sports. The station has 27 full-time employees and 70 part-time student employees.

  • Fordham Nightly News (FNN), Fordham's evening news program since 2004, was created and is produced by students. The program airs on weeknights and has built up a management structure of about 35 staff ranging from on-air talent to technical production. FNN is on a closed-circuit channel, EIC-TV10, and reports current topics focusing on Fordham news, but also a quick overview of selected local, national, and international news as well as entertainment, sports, and weather.

Performing arts

  • Fordham University Concert Choir, a choral ensemble with students from both the Rose Hill and Lincoln Center campuses. Its repertoire includes both religious and secular music.
  • Fordham University Glee Club, the umbrella organization for Fordham's various a cappella groups, including the Ramblers (all-male), one of the top a cappella ensembles in the country, the Satin Dolls (all-female), and the b-Sides (co-ed), which released its first studio album entitled "Underground" in 2009.
  • Fordham Symphony Orchestra, the largest of the University's instrumental ensembles. It performs primarily in the Leonard Theater at Fordham Preparatory School and has made several nationally televised appearances on MSNBC, MTV and ABC.
  • Fordham University Theatre Company, a stage production troupe for theater majors located at the Lincoln Center campus.
  • Mimes & Mummers, a theater troupe based in Collins Auditorium at the Rose Hill campus. It is one of the oldest extracurricular organizations at Fordham.
  • Ailey/Fordham Student Dancers, a dance company composed entirely of seniors in the BFA program in dance. It tours the tri-state area, performing at schools and corporate events.
  • Expressions Dance Alliance, a traditional dance ensemble located in Keating Hall on the Rose Hill campus.

Rhetoric and debate


The Fordham Debate Society (FDS) is based at the Rose Hill campus and is the oldest existing club at the University, having been founded in 1854. The club competes in the American Parliamentary Debate Association (APDA), which was founded at Fordham's annual tournament in 1982. FDS regularly places among the top teams in the country, and it ranks well in the World Universities Debating Championship
World Universities Debating Championship
The World Universities Debating Championship is the world's largest debating tournament, and one of the largest annual international student events in the world. It is a parliamentary debating event, held using the British Parliamentary Debate format. Each year, the event is hosted by a university...

 standings. The club hosts several tournaments throughout the year, including the Fordham Fandango tournament and a tournament for novice debaters in New York City. Additional competitions, such as an Intervarsity Tournament in the British Parliamentary
British Parliamentary Style
British Parliamentary style debate is a common form of academic debate. It has gained support in the United Kingdom, Ireland, Canada, Europe, Africa, Philippines and United States, and has also been adopted as the official style of the World Universities Debating Championship and European...

 style, a public policy forum for high school students, and a round robin for students at Fordham, are in the works. The club holds practice debates and chamber discussions on Monday and Thursday nights, in which anyone at Fordham can participate.

Campus Ministry



The purpose of Campus Ministry at Fordham is to provide “opportunities and resources for spiritual growth to members of [the University] community.” It currently offers programming for more than 15 faith traditions in such areas as worship, music ministry, and social ministry. One of its most popular initiatives is its retreats, which are held at Fordham's McGrath House of Prayer in Goshen, NY and other retreat houses in the Greater New York area.

Global Outreach! (¡GO!) is a student-run organization that leads service projects to various locations around the country and the world, with the goal of promoting social justice and fostering a sense of individual responsibility among the student body. ¡GO! currently sponsors 27 annual projects over the winter, spring, and summer breaks that deal with such issues as HIV/AIDS, affordable housing, migrant labor, and environmental justice.

Military education


The Fordham Military Science program is available to all undergraduate and graduate students, regardless of their chosen course of study. It is also available to students at over 50 other New York area colleges and universities. The program consists of membership and training in the Ram Battalion of the Army Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) and a sequence of military science classes taught on campus. Participants in the program are also eligible to enroll in the Air Force ROTC program at Manhattan College
Manhattan College
Manhattan College is a Roman Catholic liberal arts college in the Lasallian tradition in New York City, United States. Despite the college's name, it is no longer located in Manhattan but in the Riverdale section of the Bronx, roughly 10 miles north of Midtown. Manhattan College offers...

 and the Navy ROTC program at SUNY Maritime College
State University of New York Maritime College
SUNY Maritime College is a maritime college located in the Bronx, New York City in historic Fort Schuyler on the Throggs Neck peninsula where the East River meets Long Island Sound...

. In 2011, Fordham Military Science began offering a combat nursing program in conjunction with Regis University
Regis University
Regis University is a private, co-educational Roman Catholic, Jesuit university in the United States. Founded by the Society of Jesus in 1877, it is one of 28 member institutions of the Association of Jesuit Colleges and Universities...

 and the University of Colorado at Denver.

The Military Science program has several notable alumni, including former Secretary of State
Secretary of State
Secretary of State or State Secretary is a commonly used title for a senior or mid-level post in governments around the world. The role varies between countries, and in some cases there are multiple Secretaries of State in the Government....

 Colin Powell
Colin Powell
Colin Luther Powell is an American statesman and a retired four-star general in the United States Army. He was the 65th United States Secretary of State, serving under President George W. Bush from 2001 to 2005. He was the first African American to serve in that position. During his military...

, four-star General John M. Keane, and at least four recipients of the Medal of Honor
Medal of Honor
The Medal of Honor is the highest military decoration awarded by the United States government. It is bestowed by the President, in the name of Congress, upon members of the United States Armed Forces who distinguish themselves through "conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his or her...

. The program has been distinguished as being in the top fifteen percent of military science programs in the country.

In addition to the Military Science program, Fordham contributes to military education through the FordhamVets initiative, which provides financial assistance to veterans looking to attend the University to complete a degree. The initiative was one of the primary reasons that Fordham ranked 34th on the Military Times EDGE list of "veteran-friendly" universities in the United States.

Fraternities and sororities


Like many Jesuit institutions, Fordham does not have any Greek letter fraternities or sororities on campus. Nevertheless, it does have a number of organizations that are similar to fraternities and sororities in both structure and function. The University has an informal system of Houses off campus, which performs many of the same social functions as a traditional Greek system (though in a milder context). Most of the houses are independent, but some are affiliated with specific clubs and athletic teams on campus. In addition, Campus Ministry oversees a number of Christian Life Communities, co-ed, faith-based social organizations that meet weekly to discuss spirituality, build friendships, and “put the Gospel values into action.” Finally, the University supports a chapter of Pershing Rifles
Pershing Rifles
The Pershing Rifles is a military fraternal organization for college-level students, founded by then 2nd Lieutenant John J. Pershing in 1894 as a drill unit at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln...

, the national military fraternity.

The Jack Coffey College Council is Fordham's chapter of the Knights of Columbus
Knights of Columbus
The Knights of Columbus is the world's largest Catholic fraternal service organization. Founded in the United States in 1882, it is named in honor of Christopher Columbus....

, the national Catholic service fraternity and secret society for men. Committed to the advancement of charity, unity, fraternity, and patriotism, the council meets weekly for various social, service, and spiritual activities and operates a sister organization on campus, the St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Society.

The Fordham Club is a senior society that serves as an advisory board to the President of the University. Composed of about 30 students who are generally at or near the top of the senior class, the club meets every month to discuss various issues surrounding the student experience at Fordham and make recommendations to the president regarding these issues.

Traditions


Fordham University has many traditions, some of which are listed below:
  • The President's Ball: The President's Ball takes place every autumn on the night before the Homecoming
    Homecoming
    Homecoming is the tradition of welcoming back alumni of a school. It most commonly refers to a tradition in many universities, colleges and high schools in North America...

     football game. It is a semi-formal event held underneath a tent at the Rose Hill campus on Edward's Parade Ground, the University's largest quadrangle. The event is hosted by the Office of the President, which is from where it gets its name.
  • Under the Tent: The "Under the Tent" Dance is a semi-formal event that is held the weekend before final exams. It takes place underneath a tent on Martyrs' Lawn, the University's second-largest quadrangle, and has a different theme each year. The dance is part of the Spring Weekend Festival, which also includes two concerts, a celebrity Q&A, a race around the Rose Hill campus, and a comedy show.
  • The Festival of Lessons and Carols: The Fordham University Choir presents a concert of Lessons and Carols
    Nine Lessons and Carols
    The Festival of Nine Lessons and Carols is a format for a service of Christian worship celebrating the birth of Jesus that is traditionally followed at Christmas...

     every year during the Christmas
    Christmas
    Christmas or Christmas Day is an annual holiday generally celebrated on December 25 by billions of people around the world. It is a Christian feast that commemorates the birth of Jesus Christ, liturgically closing the Advent season and initiating the season of Christmastide, which lasts twelve days...

     season. The choir performs one afternoon concert at the University Church on the Rose Hill campus and one evening concert at the Church of Saint Paul the Apostle next to the Lincoln Center campus.
  • Midnight Breakfast: Each semester, the official beginning of the final exam period is marked by a "midnight breakfast," in which professors cook students their favorite breakfast items so as to prepare them for the long night of studying ahead.
  • The Liberty Cup: The Liberty Cup is awarded annually to the winner of the football game between Fordham and Columbia Universities, the only two NCAA Division I football teams in New York City. The tradition began in 2002, a year after the Fordham-Columbia game was postponed due to the September 11th attacks (hence the name).
  • Encaenia: Fordham College at Rose Hill hosts an Encaenia
    Encaenia
    Encaenia is an academic or sometimes ecclesiastical ceremony, usually performed at colleges or universities. It generally occurs some time near the annual ceremony for the general conference of degrees to students...

     in early May each year. Faculty, administrators, and students process in academic regalia, and candidates for degrees at the current year's Commencement receive various awards and honors. The ceremony includes a sentimental speech by the year's valedictorian
    Valedictorian
    Valedictorian is an academic title conferred upon the student who delivers the closing or farewell statement at a graduation ceremony. Usually, the valedictorian is the highest ranked student among those graduating from an educational institution...

     as well as a generally more humorous yet equally endearing speech by the honorary Lord or Lady of the Manor selected for the evening.

Symbols


There are several symbols associated with Fordham University, some of which are listed below:
  • Maroon: Fordham's official color was originally magenta
    Magenta
    Magenta is a color evoked by light stronger in blue and red wavelengths than in yellowish-green wavelengths . In light experiments, magenta can be produced by removing the lime-green wavelengths from white light...

    , but magenta was also used by Fordham's archrival, Harvard University. Since it was improper for the two schools to be wearing the same color in athletic competitions, the matter was to be settled by a series of baseball games. The winning team could lay claim to magenta; the losing team would have to find a new color. Fordham won, but Harvard reneged on its promise. Later, in 1874, at a meeting of the student body, one of the matters dicussed was that of choosing an official college color that would belong to Fordham and Fordham alone. Stephen Wall ('75), suggested maroon, a color not widely used at the time. He explained that it looked "something like claret wine with the sun shining through it." The committee charged with determining the official color unanimously agreed, and maroon has been the official color ever since. Ironically, Harvard also stopped using magenta in favor of crimson.
  • The Ram: The Ram
    Bighorn Sheep
    The bighorn sheep is a species of sheep in North America named for its large horns. These horns can weigh up to , while the sheep themselves weigh up to . Recent genetic testing indicates that there are three distinct subspecies of Ovis canadensis, one of which is endangered: Ovis canadensis sierrae...

     became Fordham's mascot as a result of a slightly vulgar cheer that Fordham fans sang during an 1893 football game against the United States Military Academy
    United States Military Academy
    The United States Military Academy at West Point is a four-year coeducational federal service academy located at West Point, New York. The academy sits on scenic high ground overlooking the Hudson River, north of New York City...

     at West Point. The students began cheering "One-damn, two-damn, three-damn ... Fordham!" It was an instant hit, but "damn" was later sanitized to "ram" to conform to the University's image.
  • The Victory Bell: Presented to Fordham by Admiral Chester W. Nimitz, LL.D. ('44), the Victory Bell was the ship's bell of the Japanese warship Junyo. It currently stands in front of the gymnasium at the Rose Hill campus. On May 11, 1946, the Charter Centenary of the University, President Harry S. Truman became the first to ring the Victory Bell on campus. Today, it peals following Ram athletic victories, and its ringing signals the beginning of Commencement each year.
  • The Great Seal: The Great Seal of Fordham University was designed to acknowledge the presence of the members of the Society of Jesus
    Society of Jesus
    The Society of Jesus is a Catholic male religious order that follows the teachings of the Catholic Church. The members are called Jesuits, and are also known colloquially as "God's Army" and as "The Company," these being references to founder Ignatius of Loyola's military background and a...

    , hence the Coat of Arms
    Coat of arms
    A coat of arms is a unique heraldic design on a shield or escutcheon or on a surcoat or tabard used to cover and protect armour and to identify the wearer. Thus the term is often stated as "coat-armour", because it was anciently displayed on the front of a coat of cloth...

     of the Society in the center of the seal. Around this central fact is grouped the name of the University, the date of its founding, its motto, and its various schools. The Coat of Arms of the Society of Jesus bears the Greek letters of the lapidary form of the name of Jesus (IHS) with the cross resting on the crossed line of the H, the three nails beneath, all in gold in a field framed in maroon, the color of the University, with silver fleur-de-lis on the edge of the maroon frame, in remembrance of the French Jesuits who arrived in 1846. Immediately above the central shield rests the laurel crown enclosing the tiles of the areas of learning of the college when it was first granted University status in 1907: arts, science, philosophy
    Philosophy
    Philosophy is the study of general and fundamental problems, such as those connected with existence, knowledge, values, reason, mind, and language. Philosophy is distinguished from other ways of addressing such problems by its critical, generally systematic approach and its reliance on rational...

    , medicine
    Medicine
    Medicine is the science and art of healing. It encompasses a variety of health care practices evolved to maintain and restore health by the prevention and treatment of illness....

    , and law
    Law
    Law is a system of rules and guidelines which are enforced through social institutions to govern behavior, wherever possible. It shapes politics, economics and society in numerous ways and serves as a social mediator of relations between people. Contract law regulates everything from buying a bus...

    . Below the central shield is a blue scroll with the motto of the University, Sapientia et Doctrina. The scroll rests on a gold field emblematic of learning (doctrina); scattered over the field are fiery tongues emblematic of the Holy Spirit
    Holy Spirit
    Holy Spirit is a term introduced in English translations of the Hebrew Bible, but understood differently in the main Abrahamic religions.While the general concept of a "Spirit" that permeates the cosmos has been used in various religions Holy Spirit is a term introduced in English translations of...

     of Wisdom (sapientia), as evinced on the first Pentecost
    Pentecost
    Pentecost is a prominent feast in the calendar of Ancient Israel celebrating the giving of the Law on Sinai, and also later in the Christian liturgical year commemorating the descent of the Holy Spirit upon the disciples of Christ after the Resurrection of Jesus...

    . In a circular maroon field edged with laurel-colored beads is the title of the University, Universitas Fordhamensis. At the lower edge of the circular field is the date of the founding of the University, 1841. Finally, surrounding the entire seal, is a heraldic belt. The belt is used as a stylistic decoration to the seal; however, Oxford University, one of the few schools that uses the belt in its seal, maintains that without the belt, the seal is not official.
  • The mace: The mace
    Ceremonial mace
    The ceremonial mace is a highly ornamented staff of metal or wood, carried before a sovereign or other high official in civic ceremonies by a mace-bearer, intended to represent the official's authority. The mace, as used today, derives from the original mace used as a weapon...

     of Fordham University is traditionally carried at Commencement by the President of the Faculty Senate, who serves as the Grand Marshal of the academic procession. The device, four feet in length, bears a regal crown
    Crown (heraldry)
    A Crown is often an emblem of the monarchy, a monarch's government, or items endorsed by it; see The Crown. A specific type of crown is employed in heraldry under strict rules....

     at the summit to denote the delegated sovereignty of the University of the State of New York
    University of the State of New York
    The University of the State of New York is the State of New York's governmental umbrella organization responsible for most institutions and people in any way connected with formal educational functions, public and private, in New York State...

     to grant academic degrees. Above the crown is a cross
    Cross
    A cross is a geometrical figure consisting of two lines or bars perpendicular to each other, dividing one or two of the lines in half. The lines usually run vertically and horizontally; if they run obliquely, the design is technically termed a saltire, although the arms of a saltire need not meet...

     composed of four windmill
    Windmill
    A windmill is a machine which converts the energy of wind into rotational energy by means of vanes called sails or blades. Originally windmills were developed for milling grain for food production. In the course of history the windmill was adapted to many other industrial uses. An important...

     sails to signify the faith and the Dutch
    Dutch people
    The Dutch people are an ethnic group native to the Netherlands. They share a common culture and speak the Dutch language. Dutch people and their descendants are found in migrant communities worldwide, notably in Suriname, Chile, Brazil, Canada, Australia, South Africa, New Zealand, and the United...

     founding fathers of New Amsterdam
    New Amsterdam
    New Amsterdam was a 17th-century Dutch colonial settlement that served as the capital of New Netherland. It later became New York City....

    . The center of the cross displays a heraldic rose
    Rose
    A rose is a woody perennial of the genus Rosa, within the family Rosaceae. There are over 100 species. They form a group of erect shrubs, and climbing or trailing plants, with stems that are often armed with sharp prickles. Flowers are large and showy, in colours ranging from white through yellows...

     for Rose Hill. Immediately beneath the crown is a support with the Fordham seal emblazoned. The upper node of the staff is decorated with three heraldic roses, the Fordham seal, the ram's head, and a silhouette of Fordham's Lincoln Center campus. The names of Fordham's schools are engraved above the node, and the names of Fordham's presidents from 1841 to 1966 are engraved below the node. The mace was a gift to the University from the Fordham University Alumni Federation.
  • The Terrace of the Presidents: Robert Gannon, S.J., President of Fordham University from 1936 to 1949, initiated the custom of engraving the granite steps leading up to Keating Hall with the names of heads of state who have received honorary doctorates from Fordham. Among the first names included were President Franklin Delano Roosevelt (1940) and President Harry S. Truman (1946). More recently, the names of President Corazon Aquino of the Philippines (1986), President Mary Robinson of Ireland (1995), and President Mary McAleese of Ireland (2010) have been added to the Terrace.
  • School songs: Fordham's official school song is "Alma Mater Fordham," and its fight song
    Fight song
    A fight song is primarily an American and Canadian sports term, referring to a song associated with a team. In both professional and amateur sports, fight songs are a popular way for fans to cheer for their team...

     is "Fordham Ram" by J. Ignatius Coveney. "The Marching Song" is typically played during parades and after athletic games (particularly after a Fordham victory).

Alumni and faculty


Fordham has over 125,000 alumni spread throughout the world, supported by the University's Office of Alumni Relations as well as more than 40 regional chapters in the US and abroad. Alumni benefits include unlimited access to all University campuses, membership opportunities at the Princeton Club of New York
Princeton Club of New York
The Princeton Club of New York is a private club located in Midtown Manhattan, New York City, New York, USA. Its membership is composed almost entirely of alumni and faculty of Princeton University, which is located 40 miles outside New York City in Princeton, New Jersey.Incorporated on December...

, the Hudson Union Society, and the Reebok Sports Club/NY
Sports Club/LA
The Sports Club/LA is a collection of large luxury health clubs located in Los Angeles and in several large city real estate projects in the United States.-History:...

, and discounts on such brands as Choice Hotels
Choice Hotels
Choice Hotels International is a hospitality holding corporation which is affiliated with several hotel brands and is based in Silver Spring, Maryland...

, Hertz
The Hertz Corporation
Hertz Global Holdings Inc is an American car rental company with international locations in 145 countries worldwide.-Early years:The company was founded by Walter L. Jacobs in 1918, who started a car rental operation in Chicago with a dozen Model T Ford cars. In 1923, Jacobs sold it to John D...

, Liberty Mutual
Liberty Mutual
Liberty Mutual Group, more commonly known by the name of its primary line of business Liberty Mutual, is a diversified global insurer and the third largest property and casualty insurer in the United States based on 2010 net written premium. It is the 82nd company on the Fortune 500 list for 2011...

, Lenovo, and the New York Times. These benefits also apply to Fordham faculty members.

Notable alumni


Geraldine Ferraro
Geraldine Ferraro
Geraldine Anne Ferraro was an American attorney, a Democratic Party politician, and a member of the United States House of Representatives. She was the first female Vice Presidential candidate representing a major American political party....

, the first female Vice Presidential candidate of a major political party in the United States, attended Fordham, as did three current members of the United States House of Representatives
United States House of Representatives
The United States House of Representatives is one of the two Houses of the United States Congress, the bicameral legislature which also includes the Senate.The composition and powers of the House are established in Article One of the Constitution...

 and numerous past members of Congress
United States Congress
The United States Congress is the bicameral legislature of the federal government of the United States, consisting of the Senate and the House of Representatives. The Congress meets in the United States Capitol in Washington, D.C....

, including at least two United States Senators. Current New York State Governor, Andrew Cuomo
Andrew Cuomo
Andrew Mark Cuomo is the 56th and current Governor of New York, having assumed office on January 1, 2011. A member of the Democratic Party, he was the 64th New York State Attorney General, and was the 11th United States Secretary of Housing and Urban Development...

, is an alumnus. A number of Fordham graduates have served at the highest levels of the U.S. Executive Branch, including John E. Potter
John E. Potter
John E. "Jack" Potter is the current President and CEO of the Metropolitan Washington Airports Authority since July 18, 2011. He is the former United States Postmaster General and CEO of the United States Postal Service , having become the 72nd Postmaster General on June 1, 2001.-Early postal...

, former Postmaster General of the United States; William J. Casey
William J. Casey
William Joseph Casey was the Director of Central Intelligence from 1981 to 1987. In this capacity he oversaw the entire United States Intelligence Community and personally directed the Central Intelligence Agency ....

, U.S. Director of Central Intelligence from 1981 to 1987; John N. Mitchell
John N. Mitchell
John Newton Mitchell was the Attorney General of the United States from 1969 to 1972 under President Richard Nixon...

, former U.S. Attorney General; and Bernard M. Shanley
Bernard M. Shanley
Bernard Michael Shanley was best known for his work with U.S. President Dwight D. Eisenhower. He served under President Eisenhower as Deputy White House Chief of Staff, Appointments Secretary and Special Counsel .-Biography:Shanley was born in Newark, New Jersey on August 4, 1903 and began his...

, Deputy Chief of Staff
Chief of Staff
The title, chief of staff, identifies the leader of a complex organization, institution, or body of persons and it also may identify a Principal Staff Officer , who is the coordinator of the supporting staff or a primary aide to an important individual, such as a president.In general, a chief of...

 and White House Counsel
White House Counsel
The White House Counsel is a staff appointee of the President of the United States.-Role:The Counsel's role is to advise the President on all legal issues concerning the President and the White House...

 to President Dwight D. Eisenhower
Dwight D. Eisenhower
Dwight David "Ike" Eisenhower was the 34th President of the United States, from 1953 until 1961. He was a five-star general in the United States Army...

. Fordham claims a number of distinguished military honorees, including three Medal of Honor
Medal of Honor
The Medal of Honor is the highest military decoration awarded by the United States government. It is bestowed by the President, in the name of Congress, upon members of the United States Armed Forces who distinguish themselves through "conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his or her...

 recipients and a number of notable generals
General Staff
A military staff, often referred to as General Staff, Army Staff, Navy Staff or Air Staff within the individual services, is a group of officers and enlisted personnel that provides a bi-directional flow of information between a commanding officer and subordinate military units...

, including General John "Jack" Keane
Jack Keane
John Keane is a retired four-star general and former Vice Chief of Staff of the United States Army, and a defense analyst currently serving as Chairman of the Board for .-Biography:...

, retired four-star general and former Vice Chief of Staff for the United States Army
United States Army
The United States Army is the main branch of the United States Armed Forces responsible for land-based military operations. It is the largest and oldest established branch of the U.S. military, and is one of seven U.S. uniformed services...

, and Major General Martin Thomas McMahon, decorated American Civil War
American Civil War
The American Civil War was a civil war fought in the United States of America. In response to the election of Abraham Lincoln as President of the United States, 11 southern slave states declared their secession from the United States and formed the Confederate States of America ; the other 25...

 officer. Fordham has produced college and university presidents for at least 10 institutions around the United States, including two for Georgetown University
Georgetown University
Georgetown University is a private, Jesuit, research university whose main campus is in the Georgetown neighborhood of Washington, D.C. Founded in 1789, it is the oldest Catholic university in the United States...

 and one each for Columbia University
Columbia University
Columbia University in the City of New York is a private, Ivy League university in Manhattan, New York City. Columbia is the oldest institution of higher learning in the state of New York, the fifth oldest in the United States, and one of the country's nine Colonial Colleges founded before the...

 and New York University
New York University
New York University is a private, nonsectarian research university based in New York City. NYU's main campus is situated in the Greenwich Village section of Manhattan...

.

Business and finance magnates that have attended Fordham include Anne M. Mulcahy
Anne M. Mulcahy
Anne M. Mulcahy is former chairwoman and CEO of Xerox Corporation. She was named CEO of Xerox on August 1, 2001, and chairwoman on January 1, 2002. In addition to serving on the Xerox board, she has been a member of the boards of directors of Catalyst, Citigroup Inc., Fuji Xerox Co. Ltd...

, retired Chairman and CEO of Xerox
Xerox
Xerox Corporation is an American multinational document management corporation that produced and sells a range of color and black-and-white printers, multifunction systems, photo copiers, digital production printing presses, and related consulting services and supplies...

 and named one of the "50 Most Powerful Women in Business" in 2006 by Fortune Magazine; Rose Marie Bravo
Rose Marie Bravo
Rose Marie Bravo is an American businesswoman. During her career, she has occupied leadership positions in several major fashion businesses and is now vice chairman at Burberry, of which she was CEO from 1997 to 2005....

, Vice Chairman and former CEO of Burberry
Burberry
Burberry Group plc is a British luxury fashion house, manufacturing clothing, fragrance, and fashion accessories. Its distinctive tartan pattern has become one of its most widely copied trademarks. Burberry is most famous for its iconic trench coat, which was invented by founder Thomas Burberry...

 and named one of the "50 Most Powerful Women in Business Outside the United States" in 2004 and 2005 by Fortune Magazine; E. Gerald Corrigan
E. Gerald Corrigan
Edward Gerald Corrigan is an American banker who was the 7th President of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and Vice-Chairman of the Federal Open Market Committee...

, former President of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York
Federal Reserve Bank of New York
The Federal Reserve Bank of New York is one of the 12 Federal Reserve Banks of the United States. It is located at 33 Liberty Street, New York, NY. It is responsible for the Second District of the Federal Reserve System, which encompasses New York state, the 12 northern counties of New Jersey,...

; Maria Elena Lagomasino
Maria Elena Lagomasino
Maria Elena Lagomasino is a high-ranking business woman who has been CEO and director of such companies as Coca-Cola and JP Morgan Chase. In 2007, she was named Hispanic Business Woman of the Year by Hispanic Business magazine.-Biography:...

, CEO of JP Morgan Private Bank from 2001 to 2005 and currently on the board of directors of Coca-Cola
Coca-Cola
Coca-Cola is a carbonated soft drink sold in stores, restaurants, and vending machines in more than 200 countries. It is produced by The Coca-Cola Company of Atlanta, Georgia, and is often referred to simply as Coke...

; Joe Moglia
Joe Moglia
Joe Moglia is the current head football coach of the Omaha Nighthawks of the United Football League. Moglia is also the current Chairman and former CEO of TD Ameritrade, the largest online discount brokerage firm in the world in terms of the number of retail online equity trades placed each...

, Chairman and former CEO of TD Ameritrade
TD Ameritrade
TD Ameritrade is an American online broker with over 6 million U.S. customers, and many more internationally, that has grown rapidly through acquisition to become the 746th-largest US firm in 2008. TD Ameritrade Holding Corporation is the owner of TD Ameritrade Inc...

; John Leahy, Chief Operating Officer of Airbus
Airbus
Airbus SAS is an aircraft manufacturing subsidiary of EADS, a European aerospace company. Based in Blagnac, France, surburb of Toulouse, and with significant activity across Europe, the company produces around half of the world's jet airliners....

; Stephen J. Hemsley
Stephen J. Hemsley
Stephen J. Hemsley has been CEO of UnitedHealth Group Inc since 2006. Before joining the company in 1997, he had a career at Arthur Andersen, where he was Managing Partner and Chief Financial Officer....

, CEO of UnitedHealth Group
UnitedHealth Group
UnitedHealth Group Incorporated is a diversified health and "well-being" company. Headquartered in Minnetonka, Minnesota, UnitedHealth Group offers a spectrum of products and services through two operating businesses: United Healthcare and Optum. Through its family of subsidiaries and divisions,...

; Wellington Mara
Wellington Mara
Wellington Timothy Mara was the co-owner of the NFL's New York Giants from 1959 until his death, and one of the most influential and iconic figures in the history of the National Football League. He was the younger son of Tim Mara, who founded the Giants in 1925...

, former owner of the New York Giants
New York Giants
The New York Giants are a professional American football team based in East Rutherford, New Jersey, representing the New York City metropolitan area. The Giants are currently members of the Eastern Division of the National Football Conference in the National Football League...

; Mario Gabelli
Mario Gabelli
Mario Joseph Gabelli is an American stock investor, investment advisor, and financial analyst. He is the founder, chairman, and CEO of Gabelli Asset Management Company Investors a $30 billion dollar global investment firm headquartered in Rye, New York...

, billionaire
Billionaire
A billionaire, in countries that use the short scale number naming system, is a person who has a net worth of at least one billion units of a given currency, usually the United States dollar, Euro, or Pound sterling. Forbes magazine updates a complete list of U.S. dollar billionaires around the...

 and founder and CEO of GAMCO Investors
GAMCO Investors
GAMCO Investors, Inc formerly known as Gabelli Asset Management Company is a provider of investment advice and brokerage services to mutual funds, institutional and select investors. One of the companies key elements of their success is the investment research publishing. It is listed on the New...

; Lorenzo Mendoza
Lorenzo Mendoza
Lorenzo Mendoza Giménez oversees Venezuela's largest privately held company, $ 4 billion Empresas Polar. He is the son of Lorenzo Alejandro Mendoza Quintero and Leonor Giménez Pocaterra.-Early life:...

, billionaire
Billionaire
A billionaire, in countries that use the short scale number naming system, is a person who has a net worth of at least one billion units of a given currency, usually the United States dollar, Euro, or Pound sterling. Forbes magazine updates a complete list of U.S. dollar billionaires around the...

 and CEO of Empresas Polar
Empresas Polar
Empresas Polar is a Venezuelan corporation, that started as a brewery founded in 1941 by Lorenzo Alejandro Mendoza Fleury in Antímano, Caracas. It is the largest and best known brewery in Venezuela, but has since long diversified to an array of industries, mostly related to food processing and...

; Eugene Shvidler
Eugene Shvidler
Evgeny Markovich Shvidler , also Eugene Shvidler, is a Russian oil businessman. Although not often referred to as one of the prominent business oligarchs, he still made his fortune in Russia during the privatization of Russian industry....

, billionaire
Billionaire
A billionaire, in countries that use the short scale number naming system, is a person who has a net worth of at least one billion units of a given currency, usually the United States dollar, Euro, or Pound sterling. Forbes magazine updates a complete list of U.S. dollar billionaires around the...

 and international oil tycoon; and billionaire
Billionaire
A billionaire, in countries that use the short scale number naming system, is a person who has a net worth of at least one billion units of a given currency, usually the United States dollar, Euro, or Pound sterling. Forbes magazine updates a complete list of U.S. dollar billionaires around the...

 Donald Trump
Donald Trump
Donald John Trump, Sr. is an American business magnate, television personality and author. He is the chairman and president of The Trump Organization and the founder of Trump Entertainment Resorts. Trump's extravagant lifestyle, outspoken manner and role on the NBC reality show The Apprentice have...

 (attended, no degree).

In the media and communications field, Fordham has produced Charles Osgood
Charles Osgood
Charles Osgood is a radio and television commentator in the United States. His daily program, The Osgood File, has been broadcast on the CBS Radio Network since 1971. He is also known for being the voice of the narrator of Horton Hears a Who!, an animated film released in 2008, based on the book...

, three-time Emmy Award
Emmy Award
An Emmy Award, often referred to simply as the Emmy, is a television production award, similar in nature to the Peabody Awards but more focused on entertainment, and is considered the television equivalent to the Academy Awards and the Grammy Awards .A majority of Emmys are presented in various...

 and two-time Peabody Award
Peabody Award
The George Foster Peabody Awards recognize distinguished and meritorious public service by radio and television stations, networks, producing organizations and individuals. In 1939, the National Association of Broadcasters formed a committee to recognize outstanding achievement in radio broadcasting...

-winning journalist for CBS
CBS
CBS Broadcasting Inc. is a major US commercial broadcasting television network, which started as a radio network. The name is derived from the initials of the network's former name, Columbia Broadcasting System. The network is sometimes referred to as the "Eye Network" in reference to the shape of...

 and Radio Hall of Fame
Radio Hall of Fame
The National Radio Hall of Fame is a project of the Museum of Broadcast Communications.Although no physical building currently exists to house it, the National Radio Hall of Fame is a project of Bruce DuMont, CEO of the currently homeless Museum of Broadcast Communications, and is purported to be a...

 inductee; Louis Boccardi
Louis Boccardi
Louis D. Boccardi was President and Chief Executive Officer of The Associated Press , the world’s largest news organization, from 1985 until his retirement in 2003...

, retired President of the Associated Press
Associated Press
The Associated Press is an American news agency. The AP is a cooperative owned by its contributing newspapers, radio and television stations in the United States, which both contribute stories to the AP and use material written by its staff journalists...

; Pulitzer Prize
Pulitzer Prize
The Pulitzer Prize is a U.S. award for achievements in newspaper and online journalism, literature and musical composition. It was established by American publisher Joseph Pulitzer and is administered by Columbia University in New York City...

-winning journalist Loretta Tofani
Loretta Tofani
Loretta Tofani is a Pulitzer Prize-winning American journalist.-Life:Tofani earned a bachelor’s degree from Fordham University in 1975 and a master’s degree in journalism from the University of California, Berkeley...

; G. Gordon Liddy
G. Gordon Liddy
George Gordon Liddy was the chief operative for the White House Plumbers unit that existed from July–September 1971, during Richard Nixon's presidency. Separately, along with E. Howard Hunt, Liddy organized and directed the Watergate burglaries of the Democratic National Committee headquarters in...

, political operative for President Richard Nixon, leader of the White House Plumbers
White House Plumbers
The White House Plumbers, sometimes simply called the Plumbers, were a covert White House Special Investigations Unit established July 24, 1971 during the presidency of Richard Nixon. Its task was to stop the leaking of classified information to the news media...

, political pundit, and radio show host; and Baseball Hall of Fame broadcaster and Radio Hall of Famer Vin Scully
Vin Scully
Vincent Edward Scully is an American sportscaster, known primarily as the play-by-play voice of the Brooklyn and Los Angeles Dodgers baseball team on Prime Ticket, KCAL-TV and KABC radio...

.

Fordham's list of contributions to the arts and entertainment industry is long and includes Alan Alda
Alan Alda
Alphonso Joseph D'Abruzzo , better known as Alan Alda, is an American actor, director, screenwriter, and author. A six-time Emmy Award and Golden Globe Award winner, he is best known for his role as Hawkeye Pierce in the TV series M*A*S*H...

, six-time Emmy Award
Emmy Award
An Emmy Award, often referred to simply as the Emmy, is a television production award, similar in nature to the Peabody Awards but more focused on entertainment, and is considered the television equivalent to the Academy Awards and the Grammy Awards .A majority of Emmys are presented in various...

 and six-time Golden Globe Award
Golden Globe Award
The Golden Globe Award is an accolade bestowed by the 93 members of the Hollywood Foreign Press Association recognizing excellence in film and television, both domestic and foreign...

-winning actor; Mary Higgins Clark
Mary Higgins Clark
Mary Theresa Eleanor Higgins Clark Conheeney , known professionally as Mary Higgins Clark, is an American author of suspense novels...

, best-selling suspense novelist; Bob Keeshan
Bob Keeshan
Robert James "Bob" Keeshan was an American television producer and actor. He is most notable as the title character of the children's television program Captain Kangaroo, which became an icon for millions of people during its 30-year run from 1955 to 1984.Keeshan also played the original...

, television's multiple award-winning "Captain Kangaroo
Captain Kangaroo
Captain Kangaroo is a children's television series which aired weekday mornings on the American television network CBS for nearly 30 years, from October 3, 1955 until December 8, 1984, making it the longest-running children's television program of its day...

;" John LaFarge
John LaFarge
John La Farge was an American painter, muralist, stained glass window maker, decorator, and writer.-Biography:...

, painter, muralist, and designer of stained-glass windows; Virginia O'Hanlon, who, as a child, wrote a letter to the New York Sun
New York Sun
The New York Sun was a weekday daily newspaper published in New York City from 2002 to 2008. When it debuted on April 16, 2002, adopting the name, motto, and masthead of an otherwise unrelated earlier New York paper, The Sun , it became the first general-interest broadsheet newspaper to be started...

that prompted the famous response "Yes, Virginia, there is a Santa Claus
Yes, Virginia, there is a Santa Claus
Is There a Santa Claus? was the title of an editorial appearing in the September 21, 1897, edition of The New York Sun. The editorial, which included the famous reply "Yes, Virginia, there is a Santa Claus", has become an indelible part of popular Christmas folklore in the United States and...

;" Tony Reali
Tony Reali
Anthony Joseph Paul "Tony" Reali is an American sports personality and television host, and the current host of Around the Horn on ESPN...

, Host of ESPN's Around The Horn
Around the Horn
Around the Horn is a daily, half-hour sports roundtable on ESPN filmed in Washington, D.C. It airs at 5:00 pm ET, as part of a sports talk hour with Pardon the Interruption. The show is currently hosted by Tony Reali.-History:Around the Horn premiered on November 4, 2002, hosted by Max Kellerman...

; J-14 Magazine editor Rachel Sheehan; and Denzel Washington
Denzel Washington
Denzel Hayes Washington Jr. is an American actor, screenwriter, director, and film producer. He first rose to prominence when he joined the cast of the medical drama, St. Elsewhere, playing Dr...

, two-time Academy Award and two-time Golden Globe Award
Golden Globe Award
The Golden Globe Award is an accolade bestowed by the 93 members of the Hollywood Foreign Press Association recognizing excellence in film and television, both domestic and foreign...

-winning actor.

Among the giants of sports who attended Fordham are Frankie Frisch
Frankie Frisch
Francis “Frankie” Frisch , nicknamed the "Fordham Flash" or "The Old Flash", was a German American Major League Baseball player of the early twentieth century....

 (known as the "Fordham Flash"), Baseball Hall of Fame inductee; Vince Lombardi
Vince Lombardi
Vincent Thomas "Vince" Lombardi was an American football coach. He is best known as the head coach of the Green Bay Packers during the 1960s, where he led the team to three straight league championships and five in seven years, including winning the first two Super Bowls following the 1966 and...

, football coaching legend; Bill Chadwick
Bill Chadwick
William Leroy "The Big Whistle" Chadwick was the first US-born referee to serve in the National Hockey League...

, Hockey Hall of Fame
Hockey Hall of Fame
The Hockey Hall of Fame is located in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Dedicated to the history of ice hockey, it is both a museum and a hall of fame. It holds exhibits about players, teams, National Hockey League records, memorabilia and NHL trophies, including the Stanley Cup...

 inductee; Tom Courtney
Tom Courtney
Thomas William Courtney is a former American athlete, winner of two gold medals at the 1956 Summer Olympics....

, two-time Olympic gold medalist and holder of the world record in the 880-yard run; and Steve Bellán
Steve Bellán
Estevan Enrique "Steve" Bellán , also known as Esteban, was a Cuban professional baseball player who played as a third baseman for six seasons in the United States , three in the National Association of Base Ball Players from 1868 to , and three in the National Association of Professional Base...

, the first Latin American to play Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball is the highest level of professional baseball in the United States and Canada, consisting of teams that play in the National League and the American League...

.

Notable faculty

  • Joseph Abboud
    Joseph Abboud
    Joseph Abboud is an award-winning Lebanese American menswear fashion designer and author.-Family:The Abboud family was a working-class Christian Lebanese family that started out in the South End of Boston and later moved to the Roslindale section of Boston. Abboud's mother, Lila, was a seamstress...

    , fashion designer
  • Bruce Andrews
    Bruce Andrews
    Bruce Andrews is a U.S. poet who is one of the key figures associated with the Language poets .-Life and work:...

    , poet and theorist on the state and global capitalism
  • Hilaire Belloc
    Hilaire Belloc
    Joseph Hilaire Pierre René Belloc was an Anglo-French writer and historian who became a naturalised British subject in 1902. He was one of the most prolific writers in England during the early twentieth century. He was known as a writer, orator, poet, satirist, man of letters and political activist...

    , writer
  • Doron Ben-Atar
    Doron Ben-Atar
    Doron Ben-Atar is an Israeli-born American historian and playwright. He is head of the History Department at Fordham University in New York.-Biography:...

    , historian
  • Daniel Berrigan, S.J.
    Daniel Berrigan
    Daniel Berrigan, SJ is an American Catholic priest, peace activist, and poet. Daniel and his brother Philip were for a time on the FBI Ten Most Wanted Fugitives list for their involvement in antiwar protests during the Vietnam war....

    , poet-in-residence and world-renowned peace activist
  • Mary Bly
    Mary Bly
    Mary Bly is a tenured associate professor of English Literature at Fordham University who also writes best-selling Regency romance novels under the pen name Eloisa James.She is the daughter of poet Robert Bly and short-story author Carol Bly....

    , writer
  • Joseph Campbell
    Joseph Campbell (poet)
    Joseph Campbell was an Irish poet and lyricist. He wrote under the Gaelicised version of his name Seosamh Mac Cathmhaoil...

    , poet, Irish studies scholar, and Irish republican and POW
  • John M. Culkin
    John M. Culkin
    John M. Culkin, SJ, PhD , leading media scholar and critic, educator, writer and consultant.-Early life and education:John Culkin was born in 1928 to an Irish-Catholic family from Brooklyn. He and his brother Gerald attended Xavier High School, an elite Jesuit College Preparatory High School, in...

    , leading media scholar and critic, educator, writer, and consultant
  • Avery Dulles, S.J., theologian and Cardinal
    Cardinal (Catholicism)
    A cardinal is a senior ecclesiastical official, usually an ordained bishop, and ecclesiastical prince of the Catholic Church. They are collectively known as the College of Cardinals, which as a body elects a new pope. The duties of the cardinals include attending the meetings of the College and...

     of the Roman Catholic Church
    Roman Catholic Church
    The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the world's largest Christian church, with over a billion members. Led by the Pope, it defines its mission as spreading the gospel of Jesus Christ, administering the sacraments and exercising charity...

  • Victor Francis Hess
    Victor Francis Hess
    Victor Francis Hess was an Austrian-American physicist, and Nobel laureate in physics, who discovered cosmic rays.-Early years:...

    , Nobel Laureate for physics
  • Elizabeth Johnson, Christian feminist theologian
  • Carl Jung
    Carl Jung
    Carl Gustav Jung was a Swiss psychiatrist and the founder of Analytical Psychology. Jung is considered the first modern psychiatrist to view the human psyche as "by nature religious" and make it the focus of exploration. Jung is one of the best known researchers in the field of dream analysis and...

    , psychologist
  • Beth Knobel, Emmy Award-winning former Moscow Bureau Chief for CBS News
  • Joseph Koterski, S.J.
    Joseph Koterski
    Joseph Koterski, S.J. is an American Jesuit priest, philosopher, author, and currently associate professor and chair of the Philosophy Department at Fordham University in the Bronx, New York.-Academic career:...

    , philosopher, author
  • Paul Levinson
    Paul Levinson
    Paul Levinson is an American author and professor of communications and media studies at Fordham University in New York City. Levinson's novels, short fiction, and non-fiction works have been translated into twelve languages....

    , author of The Plot To Save Socrates
    The Plot To Save Socrates
    The Plot to Save Socrates is a time travel novel by Paul Levinson, first published in 2006. Starting in the near future, the novel also has scenes set in the ancient world and Victorian New York.-Summary:...

    and winner of the 1999 Locus Award
    Locus Award
    The Locus Award is a literary award established in 1971 and presented to winners of Locus magazine's annual readers' poll. Currently, the Locus Awards are presented at an annual banquet...

     for Best First Novel
  • Mark Massa, S.J.
    Mark S. Massa
    Mark S. Massa, SJ is the Dean of the Boston College School of Theology and Ministry and Karl Rahner Distinguished Professor of Theology at Fordham University in New York....

    , American Catholicism scholar
  • John James Maximilian Oertel
    John James Maximilian Oertel
    John James Maximilian Oertel was a German-American journalist.-Life:...

    , German-American writer and journalist
  • Marshall McLuhan
    Marshall McLuhan
    Herbert Marshall McLuhan, CC was a Canadian educator, philosopher, and scholar—a professor of English literature, a literary critic, a rhetorician, and a communication theorist...

    , communications theorist and coiner of the phrase "the medium is the message
    The medium is the message
    "The medium is the message" is a phrase coined by Marshall McLuhan meaning that the form of a medium embeds itself in the message, creating a symbiotic relationship by which the medium influences how the message is perceived.- Publications :...

    "
  • Margaret Mead
    Margaret Mead
    Margaret Mead was an American cultural anthropologist, who was frequently a featured writer and speaker in the mass media throughout the 1960s and 1970s....

    , anthropologist
  • William O'Malley, S.J., actor in the film The Exorcist
    The Exorcist (film)
    The Exorcist is a 1973 American horror film directed by William Friedkin, adapted from the 1971 novel of the same name by William Peter Blatty and based on the exorcism case of Robbie Mannheim, dealing with the demonic possession of a young girl and her mother’s desperate attempts to win back her...

    , for which he was also a technical advisor, and author of numerous books
  • Mark D. Naison
    Mark D. Naison
    Mark Naison is a professor of history at Fordham University in New York, and a former political activist who was a member of CORE and SDS in the 1960s. He is a graduate of Columbia University and holds a Ph. D. in American History.-Early life:...

    , political activist
  • Diana Villiers Negroponte
    Diana Villiers Negroponte
    Diana Mary Villiers Negroponte is an English-born American trade lawyer and adjunct professor of law at Fordham University whose professional name is Diana Villiers Negroponte. She is the wife of John Negroponte, the former United States Deputy Secretary of State and former U.S...

    , legal historian and wife of US Director of National Intelligence John Negroponte
    John Negroponte
    John Dimitri Negroponte is an American diplomat. He is currently a research fellow and lecturer in international affairs at Yale University's Jackson Institute for Global Affairs...

  • Willie Perdomo
    Willie Perdomo
    -Overview:Willie Perdomo is a prize-winning Nuyorican poet and children's book author. He is the author of Where a Nickel Costs a Dime , Postcards of El Barrio , and Smoking Lovely , which received a PEN American Center Beyond Margins Award...

    , Nuyorican
    Nuyorican
    Nuyorican is a portmanteau of the terms "New York" and "Puerto Rican" and refers to the members or culture of the Puerto Rican diaspora located in or around New York State especially the New York City metropolitan area, or of their descendants...

     poet and author
  • Phylicia Rashad
    Phylicia Rashad
    Phylicia Rashād is an American Tony Award winning actress and singer, best known for her role as Clair Huxtable on the long-running NBC sitcom The Cosby Show....

    , Tony Award
    Tony Award
    The Antoinette Perry Award for Excellence in Theatre, more commonly known as a Tony Award, recognizes achievement in live Broadway theatre. The awards are presented by the American Theatre Wing and The Broadway League at an annual ceremony in New York City. The awards are given for Broadway...

    -winning actress
  • Jonathan Sanders
    Jonathan Sanders
    Jonathan Sanders is an American semi-professional basketball player and amateur poet. He has played for teams in Lithuania, Japan, and Taiwan with most of his career spent with the Super Basketball League of Taiwan.- Early life :...

    , international journalist
  • Asif Siddiqi, historian specializing in the space race
    Space Race
    The Space Race was a mid-to-late 20th century competition between the Soviet Union and the United States for supremacy in space exploration. Between 1957 and 1975, Cold War rivalry between the two nations focused on attaining firsts in space exploration, which were seen as necessary for national...

     between the United States and the Soviet Union. He is a leading authority on the Soviet Space Program.
  • Dietrich von Hildebrand
    Dietrich von Hildebrand
    Dietrich von Hildebrand was a German Catholic philosopher and theologian who was called by Pope Pius XII "the 20th Century Doctor of the Church."...

    , theologian

In the arts



Fordham's campuses have been featured in a number of films, including the following: The Adjustment Bureau
The Adjustment Bureau
The Adjustment Bureau is a 2011 American fantasy romantic thriller film loosely based on the Philip K. Dick short story, "Adjustment Team". The film was written and directed by George Nolfi and stars Matt Damon and Emily Blunt. The cast also includes Anthony Mackie, John Slattery, Michael Kelly,...

, Awake
Awake (film)
Awake is a 2007 American crime/supernatural/conspiracy thriller written and directed by Joby Harold. It stars Hayden Christensen, Jessica Alba, Terrence Howard and Lena Olin. The film was released in the United States and Canada on November 30, 2007....

, A Beautiful Mind
A Beautiful Mind (film)
A Beautiful Mind is a 2001 American drama film based on the life of John Nash, a Nobel Laureate in Economics. The film was directed by Ron Howard and written by Akiva Goldsman. It was inspired by a bestselling, Pulitzer Prize-nominated 1998 book of the same name by Sylvia Nasar...

, Center Stage
Center Stage
Center Stage is a 2000 American drama film, directed by Nicholas Hytner, about a group of young dancers from various backgrounds who enroll at the fictitious American Ballet Academy in New York City...

, Cheerleaders Beach Party
Cheerleaders Beach Party
Cheerleaders Beach Party is a 1978 comedy film by producer/director Alex E. Goitein and writer Chuck Vincent.It stars Elizabeth Loredan, Jamie Jenson, Lynn Hastings, and Gloria Upson as college cheerleaders out to save their team, the Rambling U...

, The Exorcist
The Exorcist (film)
The Exorcist is a 1973 American horror film directed by William Friedkin, adapted from the 1971 novel of the same name by William Peter Blatty and based on the exorcism case of Robbie Mannheim, dealing with the demonic possession of a young girl and her mother’s desperate attempts to win back her...

, Fair Game
Fair Game (2010 film)
Fair Game is a 2010 biographical film drama directed by Doug Liman and starring Naomi Watts and Sean Penn. It is based on Valerie Plame's memoir, Fair Game: My Life as a Spy, My Betrayal by the White House which details the scandalous events that took place in mid 2003, implicating senior White...

, The Gambler
The Gambler (1974 film)
The Gambler is a 1974 feature film starring James Caan, Lauren Hutton, and Paul Sorvino.The film is loosely based on the short novel The Gambler by Fyodor Dostoyevsky and was filmed at a time when leading actor James Caan was battling his own addiction to cocaine...

, Godspell
Godspell (film)
Godspell, released in 1973, is the film adaptation of the Off-Broadway musical Godspell created by John-Michael Tebelak.Set in modern New York City, the film stars Victor Garber as Jesus and David Haskell as John the Baptist/Judas...

, The Iron Major, Kinsey
Kinsey (film)
Kinsey is a 2004 biographical film written and directed by Bill Condon. It describes the life of Alfred Kinsey , a pioneer in the area of sexology. His 1948 publication, Sexual Behavior in the Human Male was one of the first recorded works that tried to scientifically address and investigate...

, Love Story
Love Story (1970 film)
Love Story is a 1970 romantic drama film written by Erich Segal and based on his novel Love Story. It was directed by Arthur Hiller. The film, well known as a tragedy, is considered one of the most romantic of all time by the American Film Institute , and was followed by a sequel, Oliver's Story...

, Quiz Show
Quiz Show
Quiz Show is a 1994 American historical drama film produced and directed by Robert Redford. Adapted by Paul Attanasio from Richard Goodwin's memoir Remembering America, the film is based upon the Twenty One quiz show scandal of the 1950s...

, Solitary Man
Solitary Man (film)
Solitary Man is a 2009 American film co-directed by Brian Koppelman and David Levien. The film stars Michael Douglas, Susan Sarandon, Jenna Fischer, Jesse Eisenberg, Mary-Louise Parker and Danny DeVito.-Plot:...

, The Verdict
The Verdict
The Verdict is a 1982 courtroom drama film which tells the story of a down-on-his-luck alcoholic lawyer who pushes a medical malpractice case in order to improve his own situation, but discovers along the way that he is doing the right thing. Since the lawsuit involves a woman in a persistent...

, and Wall Street 2: Money Never Sleeps
Wall Street 2: Money Never Sleeps
Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps, also known as Wall Street 2, is a 2010 American drama film directed by Oliver Stone, a sequel to Wall Street . Michael Douglas reprises his role as Gordon Gekko with Shia LaBeouf, Josh Brolin, Carey Mulligan, and Frank Langella also starring in the film. The...

. Rev. William O'Malley, a Jesuit intructor at Fordham Prep School, played Father Dyer in The Exorcist. The film's language lab scene was filmed in Keating Hall on the Rose Hill campus, and the bedroom scene was filmed in Hughes Hall. The 1993 crime drama A Bronx Tale
A Bronx Tale
A Bronx Tale is a 1993 American crime drama film set in The Bronx during the turbulent era of the 1960s. It was the directorial debut of Robert De Niro, and follows a young Italian-American teenager as his path in life is guided by two father figures, played by De Niro and Chazz Palminteri...

is set in the neighborhood around Rose Hill in the 1960s.

Television shows filmed at Fordham include Shattered Vows, a 1984 made-for-TV film starring Valerie Bertinelli
Valerie Bertinelli
Valerie Anne Bertinelli is an American actress, best known for her roles as Barbara Cooper Royer on the television series One Day at a Time , Gloria on the television series Touched by an Angel and Melanie Moretti on the sitcom Hot in Cleveland .- Early years :Bertinelli was born in Wilmington,...

, which portrays the true story of a young nun in the 1960s who goes to Fordham for her master's degree and falls in love with a priest; White Collar, a crime show on USA Network; Naked City
Naked City (TV series)
Naked City is a police drama series which aired from 1958 to 1963 on the ABC television network. It was inspired by the 1948 motion picture of the same name, and mimics its dramatic "semi-documentary" format....

; Saturday Night Live; CEO Exchange; And-1 Mixtape, a skit performed by Dave Chappelle for his sketch-comedy show, Chappelle's Show
Chappelle's Show
Chappelle's Show is an American sketch comedy television series created by comedian Dave Chappelle and Neal Brennan, with Chappelle hosting the show as well as starring in various skits. Chappelle, Brennan and Michele Armour were the show's executive producers. The series premiered on January 22,...

; the 2009 U2
U2
U2 are an Irish rock band from Dublin. Formed in 1976, the group consists of Bono , The Edge , Adam Clayton , and Larry Mullen, Jr. . U2's early sound was rooted in post-punk but eventually grew to incorporate influences from many genres of popular music...

 performance on Good Morning America
Good Morning America
Good Morning America is an American morning news and talk show that is broadcast on the ABC television network; it debuted on November 3, 1975. The weekday program airs for two hours; a third hour aired between 2007 and 2008 exclusively on ABC News Now...

; and the music video What's Luv?
What's Luv?
Not to be confused with What's Love"What’s Luv?" is a single by rapper Fat Joe featuring singer Ashanti & Ja Rule on the chorus. The single peaked at #4 in the UK, and peaked and stayed for five weeks at #2 on the Billboard Hot 100 on April 20, 2002. It was Ashanti's second top ten single, Fat...

by Fat Joe
Fat Joe
Joseph Antonio Cartagena , better known by his stage name Fat Joe, is an American rapper, CEO of Terror Squad Entertainment, and member of musical groups D.I.T.C. and Terror Squad....

 and Ashanti
Ashanti (singer)
Ashanti Shequoiya Douglas is an American singer-songwriter, record producer, dancer, actress, and model. She rose to fame in the early 2000s. Ashanti is most famous for her eponymous debut album, which featured the hit song "Foolish", and sold over 503,000 copies in its first week of release...

.

Fictional alumni of Fordham include the title character of Michael Clayton
Michael Clayton (film)
Michael Clayton is a 2007 American drama film written and directed by Tony Gilroy, starring George Clooney, Tom Wilkinson, Tilda Swinton and Sydney Pollack...

, Ray Brocco of The Good Shepherd
The Good Shepherd (film)
The Good Shepherd is a 2006 spy film directed by Robert De Niro and starring Matt Damon and Angelina Jolie, with an extensive supporting cast. Although it is a fictional film loosely based on real events, it is advertised as telling the untold story of the birth of counter-intelligence in the...

, Michael Patrick Flaherty of Spin City
Spin City
Spin City is an American sitcom television series that aired from September 17, 1996 until April 30, 2002 on the ABC network. Created by Gary David Goldberg and Bill Lawrence, the show was based on a fictional local government running New York City, and originally starred Michael J. Fox as Mike...

, Jacob Moore of Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps, Annie Norris of Life on Mars
Life on Mars (U.S. TV series)
Life on Mars was a science fiction crime drama television series which originally aired on ABC from October 9, 2008 to April 1, 2009. It is an adaptation of the BAFTA-winning original UK series of the same name produced by the BBC...

, Vinnie Terranova of Wiseguy
Wiseguy
Wiseguy is an American crime drama series that aired on CBS from September 16, 1987 to December 8, 1990 for a total of four seasons. Starring Ken Wahl, the series was produced by Stephen J...

, ADA Nick Rice of Law Abiding Citizen
Law Abiding Citizen
Law Abiding Citizen is a 2009 thriller film directed by F. Gary Gray from a screenplay written by Kurt Wimmer, starring Jamie Foxx and Gerard Butler. The film takes place in Philadelphia and tells the story of a man whose developed sociopathic tendencies drove him into killing while targeting not...

, Bruno Tattaglia
Bruno Tattaglia
Bruno Tattaglia is a fictional character appearing in Mario Puzo's novel The Godfather and the first installment of Francis Ford Coppola's The Godfather trilogy of films. He also appeared in The Godfather: The Game, where the player kills him in an act of revenge...

 of The Godfather
The Godfather (novel)
The Godfather is a crime novel written by Italian American author Mario Puzo, originally published in 1969 by G. P. Putnam's Sons. It details the story of a fictitious Sicilian Mafia family based in New York City and headed by Don Vito Corleone, who became synonymous with the Italian Mafia...

, and Dave Norris of The Adjustment Bureau
The Adjustment Bureau
The Adjustment Bureau is a 2011 American fantasy romantic thriller film loosely based on the Philip K. Dick short story, "Adjustment Team". The film was written and directed by George Nolfi and stars Matt Damon and Emily Blunt. The cast also includes Anthony Mackie, John Slattery, Michael Kelly,...

.

Sustainability


Fordham has committed to reducing its greenhouse gas emissions 30% by 2017. It has also committed to certifying all new buildings as LEED
Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design
Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design consists of a suite of rating systems for the design, construction and operation of high performance green buildings, homes and neighborhoods....

 Silver. In addition, Fordham is pledging to recycle up to 90% of its construction debris, to use low flow faucets and shower heads, and to use sustainable materials such as recycled flooring. The school's Grounds Department has also pledged to make half of its vehicle fleet electric, while the Security Department has pledged to make its entire fleet hybrid.

Affiliations


Fordham University is affiliated with the following organizations:
  • American Association of Colleges of Teacher Education
  • American Council on Education
    American Council on Education
    The American Council on Education is a United States organization, established in 1918, comprising over 1,800 accredited, degree-granting colleges and universities and higher education-related associations, organizations, and corporations....

  • Association of Catholic Colleges and Universities
  • Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges
  • Association of Jesuit Colleges and Universities
    Association of Jesuit Colleges and Universities
    The Association of Jesuit Colleges and Universities is a consortium of the 28 Jesuit colleges and universities and two theological centers in the United States committed to advancing academic excellence by promoting and coordinating collaborative activities, sharing resources, and advocating and...

  • Association of University Evening Colleges
  • Center for Academic Integrity
  • Collegiate Association for Development of Educational Administration
  • Commission on Independent Colleges and Universities
  • Council of Graduate Schools of the United States
  • Fulbright Association
    Fulbright Association
    The Fulbright Association is a U.S.-based membership organization of Fulbright Program alumni and supporters committed to fostering international awareness and understanding through:*Advocating increased worldwide support for Fulbright exchanges;...

  • Graduate Schools in Catholic Colleges and Universities
  • Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities
  • International Federation of Catholic Universities
  • Marymount Schools
  • National Association of Graduate Schools
  • National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities
    National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities
    Founded in 1976, the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities is an organization of private US colleges and universities...

  • National Collegiate Athletic Association
    National Collegiate Athletic Association
    The National Collegiate Athletic Association is a semi-voluntary association of 1,281 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States...

  • Northeastern Association of Graduate Schools


In addition, the University is accredited by the following entities:
  • American Bar Association
    American Bar Association
    The American Bar Association , founded August 21, 1878, is a voluntary bar association of lawyers and law students, which is not specific to any jurisdiction in the United States. The ABA's most important stated activities are the setting of academic standards for law schools, and the formulation...

  • American Psychological Association
    American Psychological Association
    The American Psychological Association is the largest scientific and professional organization of psychologists in the United States. It is the world's largest association of psychologists with around 154,000 members including scientists, educators, clinicians, consultants and students. The APA...

  • Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business
  • Council on Social Work
  • Middle States Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools
  • National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education
    National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education
    The National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education was founded in 1954 to accredit teacher certification programs at U.S. colleges and universities. NCATE is a council of educators created to ensure and raise the quality of preparation for their profession. NCATE is recognized by the U.S....


External links