List of human anatomical parts named after people

List of human anatomical parts named after people

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This is a list of human anatomical parts named after people.
For other lists of eponyms (names derived from people) see eponym
Eponym
An eponym is the name of a person or thing, whether real or fictitious, after which a particular place, tribe, era, discovery, or other item is named or thought to be named...

.
For a list of eponyms sorted by name see List of eponyms.

Alphabetical list


For clarity, entries are listed by the name of the person associated with them, so Loop of Henle
Loop of Henle
In the kidney, the loop of Henle is the portion of a nephron that leads from the proximal convoluted tubule to the distal convoluted tubule. Named after its discoverer F. G. J...

 is listed under H not L.

A

  • Achilles tendon
    Achilles tendon
    The Achilles tendon , also known as the calcaneal tendon or the tendo calcaneus, is a tendon of the posterior leg. It serves to attach the plantaris, gastrocnemius and soleus muscles to the calcaneus bone.- Anatomy :The Achilles is the tendonous extension of 3 muscles in the lower leg:...

     – Achilles
    Achilles
    In Greek mythology, Achilles was a Greek hero of the Trojan War, the central character and the greatest warrior of Homer's Iliad.Plato named Achilles the handsomest of the heroes assembled against Troy....

    , Greek mythological character
  • Adam's apple
    Adam's apple
    The laryngeal prominence—commonly known as the Adam's Apple—is a feature of the human neck. This lump, or protrusion, is formed by the angle of the thyroid cartilage surrounding the larynx...

     – Adam, Biblical character
  • Alcock's canal (pudendal canal) – Sir Rutherford Alcock
    Rutherford Alcock
    Sir Rutherford Alcock KCB was the first British diplomatic representative to live in Japan.-Early life:Alcock was the son of the physician, Dr. Thomas Alcock, who practised at Ealing, near London. As he grew up, Alcock followed his father into the medical profession...

  • Artery of Adamkiewicz
    Artery of Adamkiewicz
    In human anatomy, the Artery of Adamkiewicz is the largest anterior segmental medullary artery.It has several other names, including:* Adamkiewicz artery* great radicular artery of Adamkiewicz* major anterior segmental medullary artery...

     – Albert Wojciech Adamkiewicz
    Albert Wojciech Adamkiewicz
    Albert Wojciech Adamkiewicz was a Polish pathologist who was born in Żerków. In 1873 he earned his medical doctorate from the University of Breslau, where he was a student-assistant to physiologist Rudolf Peter Heinrich Heidenhain...


B

  • Bachmann's bundle
    Bachmann's bundle
    right|thumb|350px|Image showing Bachmann's bundleBachmann's bundle, also known as the anterior interatrial band, is a broad band of atrial muscle that runs just behind the ascending aorta and connects the top of the right atrium with the top of the left atrium. Bachmann's bundle is, during normal...

     – Jean George Bachmann
  • Bartholin's gland
    Bartholin's gland
    The Bartholin's glands are two glands located slightly posterior and to the left and right of the opening of the vagina. They secrete mucus to lubricate the vagina and are homologous to bulbourethral glands in males...

     – Caspar Bartholin the Younger
    Caspar Bartholin the Younger
    Caspar Bartholin the Younger , was a Danish anatomist who first described the "Bartholin's gland" in the 17th century...

  • Batson's plexus
  • Long thoracic nerve of Bell – Sir Charles Bell
  • Duct of Bellini
    Duct of Bellini
    The duct of Bellini is an anatomical structure of the kidneys, also known as papillary duct.The straight or collecting tubes commence in the radiate part of the renal cortex, where they receive the curved ends of the distal convoluted tubules.They unite at short intervals with one another, the...

     – Lorenzo Bellini
    Lorenzo Bellini
    Lorenzo Bellini , Italian physician and anatomist, was born at Florence on the September 3, 1643. At the age of twenty, when he had already begun his researches on the structure of the kidneys and had described the papillary ducts , as published in his book Exercitatio Anatomica de Structura Usu...

  • Renal columns of Bertin – Exupere Joseph Bertin
    Exupere Joseph Bertin
    Exupere Joseph Bertin was a French anatomist born in Ille-et-Vilaine, Brittany. He was the father of cardiologist René-Joseph-Hyacinthe Bertin ....

  • Betz cells – Vladimir Alekseyevich Betz
  • Billroth's cords – Theodor Billroth
    Theodor Billroth
    Christian Albert Theodor Billroth was a German-born Austrian surgeon and amateur musician....

  • Bowman's capsule
    Bowman's capsule
    The Bowman's capsule is a cup-like sac at the beginning of the tubular component of a nephron in the mammalian kidney that performs the first step in the filtration of blood to form urine. A glomerulus is enclosed in the sac...

     and Bowman's membrane
    Bowman's membrane
    The Bowman's membrane is a smooth layer in the eye. It is located between the superficial epithelium and the stroma in the cornea. It is composed of strong collagen fibers and helps the cornea maintain its shape...

     – Sir William Bowman
  • Broca's area
    Broca's area
    Broca's area is a region of the hominid brain with functions linked to speech production.The production of language has been linked to the Broca’s area since Pierre Paul Broca reported impairments in two patients. They had lost the ability to speak after injury to the posterior inferior frontal...

     – Paul Broca
    Paul Broca
    Pierre Paul Broca was a French physician, surgeon, anatomist, and anthropologist. He was born in Sainte-Foy-la-Grande, Gironde. He is best known for his research on Broca's area, a region of the frontal lobe that has been named after him. Broca’s Area is responsible for articulated language...

  • Brodmann's areas – Korbinian Brodmann
    Korbinian Brodmann
    Korbinian Brodmann was a German neurologist who became famous for his definition of the cerebral cortex into 52 distinct regions from their cytoarchitectonic characteristics.-Life:...

  • Brunner's glands
    Brunner's glands
    Brunner's glands are compound tubular submucosal glands found in that portion of the duodenum which is above the hepatopancreatic sphincter...

     – Johann Conrad Brunner
    Johann Conrad Brunner
    Johann Conrad Brunner was a Swiss anatomist from Diessenhofen. He studied medicine in Schaffhausen, Strasbourg and Paris. At Schaffhausen he studied under Johann Jakob Wepfer , who was also his father-in-law...

  • Buck's fascia
    Buck's fascia
    Buck's fascia is a layer of deep fascia covering the penis.It is also known as the "deep fascia of the penis".It is also sometimes simply called the "fascia of the penis", and the Terminologia Anatomica is simply "fascia penis"....

     – Gurdon Buck
    Gurdon Buck
    Gurdon Buck was a pioneer military plastic surgeon during the Civil War. He's known for being the first doctor to incorporate pre and post-operative photographs into his publications...


C

  • Cajal cell – Santiago Ramón y Cajal
    Santiago Ramón y Cajal
    Santiago Ramón y Cajal ForMemRS was a Spanish pathologist, histologist, neuroscientist, and Nobel laureate. His pioneering investigations of the microscopic structure of the brain were original: he is considered by many to be the father of modern neuroscience...

  • Cajal-Retzius cell
    Cajal-Retzius cell
    The term Cajal–Retzius cell is applied to reelin-producing neurons of the human embryonic marginal zone which display, as a salient feature, radial ascending processes that contact the pial surface, and a horizontal axon plexus located in the deep marginal zone...

     – Santiago Ramón y Cajal
    Santiago Ramón y Cajal
    Santiago Ramón y Cajal ForMemRS was a Spanish pathologist, histologist, neuroscientist, and Nobel laureate. His pioneering investigations of the microscopic structure of the brain were original: he is considered by many to be the father of modern neuroscience...

     and Gustaf Retzius
    Gustaf Retzius
    Magnus Gustaf Retzius was a Swedish physician and anatomist who dedicated a large part of his life to researching the histology of the sense organs and nervous system.-Biography:...

  • Calot's triangle – Jean-François Calot
    Jean-François Calot
    Jean-François Calot was a French surgeon best known for describing treatment of curvature of the spine in Pott's disease. He also described a method of treating tuberculous abscesses and defined Calot's triangle....

  • Castle intrinsic factor
    Intrinsic factor
    Intrinsic factor also known as gastric intrinsic factor is a glycoprotein produced by the parietal cells of the stomach. It is necessary for the absorption of vitamin B12 later on in the small intestine...

     – William Bosworth Castle
  • Charcot-Bouchard aneurysms – Jean-Martin Charcot
    Jean-Martin Charcot
    Jean-Martin Charcot was a French neurologist and professor of anatomical pathology. He is known as "the founder of modern neurology" and is "associated with at least 15 medical eponyms", including Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis...

     and Charles-Joseph Bouchard
    Charles-Joseph Bouchard
    Charles-Joseph Bouchard was a French pathologist born in Montier-en-Der, a commune the department of Haute-Marne. He studied medicine in Lyon and Paris, where he obtained his doctorate in 1866. In 1874 he became a physician at Bicêtre Hospital, and in 1879 was appointed chair of general pathology...

  • Chassaignac tubercle
    Chassaignac tubercle
    Chassaignac tubercle is the name given to the anterior tubercle of the transverse process of the sixth cervical vertebra, separating the carotid artery from the vertebral artery and against which the carotid artery may be compressed by the finger.It is named for Charles Marie Édouard Chassaignac,...

     – Charles Marie Édouard Chassaignac
    Charles Marie Edouard Chassaignac
    Charles Marie Edouard Chassaignac was a French physician. He was born in Nantes and in 1835 became prosecutor and professor at the university and physician at the central bureau of the hospitals of Paris...


Circle of Willis - arterial circle in base of brain - Dr. Thomas Willis
  • Christmas factor
    Factor IX
    Factor IX is one of the serine proteases of the coagulation system; it belongs to peptidase family S1. Deficiency of this protein causes hemophilia B. It was discovered in 1952 after a young boy named Stephen Christmas was found to be lacking this exact factor, leading to...

     – Stephen Christmas
    Stephen Christmas
    Stephen Christmas was the first patient described to have Christmas disease in 1952 by a group of British doctors.-Biography:...

  • Clara cell
    Clara cell
    Clara cells are dome-shaped cells with short microvilli found in the small airways of the lungs.Clara cells are found in the ciliated simple epithelium...

     – Max Clara
    Max Clara
    Max Clara was an Austrian anatomist. He was appointed as Chair of Anatomy at Leipzig University in 1935. Clara is known for having close ties with the Nazi Party, basing much of his controversial work on his studies of the bodies of executed prisoners...

  • Colles' fascia – Abraham Colles
    Abraham Colles
    Abraham Colles was professor of Anatomy, Surgery and Physiology at the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Descended from a Worcestershire family, some of whom had sat in Parliament, he was born to William Colles and Mary Anne Bates of Woodbroak, Co. Wexford...

  • Cooper's fascia – Astley Cooper
    Astley Cooper
    Sir Astley Paston Cooper, 1st Baronet was an English surgeon and anatomist, who made historical contributions to otology, vascular surgery, the anatomy and pathology of the mammary glands and testicles, and the pathology and surgery of hernia.-Life:Cooper was born at Brooke Hall in Brooke, Norfolk...

  • Cooper's iliopectineal ligament – Astley Cooper
    Astley Cooper
    Sir Astley Paston Cooper, 1st Baronet was an English surgeon and anatomist, who made historical contributions to otology, vascular surgery, the anatomy and pathology of the mammary glands and testicles, and the pathology and surgery of hernia.-Life:Cooper was born at Brooke Hall in Brooke, Norfolk...

  • Cooper's suspensory ligaments
    Cooper's ligaments
    Cooper's ligaments are connective tissue in the breast that help maintain structural integrity.Transmission diffraction tomography can reveal the anatomy....

     – Astley Cooper
    Astley Cooper
    Sir Astley Paston Cooper, 1st Baronet was an English surgeon and anatomist, who made historical contributions to otology, vascular surgery, the anatomy and pathology of the mammary glands and testicles, and the pathology and surgery of hernia.-Life:Cooper was born at Brooke Hall in Brooke, Norfolk...

  • Organ of Corti
    Organ of Corti
    The organ of Corti is the organ in the inner ear of mammals that contains auditory sensory cells, or "hair cells."The organ was named after the Italian anatomist Marquis Alfonso Giacomo Gaspare Corti , who conducted microscopic research of the mammaliean auditory system.-Structure and function:The...

     – Alfonso Corti
    Alfonso Giacomo Gaspare Corti
    Alfonso Giacomo Gaspare Corti was born at Gambarana, near Pavia in 1822. A famous friend of Corti's father, Antonio Scarpa, may have kindled his boyhood interest in anatomy and medicine. As a medical student he enrolled first at the University of Pavia. Corti's favorite study there was...

  • Cowper's glands – William Cowper
    William Cowper (anatomist)
    William Cowper FRS was an English surgeon and anatomist, famous for his early description of what is now known as the Cowper's gland....

  • Cuvier ducts – Georges Cuvier
    Georges Cuvier
    Georges Chrétien Léopold Dagobert Cuvier or Jean Léopold Nicolas Frédéric Cuvier , known as Georges Cuvier, was a French naturalist and zoologist...

  • Chiari malformation – Hans Chiari
    Hans Chiari
    Hans Chiari was an Austrian pathologist who was a native of Vienna. He was the son of gynecologist Johann Baptist Chiari , and brother to rhinolaryngologist Ottokar Chiari ....


D

  • Darwin's tubercle
    Darwin's tubercle
    Darwin's tubercle is a congenital ear condition which often presents as a thickening on the helix at the junction of the upper and middle thirds. The feature is present in approximately 10.4% of the population...

     – Charles Darwin
    Charles Darwin
    Charles Robert Darwin FRS was an English naturalist. He established that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestry, and proposed the scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection.He published his theory...

  • Campbell de Morgan spots
  • Denonvilliers' fascia – Charles-Pierre Denonvilliers
    Charles-Pierre Denonvilliers
    Charles-Pierre Denonvilliers was a French surgeon who was a native of Paris. In 1837 he received his medical doctorate, and later was a professor of surgery and anatomy in Paris....

  • Descemet's membrane
    Descemet's membrane
    Descemet's membrane is the basement membrane that lies between the corneal proper substance, also called stroma, and the endothelial layer of the cornea. It is composed of a different kind of collagen than the stroma. The endothelial layer is located at the posterior of the cornea...

      – Jean Descemet
  • Space of Disse
    Space of Disse
    The space of Disse is a location in the liver between a hepatocyte and a sinusoid. It contains the blood plasma. Microvilli of hepatocytes extend into this space, allowing proteins and other plasma components from the sinusoids to be absorbed by the hepatocytes. Fenestration and discontinuity of...

     – Joseph Disse
    Joseph Disse
    Joseph Disse was a German anatomist and histologist born in Brakel, North Rhine-Westphalia.He studied at the University of Erlangen, and after graduation became an assistant to anatomist Heinrich von Waldeyer-Hartz at Strassburg...

  • Pouch of Douglas
    Pouch of Douglas
    The rectouterine pouch is the extension of the peritoneal cavity between the rectum and back wall of the uterus in the female human body....

     – James Douglas
    James Douglas (physician)
    James Douglas was a Scottish physician and anatomist, and Physician Extraordinary to Queen Caroline.One of the seven sons of William Douglas and his wife, Joan, daughter of James Mason of Park, Blantyre, he was born in West Calder, West Lothian, in 1675...


E

  • Von Ebner's glands
    Von Ebner's glands
    Von Ebner's glands are named after Anton Gilbert Victor von Ebner, Ritter von Rosenstein, who was an Austrian histologist....

     – Victor von Ebner
    Victor von Ebner
    Anton Gilbert Victor von Ebner, Ritter von Rofenstein was an Austrian anatomist and histologist who was a native of Bregenz...

  • Edinger-Westphal nucleus
    Edinger-Westphal nucleus
    The Edinger-Westphal nucleus is the accessory parasympathetic cranial nerve nucleus of the oculomotor nerve , supplying the constricting muscles of the iris...

     – Ludwig Edinger
    Ludwig Edinger
    Ludwig Edinger was an influential German anatomist and neurologist and co-founder of the University of Frankfurt. In 1914 he was also appointed the first German professor of neurology....

     and Karl Friedrich Otto Westphal
  • Eustachian tube
    Eustachian tube
    The Eustachian tube is a tube that links the nasopharynx to the middle ear. It is a part of the middle ear. In adult humans the Eustachian tube is approximately 35 mm long. It is named after the sixteenth-century anatomist Bartolomeo Eustachi...

     – Bartolomeo Eustachi
    Bartolomeo Eustachi
    Bartolomeo Eustachi , also known by his Latin name of Eustachius, was one of the founders of the science of human anatomy.-Life:...


G

  • Gallaudet's fascia
  • Gartner's duct
    Gartner's duct
    Gartner's duct is a potential embryological remnant in human female development of the mesonephric ducts in the development of the urinary and reproductive organs...

     – Hermann Gartner
  • Fossa of Geraldi
  • Gerdy's Fibers – Pierre Nicolas Gerdy
    Pierre Nicolas Gerdy
    Pierre Nicolas Gerdy was a French physician who was a native of Loches. He was a professor with the Faculty of Medicine in Paris, and worked with renowned surgeons such as Jacques Lisfranc de St. Martin , Armand Velpeau and Guillaume Dupuytren...

  • Gerota Capsule – Dumitru Gerota
    Dimitrie Gerota
    Dimitrie D. Gerota , Romanian anatomist, physician, radiologist, urologist, and an associated member of the Romanian Academy from 1916.-Biography:...

  • Glisson's capsule – Francis Glisson
    Francis Glisson
    Francis Glisson was a British physician, anatomist, and writer on medical subjects. He did important work on the anatomy of the liver, and he wrote an early pediatric text on rickets...

  • Golgi apparatus
    Golgi apparatus
    The Golgi apparatus is an organelle found in most eukaryotic cells. It was identified in 1898 by the Italian physician Camillo Golgi, after whom the Golgi apparatus is named....

     and Golgi receptor – Camillo Golgi
    Camillo Golgi
    Camillo Golgi was an Italian physician, pathologist, scientist, and Nobel laureate.-Biography:Camillo Golgi was born in the village of Corteno, Lombardy, then part of the Austrian Empire. The village is now named Corteno Golgi in his honour. His father was a physician and district medical officer...

  • Graafian follicle – Regnier de Graaf
    Regnier de Graaf
    Regnier de Graaf, Dutch spelling Reinier de Graaf or latinized Reijnerus de Graeff was a Dutch physician and anatomist who made key discoveries in reproductive biology. His first name is often spelled Reinier or Reynier.-Biography:De Graaf was born in Schoonhoven and perhaps a relative to the De...

  • Gräfenberg spot (G-spot) – Ernst Gräfenberg
    Ernst Gräfenberg
    Ernst Gräfenberg was a German-born physician and scientist...

  • Grafstein's Growth (Bernice's Bulge) – Neuroscientist Bernice Grafstein, an ancient physician
  • Great vein of Galen – Galen
    Galen
    Aelius Galenus or Claudius Galenus , better known as Galen of Pergamon , was a prominent Roman physician, surgeon and philosopher...

    , an ancient Greek physician

H

  • Hasner's Fold – Joseph Hasner
    Joseph Hasner
    Joseph Hasner, Ritter von Artha was an Austrian ophthalmologist born in Prague. He studied medicine at the University of Prague, and subsequently was an assistant at Johann Fischer's eye clinic in Prague, and later a lecturer and professor of ophthalmology...

  • Haversian canal – Clopton Havers
    Clopton Havers
    Clopton Havers was an English physician who did pioneering research on the microstructure of bone. He is believed to have been the first person to observe and almost certainly the first to describe what are now called Haversian canals and Sharpey's fibres.-Biography:He was born Stambourne, Essex,...

  • Spiral valves of Heister
    Spiral valves of Heister
    Spiral valves of Heister are undulating folds or valves in the proximal mucosa of the cystic duct. The cystic duct attaches the gallbladder to the common bile duct....

     – Lorenz Heister
    Lorenz Heister
    Lorenz Heister was a German anatomist, surgeon and botanist born in Frankfurt am Main....

  • Loop of Henle
    Loop of Henle
    In the kidney, the loop of Henle is the portion of a nephron that leads from the proximal convoluted tubule to the distal convoluted tubule. Named after its discoverer F. G. J...

     – F. G. J. Henle
    Friedrich Gustav Jakob Henle
    Friedrich Gustav Jakob Henle was a German physician, pathologist and anatomist. He is credited with the discovery of the loop of Henle in the kidney. His essay "On Miasma and Contagia" was an early argument for the germ theory of disease...

  • Canals of Hering
    Canals of Hering
    The Canals of Hering, or intrahepatic bile ductules, are part of the outflow system of exocrine bile product from the liver.-Anatomy:They are found between the bile canaliculi and interlobular bile ducts near the outer edge of a classic liver lobule...

     – Karl Ewald Konstantin Hering
    Ewald Hering
    Karl Ewald Konstantin Hering was a German physiologist who did much research into color vision and spatial perception...

  • Hering's nerve – Heinrich Ewald Hering
  • Herring bodies
    Herring bodies
    Herring bodies or neurosecretory bodies are structures found in the posterior pituitary. They represent the terminal end of the axons from the hypothalamus, and hormones are temporarily stored in these locations.They are neurosecretory terminals....

     – Percy Theodore Herring
    Percy Theodore Herring
    Percy Theodore Herring was a physician and physiologist, notable for first describing Herring bodies in the posterior pituitary gland....

  • Heschl's gyri – Richard L. Heschl
    Richard L. Heschl
    Richard Ladislaus Heschl was an Austrian anatomist. In 1849 he received his medical doctorate from the University of Vienna and in 1850 became an assistant to Carl von Rokitansky . Later, he became a professor at Olmütz , Krakow , Graz and Vienna...

  • Hesselbach's triangle – Franz Kaspar Hesselbach
    Franz Kaspar Hesselbach
    Franz Kaspar Hesselbach was a German surgeon and anatomist who was a native of Hammelburg. He was a pupil, and later Prosector under Karl Kaspar von Siebold at Würzburg. Later Hesselbach was a lecturer at Würzburg, where one of his students was Konrad Johann Martin Langenbeck...

  • Antrum of Highmore – Nathaniel Highmore
  • Bundle of His
    Bundle of His
    The bundle of His, known as the AV bundle or atrioventricular bundle, is a collection of heart muscle cells specialized for electrical conduction that transmits the electrical impulses from the AV node to the point of the apex of the fascicular branches...

     – Wilhelm His, Jr.
    Wilhelm His, Jr.
    Wilhelm His, Jr. was a Swiss-born cardiologist and anatomist.He was born on December 29, 1863 to Wilhelm His, Sr.. In 1893, he discovered the bundle of His, which is a specialized tissue in the heart that transmits the electrical impulses and helps synchronize contraction of the cardiac muscles...

  • Scrotal Raphe of Holzer – Remington Double Duke Holzer III
  • Houston's muscle – John Houston
    John Houston
    John Houston is the name of:* John Houston * John Houston , Pioneer newspaperman and politician from British Columbia, Canada* John Houston , New Zealand historian and writer...

  • Howell-Jolly bodies – William Henry Howell
    William Henry Howell
    William Henry Howell, Ph.D., M.D., LL.D., Sc.D. was an American physiologist. He pioneered the use of heparin as a blood anti-coagulant....

    , Justin Marie Jolly
    Justin Marie Jolly
    Justin Marie Jolly was a French hematologist and histologist born in Melun, Seine-et-Marne. He was a pioneer in the field of hematology as it pertained to the study of living tissue....

  • Canal of Huguier – Pierre Charles Huguier
    Pierre Charles Huguier
    Pierre Charles Huguier was a French surgeon and gynecologist who was born in Sézanne. In 1834 he received his medical doctorate at Paris, and was later a surgeon at the Hôpital Beaujon....

  • Hurthle cell
    Hurthle cell
    A Hürthle cell is a cell in the thyroid that is often associated with Hashimoto's thyroiditis as well as follicular thyroid cancer.-Histology:...

     – Karl Hürthle
    Karl Hürthle
    Karl Hürthle was a German physiologist and histologist who was a native of Ludwigsburg.In 1884 he received his doctorate from the University of Tübingen, where he remained until 1886, working as a prosector at the anatomical institute. At Tübingen he was a student and assistant to physiologists...


K

  • Kerckring's valves
    Circular folds
    The circular folds are large valvular flaps projecting into the lumen of the bowel.-Composition:...

     – Theodor Kerckring
    Theodor Kerckring
    Theodor Kerckring or Dirk Kerckring was a Dutch anatomist and chemical physician....

  • Kernohan notch – James Watson Kernohan
    James Watson Kernohan
    James Watson Kernohan was an Irish-American pathologist from County Antrim , Ireland. He studied medicine at Queen’s University, and in 1931 he emigrated to the United States and subsequently worked as a pathologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota...

  • Kiesselbach's plexus
    Kiesselbach's plexus
    Kiesselbach's area, also Kiesselbach's plexus, Kiesselbach's triangle, and Little's area, is a region in the anteroinferior part of the nasal septum, where four arteries anastomose to form a vascular plexus called Kiesselbach's plexus...

     – Wilhelm Kiesselbach
    Wilhelm Kiesselbach
    Wilhelm Kiesselbach was a German otolaryngologist who was a native of Hanau. He was director of otolaryngology at the university clinic in Erlangen from 1889 to 1902....

  • Pores of Kohn
    Pores of Kohn
    The Pores of Kohn are pores between adjacent alveoli, or interalveolar connections. They function as a means of collateral ventilation; that is, if the lung is partially deflated, ventilation can occur to some extent through these pores...

     – Hans Kohn
  • Krause's end-bulbs – Wilhelm Krause
  • Kupffer cells – Karl Wilhelm von Kupffer
    Karl Wilhelm von Kupffer
    Karl Wilhelm von Kupffer was a Baltic German anatomist who discovered stellate macrophage cells that bear his name....


L

  • Canals of Lambert – Margaret Waugh Lambert
  • Langer's lines
    Langer's lines
    Langer's lines, sometimes called cleavage lines, are topological lines drawn on a map of the human body. They technically are defined by the direction in which the skin of a human cadaver will split when struck with a spike. They correspond to the natural orientation of collagen fibers in the dermis...

     – Karl Langer
  • Islets of Langerhans
    Islets of Langerhans
    The islets of Langerhans are the regions of the pancreas that contain its endocrine cells. Discovered in 1869 by German pathological anatomist Paul Langerhans at the age of 22, the islets of Langerhans constitute approximately 1 to 2% of the mass of the pancreas...

     and Langerhans cell
    Langerhans cell
    Langerhans cells are dendritic cells of the skin and mucosa, and contain large granules called Birbeck granules. They are present in all layers of the epidermis, but are most prominant in the stratum spinosum. They also occur in the papillary dermis, particularly around blood vessels, as well as...

     – Paul Langerhans
    Paul Langerhans
    Paul Langerhans was a German pathologist, physiologist and biologist.-Eponymous terms:* Islets of Langerhans - Pancreatic cells which produce insulin...

  • Langhans giant cell
    Langhans giant cell
    Langhans giant cells are large cells found in granulomatous conditions.They are formed by the fusion of epithelioid cells , and contain nuclei arranged in a horseshoe-shaped pattern in the cell periphery....

     – Theodor Langhans
    Theodor Langhans
    Theodor Langhans was a German pathologist who was a native of Usingen, Duchy of Nassau. He studied medicine at the University of Heidelberg, and at the University of Göttingen under Friedrich Gustav Jakob Henle , at Berlin under Rudolf Virchow and in Würzburg, where he became an assistant to...

  • Leydig Cells
    Leydig cell
    Leydig cells, also known as interstitial cells of Leydig, are found adjacent to the seminiferous tubules in the testicle. They produce testosterone in the presence of luteinizing hormone...

     – Franz Leydig
    Franz Leydig
    Franz von Leydig , also Franz Leydig, was a German zoologist and comparative anatomist.- Life :Franz Leydig was born on May 21, 1821, in Rothenburg ob der Tauber . He was the only boy of three children born to Melchior Leydig, a Catholic and a minor public official, and Margareta, a Protestant...

  • Crypts of Lieberkühn
    Crypts of Lieberkühn
    In histology, an intestinal crypt is a gland found in the epithelial lining of the small intestine and colon...

     – Johann Nathanael Lieberkühn
    Johann Nathanael Lieberkühn
    Johann Nathanael Lieberkühn was a German physician. His middle name is sometimes misspelled Nathaniel....

  • Lissauer's tract – Heinrich Lissauer
    Heinrich Lissauer
    Heinrich Lissauer was a German neurologist who was born in Neidenburg . He studied at the Universities of Heidelberg, Berlin and Leipzig. He was a neurologist at the psychiatric hospital in Breslau, and was a one-time assistant to Carl Wernicke...

  • Urethral glands of Littré – Alexis Littré
    Alexis Littré
    Alexis Littré was a French physician and anatomist born in Cordes, located in the present-day department of Tarn-et-Garonne. He studied medicine in Montpellier and Paris, receiving his doctorate in 1691. In 1699 he became a member of the Académie des Sciences.In Paris, Littré taught anatomy and...

  • Lockwood's ligament
    Lockwood's ligament
    The suspensory ligament forms a hammock stretching below the eyeball between the medial and lateral check ligaments and enclosing the inferior rectus and inferior oblique muscles of the eye....

     – Charles Barrett Lockwood
    Charles Barrett Lockwood
    Charles Barrett Lockwood was a British surgeon and anatomist who practiced surgery at St. Bartholomew's Hospital in London. Lockwood was a member of the Royal College of Surgeons....

  • Angle of Louis – Antoine Louis
    Antoine Louis
    Antoine Louis was a French surgeon and physiologist who was born in Metz.He was originally trained in medicine by his father, a surgeon-major at a local military hospital. As a young man he moved to Paris, where he served as gagnant-maîtrise at the Salpêtrière...

  • Lovibond's angle
    Lovibond's angle
    Lovibond's angle is the angle between the base of the nail plate and the adjacent skin on the end of the finger. Normally, this angle is less than 165°. If it is 180° or more, there will be a positive Schamroth's window test. This is a sign of clubbing....

  • Lund's node
    Lund's node
    Lund's node, or Calot's node, is the sentinel lymph node of the gall bladder. It increases in size in cholecystitis and cholangitis. It is an anatomic landmark and is removed along with the gall bladder in cholecystectomy....

  • Crypts of Luschka
    Luschka's crypts
    The Luschka's crypts are mucous membrane indentations of the inner wall of the gall bladder.-See also:*Hubert von Luschka*foramina of Luschka*Luschka's joints*Ducts of Luschka...

    , Ducts of Luschka
    Ducts of Luschka
    An accessory bile duct is a conduit that transports bile and is considered to be supernumerary or auxiliary to the biliary tree.It may be described by its location relative to the gallbladder as supravescicular or subvesicular .-Duct of Luschka:In the surgical literature, the term duct of Luschka...

    , Foramina of Luschka, and Luschka's joints
    Luschka's joints
    In anatomy, Luschka's joints are formed between uncinate processes above, and uncus below; see synovial. They are located in the cervical region of the vertebral column between C3 and C6. Two lips project upward from the superior surface of the vertebral body below, and one projects downward from...

     – Hubert von Luschka
    Hubert von Luschka
    Hubert von Luschka, born Hubert Luschka , was a German anatomist. He lent his name to several structures, including the foramina of Luschka, Luschka's crypts, Luschka's law, Luschka's joints, and Ducts of Luschka....


M

  • Macewen's triangle – Sir William Macewen
    William Macewen
    Sir William Macewen, CB, FRS, was a Scottish surgeon. He was a pioneer in modern brain surgery and contributed to the development of bone graft surgery, the surgical treatment of hernia and of pneumonectomy .-Career:Macewen was born near Port Bannatyne, Isle of Bute, Scotland in 1848 and studied...

  • Foramen of Magendie – François Magendie
    François Magendie
    François Magendie was a French physiologist, considered a pioneer of experimental physiology. He is known for describing the foramen of Magendie. There is also a Magendie sign, a downward and inward rotation of the eye due to a lesion in the cerebellum...

  • McBurney's point
    McBurney's point
    McBurney's point is the name given to the point over the right side of the abdomen that is one-third of the distance from the anterior superior iliac spine to the navel...

     – Charles McBurney
    Charles McBurney (surgeon)
    Charles Heber McBurney, MD was an American surgeon known for describing McBurney's point in appendicitis.-Biography:Charles McBurney was born in 1845...

  • Malpighian corpuscle
    Malpighian corpuscle
    There are at least two anatomical structures called a Malpighian corpuscle. They are also known as:* Renal corpuscles — the initial filtering component of nephrons in the kidneys...

     – Marcello Malpighi
    Marcello Malpighi
    Marcello Malpighi was an Italian doctor, who gave his name to several physiological features, like the Malpighian tubule system.-Early years:...

  • Meckel's cartilage
    Meckel's cartilage
    The cartilaginous bar of the mandibular arch is formed by what are known as Meckel’s cartilages also known as Meckelian cartilages; above this the incus and malleus are developed....

     and Meckel's diverticulum
    Meckel's diverticulum
    A Meckel's diverticulum, a true congenital diverticulum, is a small bulge in the small intestine present at birth. It is a vestigial remnant of the omphalomesenteric duct , and is the most frequent malformation of the gastrointestinal tract...

     – Johann Friedrich Meckel
    Johann Friedrich Meckel
    Johann Friedrich Meckel , often referred to as Johann Friedrich Meckel, the Younger, was a German anatomist born in Halle...

  • Anal Crypts of Meera – Meera Shah
  • Meibomian glands – Heinrich Meibom
    Heinrich Meibom
    Heinrich Meibom may refer to:* Heinrich Meibom * Heinrich Meibom , grandson of the poet...

  • Meissner's corpuscle
    Meissner's corpuscle
    Meissner's corpuscles are a type of mechanoreceptor. They are a type of nerve ending in the skin that is responsible for sensitivity to light touch. In particular, they have highest sensitivity when sensing vibrations lower than 50 Hertz...

     and Meissner's plexus – Georg Meissner
    Georg Meissner
    Georg Meissner was a German anatomist and physiologist born in Hannover.He studied medicine at the University of Göttingen, where he worked closely with Rudolf Wagner . In 1851 he accompanied Wagner and Theodor Billroth on an expedition to Trieste, where he performed scientific studies of torpedo...

  • Merkel cell
    Merkel cell
    Merkel cells or Merkel-Ranvier cells are oval receptor cells found in the skin of vertebrates that have synaptic contacts with somatosensory afferents. They are associated with the sense of light touch discrimination of shapes and textures. They can turn malignant and form the skin tumor known as...

     – Friedrich Sigmund Merkel
    Friedrich Sigmund Merkel
    Friedrich Sigmund Merkel was a leading German anatomist and histopathologist of the late 19th century. In 1875 he provided the first full description of Tastzellen which occur in the skin of all vertebrates. They were subsequently given the eponym Merkel cells in 1878 by Robert Bonnet .Merkel was...

  • Meyer's loop
  • Paraclitoral Recess of Mulvey – Joseph Mulvey
  • Möll's gland
    Glands of Moll
    Glands of Moll, also known as ciliary glands, are modified apocrine sweat glands that are found on the margin of the eyelid. They are next to the base of the eyelashes, and anterior to the Meibomian glands within the distal eyelid margin. These glands are relatively large and tubular-shaped.Moll's...

     and Space of Möll
    Space of Möll
    In the hepatic lobule, the space of Möll lies between the limiting plate and the connective tissue of the portal triad. It receives lymph from the Space of Disse and drains it into the surrounding lymphatic vessels....

     – Jacob A. Möll
  • Foramina of Monro – Alexander Monro
    Alexander Monro
    Alexander Monro may refer to:*Alexander Monro , Principal of Edinburgh University, 1685–1690* Alexander Monro , Scottish physician, founder of Edinburgh Medical School...

  • Glands of Montgomery
    Glands of Montgomery
    Areolar glands or Glands of Montgomery are sebaceous glands in the areola . The glands make oily secretions to keep the areola and the nipple lubricated and protected. Volatile compounds in these secretions may also serve as an olfactory stimulus for newborn appetite.The portion of the gland on...

     – William Fetherstone Montgomery
    William Fetherstone Montgomery
    William Fetherstone Montgomery was an Irish obstetrician credited for first describing the Glands of Montgomery.Montgomery was born, raised and educated in Dublin, Ireland. He attended medical school at Trinity College, Dublin...

  • Hydatids of Morgagni, and Lacunae of Morgagni
    Lacunae of Morgagni
    Lacunae of Morgagni, also called the urethral lacunae of the male urethra , are small depressions or recesses on the surface of the mucous membrane of the urethra. Their openings are usually directed distally...

     – Giovanni Battista Morgagni
    Giovanni Battista Morgagni
    Giovanni Battista Morgagni was an Italian anatomist, celebrated as the father of modern anatomical pathology.-Education:...

  • Morison's pouch
    Morison's pouch
    The hepatorenal recess or subhepatic recess is the space that separates the liver from the right kidney. As a potential space, the recess is not filled with fluid under normal conditions. However, fluid can collect in this space in circumstances where the abdomen fills with fluid, such as...

     – James Rutherford Morison
    James Rutherford Morison
    James Rutherford Morison was a British surgeon who was a native of County Durham. In 1874, he graduated from the University of Edinburgh, and as a young man was an assistant and "surgical dresser" to Joseph Lister . Later, he became a surgeon at the Newcastle Royal Infirmary and a professor at the...

  • Müllerian ducts – Johannes Peter Müller
    Johannes Peter Müller
    Johannes Peter Müller , was a German physiologist, comparative anatomist, and ichthyologist not only known for his discoveries but also for his ability to synthesize knowledge.-Early years and education:...

  • Mahdi Nerve - Dr. Mahdi Hasan

N

  • Nissl bodies or granules and Nissl substance – Franz Nissl
    Franz Nissl
    Franz Nissl was a German medical researcher. He was a noted neuropathologist.-Early life:...

     (all terms now rarely used)

P

  • Pacinian corpuscles – Filippo Pacini
    Filippo Pacini
    Filippo Pacini was an Italian anatomist, posthumously famous for isolating the cholera bacillus Vibrio cholerae in 1854, well before Robert Koch's more widely accepted discoveries thirty years later....

  • Paneth cells
    Paneth cells
    Paneth cells, along with goblet cells, enterocytes, and enteroendocrine cells, represent the principal cell types of the epithelium of the small intestine...

     – Joseph Paneth
    Joseph Paneth
    Joseph Paneth was an Austrian physiologist from Vienna. He was a professor at the Universities of Breslau and Vienna. He was the father of chemist Friedrich Adolf Paneth ....

  • Papez circuit
    Papez circuit
    Described by James Papez in 1937, the Papez circuit of the brain is one of the major pathways of the limbic system and is chiefly involved in the cortical control of emotion. The Papez circuit plays a role in storing memory....

     – James Papez
    James Papez
    James Papez was an American neuroanatomist. Papez received his MD from the University of Minnesota College of Medicine and Surgery. He is most famous for his 1937 description of the Papez circuit which is a neural pathway in the brain thought to be involved in the cortical control of emotion...

  • Peyer's patches – Johann Conrad Peyer
    Johann Conrad Peyer
    Johann Conrad Peyer was a Swiss anatomist who was a native of Schaffhausen. He studied medicine in Paris under Guichard Joseph Duverney , in Montpellier under Raymond Vieussens and received his medical degree in 1681 at Basel. Later he returned to Schaffhausen to practice medicine...

  • Poupart's ligament – François Poupart
  • Prussak's space
    Prussak's space
    In human anatomy, Prussak's Space is the small middle ear recess, bordered laterally by the flaccid part of Shrapnell's membrane, superiorly by the scutum and lateral malleal ligament, inferiorly by the short process of the malleus, and medially by the neck of the malleus.It communicates with the...

     – Alexander Prussak
  • Purkinje cell
    Purkinje cell
    For the cells of the electrical conduction system of the heart, see Purkinje fibersPurkinje cells, or Purkinje neurons , are a class of GABAergic neurons located in the cerebellar cortex...

    s – Jan E. Purkinje
  • Pimenta's Point
    Pimenta's Point
    Pimenta's Point is an anatomical landmark for easy location of the posterior tibial artery or tibialis posterior artery . An imagined line is drawn between the bony prominence of the medial malleolus and the insertion of the achilles tendon...


R

  • Node of Ranvier – Louis-Antoine Ranvier
    Louis-Antoine Ranvier
    Louis-Antoine Ranvier was a French physician, pathologist, anatomist and histologist, who discovered nodes of Ranvier, regularly spaced constrictions of the myelin sheath, occurying at varying intervals along the length of a nerve fiber.Ranvier was born and studied medicine at Lyon, graduating in...

  • Rathke's pouch
    Rathke's pouch
    In embryogenesis, Rathke's pouch is a depression in the roof of the developing mouth in front of the buccopharyngeal membrane. It gives rise to the anterior pituitary , a part of the endocrine system.-Development:...

     – Martin Heinrich Rathke
  • Reichert cartilage – Karl Bogislaus Reichert
    Karl Bogislaus Reichert
    Karl Bogislaus Reichert was a German anatomist.Reichert was born in Rastenburg , East Prussia. He studied etiology and histology in Königsberg. He was a student of Friedrich Schlemm and Johannes Peter Müller at the Friedrich-Wilhelm-Institute and at the Charité in Berlin, receiving his doctorate...

  • Renshaw cells
  • Space of Retzius and Veins of Retzius – Anders Retzius
    Anders Retzius
    Anders Retzius , was a Swedish professor of anatomy and a supervisor at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm....

  • Riedel's lobe – Bernhard Moritz Carl Ludwig Riedel
    Bernhard Moritz Carl Ludwig Riedel
    Bernhard Moritz Carl Ludwig Riedel was a German surgeon who was a native of Teschentin, Grossherzogtum Mecklenburg. He graduated from the University of Rostock in 1872, and for the next three years was Prosector at Rostock under Friedrich Sigmund Merkel...

  • Rokitansky-Aschoff sinuses
    Rokitansky-Aschoff sinuses
    Rokitansky-Aschoff sinuses, also entrapped epithelial crypts, are diverticula or pockets in the wall of the gallbladder. They may be microscopic or macroscopic....

     – Carl Freiherr von Rokitansky
    Carl Freiherr von Rokitansky
    Baron Carl von Rokitansky , was a Bohemian physician, pathologist, humanist philosopher and liberal politician.-Medical career:...

     and Ludwig Aschoff
    Ludwig Aschoff
    Karl Albert Ludwig Aschoff was a German physician and pathologist. He is considered to be one of the most influential pathologists of the early 20th century and is regarded as the most important German pathologist after Rudolf Virchow.Aschoff was born in Berlin, Prussia...

  • Rolandic fissure
    Central sulcus
    -External links:* via the Neuroscience Information Framework...

     and fissure of Rolando
    Central sulcus
    -External links:* via the Neuroscience Information Framework...

     – Luigi Rolando
    Luigi Rolando
    Luigi Rolando was an Italian anatomist.As a University of Turin professor, he devoted his life in studying brain anatomy.The Substantia gelatinosa of Rolando and the fissure of Rolando are named for him.-External links:*...

  • Rotter's lymph nodes
    Rotter's lymph nodes
    Rotter's lymph nodes are small interpectoral lymph nodes located between the pectoralis major and pectoralis minor muscles. They receive lymphatic fluid from the muscles and the mammary gland, and deliver lymphatic fluid to the axillary lymphatic plexus....

     – Josef Rotter
  • Ruffini's corpuscles
    Ruffini ending
    The Bulbous corpuscle or Ruffini ending or Ruffini corpuscle is a class of slowly adapting mechanoreceptor thought to exist only in the glabrous dermis and subcutaneous tissue of humans...

     – Angelo Ruffini
    Angelo Ruffini
    Angelo Ruffini was an Italian histologist and embryologist.He studied medicine at the University of Bologna, where beginning in 1894 he taught classes in histology...

  • Russ's moustache (Russtache) – Jeffrey Russ
  • Rutherford Morrison's subhepatic space

S

  • Duct of Santorini – Giovanni Domenico Santorini
    Giovanni Domenico Santorini
    Giovanni Domenico Santorini was an Italian anatomist. He was a native of Venice, and earned his medical doctorate from Pisa in 1701. He is remembered for his anatomical dissections of the human body....

  • Schatzki's ring – Richard Schatzki
    Richard Schatzki
    Richard Schatzki was a German-American radiologist.Richard Schatzki trained in radiology in Berlin with Hans Heinrich Berg who was the leading diagnostic radiologist in Germany at that time. He immigrated to the USA in 1933 and subsequently worked as a radiologist in Boston...

  • Canal of Schlemm
    Schlemm's canal
    Schlemm's canal, also known as canal of Schlemm or the scleral venous sinus, is a circular channel in the eye that collects aqueous humor from the anterior chamber and delivers it into the bloodstream via the anterior ciliary veins....

     – Friedrich Schlemm
    Friedrich Schlemm
    Friedrich Schlemm was a German anatomist who was professor at the University of Berlin.He was born in Salzgitter. As his family could not afford higher education, he was apprenticed to a barber-surgeon in Braunschweig. This gave him the opportunity to study anatomy and surgery at the local...

  • Sertoli cell
    Sertoli cell
    A Sertoli cell is a 'nurse' cell of the testes that is part of a seminiferous tubule.It is activated by follicle-stimulating hormone and has FSH-receptor on its membranes.-Functions:...

     – Enrico Sertoli
    Enrico Sertoli
    Enrico Sertoli was an Italian physiologist and histologist who was a native of Sondrio. He studied medicine at the University of Pavia, where one of his instructors was physiologist Eusebio Oehl . He continued his studies of physiology in Vienna under Ernst Wilhelm von Brücke , and in Tübingen...

  • Sharpey's fibres
    Sharpey's fibres
    Sharpey's fibres are a matrix of connective tissue consisting of bundles of strong collagenous fibres connecting periosteum to bone...

     – William Sharpey
    William Sharpey
    William Sharpey was a Scottish anatomist and physiologist.-Life and career:Dr. William Sharpey was a correspondent with and friend of Charles Darwin. He contributed to the many editions of ‘Quain’s Anatomy’ and was one of the Secretaries of the Royal Society...

  • Shrapnell's membrane
    Shrapnell's membrane
    In human anatomy, the Pars flaccida of tympanic membrane or Shrapnell's membrane is the small, triangular, flaccid portion of the tympanic membrane, or eardrum. It lies above the malleolar folds attached directly to the petrous bone at the notch of Rivinus...

     – Henry Jones Shrapnell
    Henry Jones Shrapnell
    Henry Jones Shrapnell was an English anatomist. For a period of time during his career he was a colleague to Edward Jenner , creator of the vaccine for smallpox....

  • Sideburns
    Sideburns
    Sideburns or sideboards are patches of facial hair grown on the sides of the face, extending from the hairline to below the ears and worn with an unbearded chin...

     – General Ambrose Burnside
    Ambrose Burnside
    Ambrose Everett Burnside was an American soldier, railroad executive, inventor, industrialist, and politician from Rhode Island, serving as governor and a U.S. Senator...

     (for his distinctive whiskers)
  • Skene's gland
    Skene's gland
    In human anatomy , the Skene's glands are glands located on the anterior wall of the vagina, around the lower end of the urethra. They drain into the urethra and near the urethral opening and may be near or a part of the G-Spot...

     – Alexander Skene
    Alexander Skene
    Alexander Johnston Chalmers Skene was a British gynaecologist who described what became known as the Skene's glands.-Biography:...

  • Spigelian fascia
    Spigelian hernia
    A Spigelian hernia is a hernia through the spigelian fascia, which is the aponeurotic layer between the rectus abdominis muscle medially, and the semilunar line laterally. These hernias almost always develop at or below the linea arcuata, probably because of the lack of posterior rectus sheath...

     – Adriaan van den Spiegel
    Adriaan van den Spiegel
    Adriaan van den Spiegel, name sometimes written as Adrianus Spigelius was a Flemish anatomist who was born in Brussels. For much of his career he practiced medicine in Padua, and is considered one of the great physicians associated with that city...

  • Stensen's duct – Niels Stensen
  • Sylvian aqueduct - Franciscus Sylvius
    Franciscus Sylvius
    Franciscus Sylvius , born Franz de le Boë, was a Dutch physician and scientist who was an early champion of Descartes', Van Helmont's and William Harvey's work and theories...


T

  • Thorel's pathway– Carl Thorel (1859-1938)
  • White lines of Toldt – Carl Toldt
    Carl Toldt
    Carl Toldt was an Austrian anatomist who was a native of Bruneck, Tyrol.In 1864 he earned his medical doctorate in Vienna, and later was a professor of anatomy in Prague and Vienna...

  • Torcular herophili – Herophilus
  • Traube's space
    Traube's space
    Traube's space is an anatomic region of some clinical importance. It's a crescent-shaped space, encompassed by the lower edge of the left lung, the anterior border of the spleen, the left costal margin and the inferior margin of the left lobe of the liver...

     – Ludwig Traube
    Ludwig Traube (physician)
    Ludwig Traube was a German physician and co-founder of the experimental pathology in Germany.-Biography:...

  • Ligament of Trietz – Václav Treitz
    Václav Treitz
    Václav Treitz was a Czech pathologist who was a native of Hostomice, Bohemia. He studied medicine in Prague, and performed post-graduate studies in Vienna with Joseph Hyrtl...


V

  • Sinus of Valsalva – Antonio Maria Valsalva
    Antonio Maria Valsalva
    Antonio Maria Valsalva , was an Italian anatomist born in Imola. His research focused on the anatomy of the ears. He coined the term Eustachian tube and he described the aortic sinuses of Valsalva in his writings, published posthumously in 1740...

  • Ampulla of Vater – Abraham Vater
    Abraham Vater
    Abraham Vater was a German anatomist from Wittenberg. He received his doctorate in philosophy from the University of Wittenberg in 1706, and his medical degree from the University of Leipzig in 1710...

  • Virchow-Robin spaces
    Virchow-Robin spaces
    Virchow-Robin spaces are perivascular, fluid-filled canals that surround perforating arteries and veins in the parenchyma of the brain. These spaces are separated from the subarachnoid space by a thin pia layer. VRS are extremely small and can usually only be seen on MR images when dilated...

     – Rudolf Virchow
    Rudolf Virchow
    Rudolph Carl Virchow was a German doctor, anthropologist, pathologist, prehistorian, biologist and politician, known for his advancement of public health...

     and Charles-Philippe Robin
    Charles-Philippe Robin
    Charles-Philippe Robin was a French anatomist, biologist, and histologist who was born in Jasseron, département Ain....

  • Virchow's node
    Virchow's node
    Virchow's node is a lymph node in the left supraclavicular fossa . It takes its supply from lymph vessels in the abdominal cavity...

     – Rudolf Virchow
    Rudolf Virchow
    Rudolph Carl Virchow was a German doctor, anthropologist, pathologist, prehistorian, biologist and politician, known for his advancement of public health...


W

  • Waldeyer's throat – Heinrich Wilhelm Gottfried von Waldeyer-Hartz
    Heinrich Wilhelm Gottfried von Waldeyer-Hartz
    Heinrich Wilhelm Gottfried von Waldeyer-Hartz was a German anatomist, famous for consolidating the neuron theory of organization of the nervous system and for naming the chromosome...

  • Weibel-Palade body
    Weibel-Palade body
    Weibel-Palade bodies are the storage granules of endothelial cells, the cells that form the inner lining of the blood vessels and heart. They store and release two principal molecules, von Willebrand factor and P-selectin, and thus play a dual role in hemostasis and inflammation...

     – Ewald R. Weibel  – George Emil Palade
    George Emil Palade
    George Emil Palade was a Romanian cell biologist. Described as "the most influential cell biologist ever", in 1974 he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine, together with Albert Claude and Christian de Duve. The prize was granted for his innovations in electron microscopy and...

     Weibel-Palade body
    Weibel-Palade body
    Weibel-Palade bodies are the storage granules of endothelial cells, the cells that form the inner lining of the blood vessels and heart. They store and release two principal molecules, von Willebrand factor and P-selectin, and thus play a dual role in hemostasis and inflammation...

  • Wenckebach's bundle – Karel Frederik Wenckebach
    Karel Frederik Wenckebach
    Karel Frederik Wenckebach was a Dutch anatomist who was a native of the Hague. He studied medicine in Utrecht, and in 1901 become a professor of medicine at the University of Groningen. Later he was a professor at the Universities of Strasbourg and Vienna .Wenckebach is primarily remembered for...

  • Wernicke's area
    Wernicke's area
    Wernicke's area is one of the two parts of the cerebral cortex linked since the late nineteenth century to speech . It is involved in the understanding of written and spoken language...

     – Karl Wernicke
    Karl Wernicke
    Carl Wernicke was a German physician, anatomist, psychiatrist and neuropathologist. He earned his medical degree at the University of Breslau...

  • Wharton's duct and Wharton's jelly
    Wharton's jelly
    Wharton's jelly is a gelatinous substance within the umbilical cord, largely made up of mucopolysaccharides . It also contains some fibroblasts and macrophages...

     – Thomas Wharton
    Thomas Wharton
    -Life:Born in Grande Prairie, Alberta, Wharton attended the University of Alberta and the University of Calgary. He was a student of Rudy Wiebe and Greg Hollingshead. His first novel began as his M.A. thesis, under the supervision of Kristjana Gunnars. He worked on his PhD at Calgary with Aritha...

  • Circle of Willis
    Circle of Willis
    The Circle of Willis is a circle of arteries that supply blood to the brain...

     – Thomas Willis
    Thomas Willis
    Thomas Willis was an English doctor who played an important part in the history of anatomy, neurology and psychiatry. He was a founding member of the Royal Society.-Life:...

  • Foramen of Winslow – Jean-Jacques Bénigne Winslow
  • Duct of Wirsung – Johann Georg Wirsung
    Johann Georg Wirsung
    Johann Georg Wirsung was a German anatomist who was a long-time Prosector in Padua.He is remembered for the discovery of the pancreatic duct during the dissection of a man who had been recently hanged for murder...

  • Wolffian duct
    Wolffian duct
    The mesonephric duct is a paired organ found in mammals including humans during embryogenesis....

     – Kaspar Friedrich Wolff
  • Wormian bones
    Wormian bones
    Wormian bones, also known as extra sutural bones are extra bone pieces that occur within a suture in the cranium. These are irregular isolated bones which appear in addition to the usual centers of ossification of the cranium and, although unusual, are not rare. They occur most frequently in the...

     – Ole Worm
    Ole Worm
    Ole Worm , who often went by the Latinized form of his name Olaus Wormius, was a Danish physician and antiquary.-Life:...


See also