Catalogue of Ships

Catalogue of Ships

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The Catalogue of Ships (νεῶν κατάλογος; neōn katalogos) is a passage in Book 2 of Homer's
Homer
In the Western classical tradition Homer , is the author of the Iliad and the Odyssey, and is revered as the greatest ancient Greek epic poet. These epics lie at the beginning of the Western canon of literature, and have had an enormous influence on the history of literature.When he lived is...

 Iliad
Iliad
The Iliad is an epic poem in dactylic hexameters, traditionally attributed to Homer. Set during the Trojan War, the ten-year siege of the city of Troy by a coalition of Greek states, it tells of the battles and events during the weeks of a quarrel between King Agamemnon and the warrior Achilles...

(2.494-759), which lists the contingents of the Achaean army that sailed to Troy
Troy
Troy was a city, both factual and legendary, located in northwest Anatolia in what is now Turkey, southeast of the Dardanelles and beside Mount Ida...

. The catalogue gives the names of the leaders of each contingent, lists the settlements in the kingdom represented by the contingent, sometimes with a descriptive epithet
Epithet
An epithet or byname is a descriptive term accompanying or occurring in place of a name and having entered common usage. It has various shades of meaning when applied to seemingly real or fictitious people, divinities, objects, and binomial nomenclature. It is also a descriptive title...

 that fills out a half-verse or articulates the flow of names and parentage and place, and gives the number of ships required to transport the men to Troy, offering further differentiations of weightiness. A similar, though shorter, Catalogue of the Trojans
Trojan Battle Order
The Trojan Battle Order or Trojan Catalogue is a section of the second book of the Iliad listing the allied contingents that fought for Troy in the Trojan War...

 and their allies follows (2.816-877). A similar catalogue appears in Apollodorus
Apollodorus
Apollodorus of Athens son of Asclepiades, was a Greek scholar and grammarian. He was a pupil of Diogenes of Babylon, Panaetius the Stoic, and the grammarian Aristarchus of Samothrace...

' Library.

Historical background



The designation "Catalogue of Ships" suggests that the passage is in some way detachable from its context. It is bracketed between two invocation
Invocation
An invocation may take the form of:*Supplication or prayer.*A form of possession.*Command or conjuration.*Self-identification with certain spirits....

s. In the debate since antiquity over the Catalogue of Ships, the core questions have concerned the extent of historical credibility of the account, whether it was composed by Homer himself, to what extent it reflects a pre-Homeric document or memorized tradition, surviving perhaps in part from Mycenaean
Mycenaean Greece
Mycenaean Greece was a cultural period of Bronze Age Greece taking its name from the archaeological site of Mycenae in northeastern Argolis, in the Peloponnese of southern Greece. Athens, Pylos, Thebes, and Tiryns are also important Mycenaean sites...

 times, or whether it is a result of post-Homeric development. The separate debate over the identity of Homer and the authorship of the Iliad
Iliad
The Iliad is an epic poem in dactylic hexameters, traditionally attributed to Homer. Set during the Trojan War, the ten-year siege of the city of Troy by a coalition of Greek states, it tells of the battles and events during the weeks of a quarrel between King Agamemnon and the warrior Achilles...

and the Odyssey
Odyssey
The Odyssey is one of two major ancient Greek epic poems attributed to Homer. It is, in part, a sequel to the Iliad, the other work ascribed to Homer. The poem is fundamental to the modern Western canon, and is the second—the Iliad being the first—extant work of Western literature...

is conventionally termed "the Homeric Question
Homeric Question
The Homeric Question concerns the doubts and consequent debate over the identity of Homer, the authorship of the Iliad and Odyssey, and historicity, especially of the Iliad...

".

The consensus before the mid-twentieth century was that the Catalogue of Ships was not the work of the man who composed the Iliad, though great pains had been taken to render it a work of art; furthermore, that the material of the text is essentially Mycenaean or sub-Mycenaean, while disagreement centers largely on the extent of later additions.

If taken to be an accurate account, the Catalogue provides a rare summary of the geopolitical situation in early Greece at some time between the Late Bronze Age and the eighth century BCE. Following Milman Parry
Milman Parry
Milman Parry was a scholar of epic poetry and the founder of the discipline of oral tradition.-Biography:He was born in 1902 and studied at the University of California, Berkeley and at the Sorbonne . A student of the linguist Antoine Meillet at the Sorbonne, Parry revolutionized Homeric studies...

's theory of Homeric oral poetry
Oral poetry
Oral poetry can be defined in various ways. A strict definition would include only poetry that is composed and transmitted without any aid of writing. However, the complex relationships between written and spoken literature in some societies can make this definition hard to maintain, and oral...

, some scholars, such as Denys Page
Denys Page
Sir Denys Lionel Page was a British classical scholar at Oxford and Cambridge.-Early life:Born at Reading, Page was the son of Frederick Harold Dunn Page, a chartered civil engineer of the Great Western Railway, and his wife Elsie Daniels. He was educated at St...

, argue that it represents a pre-Homeric recitation incorporated into the epic by Homer. A few argue that parts of the recitation, such as the formulae describing places, date as early as the time of the Trojan War
Trojan War
In Greek mythology, the Trojan War was waged against the city of Troy by the Achaeans after Paris of Troy took Helen from her husband Menelaus, the king of Sparta. The war is among the most important events in Greek mythology and was narrated in many works of Greek literature, including the Iliad...

 in the mid-13th century BCE, or possibly before. Others contend that the Catalogue is based on the time of Homer himself in the eighth century BCE and represents an anachronistic attempt to impose contemporary information to events five centuries earlier.

An intermediate theory is that the catalogue developed through a process of accretion during the poem's oral transmission
Oral literature
Oral literature corresponds in the sphere of the spoken word to literature as literature operates in the domain of the written word. It thus forms a generally more fundamental component of culture, but operates in many ways as one might expect literature to do...

 and reflects gradual inclusion of the homelands of local sponsors by individual singers. In the most recent extended study of the Catalogue, Edzard Visser, of the University of Basel, concludes that the Catalogue is compatible with the rest of the Iliad in its techniques of verse improvisation, that the order of the names is meaningful and that the geographical epithets evince concrete geographical knowledge. Visser argues that this knowledge was transmitted by the heroic myth, elements of which introduce each geographical section. W. W. Minton places the catalogue within similar "enumerations" in Homer and Hesiod
Hesiod
Hesiod was a Greek oral poet generally thought by scholars to have been active between 750 and 650 BC, around the same time as Homer. His is the first European poetry in which the poet regards himself as a topic, an individual with a distinctive role to play. Ancient authors credited him and...

, and suggests that part of their purpose was to impress the audience with a display of the performer's memory.

The most striking feature of the catalogue's geography is that it does not portray Greece in the Iron Age
Iron Age
The Iron Age is the archaeological period generally occurring after the Bronze Age, marked by the prevalent use of iron. The early period of the age is characterized by the widespread use of iron or steel. The adoption of such material coincided with other changes in society, including differing...

, the time of Homer. By then a tribal identity called the Dorians had enveloped
Dorian invasion
The Dorian invasion is a concept devised by historians of Ancient Greece to explain the replacement of pre-classical dialects and traditions in southern Greece by the ones that prevailed in Classical Greece...

 western Greece, the Peloponnesus and Crete
Crete
Crete is the largest and most populous of the Greek islands, the fifth largest island in the Mediterranean Sea, and one of the thirteen administrative regions of Greece. It forms a significant part of the economy and cultural heritage of Greece while retaining its own local cultural traits...

, while the shores of Ionia
Ionia
Ionia is an ancient region of central coastal Anatolia in present-day Turkey, the region nearest İzmir, which was historically Smyrna. It consisted of the northernmost territories of the Ionian League of Greek settlements...

 were densely populated by a people claiming to descend from families in the now-Dorian regions of Greece. The whole northwestern part of Greece is not mentioned and it is these peoples (Epirotes, Macedonians, some Thessalians etc.) thought to be of Dorian descent.

Instead the catalogue portrays a loose union of city-states, mostly in mainland Greece, ruled by hereditary families under the overlordship of the High King of Mycenae
Mycenae
Mycenae is an archaeological site in Greece, located about 90 km south-west of Athens, in the north-eastern Peloponnese. Argos is 11 km to the south; Corinth, 48 km to the north...

. Hardly any of them are Dorian. The Ionian Greeks are mainly missing. This political snapshot is undeniably one intended to be of late Bronze Age
Bronze Age
The Bronze Age is a period characterized by the use of copper and its alloy bronze as the chief hard materials in the manufacture of some implements and weapons. Chronologically, it stands between the Stone Age and Iron Age...

 Greece.

The Catalogue


In the Iliad, the Greek Catalogue lists twenty-nine contingents under 46 captains, accounting for a total of 1186 ships. Using the Boeotian figure of 120 men per ship results in a total of 142,320 men transported to the Troad. They are named by various ethnonym
Ethnonym
An ethnonym is the name applied to a given ethnic group. Ethnonyms can be divided into two categories: exonyms and autonyms or endonyms .As an example, the ethnonym for...

s and had lived in 164 places described by toponyms
Toponymy
Toponymy is the scientific study of place names , their origins, meanings, use and typology. The word "toponymy" is derived from the Greek words tópos and ónoma . Toponymy is itself a branch of onomastics, the study of names of all kinds...

. The majority of these places have been identified and were occupied in the Late Bronze Age
Bronze Age
The Bronze Age is a period characterized by the use of copper and its alloy bronze as the chief hard materials in the manufacture of some implements and weapons. Chronologically, it stands between the Stone Age and Iron Age...

. The terms Danaans, Argives and Achaeans or the sons of the Achaeans are used for the army as a whole. In his Library, Apollodorus lists thirty contingents under 43 leaders with a total of 1013 ships, Hyginus
Hyginus
Hyginus can refer to:People:*Gaius Julius Hyginus , Roman poet, author of Fabulae, reputed author of Poeticon astronomicon*Hyginus Gromaticus, Roman surveyor*Pope Hyginus, also a saint, Bishop of Rome about 140...

 lists 245 ships.
Line Ethnic Identity No. of Ships Captains Settlements
Tabular Catalog
2.494 Boeotians 50 of 120 men each (First led by Thersander
Thersander
In Homer's Iliad, Thersander was one of the Epigoni, who attacked the city of Thebes in retaliation for the deaths of their fathers, the Seven Against Thebes, who had attempted the same thing. He was the son of Polynices and Argea....

, then by:) Peneleōs, Leïtus
Leitus
In Greek mythology, Leitus was the son of Alector or Lacritus and Cleobule, brother of Clonius, from Boeotia. He sailed with the Argonauts and afterwards, as one of the suitors of Helen, fought in the Trojan War, where he killed twenty enemies, including Phylacus...

, Arcesilaus
Arcesilaus (mythology)
In Greek mythology, Arcesilaus was one of the Greek leaders in the Trojan War, from Boeotia, commander of ten ships. He was son of Areilycus and Theobule, and brother of Prothoenor. He was killed by Hector. Leitus brought his remains back to Boeotia and buried them near Lebadea, on the banks of...

, Prothoënor
Prothoenor
In Greek mythology, Prothoenor was one of the Greek leaders in the Trojan War, from Thespiae in Boeotia, son of Areilycus and Theobule, brother of Arcesilaus; he commanded eight ships. He was killed by Polydamas, who immediately began to boast about it....

 and Clonius
Hyria, Aulis
Aulis (ancient Greece)
Ancient Aulis was a Greek port-town, located in Boeotia in central Greece, at the Euripus Strait, opposite of the island of Euboea.Aulis never developed into fully independent polis, but belonged to Thebes and Tanagra respectively ....

, Schoenus
Schoenus
A schoenus or schoinos is a historical unit of itinerant distance once common throughout the Mediterranean.The Greeks, who adopted it from the Egyptians, considered the schoinos equal to 40 stades. But neither the schoinos nor the stadion had an absolute value, and there were several regional...

, Scolus, Eteonus, Thespeia
Thespiae
Thespiae was an ancient Greek city in Boeotia. It stood on level ground commanded by the low range of hills which runs eastward from the foot of Mount Helicon to Thebes, near modern Thespies.-History:...

, Graia, Mycalessus, Harma, Eilesium, Erythrae
Erythrae
Erythrae or Erythrai later Litri, was one of the twelve Ionian cities of Asia Minor, situated 22 km north-east of the port of Cyssus , on a small peninsula stretching into the Bay of Erythrae, at an equal distance from the mountains Mimas and Corycus, and directly opposite the island of Chios...

, Eleon, Hyle
Hyle
In philosophy, hyle refers to matter or stuff. It can also be the material cause underlying a change in Aristotelian philosophy. The Greeks originally had no word for matter in general, as opposed to raw material suitable for some specific purpose or other, so Aristotle adapted the word for...

, Peteon, Ocalea
Ocalea (town)
Ocalea was a town in antiquity in Boeotia, Greece, on the south shore of Lake Copais.Ocalea lay roughly halfway between Alalcomenae and Aliartos , about 30 stadia from each. Ancient sources often mention it alongside Mantinea and Medeon, which suggests that they were close by...

, Medeon
Medeon
Medeon is a former municipality in Aetolia-Acarnania, West Greece, Greece. Since the 2011 local government reform it is part of the municipality Aktio-Vonitsa, of which it is a municipal unit. Population 5,050...

, Copae, Eutrēsis, Thisbe, Coronea, Haliartus
Aliartos
Aliartos is a municipality in the Boeotia regional unit, Greece, at 109 kilometres from Athens. Population 6,351 . It is the center of the Kopais valley...

, Plataea
Plataea
Plataea or Plataeae was an ancient city, located in Greece in southeastern Boeotia, south of Thebes. It was the location of the Battle of Plataea in 479 BC, in which an alliance of Greek city-states defeated the Persians....

, Glisas, Thebes
Thebes, Greece
Thebes is a city in Greece, situated to the north of the Cithaeron range, which divides Boeotia from Attica, and on the southern edge of the Boeotian plain. It played an important role in Greek myth, as the site of the stories of Cadmus, Oedipus, Dionysus and others...

, Onchestus, Arne
Arne
In Greek mythology, Arne or Melanippe was a daughter of Aeolus and Melanippe , daughter of Chiron. She was born as a foal as her mother had been transformed into a horse as a disguise, but was returned to the human form and renamed Arne...

, Midea
Midea
Midea Founded in 1968, Midea is renowned as a sizeable conglomerate that specializes in the manufacturing of household appliances and sets foot in relevant fields of real estates and logistics...

, Nisa
Nisa
-Locations:*Nısa - a village in Azerbaijan*Nisa, Portugal - a municipality in the district of Portalegre*Nisa, Turkmenistan - an ancient city , first capital of the Parthians-Organizations:*The Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency in Japan....

, Anthedon
Anthedon (mythology)
In Greek mythology, there were several people named Anthedon.Anthedon is possibly the father of Glaucus, a sea god – whose mother might have been Alcyone...

2.511 Minyans
Minyans
According to Greek mythology and legendary prehistory of the Aegean region, the Minyans were an autochthonous group inhabiting the Aegean region...

30 Ascalaphus
Ascalaphus
In Greek mythology, two people share the name Ascalaphus/Askalaphos .#Son of Acheron and Orphne. Askalaphos was the orchardist of Hades. He told the other gods that Persephone had eaten a pomegranate in Hades. He was punished by being changed into an owl...

, Ialmenus
Ialmenus
In Greek mythology, Ialmenus was a son of Ares and Astyoche, and twin brother of Ascalaphus. Together with his brother, he sailed with the Argonauts, was among the suitors of Helen and led the Orchomenian contingent in the Trojan War....

Aspledon, Orchomenus
2.517 Phocēans
Phocis
Phocis is one of the regional units of Greece. It is part of the administrative region of Central Greece. It stretches from the western mountainsides of Parnassus on the east to the mountain range of Vardousia on the west, upon the Gulf of Corinth...

40 Schedius
Schedius
Schedius was a name attributed to four individuals in Greek mythology.*Schedius was the son of Iphitus and brother of Epistrophus. In the Iliad, he and his brother lead the Phocians on the side of the Achaeans in the Trojan War. He was killed when Hector threw a spear at Ajax, who dodged...

, Epistrophus
Epistrophus
In the Iliad, Epistrophus was the son of Iphitus and brother of Schedius. Together with his brother he led the Phocians on the side of the Achaeans in the Trojan War....

Cyparissus
Cyparissus
In Greek mythology, Cyparissus or Kyparissos was a boy beloved by Apollo, or in some versions by other deities. In the best-known version of the story, the favorite companion of Cyparissus was a tamed stag, which he accidentally killed with his hunting javelin as it lay sleeping in the woods...

, Pytho
Delphi
Delphi is both an archaeological site and a modern town in Greece on the south-western spur of Mount Parnassus in the valley of Phocis.In Greek mythology, Delphi was the site of the Delphic oracle, the most important oracle in the classical Greek world, and a major site for the worship of the god...

, Crisa
CRISA
Computadores, Redes e Ingeniería, S.A. is a Spanish company founded in 1985 to develop and manufacture electronics and software products for aerospace applications.In 2000, CRISA became part of the EADS Astrium group....

, Daulis
Daulis
Daulis was an ancient Greek city in Phocis.According to Greek mythology, Daulis was the hometown of Tereus. The city is mentioned by Homer and it is said to be named after a nymph Daulis, a daughter of the river-god Cephissus....

, Panopeus
Panopeus
Panopeus , or Phanoteus , was an ancient Greek town of Phocis, near the frontier of Boeotia, and on the road from Daulis to Chaeronea. Pausanias said that Panopeus was 20 stadia from Chaeronea and 7 from Daulis; but the latter number is almost certainly a mistake...

, Anemorea, Hyampolis, river Cephissus
Cephissus
Cephissus, Cephisus, Kephisos, or Kifisos may refer to:* Cephissus , a river in through northern Boeotia* Cephissus , a river in Attica flowing through the Athenian plain...

, Lilaea
Lilaea
In Greek mythology, Lilaea was a Naiad of a spring of the same name, daughter of the river god Cephissus.The town of Lilaea in Phocis and the asteroid 213 Lilaea are named after her....

2.527 Locrians
Locris
Locris was a region of ancient Greece, the homeland of the Locrians, made up of three distinct districts.-Locrian tribe:...

40 Ajax the Lesser
Ajax the Lesser
Ajax was a Greek mythological hero, son of Oileus, the king of Locris. He was called the "lesser" or "Locrian" Ajax, to distinguish him from Ajax the Great, son of Telamon. He was the leader of the Locrian contingent during the Trojan War. He is a significant figure in Homer's Iliad and is also...

Cynus
Cynus
Cynus in Ancient Greece, was a city and seaport of Opus in Eastern Locris....

, Opoüs
Opus, Greece
Opus , in Ancient Greece, the chief city of Opuntian or Eastern Locris. It was located on the coast of mainland Greece opposite Euboea, perhaps at modern Atalandi...

, Calliatus, Bessa
Bessa
Bessa is a genus of flies in the family Tachinidae.-Species:*B. harveyi *B. selecta *B. remota *B. parallela...

, Scarphe, Augeae, Tarphe, Thronium
Thronium
Thronion or Thronium was an ancient Greek city of the Euboian-Lokrians in Epirus. It is believed to lie somewhere to the south of Vlorë, between the Shushicë River and the sea....

2.537 Abantes
Abantes
The Abantes were an ancient Ionian tribe. Their home was Euboea.- Origins :Aristotle of Chalcis states that the Abantes were Thracians from Abae in Phokis...

 of Euboea
Euboea
Euboea is the second largest Greek island in area and population, after Crete. The narrow Euripus Strait separates it from Boeotia in mainland Greece. In general outline it is a long and narrow, seahorse-shaped island; it is about long, and varies in breadth from to...

40 Elephenor
Elephenor
In Greek mythology, Elephenor was the son of Chalcodon and king of the Abantes of Euboea. He received the sons of Theseus of Athens, Acamas and Demophon, when they fled the usurper Menestheus...

Chalcis
Chalcis
Chalcis or Chalkida , the chief town of the island of Euboea in Greece, is situated on the strait of the Evripos at its narrowest point. The name is preserved from antiquity and is derived from the Greek χαλκός , though there is no trace of any mines in the area...

, Eretria
Eretria
Erétria was a polis in Ancient Greece, located on the western coast of the island of Euboea, south of Chalcis, facing the coast of Attica across the narrow Euboean Gulf. Eretria was an important Greek polis in the 6th/5th century BC. However, it lost its importance already in antiquity...

, Histiaea, Cerinthus
Cerinthus
Cerinthus was a gnostic and to some, an early Christian, who was prominent as a "heresiarch" in the view of the early Church Fathers. Contrary to proto-orthodox Christianity, Cerinthus's school followed the Jewish law, used the Gospel according to the Hebrews, denied that the Supreme God had made...

, Dium, Carystus
Carystus
Carystus ; was an ancient city-state on Euboea. In the Iliad it is controlled by the Abantes. By the time of Thucydides it was inhabited by Dryopians.- Persian War :...

, Styra
Styra
Styra is a village and a former municipality on the island Euboea, Greece. Since the 2011 local government reform it is part of the municipality Karystos, of which it is a municipal unit. It is located in the southern part of Euboea, facing the eastern shore of Attica across the South Euboean Gulf...

2.546 Athenians
Athens
Athens , is the capital and largest city of Greece. Athens dominates the Attica region and is one of the world's oldest cities, as its recorded history spans around 3,400 years. Classical Athens was a powerful city-state...

50 Led first by Menestheus
Menestheus
Menestheus , the son of Peteus, son of Orneus, son of Erechtheus, was a legendary King of Athens during the Trojan War. He was set up as king by the Dioscuri when Theseus travelled to the underworld, and at his return Menestheus exiled him from the city.Menestheus was one of the suitors of Helen of...

 (then by later by Acamas
Acamas
Acamas was a name attributed to several characters in Greek mythology. The following three all fought in the Trojan War, and only the first was not mentioned by Homer....

 and Demophon, the sons of Theseus
Theseus
For other uses, see Theseus Theseus was the mythical founder-king of Athens, son of Aethra, and fathered by Aegeus and Poseidon, both of whom Aethra had slept with in one night. Theseus was a founder-hero, like Perseus, Cadmus, or Heracles, all of whom battled and overcame foes that were...

)
Athens
Athens
Athens , is the capital and largest city of Greece. Athens dominates the Attica region and is one of the world's oldest cities, as its recorded history spans around 3,400 years. Classical Athens was a powerful city-state...

2.557 Salamineans
Salamis Island
Salamis , is the largest Greek island in the Saronic Gulf, about 1 nautical mile off-coast from Piraeus and about 16 km west of Athens. The chief city, Salamina , lies in the west-facing core of the crescent on Salamis Bay, which opens into the Saronic Gulf...

12 Telamonian Ajax
Ajax (mythology)
Ajax or Aias was a mythological Greek hero, the son of Telamon and Periboea and king of Salamis. He plays an important role in Homer's Iliad and in the Epic Cycle, a series of epic poems about the Trojan War. To distinguish him from Ajax, son of Oileus , he is called "Telamonian Ajax," "Greater...

Salamis
Salamis Island
Salamis , is the largest Greek island in the Saronic Gulf, about 1 nautical mile off-coast from Piraeus and about 16 km west of Athens. The chief city, Salamina , lies in the west-facing core of the crescent on Salamis Bay, which opens into the Saronic Gulf...

2.559 Argives 80 Diomedes
Diomedes
Diomedes or Diomed is a hero in Greek mythology, known for his participation in the Trojan War.He was born to Tydeus and Deipyle and later became King of Argos, succeeding his maternal grandfather, Adrastus. In Homer's Iliad Diomedes is regarded alongside Ajax as one of the best warriors of all...

 with subordinates Sthenelus
Sthenelus
In Greek mythology, Sthenelus was a name attributed to several different individuals.*Son of Perseus and Andromeda, and king of Mycenae.*Son of Capaneus and Evadne, he fought alongside Diomedes and the other Argives in the Trojan War and was one of the men who hid in the Trojan horse...

 and Euryalus
Euryalus
Euryalus refers to several different characters from Greek mythology and classical literature:#In the Aeneid by Virgil, Nisus and Euryalus are ideal friends and lovers, who died during a raid on the Rutulians.# Euryalus was the son of Mecisteus...

Argos
Argos
Argos is a city and a former municipality in Argolis, Peloponnese, Greece. Since the 2011 local government reform it is part of the municipality Argos-Mykines, of which it is a municipal unit. It is 11 kilometres from Nafplion, which was its historic harbour...

, Tiryns
Tiryns
Tiryns is a Mycenaean archaeological site in the prefecture of Argolis in the Peloponnese, some kilometres north of Nauplion.-General information:...

, Hermione
Hermione
Hermione may refer to:* Hermione , a female given name* Hermione Granger, a main character in the Harry Potter novels and films, seven ships of the Royal Navy...

, Asine
Asine
Asine was an ancient Greek city of Argolis, which was the first city mentioned by Homer as part of the kingdom of Diomedes, king of Argos.In 740 BC, the Argives destroyed the city because its citizens had helped the Spartans in their war against Argos...

, Troezen
Troezen
Troezen is a small town and a former municipality in the northeastern Peloponnese, Greece. Since the 2011 local government reform it is part of the municipality Troizinia, of which it is a municipal unit....

, Eїonae, Epidaurus
Epidaurus
Epidaurus was a small city in ancient Greece, at the Saronic Gulf. Two modern towns bear the name Epidavros : Palaia Epidavros and Nea Epidavros. Since 2010 they belong to the new municipality of Epidavros, part of the peripheral unit of Argolis...

, Aegina
Aegina
Aegina is one of the Saronic Islands of Greece in the Saronic Gulf, from Athens. Tradition derives the name from Aegina, the mother of Aeacus, who was born in and ruled the island. During ancient times, Aegina was a rival to Athens, the great sea power of the era.-Municipality:The municipality...

, Mases
2.569 Mycenaeans 100 Agamemnon
Agamemnon
In Greek mythology, Agamemnon was the son of King Atreus and Queen Aerope of Mycenae, the brother of Menelaus, the husband of Clytemnestra, and the father of Electra and Orestes. Mythical legends make him the king of Mycenae or Argos, thought to be different names for the same area...

, king of Mycenae, supreme commander
Mycenae
Mycenae
Mycenae is an archaeological site in Greece, located about 90 km south-west of Athens, in the north-eastern Peloponnese. Argos is 11 km to the south; Corinth, 48 km to the north...

, Corinth
Corinth
Corinth is a city and former municipality in Corinthia, Peloponnese, Greece. Since the 2011 local government reform it is part of the municipality Corinth, of which it is the seat and a municipal unit...

, Cleonae
Cleonae
Cleonae or Cleonæ or Kleonai may refer to any of several ancient cities, including:*Archaies Kleones formerly Cleonae, in Argolis, now in Corinthia prefecture, Greece*Cleonae on Mount Athos...

, Orneae
Orneae
Orneae was an ancient Greek City which is mentioned in Homer's Catalogue of Ships and which was situated north of Leontio in the prefecture of Corinthia....

, Araethyrea, Sicyon
Sicyon
Sikyon was an ancient Greek city situated in the northern Peloponnesus between Corinth and Achaea on the territory of the present-day prefecture of Corinthia...

, Hyperesia, Gonoessa
Gonoessa
Gonoessa was an ancient city in ancient Achaia that is now in the Corinthia prefecture, Greece.Gonoessa was first mentioned by Homer in his Iliad. It was a settlement of the city-state of Pellene with its port that was used during the Trojan War, its trip and the leader of Agamemnon. Homer had...

, Pellene
Pellene
Pellene was the easternmost ancient Greek city-state in Achaea. The ruins are southwest of Xylokastro. The city sided with Sparta throughout the Peloponnesian War. It was a member of the Achaean League until that League was dissolved by Alexander the Great. In the fourth century it was ruled for...

, Aegium, Helice
2.581 Lacedaemonians
Sparta
Sparta or Lacedaemon, was a prominent city-state in ancient Greece, situated on the banks of the River Eurotas in Laconia, in south-eastern Peloponnese. It emerged as a political entity around the 10th century BC, when the invading Dorians subjugated the local, non-Dorian population. From c...

60 Menelaus
Menelaus
Menelaus may refer to;*Menelaus, one of the two most known Atrides, a king of Sparta and son of Atreus and Aerope*Menelaus on the Moon, named after Menelaus of Alexandria.*Menelaus , brother of Ptolemy I Soter...

, brother of Agamemnon, husband of Helen
Pharis, Sparta
Sparta
Sparta or Lacedaemon, was a prominent city-state in ancient Greece, situated on the banks of the River Eurotas in Laconia, in south-eastern Peloponnese. It emerged as a political entity around the 10th century BC, when the invading Dorians subjugated the local, non-Dorian population. From c...

, Messe
Messé
Messé is a commune in the Deux-Sèvres department in western France.-References:*...

, Bryseae, Augeae, Amyclae, Helos, Laas
Passavas
Passavas or Las is situated on the Mani Peninsula. In ancient times Las was a Spartan possession and in 218 BC the citizens of the city fought and routed and group of Philip V of Macedon's army. Las became part of the Union of Free Laconians in 195 BC when it separated from Sparta. The Spartans...

, Oetylus
2.592 No name given. 90 Nestor
Nestor (mythology)
In Greek mythology, Nestor of Gerenia was the son of Neleus and Chloris and the King of Pylos. He became king after Heracles killed Neleus and all of Nestor's siblings...

Pylos
Pylos
Pylos , historically known under its Italian name Navarino, is a town and a former municipality in Messenia, Peloponnese, Greece. Since the 2011 local government reform it is part of the municipality Pylos-Nestoras, of which it is the seat and a municipal unit. It was the capital of the former...

, Arēne
Arene
Arene or Arênê or Arène may refer to:*an aromatic hydrocarbon*Arene , a genus of marine snails in the family Areneidae*Arene , the wife of Aphareus and mother of Idas and Lynceus in Greek mythology...

, Thryum, Aipy
Aipy
Aipy or Typaneai was an ancient city in Elis, the modern Ilia Prefecture, Greece. It was one of the oldest cities in Elis and was a member of the Minyae which had six cities, it was located near Makistos and according to Homer, they were prepared for the Trojan War. The ancient city has never...

, Cyparisseis, Amphigenea, Pteleum, Helos, Dorium
2.603 Arcadia
Arcadia
Arcadia is one of the regional units of Greece. It is part of the administrative region of Peloponnese. It is situated in the central and eastern part of the Peloponnese peninsula. It takes its name from the mythological character Arcas. In Greek mythology, it was the home of the god Pan...

ns
60 Agapenor
Agapenor
Agapenor was in Greek mythology a leader of the Arcadians in the Trojan war. He was a son of Ancaeus, and grandson of Lycurgus. As king of the Arcadians he received sixty ships from Agamemnon, in which he led his Arcadians to Troy. He also occurs among the suitors of Helen...

Cyllene, Pheneus, Orchomenus
Orchomenus (Arcadia)
Orchomenus or Orchomenos was an ancient city of Arcadia, Greece, called by Thucydides the Arcadian Orchomenus , to distinguish it from the Boeotian town. Its ruins are near the modern village of Orchomenos .-Situation:It was situated in a plain surrounded on every side by mountains...

, Rhipae, Stratie
Stratie
Stratie was an ancient city in Arcadia.It was a Homeric and prehistoric city and was mentioned only by Homer and was mentioned in the Second Rhapsodies of the Iliad. Its residents pariticipated in the Trojan War with the remainder of Arcadia led by the general AgapenorThe location of the ancient...

, Enispe
Enispe
Enispe was an ancient city in Ancient ArcadiaIt was Homeric, a prehistoric city that was mentioned only by Homer. It was collaborated with ther remainder of Arcadians in the Trojan War including the commander known as Agapenor...

, Tegea
Tegea
Tegea was a settlement in ancient Greece, and it is also a former municipality in Arcadia, Peloponnese, Greece. Since the 2011 local government reform it is part of the municipality Tripoli, of which it is a municipal unit. Its seat was the village Stadio....

, Mantinea, Stymphalos, Parrhasia
2.615 Epeans
Epeius
There were two characters named Epeius in Greek mythology.#A Greek soldier during the Trojan War. He was the son of Panopeus and had the reputation for being a coward. In the Iliad he participated in the boxing match at the funeral games for Patrocles against Euryalus and won...

 of Elis
Elis
Elis, or Eleia is an ancient district that corresponds with the modern Elis peripheral unit...

40 Amphimachus
Amphimachus
In Greek mythology, Amphimachus is a name attributed to multiple individuals.-Son of Cteatus:Amphimachus was the son of Cteatus and Theronice, daughter of Dexamenus. He was one of the leaders of the Elean contingent at the Trojan War and was slain by Hector.-Son of Nomion:Amphimachus was the son...

, Thalpius, Diōres
Diores
In Greek mythology, Diorês referred to three different people.*The father of Automedon.*The son of Amarynceus *The son of Aeolus, who married his sister Polymela.Diores is also the name of an ant spider genus ....

, Polyxenus
Polyxenus
In Greek mythology, Polyxenus is a name that may refer to:*One of the first priests of Demeter and one of the first to learn the secrets of the Eleusinian Mysteries....

Buprasium and the lands enclosed by Hyrmine
Hyrmine
In Greek mythology, Hyrmine was a daughter of Neleus, Nycteus, or, according to others, of Epeius and Anaxiroe, and sister of Alector . She was the wife of Phorbas and by him the mother of the Argonauts Augeas, Actor and Tiphys. The natural father of Augeas by her may have been Helios.-References:...

, Myrsinus, Olene
Olene
The Brown Tussock Moth Olene mendosa is a species of moth found in India, Taiwan , Borneo and Australia....

, Alesium
2.624 Men of Dulichium
Dulichium
Dulichium, Dolicha, or Doliche was a place noted by numerous ancient writers that was either a city on, or an island off, the Ionian Sea coast of Acarnania, Greece....

40 Meges Dulichium
Dulichium
Dulichium, Dolicha, or Doliche was a place noted by numerous ancient writers that was either a city on, or an island off, the Ionian Sea coast of Acarnania, Greece....

, Echinean Islands
2.631 Cephallenians 12 Odysseus
Odysseus
Odysseus or Ulysses was a legendary Greek king of Ithaca and the hero of Homer's epic poem the Odyssey. Odysseus also plays a key role in Homer's Iliad and other works in the Epic Cycle....

 (known in Latin
Latin
Latin is an Italic language originally spoken in Latium and Ancient Rome. It, along with most European languages, is a descendant of the ancient Proto-Indo-European language. Although it is considered a dead language, a number of scholars and members of the Christian clergy speak it fluently, and...

 as Ulysses)
Ithaca, Neritum
Neritum
Neritum is an Ancient Greek name of an island in the Ionian Sea, near Ithaca and Cephalonia. In Homer's Iliad, book II, Neritum is part of Odysseus's kingdom....

, Crocylea, Aegilips
Aegilips
Aegilips is an Ancient Greek name of an island in the Ionian Sea, near Ithaca. In Homer's Iliad, book II, Aegilips is part of Odysseus's kingdom. Some researchers, including Wilhelm Dörpfeld estimate that Aegilips is present day island of Meganisi....

, Same
Same (Ancient Greece)
Same is an Ancient Greek name of a Homeric and unidentified island in the Ionian Sea, near Ithaca and Cephalonia. In Homer's Iliad, book II, in the Catalogue of Ships, Same is described as part of Odysseus's kingdom...

, Zacynthus (islands with mainland opposite)
2.638 Aetolia
Aetolia
Aetolia is a mountainous region of Greece on the north coast of the Gulf of Corinth, forming the eastern part of the modern prefecture of Aetolia-Acarnania.-Geography:...

ns
40 Thoas
Thoas
Thoas , son of Andraemon and Gorge, was one of the heroes who fought for the Greeks in the Trojan War. He was a former suitor of Helen of Troy and led a group of forty ships for the Aetolians, one of the larger contingents. In the Iliad it states that he received his lordship because the previous...

Pleuron, Olenus
Olenus
In Greek mythology, Olenus was the name of several individuals:#Olenus, son of Hephaestus and father of Helice and Aex, two nurses of infant Zeus. A city in Aulis was named for him....

, Pylene, Chalcis
Chalcis
Chalcis or Chalkida , the chief town of the island of Euboea in Greece, is situated on the strait of the Evripos at its narrowest point. The name is preserved from antiquity and is derived from the Greek χαλκός , though there is no trace of any mines in the area...

, Calydon
Calydon
Calydon was an ancient Greek city in Aetolia, situated on the west bank of the river Evenus. According to Greek mythology, the city took its name from its founder Calydon, son of Aetolus. Close to the city stood Mount Zygos, the slopes of which provided the setting for the hunt of the Calydonian...

2.645 Cretans
Crete
Crete is the largest and most populous of the Greek islands, the fifth largest island in the Mediterranean Sea, and one of the thirteen administrative regions of Greece. It forms a significant part of the economy and cultural heritage of Greece while retaining its own local cultural traits...

80 Idomeneus
Idomeneus
In Greek mythology, Idomeneus , "strength of Ida") was a Cretan warrior, father of Orsilochus and Chalkiope, son of Deucalion, grandson of Minos and king of Crete. He led the Cretan armies to the Trojan War and was also one of Helen's suitors. Meriones was his charioteer and brother-in-arms...

, Meriones
Meriones (mythology)
In Greek mythology, Meriones was a son of Molus and Melphis. Molus was a half-brother of Idomeneus. Like other heroes of mythology, Meriones was said to be a descendant of gods. As a grandson of Deucalion , Meriones's ancestors include Zeus, Europa, Helios, and Circe. Meriones possessed the...

Cnossus, Gortys, Lyctus
Lyctus
Lyctus or Lyttos , was one of the most considerable cities in ancient Crete, which appears in the Homeric catalogue. Lyttos is now a village in the municipality of Minoa Pediada.-Lyctus in mythology:...

, Miletus
Miletus
Miletus was an ancient Greek city on the western coast of Anatolia , near the mouth of the Maeander River in ancient Caria...

, Lycastus, Phaestus, Rhytium, others up to 100
2.653 Rhodians
Rhodes
Rhodes is an island in Greece, located in the eastern Aegean Sea. It is the largest of the Dodecanese islands in terms of both land area and population, with a population of 117,007, and also the island group's historical capital. Administratively the island forms a separate municipality within...

9 Tlepolemus
Tlepolemus
For others of this name see Tlepolemus In Greek mythology, Tlepolemus is the son of Heracles by Astyocheia, daughter of the King of Ephyra. Either that or he was the son of Melite and the second of the two sons of Hercules who goes by the name of Hyllus...

Lindus, Ielysus
Ialysos
Ialysos , is a town and a former municipality on the island of Rhodes, in the Dodecanese, Greece. Since the 2011 local government reform it is part of the municipality Rhodes, of which it is a municipal unit. It is the second-largest town on the island of Rhodes...

, Cameirus
2.671 Symi
Symi
Symi also transliterated Syme or Simi is a Greek island and municipality. It is mountainous and includes the harbor town of Symi and its adjacent upper town Ano Symi, as well as several smaller localities, beaches, and areas of significance in history and mythology...

ans
3 Nireus
Nireus
Nireus is a name that may refer to:*Nireus , in Greek mythology:**Nireus, king of Syme**Nireus, a son of Poseidon and Canace**Nireus, a companion of Heracles*173086 Nireus, an asteroid*Papilio nireus, a species of butterfly...

Syme
Syme
Syme is a surname, and may refer to:* Sir Colin Syme , Australian medical administrator and innovator* David Syme , a Scottish-Australian newspaper proprietor of The Age...

2.676 No name given. 30 Pheidippus
Pheidippus
In Greek mythology, Pheidippus or Phidippus was a son of Thessalus and Chalciope and brother of Antiphus and Nesson....

, Antiphus
Antiphus
In Greek mythology, Antiphus or Ántiphos is a name attributed to multiple individuals:*Antiphus, one of the 50 sons of Priam, and son of Hecuba. During the Trojan War, he was killed by Agamemnon....

Nisyrus
Nisyros
Nisyros is a volcanic Greek island and municipality located in the Aegean Sea. It is part of the Dodecanese group of islands, situated between the islands of Kos and Tilos. Its shape is approximately round, with a diameter of about , and an area of . Several other islets are found in the direct...

, Crapathus
Karpathos
Karpathos is the second largest of the Greek Dodecanese islands, in the southeastern Aegean Sea. Together with the neighboring smaller Saria Island it forms the municipality Karpathos, which is part of the Karpathos peripheral unit. From its remote position Karpathos has preserved many...

, Casus
Kasos
Kasos is a Greek island municipality in the Dodecanese. It is the southernmost island in the Aegean Sea, and is part of the Karpathos peripheral unit. As of 2001, its population was 990. The island has been called in , .-Geography:...

, Cos
Kos
Kos or Cos is a Greek island in the south Sporades group of the Dodecanese, next to the Gulf of Gökova/Cos. It measures by , and is from the coast of Bodrum, Turkey and the ancient region of Caria. Administratively the island forms a separate municipality within the Kos peripheral unit, which is...

, Calydnian Islands
2.681 Pelasgians
Pelasgians
The name Pelasgians was used by some ancient Greek writers to refer to populations that were either the ancestors of the Greeks or who preceded the Greeks in Greece, "a hold-all term for any ancient, primitive and presumably indigenous people in the Greek world." In general, "Pelasgian" has come...

, Myrmidons
Myrmidons
The Myrmidons or Myrmidones were legendary people of Greek history. They were very brave and skilled warriors commanded by Achilles, as described in Homer's Iliad. Their eponymous ancestor was Myrmidon, a king of Thessalian Phthia, who was the son of Zeus and "wide-ruling" Eurymedousa, a...

, Hellenes, Achaeans
50 Achilles
Achilles
In Greek mythology, Achilles was a Greek hero of the Trojan War, the central character and the greatest warrior of Homer's Iliad.Plato named Achilles the handsomest of the heroes assembled against Troy....

 (later by Neoptolemus
Neoptolemus
Neoptolemus was the son of the warrior Achilles and the princess Deidamia in Greek mythology. Achilles' mother foretold many years before Achilles' birth that there would be a great war. She saw that her only son was to die if he fought in the war...

)
Pelasgic Argos
Pelasgians
The name Pelasgians was used by some ancient Greek writers to refer to populations that were either the ancestors of the Greeks or who preceded the Greeks in Greece, "a hold-all term for any ancient, primitive and presumably indigenous people in the Greek world." In general, "Pelasgian" has come...

, Alos
Alos, Greece
Alos or Halos was an ancient Greek city, located 10 km south from present-day Almyros. The city is mentioned by Herodotus as one of the places where the Persian king Xerxes stayed in the summer of 480 during his attack on Greece; Herodotus digresses upon a human sacrifice ritual...

, Alope
Alope
Alopê was in Greek mythology a mortal woman, the daughter of Cercyon, known for her great beauty. Poseidon, in the guise of a kingfisher, seduced Alope, his granddaughter through Cercyon, and from the union she gave birth to Hippothoon...

, Trachis
Trachis
Trachis was a region in ancient Greece. Situated south of the river Spercheios, it was populated by the Malians.Its main town was also called Trachis until 426 BC, when it became Heraclea Trachinia. It is located to the west of Thermopylae. Trachis is located just west of the western-most tip of...

, Phthia
Phthia
Phthia , Phthíē ) in ancient Greece was the southernmost region of ancient Thessaly, on both sides of Othrys Mountain. It was the homeland of the Myrmidones tribe, who took part in the Trojan War under Achilles....

, Hellas
2.695 No name given. 40 Protesilaus
Protesilaus
In Greek mythology, Protesilaus , was a hero in the Iliad who was venerated at cult sites in Thessaly and Thrace. Protesilaus was the son of Iphicles, a "lord of many sheep"; as grandson of the eponymous Phylacos, he was the leader of the Phylaceans...

, later by Podarces
Podarces
In Greek mythology, Podarces was a son of Iphicles and brother of Protesilaus. In Homer's Iliad, Podarces and Protesilaus were former suitors of Helen, and therefore bound to defend the marriage rights of Menelaus, her husband, when Helen was kidnapped by Paris...

Phylace, Pyrasus, Iton
Iton
The Iton is a river in Normandy, France, left tributary of the Eure River. Its source is near Moulins-la-Marche. For about 10 km between Orvaux and Glisolles, it disappears and pursues a subterranean course....

, Antrium, Pteleum
2.711 No name given. 11 Eumelus
Eumelus
Eumelus was the name of:*Eumelus of Corinth, an epic poet of the second half of the 8th century BC*Several men in Greek mythology:**Eumelus, who succeeded Admetus as the King of Pherae. He led Pherae and Iolcus in the Trojan War on the side of the Greeks. He was the husband of Iphthime and the son...

Pherae
Pherae
Pherae was an ancient Greek town in southeastern Thessaly. It bordered Lake Boebeïs. In mythology, it was the home of King Admetus, whose wife, Alcestis, Heracles went into Hades to rescue. In history, it was more famous as the home of the fourth-century B.C...

, Boebe
Kanalia
Kanalia is a village in Thessaly, Greece, part of the municipality Rigas Feraios. It is located from Volos and at a height of above the sea level. It is one of the prettiest on the north-west side of Pelion. It is built on the foundation of the Acropolis Voivis in the plains of Metochi...

, Glaphyrae, Iolcus
2.716 No name given. 7, with 50 oarsmen each who were also archers Philoctetes
Philoctetes
Philoctetes or Philocthetes according to Greek mythology, the son of King Poeas of Meliboea in Thessaly. He was a Greek hero, famed as an archer, and was a participant in the Trojan War. He was the subject of at least two plays by Sophocles, one of which is named after him, and one each by both...

, later by Medon
Medôn
In Greek mythology, there were four people called Medon .#Medon is the faithful herald of Odysseus in Homer’s Odyssey. Following the advice of his son Telemachus, Odysseus spares Medon’s life after murdering the suitors who had been plaguing his halls in his homeland of Ithaca...

Methone
Methone
Methone can refer to:* Methone , one of the seven Alkyonides, daughters of the giant Alkyoneus in Greek mythology*Methone , a small moon of Saturn, discovered in 2004*Methoni, Messenia, a town in the prefecture of Messenia, Greece...

, Thaumacia, Meliboea
Meliboea
In Greek mythology, Meliboea was a name attributed to the following individuals:*The wife of Magnes, who named the town of Meliboea in Thessaly after her. The town of Meliboea became a kingdom in eastern Thessalia . Nowadays, Meliboea is a municipality of Larissa prefecture...

, Olizon
2.729 No name given. 30 Podalirius
Podalirius
In Greek mythology, Podalirius or Podalarius was a son of Asclepius. With Machaon, his brother, he led thirty ships from Thessaly in the Trojan War on the side of the Greeks. Like Machaon, he was a legendary healer. He healed Philoctetes, holder of the bow and arrows of Heracles required to end...

, Machaon, two sons of Asclepius
Asclepius
Asclepius is the God of Medicine and Healing in ancient Greek religion. Asclepius represents the healing aspect of the medical arts; his daughters are Hygieia , Iaso , Aceso , Aglæa/Ægle , and Panacea...

Tricca
Tricca
Tricca was an ancient city in Thessaly, Greece. It corresponds to modern Trikala.It was an ancient city, near the Peneius River and on the Lethaeus River. It is mentioned in Homer as the Kingdom of Machaon and Podaleirius, sons of Aesculapius and physicians of the Greek army. It possessed the...

, Ithome, Oechalia
2.734 No name given. 40 Eurypylus
Eurypylus
In Greek mythology, Eurypylus was the name of several different people.-Son of Thestius:One Eurypylus was a son of Thestius. He participated in the hunt for the Calydonian Boar, during which he insulted Atalanta and was killed by Meleager.-Son of Euaemon:Another Eurypylus was a Thessalian king,...

Ormenius, Hypereia (fountain), Asterius
Asterius
The name "Asterius" may refer to:* Asterion, name of two sacred kings of Crete* Asterius of Ostia , Christian martyr and saint* Asterius of Caesarea , Christian martyr and saint* Asterius, Claudius and Neon , Christian martyr and saint...

, Titanus
2.738 (Lapiths, "race of Mars") 40 Polypoetes, Leonteus Argissa
Argissa Magoula
Argissa Magoula is a Neolithic settlement mound in Thessaly in Greece. It was excavated by Vladimir Milojčić from the University of Heidelberg in the 1950s. He claimed to have found evidence of an aceramic Neolithic, but this has been disputed.-Sources:...

, Gyrtone, Orthe
Orthe
Orthe is a series of science-fiction novels by Mary Gentle.The Orthe series consists of the books Golden Witchbreed and Ancient Light and the short story The Crystal Sunlight, the Bright Air...

, Elone, Oloösson
2.748 Enienes, Peraebi 22 Guneus
Guneus
In Greek mythology, the name Guneus may refer to:*Guneus, leader of the Aenianes and Perrhaebians during the Trojan War. According to Homer, "Guneus brought two and twenty ships from Cyphus, and he was followed by the Enienes and the valiant Peraebi, who dwelt about wintry Dodona." Guneus survived...

Cyphus, Dodona (Thessalian), Gonnos
Gonnoi
Gonnoi is a former municipality in the Larissa regional unit, Thessaly, Greece. Since the 2011 local government reform it is part of the municipality Tempi, of which it is a municipal unit. Population 3,119...

, banks of the Titaresius
Titaresios
The Titarisios , older form: Xerias is one of the major rivers in Thessaly and is also one of the major tributaries of the Pineios. The river begins at the western part of Mount Olympus and flows west, then southwest and merges with the Pineios...

2.756 Magnetes
Magnetes
The Magnetes were an ancient Greek tribe living in Thessalian Magnesia who took part in the Trojan War. They later also contributed to the Greek colonisation by founding two prosperous cities in Western Anatolia, Magnesia on the Maeander and Magnesia ad Sipylum.According to Hesiod's "Eoiae" or...

40 Prothoüs
Prothous
Prothous, a son of Tenthredon, commander of the Magnetes who dwelt arount mount Pelion and the river Peneus, was one of the Greek heroes in the Trojan War...

About the Peneus
Peneus
In Greek mythology, Peneus was a Thessalian river god, one of the three thousand Rivers , a child of Oceanus and Tethys. The nymph Creusa bore him one son, Hypseus, who was King of the Lapiths, and three daughters, Menippe , Daphne, and Stilbe. He also had a son Atrax with Bura, and Andreus with...

 and Mt. Pelion
Pelion
Pelion or Pelium is a mountain at the southeastern part of Thessaly in central Greece, forming a hook-like peninsula between the Pagasetic Gulf and the Aegean Sea...


External links