New College, Oxford

New College, Oxford

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Encyclopedia
New College is one of the constituent colleges
Colleges of the University of Oxford
The University of Oxford comprises 38 Colleges and 6 Permanent Private Halls of religious foundation. Colleges and PPHs are autonomous self-governing corporations within the university, and all teaching staff and students studying for a degree of the university must belong to one of the colleges...

 of the University of Oxford
University of Oxford
The University of Oxford is a university located in Oxford, United Kingdom. It is the second-oldest surviving university in the world and the oldest in the English-speaking world. Although its exact date of foundation is unclear, there is evidence of teaching as far back as 1096...

 in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern IrelandIn the United Kingdom and Dependencies, other languages have been officially recognised as legitimate autochthonous languages under the European Charter for Regional or Minority Languages...

.

Overview


The College's official name, College of St Mary, is the same as that of the older Oriel College; hence, it has been referred to as the "New College of St Mary", and is now almost always called "New College". It stands along Holywell Street
Holywell Street
Holywell Street is a street in central Oxford, England. It runs east-west with Broad Street to the west and Longwall Street to the east. About half way along, Mansfield Road adjoins to the north.New College dominates the south side of the street...

 and New College Lane
New College Lane
New College Lane is a historic street in central Oxford, England, named after New College, one of the older Oxford colleges, adjacent to the north....

 (known for Oxford's Bridge of Sighs
Bridge of Sighs (Oxford)
Hertford Bridge, popularly known as the Bridge of Sighs, is a skyway over New College Lane in Oxford, England.- Misnomer and myth :The bridge is often referred to as the Bridge of Sighs because of its supposed similarity to the famous Bridge of Sighs in Venice...

), next to All Souls College
All Souls College, Oxford
The Warden and the College of the Souls of all Faithful People deceased in the University of Oxford or All Souls College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in England....

, Harris Manchester College, Hertford College, The Queen's College
The Queen's College, Oxford
The Queen's College, founded 1341, is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in England. Queen's is centrally situated on the High Street, and is renowned for its 18th-century architecture...

 and St Edmund Hall
St Edmund Hall, Oxford
St Edmund Hall is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in England. Better known within the University by its nickname, "Teddy Hall", the college has a claim to being "the oldest academical society for the education of undergraduates in any university"...

.

The College is one of the main choral foundations of the University of Oxford. The College Choir has recorded over one hundred albums, and has been awarded two Gramophone Award
Gramophone Award
The Gramophone Awards are one of the most significant honours bestowed on recordings in the classical record industry, often referred to as the Oscars for classical music. The winners are selected annually by critics for the Gramophone magazine and various members of the industry, including...

s.

In 2006 the College had an estimated financial endowment
Financial endowment
A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution. The total value of an institution's investments is often referred to as the institution's endowment and is typically organized as a public charity, private foundation, or trust....

 of £143m. That year the College sold an area of land in Buckinghamshire
Buckinghamshire
Buckinghamshire is a ceremonial and non-metropolitan home county in South East England. The county town is Aylesbury, the largest town in the ceremonial county is Milton Keynes and largest town in the non-metropolitan county is High Wycombe....

 for £55m, and the subsequent extra endowment income was put towards academic development, salaries, and repair to buildings.

History


Despite its name, New College is one of the oldest of the Oxford colleges, having originally been founded in 1379. The second college in Oxford to be dedicated to the Blessed Virgin Mary, it was founded by William of Wykeham
William of Wykeham
William of Wykeham was Bishop of Winchester, Chancellor of England, founder of Winchester College, New College, Oxford, New College School, Oxford, and builder of a large part of Windsor Castle.-Life:...

, Bishop of Winchester
Bishop of Winchester
The Bishop of Winchester is the head of the Church of England diocese of Winchester, with his cathedra at Winchester Cathedral in Hampshire.The bishop is one of five Church of England bishops to be among the Lords Spiritual regardless of their length of service. His diocese is one of the oldest and...

 as "The College of St Mary of Winchester in Oxford".

New College was founded in conjunction with the famous Winchester College
Winchester College
Winchester College is an independent school for boys in the British public school tradition, situated in Winchester, Hampshire, the former capital of England. It has existed in its present location for over 600 years and claims the longest unbroken history of any school in England...

, which was envisaged as a feeder to the Oxford college, and the two institutions have striking architectural similarities: both were the work of master mason William Wynford
William Wynford
William Wynford was one of the most successful English master masons of the 14th century, using the new Perpendicular Gothic style. He is first mentioned in 1360 when at work at Windsor Castle as warden of masons' work...

. The grand collection of buildings is a testament to Williams's experience in administering both ecclesiastical and civil institutions as the Bishop of Winchester and High Chancellor of England.

Both Winchester College and New College were originally established for the education of priests, there being a shortage of properly educated clergy after the Black Death
Black Death
The Black Death was one of the most devastating pandemics in human history, peaking in Europe between 1348 and 1350. Of several competing theories, the dominant explanation for the Black Death is the plague theory, which attributes the outbreak to the bacterium Yersinia pestis. Thought to have...

. William of Wykeham ordained that there were to be ten chaplains, three clerks and 16 choristers on the foundation of the college.
The original choristers were accommodated within the walls of the college under one schoolmaster. Since then the school has expanded and in 1903 moved to New College School
New College School
New College School is an independent preparatory school for boys in Oxford. It was founded in 1379 by William of Wykeham to provide for the education of 16 choristers for the chapel of New College, Oxford....

 in Savile Road.

As well as being the first Oxford college for undergraduates and the first to have senior members of the college give tutorials, New College was the first college in Oxford to be designed around a main quadrangle
Quadrangle (architecture)
In architecture, a quadrangle is a space or courtyard, usually rectangular in plan, the sides of which are entirely or mainly occupied by parts of a large building. The word is probably most closely associated with college or university campus architecture, but quadrangles may be found in other...

.

College links


Admiring William of Wykeham's
William of Wykeham
William of Wykeham was Bishop of Winchester, Chancellor of England, founder of Winchester College, New College, Oxford, New College School, Oxford, and builder of a large part of Windsor Castle.-Life:...

 achievements in creating his twinned institutions, King Henry VI modelled the establishment of his new schools, King's College, Cambridge
King's College, Cambridge
King's College is a constituent college of the University of Cambridge, England. The college's full name is "The King's College of our Lady and Saint Nicholas in Cambridge", but it is usually referred to simply as "King's" within the University....

 and Eton College
Eton College
Eton College, often referred to simply as Eton, is a British independent school for boys aged 13 to 18. It was founded in 1440 by King Henry VI as "The King's College of Our Lady of Eton besides Wyndsor"....

, upon Wykeham's foundation of New College and Winchester College
Winchester College
Winchester College is an independent school for boys in the British public school tradition, situated in Winchester, Hampshire, the former capital of England. It has existed in its present location for over 600 years and claims the longest unbroken history of any school in England...

.

Indeed, the link that King's College, Cambridge
King's College, Cambridge
King's College is a constituent college of the University of Cambridge, England. The college's full name is "The King's College of our Lady and Saint Nicholas in Cambridge", but it is usually referred to simply as "King's" within the University....

 and Eton College
Eton College
Eton College, often referred to simply as Eton, is a British independent school for boys aged 13 to 18. It was founded in 1440 by King Henry VI as "The King's College of Our Lady of Eton besides Wyndsor"....

 share is a direct copy of William of Wykeham's link between New College and Winchester College
Winchester College
Winchester College is an independent school for boys in the British public school tradition, situated in Winchester, Hampshire, the former capital of England. It has existed in its present location for over 600 years and claims the longest unbroken history of any school in England...

.

New College has formal ties with Winchester College
Winchester College
Winchester College is an independent school for boys in the British public school tradition, situated in Winchester, Hampshire, the former capital of England. It has existed in its present location for over 600 years and claims the longest unbroken history of any school in England...

, Eton College
Eton College
Eton College, often referred to simply as Eton, is a British independent school for boys aged 13 to 18. It was founded in 1440 by King Henry VI as "The King's College of Our Lady of Eton besides Wyndsor"....

, and King's College, Cambridge
King's College, Cambridge
King's College is a constituent college of the University of Cambridge, England. The college's full name is "The King's College of our Lady and Saint Nicholas in Cambridge", but it is usually referred to simply as "King's" within the University....

 dating back to 1444, a four-way relationship known as the Amicabilis Concordia.

The four institutions share formal ties to this day; King's is New College's official sister college.

Architecture and gardens


At the time of its founding, New College was larger than all of the existing Oxford Colleges combined. One of Oxford's most prestigious colleges, it is also one of the most widely visited. The College's grounds are among the largest of the Oxford University colleges
Colleges of the University of Oxford
The University of Oxford comprises 38 Colleges and 6 Permanent Private Halls of religious foundation. Colleges and PPHs are autonomous self-governing corporations within the university, and all teaching staff and students studying for a degree of the university must belong to one of the colleges...

.


The Cloisters and the Chapel are of particular note; much of the mediæval stained glass in the ante-chapel
Ante-chapel
Ante-chapel is the term given to that portion of a chapel which lies on the western side of the choir screen.In some of the colleges at Oxford and Cambridge the ante-chapel is carried north and south across the west end of the chapel, constituting a western transept or narthex...

 has recently been restored. Renowned for its grand interior, some of the stained glass windows were designed by the 18th-century portraitist Sir Joshua Reynolds and contains works by Sir Jacob Epstein and El Greco
El Greco
El Greco was a painter, sculptor and architect of the Spanish Renaissance. "El Greco" was a nickname, a reference to his ethnic Greek origin, and the artist normally signed his paintings with his full birth name in Greek letters, Δομήνικος Θεοτοκόπουλος .El Greco was born on Crete, which was at...

. The organ was built by the firm of Grant, Degens, and Bradbeer in 1969, in a case designed by George Pace; somewhat revolutionary at the time, the instrument remains no less remarkable and idiosyncratic today. The choir stalls contain 62 14th-century misericord
Misericord
A misericord is a small wooden shelf on the underside of a folding seat in a church, installed to provide a degree of comfort for a person who has to stand during long periods of prayer.-Origins:...

s which are of outstanding beauty — it is worth noting that several of New College's misericords were copied during the Victorian era, for use at Canterbury Cathedral
Canterbury Cathedral
Canterbury Cathedral in Canterbury, Kent, is one of the oldest and most famous Christian structures in England and forms part of a World Heritage Site....




The ancient Oxford
Oxford
The city of Oxford is the county town of Oxfordshire, England. The city, made prominent by its medieval university, has a population of just under 165,000, with 153,900 living within the district boundary. It lies about 50 miles north-west of London. The rivers Cherwell and Thames run through...

 City Wall, belonging to New College, is of particular interest. When William of Wykeham
William of Wykeham
William of Wykeham was Bishop of Winchester, Chancellor of England, founder of Winchester College, New College, Oxford, New College School, Oxford, and builder of a large part of Windsor Castle.-Life:...

 founded the College, he formally agreed to maintain the City Wall when he acquired the land on which to build the College. Every three years the Lord Mayor and Corporation of the City of Oxford take a walk along the Wall to make sure that the obligation is being fulfilled, a tradition dating back to the College's foundation in 1379. The gardens of New College include a Mound (which originally had steps, but is now smooth with one set of stairs) and boast one of the largest herbaceous borders in Oxford.

The bell tower contains one of the oldest rings
Ring of bells
"Ring of bells" is a term most often applied to a set of bells hung in the English style, typically for change ringing...

 of ten bells, which is rung by the Oxford Society of Change Ringers
Oxford Society of Change Ringers
The Oxford Society of Change Ringers, established in 1734, is a society dedicated to change ringing in Oxford, England. It should not be confused with the Oxford University Society of Change Ringers. The society is based at the Cathedral Church of Christ where its members ring for Sunday services...

 and the Oxford University Society of Change Ringers
Oxford University Society of Change Ringers
The Oxford University Society of Change Ringers is the official society dedicated to change ringing in Oxford University. Its objects are to promote the art of change ringing in the University and to ring for Sunday services in Oxford during full term....

. The college is also in possession of a large collection of silver (including the mediæval silver gilt Founder's Crosier
Crosier
A crosier is the stylized staff of office carried by high-ranking Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Anglican, and some Lutheran and Pentecostal prelates...

, housed in a display case in the chapel), and two notable "unicorn
Unicorn
The unicorn is a legendary animal from European folklore that resembles a white horse with a large, pointed, spiraling horn projecting from its forehead, and sometimes a goat's beard...

 horns" (which are in fact narwhal
Narwhal
The narwhal, Monodon monoceros, is a medium-sized toothed whale that lives year-round in the Arctic. One of two living species of whale in the Monodontidae family, along with the beluga whale, the narwhal males are distinguished by a characteristic long, straight, helical tusk extending from their...

 tusks).

Music



As part of the original College statutes, William of Wykeham provided for a choral foundation of lay and academical clerks, with boy choristers to sing mass and the daily offices. It is a tradition that continues today with the choral services of evensong
Evening Prayer (Anglican)
Evening Prayer is a liturgy in use in the Anglican Communion and celebrated in the late afternoon or evening...

 and Eucharist
Eucharist
The Eucharist , also called Holy Communion, the Sacrament of the Altar, the Blessed Sacrament, the Lord's Supper, and other names, is a Christian sacrament or ordinance...

 during term.

In addition to its choral duties in the chapel, the New College Choir has established a reputation as one of the finest Anglican choirs in the world and is known particularly for its performances of Renaissance
Renaissance music
Renaissance music is European music written during the Renaissance. Defining the beginning of the musical era is difficult, given that its defining characteristics were adopted only gradually; musicologists have placed its beginnings from as early as 1300 to as late as the 1470s.Literally meaning...

 and Baroque music
Baroque music
Baroque music describes a style of Western Classical music approximately extending from 1600 to 1760. This era follows the Renaissance and was followed in turn by the Classical era...

. Some seventy recordings of the choir are still in the catalogue and as well as appearing a number of times at the BBC Proms, the choir make numerous concert tours.

In 1997, the choir won a Gramophone Award
Gramophone Award
The Gramophone Awards are one of the most significant honours bestowed on recordings in the classical record industry, often referred to as the Oscars for classical music. The winners are selected annually by critics for the Gramophone magazine and various members of the industry, including...

 in the Best-selling disc category for their album Agnus Dei, and in 2008, they won a Gramophone Award in the Early Music category for their recording of Nicholas Ludford
Nicholas Ludford
Nicholas Ludford was an English composer of the Tudor period. He is known for his festal masses, which are preserved in two early-16th-century choirbooks, the Caius Choirbook at Caius College, Cambridge, and the Lambeth Choirbook at Lambeth Palace, London, along with those of the older composer...

's Missa Benedicta.
Edward Higginbottom, Organist and Tutor in Music at New College, has been made Oxford University’s first Choral Professor.

The choristers are educated at New College School
New College School
New College School is an independent preparatory school for boys in Oxford. It was founded in 1379 by William of Wykeham to provide for the education of 16 choristers for the chapel of New College, Oxford....

 on Savile Road, a short distance from New College itself.

On Thursday 21 May 2009, the choir revived an ancient custom of processing to Bartlemas Chapel for a ceremony and then on to the location of an ancient spring. The ceremony had not been observed for the past 400 years.

Organ


The present instrument was constructed by Grant, Degens and Bradbeer in 1969.

Tuning is regulated by Bishop and Son of London and Ipswich.

Organists and directors of music



  • 1694 John Weldon
    John Weldon (musician)
    John Weldon was an English composer.Born at Chichester in the south of England, he was educated at Eton, where he was a chorister, and later received musical instruction from Henry Purcell...

  • 1776 Philip Hayes
  • 1830-60 Stephen Elvey
    Stephen Elvey
    -Life:Stephen Elvey was the elder brother, and for some time the teacher, of Sir George Elvey. He was born in Canterbury in June 1805, and received his training as chorister of the cathedral under Highmore Skeats. In 1830 he succeeded Bennett as organist of New College, Oxford, and won a reputation...

  • -1869 G. B. Arnold
  • 1870 James Taylor

  • 1901 Hugh Allen
    Hugh Allen (conductor)
    Sir Hugh Percy Allen was an English musician, academic and administrator. He was a leading influence on British musical life in the first half of the 20th century.-Early years:...

  • 1919 William Henry Harris
    William Henry Harris
    Sir William Henry Harris was an English organist and composer, affectionately nicknamed 'Doc H' by his choristers.Harris was born in Fulham, London and died in Petersfield. He was a chorister of Holy Trinity, Tulse Hill...

  • 1929 John Dykes Bower
    John Dykes Bower
    Sir John Dykes Bower CVO was an English cathedral organist, who served in Truro Cathedral, Durham Cathedral and St Paul's Cathedral-Background:John Dykes Bower was born on 13 August 1905 in Gloucester. He was one of four brothers...

  • 1933 Sydney Watson
    Sydney Watson
    Sydney Watson OBE was an English church musician. Watson studied at Keble College, Oxford and at the Royal College of Music. He was the Organist of New College, Oxford from 1933 and left in 1938 to become Musical Director at Winchester College where he stayed until 1946...


  • 1938 H. K. Andrews
  • 1956 Albert Meredith Davies
  • 1959 David Lumsden
    David Lumsden (musician)
    Sir David James Lumsden PhD, DPhil, MA, MusB, FRCM, FRNCM, FRSAMD, FLCM, FRSA, Hon RAM, Hon FRCO, FKC .*Choirmaster, organist and harpsichordist,**St Mary's Church, Nottingham, 1954–1956**Southwell Minster 1956-1959,...

  • 1976 Edward Higginbottom (current)

Rowing


New College is one of only a few Oxford
University of Oxford
The University of Oxford is a university located in Oxford, United Kingdom. It is the second-oldest surviving university in the world and the oldest in the English-speaking world. Although its exact date of foundation is unclear, there is evidence of teaching as far back as 1096...

 or Cambridge Colleges to have won an Olympic Medal; the New College Boat Club
New College Boat Club
New College Boat Club is rowing club for the members of New College, Oxford. It is one of the most successful college rowing clubs with 16 men's headships and two women's.-Torpids 2010:Men's 1st VIIIStarted 6th in Div 1, 6th on the river...

 represented Great Britain at the Summer Olympics in Stockholm
Stockholm
Stockholm is the capital and the largest city of Sweden and constitutes the most populated urban area in Scandinavia. Stockholm is the most populous city in Sweden, with a population of 851,155 in the municipality , 1.37 million in the urban area , and around 2.1 million in the metropolitan area...

, Sweden
Sweden
Sweden , officially the Kingdom of Sweden , is a Nordic country on the Scandinavian Peninsula in Northern Europe. Sweden borders with Norway and Finland and is connected to Denmark by a bridge-tunnel across the Öresund....

, in 1912 and obtained a silver medal.

In 1912, Great Britain sent two men's crews to the Olympics in Stockholm
Stockholm
Stockholm is the capital and the largest city of Sweden and constitutes the most populated urban area in Scandinavia. Stockholm is the most populous city in Sweden, with a population of 851,155 in the municipality , 1.37 million in the urban area , and around 2.1 million in the metropolitan area...

, Sweden. One was a Leander
Leander Club
Leander Club, founded in 1818, is one of the oldest rowing clubs in the world. It is based in Remenham in the English county of Berkshire, adjoining Henley-on-Thames...

 crew, composed mostly of Magdalen College
Magdalen College
Magdalen College or Magdalene College may refer to:*Magdalen College, Oxford - a constituent college of the University of Oxford*Magdalene College, Cambridge - a constituent college of the University of Cambridge...

 (Oxford) rowers, and captained by the Magdalen captain. The second was the New College 1st VIII.

The two British crews were the favourites for gold so started at opposite ends of the draw. They both worked up through the competition to make the final. The course in Stockholm was not straight, and one of the two lanes was clearly favoured, the other requiring the cox to steer around a protruding boathouse and then back under a bridge.

Before the final, the two British captains met to toss for lanes. New College won the toss and following gentlemanly tradition offered the choice of lanes to their opponents, who would — in a gentlemanly fashion — refuse this offer. However the Leander/Magdalen captain accepted this offer and chose the better lane. Leander went on to win the gold medal, leaving New College with the silver.

King Gustav V of Sweden was so disheartened by this display of ungentlemanly conduct that, as a consolation, he presented his colours to New College. Ever since then, New College have raced in purple and gold, the colours of the royal house of Sweden. A further tradition has been the adoption of the toast: God Damn Bloody Magdalen!, the supposed words of the New College stroke Robert Bourne as they crossed the line. The abbreviation GDBM is still used commonly, being on the bottom of the NCBC letterhead to this very day.

New College Boat Club
New College Boat Club
New College Boat Club is rowing club for the members of New College, Oxford. It is one of the most successful college rowing clubs with 16 men's headships and two women's.-Torpids 2010:Men's 1st VIIIStarted 6th in Div 1, 6th on the river...

 is also one of the few Oxford
University of Oxford
The University of Oxford is a university located in Oxford, United Kingdom. It is the second-oldest surviving university in the world and the oldest in the English-speaking world. Although its exact date of foundation is unclear, there is evidence of teaching as far back as 1096...

 clubs to have held both Headships
Head of the River
A Head of the River race is a rowing race, held as a procession race against the clock, with the winning crew receiving the title of "Head of the River"...

 at Summer Eights
Eights Week
Eights Week, also known as Summer Eights, is a four-day regatta of bumps races which constitutes the University of Oxford's main intercollegiate rowing event of the year. The regatta takes place in May of each year, from the Wednesday to the Saturday of the fifth week of Trinity term...

 (though not in the same year), and one of only 11 Oxford
University of Oxford
The University of Oxford is a university located in Oxford, United Kingdom. It is the second-oldest surviving university in the world and the oldest in the English-speaking world. Although its exact date of foundation is unclear, there is evidence of teaching as far back as 1096...

 or Cambridge colleges to have won the Grand Challenge Cup at Henley Royal Regatta
Henley Royal Regatta
Henley Royal Regatta is a rowing event held every year on the River Thames by the town of Henley-on-Thames, England. The Royal Regatta is sometimes referred to as Henley Regatta, its original name pre-dating Royal patronage...

, having also won the Visitor Challenge Cup twice, the Ladies Challenge Plate twice and the Stewards' Challenge Cup twice.

Motto


The College's motto
Motto
A motto is a phrase meant to formally summarize the general motivation or intention of a social group or organization. A motto may be in any language, but Latin is the most used. The local language is usual in the mottoes of governments...

, created by William of Wykeham
William of Wykeham
William of Wykeham was Bishop of Winchester, Chancellor of England, founder of Winchester College, New College, Oxford, New College School, Oxford, and builder of a large part of Windsor Castle.-Life:...

, is "Manners Makyth Man". The motto was in many respects fairly revolutionary. Firstly, it was written in English
English language
English is a West Germanic language that arose in the Anglo-Saxon kingdoms of England and spread into what was to become south-east Scotland under the influence of the Anglian medieval kingdom of Northumbria...

, rather than Latin, which makes it very unusual in Oxford, and is especially revolutionary considering the College's age; even St Catherine's College
St Catherine's College, Oxford
St Catherine's College, often called Catz, is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in England. Its motto is Nova et Vetera...

, founded in 1965, has a Latin motto ("Nova et Vetera": "the new and the old").

Secondly, the motto makes a social statement. While it might initially seem to be suggesting that it is beneficial to have good manners, this does not really capture its full scope. What it really means is that it is not by birth, money, or property that an individual is defined, but by how he (or she) behaves towards other people.

Wardens



The Warden is the college's principal, responsible for its academic leadership, chairing its governing body, and representing New College to the world.

New College in popular culture


New College was used as a filming location for the 1991 Inspector Morse
Inspector Morse (TV series)
Inspector Morse is a detective drama based on Colin Dexter's series of Chief Inspector Morse novels. The series starred John Thaw as Chief Inspector Morse and Kevin Whately as Sergeant Lewis. Dexter makes a cameo appearance in all but three of the episodes....

episode "Fat Chance" in which it doubled as the fictitious "St Saviour's College", the 2005 film Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire
Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire (film)
Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire is a 2005 fantasy film directed by Mike Newell and based on the novel of the same name by J. K. Rowling. It is the fourth instalment in the Harry Potter film series, written by Steve Kloves and produced by David Heyman...

and the 1997 James Bond
James Bond (film series)
The James Bond film series is a British series of motion pictures based on the fictional character of MI6 agent James Bond , who originally appeared in a series of books by Ian Fleming. Earlier films were based on Fleming's novels and short stories, followed later by films with original storylines...

 film Tomorrow Never Dies
Tomorrow Never Dies
Tomorrow Never Dies is the eighteenth spy film in the James Bond series, and the second to star Pierce Brosnan as the fictional MI6 agent James Bond. Bruce Feirstein wrote the screenplay, and it was directed by Roger Spottiswoode. It follows Bond as he tries to stop a media mogul from engineering...

. In Tomorrow Never Dies, the Holywell Buildings are used as the location of the 'Swedish Embassy'. New College appears in the alternate Oxford of Philip Pullman's His Dark Materials
His Dark Materials
His Dark Materials is a trilogy of fantasy novels by Philip Pullman comprising Northern Lights , The Subtle Knife , and The Amber Spyglass...

as 'Wykeham College'.
In the film Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, New College Cloisters served as the Hogwarts background for some scenes, notably that in which Draco Malfoy
Draco Malfoy
Draco Malfoy is a fictional character and a major antagonist in J. K. Rowling's Harry Potter series. He is a Slytherin student in Harry Potter's year. He is frequently accompanied by his two accomplices, Vincent Crabbe and Gregory Goyle, who act as henchmen...

 is transformed into a ferret by Mad-Eye Moody.

In Cakes and Ale
Cakes and Ale
Cakes and Ale: or, the Skeleton in the Cupboard is a novel by British author William Somerset Maugham. It is often alleged to be a thinly veiled roman à clef examining contemporary novelists Thomas Hardy and Hugh Walpole — though Maugham maintained he had created both characters as composites...

 by W. Somerset Maugham
W. Somerset Maugham
William Somerset Maugham , CH was an English playwright, novelist and short story writer. He was among the most popular writers of his era and, reputedly, the highest paid author during the 1930s.-Childhood and education:...

, the character Alroy Kear, believed to be a parody of Hugh Walpole
Hugh Walpole
Sir Hugh Seymour Walpole, CBE was an English novelist. A prolific writer, he published thirty-six novels, five volumes of short stories, two plays and three volumes of memoirs. His skill at scene-setting, his vivid plots, his high profile as a lecturer and his driving ambition brought him a large...

, is a graduate of New College. In the opening chapter, the narrator describes Kear's time at the college, saying "he was president of the Union and but for an unfortunate attack of measles might very well have got his rowing blue".

Notable alumni


New College has a legacy of notable individuals who have studied and worked at the College. Among them are Nobel Prize winners, churchmen, statesmen, leading scientists and literary figures.
  • Robert Alston
    Robert Alston
    Robert John Alston, CMG, QSO, DL is a retired British diplomat.Alston was educated at Ardingly College and New College, Oxford. He is presently Chairman of Governors at Ardingly College...

  • Simon Baron-Cohen
    Simon Baron-Cohen
    Simon Baron-Cohen FBA is professor of Developmental Psychopathology in the Departments of Psychiatry and Experimental Psychology at the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom. He is the Director of the University's Autism Research Centre, and a Fellow of Trinity College...

  • Kate Beckinsale
    Kate Beckinsale
    Kathryn Bailey "Kate" Beckinsale is an English actress. After some minor television roles, she made her film debut in Much Ado About Nothing while still a student at Oxford University...

  • Tony Benn
    Tony Benn
    Anthony Neil Wedgwood "Tony" Benn, PC is a British Labour Party politician and a former MP and Cabinet Minister.His successful campaign to renounce his hereditary peerage was instrumental in the creation of the Peerage Act 1963...

  • Tim Boswell
    Tim Boswell
    Timothy Eric "Tim" Boswell, Baron Boswell of Aynho is an English Conservative Party politician who was the Member of Parliament for Daventry from 1987 until he retired at the 2010 general election.-Education:...

  • Gyles Brandreth
    Gyles Brandreth
    Gyles Daubeney Brandreth is a British writer, broadcaster and former Conservative Member of Parliament and junior minister.-Early life:...

  • Peter Brown
    Peter Brown (historian)
    Peter Robert Lamont Brown is Rollins Professor of History at Princeton University. His principal contributions to the discipline have been in the field of late antiquity and, in particular, the religious culture of the later Roman Empire and early medieval Europe.-Life:Peter Brown was born in...

  • David Butler
    David Butler
    David Butler may refer to:*David Butler , first governor of Nebraska*David Butler , UNLV Runnin' Rebels basketball player...

  • Henry Chichele
    Henry Chichele
    Henry Chichele , English archbishop, founder of All Souls College, Oxford, was born at Higham Ferrers, Northamptonshire, in 1363 or 1364...

  • G.A. Cohen
  • Angus Deayton
    Angus Deayton
    Gordon Angus Deayton is an English actor, writer, musician, comedian and broadcaster. He is best known for his role as Victor Meldrew's long-suffering neighbour Patrick Trench in the comedy series One Foot in the Grave...

  • Philip Reginald Egerton
    Philip Reginald Egerton
    The Reverend Philip Reginald Egerton was an English schoolmaster, priest, cricketer and founder of Bloxham School in Oxfordshire, England. Egerton was educated at Winchester School, where he was school captain, and New College, Oxford...

  • John Farthing
    John Farthing
    John Colborne Farthing was a student, soldier, thinker, philosopher, economist, teacher, and author of the seminal tract Freedom Wears a Crown which became rather quickly an epistle of Red Toryism.-Early years:...

  • Bram Fischer
    Bram Fischer
    Abram Louis Fischer, commonly known as Bram Fischer, was a South African lawyer of Afrikaner descent, notable for anti-apartheid activism and for the legal defence of anti-apartheid figures, including Nelson Mandela at the Rivonia Trial.-Tributes:Fischer is widely acknowledged as a key figure in...

  • John Fowles
    John Fowles
    John Robert Fowles was an English novelist and essayist. In 2008, The Times newspaper named Fowles among their list of "The 50 greatest British writers since 1945".-Birth and family:...

  • John Galsworthy
    John Galsworthy
    John Galsworthy OM was an English novelist and playwright. Notable works include The Forsyte Saga and its sequels, A Modern Comedy and End of the Chapter...

  • Hugh Gaitskell
    Hugh Gaitskell
    Hugh Todd Naylor Gaitskell CBE was a British Labour politician, who held Cabinet office in Clement Attlee's governments, and was the Leader of the Labour Party and Leader of the Opposition from 1955, until his death in 1963.-Early life:He was born in Kensington, London, the third and youngest...

  • Patrick Gale
    Patrick Gale
    Patrick Gale is a British novelist who lives in Cornwall.His father was the prison governor of Camp Hill Prison on the Isle of Wight when Gale was born, and he was brought up in and around prisons...

  • John Gardner (law)
    John Gardner (law)
    John Gardner is Professor of Jurisprudence, University of Oxford and Fellow of University College, Oxford. He received his B.A., B.C.L., M.A., and D.Phil. from the University of Oxford, where he has also been associated with New College , All Souls College , and Brasenose College...

  • Robert P. George
    Robert P. George
    Robert P. George is McCormick Professor of Jurisprudence at Princeton University, where he lectures on constitutional interpretation, civil liberties and philosophy of law. He also serves as the director of the James Madison Program in American Ideals and Institutions...

  • Victor Gollancz
    Victor Gollancz
    Sir Victor Gollancz was a British publisher, socialist, and humanitarian.-Early life:Born in Maida Vale, London, he was the son of a wholesale jeweller and nephew of Rabbi Professor Sir Hermann Gollancz and Professor Sir Israel Gollancz; after being educated at St Paul's School, London and taking...

  • Robert Goff, Baron Goff of Chieveley
    Robert Goff, Baron Goff of Chieveley
    Robert Lionel Archibald Goff, Baron Goff of Chieveley PC DCL FBA is a retired British Judge.Lord Goff, High Steward of the University of Oxford, retired in 1998 as Senior Law Lord after more than a decade as a Lord of Appeal in Ordinary in the House of Lords...

  • Hugh Grant
    Hugh Grant
    Hugh John Mungo Grant is an English actor and film producer. He has received a Golden Globe Award, a BAFTA, and an Honorary César. His films have earned more than $2.4 billion from 25 theatrical releases worldwide. Grant achieved international stardom after appearing in Richard Curtis's...

  • Irfan Habib
    Irfan Habib
    Irfan Habib is an Indian Marxist historian, a former Chairman of the Indian Council of Historical Research and a Padma Bhushan awardee. He is a Professor Emeritus at Aligarh Muslim University. He has served in the Indian History Congress for many years. Irfan Habib and R.S...

  • General Sir John Hackett
    John Winthrop Hackett Junior
    General Sir John Winthrop Hackett GCB, CBE, DSO & Bar, MC was an Australian-born British soldier, author and university administrator.-Early life:Hackett, who was nicknamed "Shan", was born in Perth, Western Australia...

  • J. B. S. Haldane
    J. B. S. Haldane
    John Burdon Sanderson Haldane FRS , known as Jack , was a British-born geneticist and evolutionary biologist. A staunch Marxist, he was critical of Britain's role in the Suez Crisis, and chose to leave Oxford and moved to India and became an Indian citizen...

  • William Reginald Halliday
    William Reginald Halliday
    Sir William Reginald Halliday was a historian and archaeologist who served as Principal of King's College London from 1928 to 1952....

  • Christopher Hampton
    Christopher Hampton
    Christopher James Hampton CBE, FRSL is a British playwright, screen writer and film director. He is best known for his play based on the novel Les Liaisons dangereuses and the film version Dangerous Liaisons and also more recently for writing the nominated screenplay for the film adaptation of...

  • H. L. A. Hart
    H. L. A. Hart
    Herbert Lionel Adolphus Hart was an influential legal philosopher of the 20th century. He was Professor of Jurisprudence at Oxford University and the Principal of Brasenose College, Oxford. He authored The Concept of Law....

  • Saiyid Nurul Hasan
    Saiyid Nurul Hasan
    Saiyid Nurul Hasan was a historian of medieval India, a prolific author, a statesman in the Government of India, and governor of Bengal and Orissa.-Background:...

  • Charles Francis Christopher Hawkes
    Charles Francis Christopher Hawkes
    Charles Francis Christopher Hawkes FBA, FSA was an English archaeologist and a professor of European prehistory at Oxford University ....

  • Arthur Cayley Headlam
    Arthur Cayley Headlam
    The Right Reverend Arthur Cayley Headlam CH was an English theologian who served as Bishop of Gloucester from 1923 to 1945....

  • Peter Heather
    Peter Heather
    Peter Heather is a historian of Late Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages, currently Professor of Medieval History at King's College London. He has held appointments at University College London and Yale University and was Fellow and Tutor in Medieval History at Worcester College, Oxford until...

  • Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck
    Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck
    Florian Maria Georg Christian, Graf Henckel von Donnersmarck is a German film director, best known for writing and directing the 2007 Oscar-winning film The Lives of Others and the 2010 film The Tourist.-Personal life and family:...

  • Peter Hobbs
    Peter Hobbs
    Peter Hobbs is a British novelist.He grew up in Cornwall and North Yorkshire and was educated at New College, Oxford. He began writing during a prolonged illness that cut short a potential diplomatic career....

  • Adrian Holman
    Adrian Holman
    Sir Adrian Holman KBE CMG MC was a British diplomat.-Early life:The son of Richard Haswell Holman, he was educated at Copthorne Preparatory School, Harrow School, and New College, Oxford.-Career:...

  • William Horman
    William Horman
    William Horman was a headmaster at Eton and Winchester in the early Tudor period of English history.He is best known for his Latin grammar textbook the Vulgaria, which created controversy at the time due to its unconventional approach in first giving examples of translations of English writings on...

  • William Howley
    William Howley
    William Howley was a clergyman in the Church of England. He served as Archbishop of Canterbury from 1828 to 1848.-Early Life, education, and interests:...

  • Thomas Hughes (footballer)
    Thomas Hughes (footballer)
    Thomas Bridges Hughes was an English amateur footballer who was the first player to score two goals in an FA Cup Final, with Wanderers in 1876...

    , footballer who won the FA Cup
    FA Cup
    The Football Association Challenge Cup, commonly known as the FA Cup, is a knockout cup competition in English football and is the oldest association football competition in the world. The "FA Cup" is run by and named after The Football Association and usually refers to the English men's...

     twice in the 1870s
  • The Venerable John Ingram, English Jesuit and martyr
  • Harry Brodribb Irving
    Harry Brodribb Irving
    Harry Brodribb Irving , was a British stage actor and actor-manager; the eldest son of Sir Henry Irving and his wife Florence , and father of designer Laurence Irving and actress Elizabeth Irving....

  • Douglas Jardine
    Douglas Jardine
    Douglas Robert Jardine was an English cricketer and captain of the England cricket team from 1931 to 1933–34.When describing cricket seasons, the convention used is that a single year represents an English cricket season, while two years represent a southern hemisphere cricket season because it...

  • Bobby Jindal
    Bobby Jindal
    Piyush "Bobby" Jindal is the 55th and current Governor of Louisiana and formerly a member of the United States House of Representatives. He is a member of the Republican Party....

  • Rachel Johnson
    Rachel Johnson
    Rachel Johnson is an English editor, journalist and author based in London.Johnson is the daughter of former Conservative MEP Stanley Johnson and artist Charlotte Johnson Wahl , the daughter of Sir James Fawcett, a prominent barrister and president of the European Commission of Human Rights...

  • Brian Johnston
    Brian Johnston
    Brian Alexander Johnston CBE, MC was a cricket commentator and presenter for the BBC from 1946 until his death.-Early life and education:...

  • Oliver Kamm
    Oliver Kamm
    Oliver Kamm is a British writer and journalist. He wrote Anti-Totalitarianism: The Left-wing Case for a Neoconservative Foreign Policy , an advocacy of interventionism in foreign policy....

  • Randal Keynes
    Randal Keynes
    Randal Hume Keynes, OBE, FLS is a British conservationist, author and great-great-grandson of Charles Darwin. He is the author of the intimate exploration of his famous ancestry, Annie's Box, subtitled Darwin, His Daughter, and Human Evolution , a book about the relationship between Darwin and his...

  • Sophie Kinsella
  • Harold Laski
    Harold Laski
    Harold Joseph Laski was a British Marxist, political theorist, economist, author, and lecturer, who served as the chairman of the Labour Party during 1945-1946, and was a professor at the LSE from 1926 to 1950....

  • A. W. Lawrence
  • John Lennard
    John Lennard
    John Lennard is Professor of British and American Literature at the University of the West Indies, Mona, Jamaica, and a freelance academic and writer.-Biography:...

  • Andro Linklater
    Andro Linklater
    Andro Linklater is a non-fiction writer, and historian.-Life:Andro Ian Robert Linklater is the youngest son of Eric Linklater. His brother is journalist, Magnus Linklater and his sisters are the voice expert Kristin Linklater and painter, Sally Linklater...

     (born 1944)
  • Bernard Longley
    Bernard Longley
    Bernard Longley is an English prelate of the Roman Catholic Church. He was named the Archbishop of Birmingham on 1 October 2009, and installed by Bishop David McGough and presented with his crozier by Archbishop Vincent Nichols, his predecessor, in St Chad's Cathedral at a Solemn Mass on 8...

  • Edward Luce
    Edward Luce
    Edward Luce is the Washington bureau chief of the Financial Times, London. Earlier he was their South Asia Bureau Chief based at New Delhi. He is married to Priya Basu...

  • Neil MacGregor
    Neil MacGregor
    Robert Neil MacGregor, OM, FSA is an art historian and museum director. He was the Editor of the Burlington Magazine from 1981 to 1987, the Director of the National Gallery, London, from 1987 to 2002, and was appointed Director of the British Museum in 2002...

  • Dambudzo Marechera
    Dambudzo Marechera
    Dambudzo Marechera was a Zimbabwean novelist and poet.-Early life:...

  • Brian Marsden
    Brian G. Marsden
    Brian Geoffrey Marsden was a British astronomer born in Cambridge, England, and educated at The Perse School in Cambridge, New College, Oxford and Yale University. Dr...

  • Charles McCreery
    Charles McCreery
    Charles Anthony Selby McCreery is a British psychologist and author, best known for his collaboration with Celia Green on work on hallucinatory states in normal people.- Biography :...

  • Nathaniel Micklem
    Nathaniel Micklem
    Nathaniel Micklem was a British Liberal Party politician and lawyer.-Early life and education:Nathaniel Micklem was born at Cookham, a village in Berkshire, the son of a solicitor. He was educated at Mill Hill School and New College, Oxford where he took a first in Jurisprudence in 1877...

  • Alasdair Milne
    Alasdair Milne
    Alasdair David Gordon Milne is a former BBC producer who became Controller of BBC Scotland, the BBC's Director of Programmes and then Director-General of the BBC in July 1982. His resignation was forced by the BBC Governors in January 1987, following pressure from the Thatcher government...

    , BBC Director General (1982-87)
  • Michael J. Mosley
    Michael J. Mosley
    Michael J. Mosley is a British journalist, producer and presenter, well known for his episodes of "Inside the Human Body" featuring certain aspects of the human body and the ways in which it works....

  • Kate Mosse
    Kate Mosse
    Kate Mosse is an English author and broadcaster. She is best known for her 2005 novel Labyrinth, which has been translated into more than 37 languages.- Private life :...

  • Junzaburō Nishiwaki
  • Richard Ollard
    Richard Ollard
    Richard Ollard was an English historian and biographer. He is best known for his work on the English Restoration period.-Life:...

  • Rageh Omaar
    Rageh Omaar
    Rageh Omaar , is a Somali born British journalist and writer. His latest book Only Half of Me deals with the tensions between these two sides of his identity. He used to be a BBC world affairs correspondent, where he made his name reporting from Iraq...

  • Dennis Potter
    Dennis Potter
    Dennis Christopher George Potter was an English dramatist, best known for The Singing Detective. His widely acclaimed television dramas mixed fantasy and reality, the personal and the social. He was particularly fond of using themes and images from popular culture.-Biography:Dennis Potter was born...

  • Gerald Priestland
    Gerald Priestland
    Gerald Francis Priestland was a news correspondent and newsreader for the BBC.-Early life and work:Gerald Priestland was educated at Charterhouse and New College, Oxford. He began his work at the BBC with a six-month spell writing obituary pieces for broadcast news...

  • Nigel Rees
    Nigel Rees
    Nigel Rees is an English author and presenter, best known for devising and hosting the Radio 4 long running panel game Quote.....

  • Susan Rice
  • Sir Bernard Rix (Lord Justice Rix)
    Bernard Rix
    Sir Bernard Anthony Rix , styled The Rt Hon. Lord Justice Rix, is an English judge, who has been a Lord Justice of Appeal since 2000.-Family:...

  • Alan Rodger, Baron Rodger of Earlsferry
    Alan Rodger, Baron Rodger of Earlsferry
    Alan Ferguson Rodger, Baron Rodger of Earlsferry, FRSE, FBA, PC was a Scottish lawyer and Justice of the Supreme Court of the United Kingdom....

  • Neil Rudenstine
  • Anthony Russell-Roberts
    Anthony Russell-Roberts
    Anthony de Villeneuve Russell-Roberts, CBE, MA is a British businessman and opera managerRussell-Roberts is the son of Francis Douglas Russell-Roberts and the pianist Edith Margaret Gertrudis Russell-Roberts, née Ashton...

  • Jonathan Sacks
    Jonathan Sacks
    Jonathan Henry Sacks, Baron Sacks, Kt is the Chief Rabbi of the United Hebrew Congregations of the Commonwealth. His Hebrew name is Yaakov Zvi...

  • Paul Seabright
    Paul Seabright
    Paul Seabright is Professor of Economics in the Industrial Economics Institute and Toulouse School of Economics at the University of Toulouse, France.-Education:...

  • Tim Sebastian
    Tim Sebastian
    Tim Sebastian is a television journalist. He is the moderator of the New Arab Debates and the Doha Debates, and was the first presenter of BBC's HARDtalk....

  • Mel Smith
    Mel Smith
    Melvin Kenneth "Mel" Smith is an English comedian, writer, film director, producer, and actor. He is most famous for his work on the sketch comedy shows Not the Nine O'Clock News and Alas Smith and Jones along with his comedy partner Griff Rhys Jones.- Early life :Smith's father, Kenneth, was born...

  • Toby Spence
    Toby Spence
    Toby Spence, born London 1969, is a professional and internationally renowned tenor active on the concert platform, in the opera house and in recordings across a wide range of classical music.-Early life and studies:...

  • Rick Stein
    Rick Stein
    Christopher Richard "Rick" Stein OBE is an English chef, restaurateur and television presenter. He is currently the head chef and co-owner of "Rick Stein at Bannisters" at Mollymook, New South Wales, Australia, owns four restaurants in Padstow, a fish and chip shop in Falmouth, Cornwall and has...

  • Adam Thirlwell
    Adam Thirlwell
    Adam Thirlwell is a British novelist. He was educated at the independent Haberdashers' Aske's Boys' School, Elstree. He is assistant editor of Areté, an arts tri-quarterly. He also writes a column for Esquire magazine....

  • Alan Thornhill
    Alan Thornhill
    Alan Thornhill is a British artist and sculptor whose long association with clay developed from pottery into sculpture. His evolved methods of working enabled the dispensing of the sculptural armature to allow improvisation, whilst his portraiture challenges notions of normality through rigorous...

    , Sculptor
  • Francis Turner
    Francis Turner (bishop)
    Francis Turner D.D. was Bishop of Ely, one of the seven bishops who petitioned against the Declaration of Indulgence and one of the nine bishops who refused to take the oath of allegiance to William III.-Family and education:...

  • Julian Turner
    Julian Turner
    Julian Turner is a British poet and mental health worker. Turner was born in Cheadle Hulme, Stockport, then moved to Cheshire in 1955...

  • William Warham
    William Warham
    William Warham , Archbishop of Canterbury, belonged to a Hampshire family, and was educated at Winchester and New College, Oxford, afterwards practising and teaching law both in London and Oxford....

  • Robert Penn Warren
    Robert Penn Warren
    Robert Penn Warren was an American poet, novelist, and literary critic and was one of the founders of New Criticism. He was also a charter member of the Fellowship of Southern Writers. He founded the influential literary journal The Southern Review with Cleanth Brooks in 1935...

  • William Waynflete
    William Waynflete
    William Waynflete , born William Patten, was Bishop of Winchester from 1447 to 1486, and Lord Chancellor of England from 1456 to 1460. He is best remembered as the founder of Magdalen College and Magdalen College School in Oxford....

     (though the validity of this claim is doubtful – see his page for further discussion)
  • Geoffrey Wheatcroft
    Geoffrey Wheatcroft
    Geoffrey Albert Wheatcroft is a British journalist and writer.- Education :He was educated at University College School, London, and at New College Oxford, where he read Modern History.- Publishing and journalism :...

  • John Edgar Wideman
    John Edgar Wideman
    John Edgar Wideman is an American writer, professor at Brown University, and sits on the contributing editorial board of the literary journal Conjunctions.-Early life:...

  • Richard Wilberforce Baron Wilberforce
  • A. N. Wilson
    A. N. Wilson
    Andrew Norman Wilson is an English writer and newspaper columnist, known for his critical biographies, novels, works of popular history and religious views...

  • Naomi Wolf
    Naomi Wolf
    Naomi Wolf is an American author and political consultant. With the publication of The Beauty Myth, she became a leading spokesperson of what was later described as the third wave of the feminist movement.-Biography:...

  • Lucy Worsley
    Lucy Worsley
    Dr Lucy Worsley is a British historian and curator.Worsley was born and grew up in Reading. Her father is a geologist and Emeritus Professor at Reading University. Before going to University she attended St Bartholomew's School, Newbury...

    , Curator and Historian.
  • Daniel Wood
    Daniel Joseph Wood
    Daniel Joseph Wood, 1849 - 1919FRCO 1873; B.Mus 1874 Oxford ; D.Mus 1896 LambethDaniel Wood was a chorister and pupil of J. L. Hopkins at Rochester...

  • James Woodforde
    James Woodforde
    James Woodforde was an English clergyman, best known as the author of The Diary of a Country Parson.-Early life:James Woodforde was born at the Parsonage, Ansford, Somerset, England on 27 June 1740...

  • Philip Ziegler
    Philip Ziegler
    -Background:Born in Ringwood, Ziegler was educated at St Cyprian's School, Eastbourne, and went with the school when it merged with Summer Fields School, Oxford. He was afterwards at Eton College and New College, Oxford...



For a more complete list, see Former students of New College

Fellows and lecturers


The Simonyi Professorship of the Public Understanding of Science was held by Richard Dawkins
Richard Dawkins
Clinton Richard Dawkins, FRS, FRSL , known as Richard Dawkins, is a British ethologist, evolutionary biologist and author...

 and is now held by Marcus du Sautoy
Marcus du Sautoy
Marcus Peter Francis du Sautoy OBE is the Simonyi Professor for the Public Understanding of Science and a Professor of Mathematics at the University of Oxford. Formerly a Fellow of All Souls College, and Wadham College, he is now a Fellow of New College...

, both of whom are fellows of New College.
  • Richard Dawkins
    Richard Dawkins
    Clinton Richard Dawkins, FRS, FRSL , known as Richard Dawkins, is a British ethologist, evolutionary biologist and author...

  • W. D. Hamilton
    W. D. Hamilton
    William Donald Hamilton FRS was a British evolutionary biologist, widely recognised as one of the greatest evolutionary theorists of the 20th century....

  • Michael Atiyah
    Michael Atiyah
    Sir Michael Francis Atiyah, OM, FRS, FRSE is a British mathematician working in geometry.Atiyah grew up in Sudan and Egypt but spent most of his academic life in the United Kingdom at Oxford and Cambridge, and in the United States at the Institute for Advanced Study...

  • G. H. Hardy
    G. H. Hardy
    Godfrey Harold “G. H.” Hardy FRS was a prominent English mathematician, known for his achievements in number theory and mathematical analysis....

  • Harold Wilson
    Harold Wilson
    James Harold Wilson, Baron Wilson of Rievaulx, KG, OBE, FRS, FSS, PC was a British Labour Member of Parliament, Leader of the Labour Party. He was twice Prime Minister of the United Kingdom during the 1960s and 1970s, winning four general elections, including a minority government after the...

  • A. J. Ayer
  • Isaiah Berlin
    Isaiah Berlin
    Sir Isaiah Berlin OM, FBA was a British social and political theorist, philosopher and historian of ideas of Russian-Jewish origin, regarded as one of the leading thinkers of the twentieth century and a dominant liberal scholar of his generation...

  • Alan Bullock
    Alan Bullock
    Alan Louis Charles Bullock, Baron Bullock , was a British historian, who wrote an influential biography of Adolf Hitler and many other works.-Early life and career:...

  • Paul Campbell
    Paul Campbell
    Paul Campbell is the name of:* Paul Campbell * Paul Campbell * Paul Campbell * Paul Campbell * Paul Campbell...

  • Raymond Carr
    Raymond Carr
    Sir Albert Raymond Maillard Carr FBA FRHS FRSL , known as Raymond Carr, is an English historian specializing in the history of Spain, Latin America, and Sweden who was Warden of St Antony's College, Oxford, from 1968 to 1987....

  • David Cecil
    Lord David Cecil
    Edward Christian David Gascoyne-Cecil, CH , was a British biographer, historian and academic. He held the style of 'Lord' by courtesy, as a younger son of a marquess.-Early life and studies:...

  • Richard Crossman
    Richard Crossman
    Richard Howard Stafford Crossman OBE was a British author and Labour Party politician who was a Cabinet Minister under Harold Wilson, and was the editor of the New Statesman. A prominent socialist intellectual, he became one of the Labour Party's leading Zionists and anti-communists...

  • Robin Lane Fox
    Robin Lane Fox
    Robin Lane Fox is an English historian, currently a Fellow of New College, Oxford and University of Oxford Reader in Ancient History.-Life:Lane Fox was educated at Eton and Magdalen College, Oxford....

  • H.L.A. Hart
  • Nigel Hitchin
    Nigel Hitchin
    Nigel Hitchin is a British mathematician working in the fields of differential geometry, algebraic geometry, and mathematical physics.-Academic career:...

  • Julian Huxley
    Julian Huxley
    Sir Julian Sorell Huxley FRS was an English evolutionary biologist, humanist and internationalist. He was a proponent of natural selection, and a leading figure in the mid-twentieth century evolutionary synthesis...

  • Willis Lamb
    Willis Lamb
    Willis Eugene Lamb, Jr. was an American physicist who won the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1955 together with Polykarp Kusch "for his discoveries concerning the fine structure of the hydrogen spectrum". Lamb and Kusch were able to precisely determine certain electromagnetic properties of the electron...

  • Hermione Lee
    Hermione Lee
    Hermione Lee, CBE is President of Wolfson College, Oxford and was lately Goldsmiths' Professor of English Literature in the University of Oxford and Professorial Fellow of New College. She is a Fellow of the British Academy and of the Royal Society of Literature.-Biography:Hermione Lee grew up in...

  • Rudolf Peierls
    Rudolf Peierls
    Sir Rudolf Ernst Peierls, CBE was a German-born British physicist. Rudolf Peierls had a major role in Britain's nuclear program, but he also had a role in many modern sciences...

  • Craig Raine
    Craig Raine
    Craig Raine is an English poet and critic born in Bishop Auckland, County Durham, England. Along with Christopher Reid, he is the best-known exponent of Martian poetry.-Life:...

  • Jane Shaw
    Jane Shaw
    The Very Revd Dr Jane Alison Shaw is Dean of Grace Cathedral, San Francisco, a British Anglican priest and scholar.Shaw read Modern History at Regent's Park College, Oxford , and Theology at Harvard University , and completed a PhD in History at the University of California, Berkeley...

  • Joe Silk
    Joe Silk
    Joseph Ivor Silk is the Savilian Chair of Astronomy at the University of Oxford. He came back to the UK in 1999 to take up the position, following a nearly 30-year career at the University of California, Berkeley. He was educated at Tottenham County School and Cambridge University . He held...

  • Marcus du Sautoy
    Marcus du Sautoy
    Marcus Peter Francis du Sautoy OBE is the Simonyi Professor for the Public Understanding of Science and a Professor of Mathematics at the University of Oxford. Formerly a Fellow of All Souls College, and Wadham College, he is now a Fellow of New College...

  • William Archibald Spooner
    William Archibald Spooner
    William Archibald Spooner was a famous Oxford don whose name is given to the linguistic phenomenon of spoonerism.-Biography:...

  • Olaf Davis


For a more complete list, see: Fellows of New College

External links