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E. W. Pugin

E. W. Pugin

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Edward Welby Pugin was the eldest son of Augustus Welby Northmore Pugin and Louisa Barton. His father, A. W. N. Pugin, was a famous architect and designer of Neo-Gothic architecture, and after his death in 1852 Edward took up his successful practice. At the time of his own early death in 1875, Pugin had designed and completed more than one hundred Catholic
Catholic
The word catholic comes from the Greek phrase , meaning "on the whole," "according to the whole" or "in general", and is a combination of the Greek words meaning "about" and meaning "whole"...

 churches (see http://www.pugin-society.1to1.org/FamPix/EWPugin.jpg).

He designed churches and cathedrals primarily in the British Isles
British Isles
The British Isles are a group of islands off the northwest coast of continental Europe that include the islands of Great Britain and Ireland and over six thousand smaller isles. There are two sovereign states located on the islands: the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland and...

. However, commissions for his exemplary work were also received from countries throughout Western Europe
Western Europe
Western Europe is a loose term for the collection of countries in the western most region of the European continents, though this definition is context-dependent and carries cultural and political connotations. One definition describes Western Europe as a geographic entity—the region lying in the...

, Scandinavia
Scandinavia
Scandinavia is a cultural, historical and ethno-linguistic region in northern Europe that includes the three kingdoms of Denmark, Norway and Sweden, characterized by their common ethno-cultural heritage and language. Modern Norway and Sweden proper are situated on the Scandinavian Peninsula,...

, and as far away as North America
North America
North America is a continent wholly within the Northern Hemisphere and almost wholly within the Western Hemisphere. It is also considered a northern subcontinent of the Americas...

.

Works in Ireland

  • SS Peter and Paul's, Carey's Lane, Cork
    Cork (city)
    Cork is the second largest city in the Republic of Ireland and the island of Ireland's third most populous city. It is the principal city and administrative centre of County Cork and the largest city in the province of Munster. Cork has a population of 119,418, while the addition of the suburban...

     (1859).
  • Edermine, Enniscorthy
    Enniscorthy
    Enniscorthy is the second largest town in County Wexford, Ireland. The population of the town and environs is 9538. The Placenames Database of Ireland sheds no light on the origins of the town's name. It may refer either to the "Island of Corthaidh" or the "Island of Rocks". With a history going...

    , County Wexford
    County Wexford
    County Wexford is a county in Ireland. It is part of the South-East Region and is also located in the province of Leinster. It is named after the town of Wexford. In pre-Norman times it was part of the Kingdom of Uí Cheinnselaig, whose capital was at Ferns. Wexford County Council is the local...

     (c. 1858).
  • Cobh Cathedral
    Cobh Cathedral
    St. Colman’s Cathedral is a Roman Catholic Cathedral located in Cobh, Ireland. It is the cathedral church of the Diocese of Cloyne.-Schedule of Mass and other services:MassWeekdays: 8am & 10amSaturday: 6pmSunday: 8am, 10am, 12noon & 7pm...

    (1867).
  • Killarney Cathedral.
  • Fermoy
    Fermoy
    Fermoy is a town in County Cork, Ireland. It is situated on the River Blackwater in the south of Ireland. Its population is some 5,800 inhabitants, environs included ....

     Roman Catholic Church
    , County Cork
    County Cork
    County Cork is a county in Ireland. It is located in the South-West Region and is also part of the province of Munster. It is named after the city of Cork . Cork County Council is the local authority for the county...

     (1867).
  • Crosshaven
    Crosshaven
    Crosshaven is a village in County Cork, Ireland. Origins of the Irish name of Crosshaven include; - mouth of the river Sabhrann , and . The village is located in a scenic area with views of Wood, and Cork Harbour.-Transport:...

     Roman Catholic Church
    , County Cork
    County Cork
    County Cork is a county in Ireland. It is located in the South-West Region and is also part of the province of Munster. It is named after the city of Cork . Cork County Council is the local authority for the county...

     (1869).
  • Monkstown Roman Catholic Church, County Dublin
    County Dublin
    County Dublin is a county in Ireland. It is part of the Dublin Region and is also located in the province of Leinster. It is named after the city of Dublin which is the capital of Ireland. County Dublin was one of the first of the parts of Ireland to be shired by King John of England following the...

     (1866).

http://www.monkstownparish.ie)
  • Monkstown
    Monkstown, County Cork
    Monkstown is a village in County Cork, Ireland, in the old barony of Kerrycurrihy. It lies 9 miles southeast of Cork city on the estuary of the River Lee, facing Great Island and looking onto Monkstown Bay....

     Roman Catholic Church
    , County Cork
    County Cork
    County Cork is a county in Ireland. It is located in the South-West Region and is also part of the province of Munster. It is named after the city of Cork . Cork County Council is the local authority for the county...

     (1866) (see http://www.imagesofoldireland.com/towns%20and%20villages/co%20cork/monkstown/CK487.jpg and http://www.gladysleach.com/images/monkstown_church.jpg).
  • Convent of Mercy, Skibbereen
    Skibbereen
    Skibbereen , is a town in County Cork, Ireland. It is the most southerly town in Ireland. It is located on the N71 national secondary road.The name "Skibbereen" means "little boat harbour." The River Ilen which runs through the town reaches the sea at Baltimore.-History:Prior to 1600 most of the...

    , County Cork
    County Cork
    County Cork is a county in Ireland. It is located in the South-West Region and is also part of the province of Munster. It is named after the city of Cork . Cork County Council is the local authority for the county...

     (1867).
  • Convent of Mercy, Birr
    Birr
    Birr is a town in County Offaly, Ireland. Once called Parsonstown, after the Parsons family who were local landowners and hereditary Earls of Rosse. It is also a parish in the Roman Catholic Diocese of Killaloe....

    , County Offaly
    County Offaly
    County Offaly is a county in Ireland. It is part of the Midlands Region and is also located in the province of Leinster. It is named after the ancient Kingdom of Uí Failghe and was formerly known as King's County until the establishment of the Irish Free State in 1922. Offaly County Council is...

    .
  • John's Lane Church
    John's Lane Church
    John's Lane Church opened in 1874 on the site of St. John's Hospital . It is located on Thomas Street, Dublin, close to the centre of the medieval city, and is served by the Augustinian Order.-History:...

    , Dublin
  • Attributed to:
  • AIB bankMidleton
    Midleton
    Midleton, historically Middleton , is a town in south-eastern County Cork, Ireland. It lies some 22 km east of Cork City on the Owenacurra River and the N25 road, which connects Cork to the port of Rosslare...

  • Midleton Arms
  • Church and Convent, Ramsgrange, County Wexford
    County Wexford
    County Wexford is a county in Ireland. It is part of the South-East Region and is also located in the province of Leinster. It is named after the town of Wexford. In pre-Norman times it was part of the Kingdom of Uí Cheinnselaig, whose capital was at Ferns. Wexford County Council is the local...

  • Bellevue Roman Catholic Church, County Wexford
    County Wexford
    County Wexford is a county in Ireland. It is part of the South-East Region and is also located in the province of Leinster. It is named after the town of Wexford. In pre-Norman times it was part of the Kingdom of Uí Cheinnselaig, whose capital was at Ferns. Wexford County Council is the local...


Works in England


  • St. Begh's Church, Whitehaven
    Whitehaven
    Whitehaven is a small town and port on the coast of Cumbria, England, which lies equidistant between the county's two largest settlements, Carlisle and Barrow-in-Furness, and is served by the Cumbrian Coast Line and the A595 road...

    , Cumberland
    Cumberland
    Cumberland is a historic county of North West England, on the border with Scotland, from the 12th century until 1974. It formed an administrative county from 1889 to 1974 and now forms part of Cumbria....

     (1868)
  • St. Mary of Furness Roman Catholic Church
    St. Mary of Furness Roman Catholic Church
    St. Mary of Furness is a Roman Catholic church located on Duke Street in Barrow-in-Furness, England. The congregation was founded in 1858, however the current building was constructed between 1866 and 1867 with £6,000 donated by Spencer Cavendish the 8th Duke of Devonshire. Designed by English...

    , Barrow-in-Furness
    Barrow-in-Furness
    Barrow-in-Furness is an industrial town and seaport which forms about half the territory of the wider Borough of Barrow-in-Furness in the county of Cumbria, England. It lies north of Liverpool, northwest of Manchester and southwest from the county town of Carlisle...

    , Lancashire
    Lancashire
    Lancashire is a non-metropolitan county of historic origin in the North West of England. It takes its name from the city of Lancaster, and is sometimes known as the County of Lancaster. Although Lancaster is still considered to be the county town, Lancashire County Council is based in Preston...

     (1866-7)
  • St. Mary's Church, Cleator
    Cleator Moor
    Cleator Moor is a small town and civil parish in the English county of Cumbria and within the boundaries of the traditional county of Cumberland....

    , Cumberland
    Cumberland
    Cumberland is a historic county of North West England, on the border with Scotland, from the 12th century until 1974. It formed an administrative county from 1889 to 1974 and now forms part of Cumbria....

     (1872)
  • Our Lady and St. Michael's Church, Workington
    Workington
    Workington is a town, civil parish and port on the west coast of Cumbria, England, at the mouth of the River Derwent. Lying within the Borough of Allerdale, Workington is southwest of Carlisle, west of Cockermouth, and southwest of Maryport...

    , Cumberland
    Cumberland
    Cumberland is a historic county of North West England, on the border with Scotland, from the 12th century until 1974. It formed an administrative county from 1889 to 1974 and now forms part of Cumbria....

     (1876);
  • St. Patrick's Wolverhampton
    Wolverhampton
    Wolverhampton is a city and metropolitan borough in the West Midlands, England. For Eurostat purposes Walsall and Wolverhampton is a NUTS 3 region and is one of five boroughs or unitary districts that comprise the "West Midlands" NUTS 2 region...

     (demolished) http://www.cobhcathedral.com/images/wolve.JPG
  • 1853: Our Lady Immaculate and St Cuthbert, Crook, Co Durham;
  • 1856: Shrewsbury Cathedral
    Shrewsbury Cathedral
    The Cathedral Church of Our Lady Help of Christians and Saint Peter of Alcantara, commonly known as Shrewsbury Cathedral, is a Roman Catholic cathedral in Shrewsbury, England...

    , the Cathedral Church of Our Lady Help of Christians and Saint Peter of Alcantara, Town Walls, Shrewsbury
    Shrewsbury
    Shrewsbury is the county town of Shropshire, in the West Midlands region of England. Lying on the River Severn, it is a civil parish home to some 70,000 inhabitants, and is the primary settlement and headquarters of Shropshire Council...

    , (built as a cathedral).
  • 1856: Our Lady Immaculate, St. Domingo Road, Everton, Liverpool. Demolished. Lady Chapel of scheme for Liverpool Cathedral.
  • 1856: St. Vincent de Paul, St. James Street, Liverpool;
  • 1857: Holy Cross, Croston
    Croston
    -External links:**** chorley.gov.uk....

    , Lancashire
    Lancashire
    Lancashire is a non-metropolitan county of historic origin in the North West of England. It takes its name from the city of Lancaster, and is sometimes known as the County of Lancaster. Although Lancaster is still considered to be the county town, Lancashire County Council is based in Preston...

    . Small estate church;
  • 1857-59: Our Lady and St. Hubert, Great Harwood, Lancashire;
  • 1859: Belmont Abbey, Hereford, Herefordshire (The Abbey Church was built as the pro-Cathedral for Wales.)
  • 1859-60: Our Lady of la Salette, Liverpool;
  • No Date: St. Mary's, Warwick
    Warwick
    Warwick is the county town of Warwickshire, England. The town lies upon the River Avon, south of Coventry and just west of Leamington Spa and Whitnash with which it is conjoined. As of the 2001 United Kingdom census, it had a population of 23,350...

    ;
  • 1860-1: St. Anne, Westby, Kirkham, Lancashire;
  • 1861: St. Edward, Thurloe Street, Rusholme
    Rusholme
    -Etymology:Rusholme, unlike other areas of Manchester which have '-holme' in the place name is not a true '-holme'. Its name came from ryscum, which is the dative plural of Old English rysc "rush": "[at the] rushes"...

    , Manchester;
  • 1861-5: St. Michael, West Derby Road, Everton, Liverpool;
  • 1862: St. Anne, Chester Road, Stretford
    Stretford
    Stretford is a town within the Metropolitan Borough of Trafford, in Greater Manchester, England. Lying on flat ground between the River Mersey and the Manchester Ship Canal, it is to the southwest of Manchester city centre, south-southwest of Salford and northeast of Altrincham...

    , near Manchester;
  • 1863: St. Peter, Greengate, Salford, Lancashire
    Lancashire
    Lancashire is a non-metropolitan county of historic origin in the North West of England. It takes its name from the city of Lancaster, and is sometimes known as the County of Lancaster. Although Lancaster is still considered to be the county town, Lancashire County Council is based in Preston...

    ;
  • 1863: SS Henry and Elizabeth, Sheerness, Kent;
  • 1863: Convent of Our Lady of Charity and Refuge, Bartestree
    Bartestree
    Bartestree is a village in Herefordshire, England, east of Hereford on the A438 road. The name is thought to be derived from the Old English Beorhtwald's tree....

    , Herefordshire
    Herefordshire
    Herefordshire is a historic and ceremonial county in the West Midlands region of England. For Eurostat purposes it is a NUTS 3 region and is one of three counties that comprise the "Herefordshire, Worcestershire and Gloucestershire" NUTS 2 region. It also forms a unitary district known as the...

      (Subsequently converted to flats
    Apartment
    An apartment or flat is a self-contained housing unit that occupies only part of a building...

    );
  • 1863: St Joseph, Bolton Road, Anderton, Chorley, Lancashire;
  • 1864: Our Lady and All Saints, New Road, Stourbridge
    Stourbridge
    Stourbridge is a town within the Metropolitan Borough of Dudley, in the West Midlands of England. Historically part of Worcestershire, Stourbridge was a centre of glass making, and today includes the suburbs of Amblecote, Lye, Norton, Oldswinford, Pedmore, Wollaston, Wollescote and Wordsley The...

    , Worcestershire;
  • 1864: St. Marie
    St Marie's Church, Widnes
    St Marie's Church, Widnes is a redundant Roman Catholic church in Widnes, Halton, Cheshire, England. It was built between 1862 and 1865 to accommodate large numbers of Irish immigrants who had come to work in the chemical factories. The church was opened in 1865 and designed by E. W. Pugin. It...

    , Lugsdale Road, Widnes
    Widnes
    Widnes is an industrial town within the borough of Halton, in Cheshire, England, with an urban area population of 57,663 in 2004. It is located on the northern bank of the River Mersey where the estuary narrows to form the Runcorn Gap. Directly to the south across the Mersey is the town of Runcorn...

    , Cheshire
    Cheshire
    Cheshire is a ceremonial county in North West England. Cheshire's county town is the city of Chester, although its largest town is Warrington. Other major towns include Widnes, Congleton, Crewe, Ellesmere Port, Runcorn, Macclesfield, Winsford, Northwich, and Wilmslow...

     (redundant);
  • 1864: Our Lady of Redemption, Wellesley Road, Croydon
    Croydon
    Croydon is a town in South London, England, located within the London Borough of Croydon to which it gives its name. It is situated south of Charing Cross...

    .
  • 1864: St. Hubert, Dunsop Bridge
    Dunsop Bridge
    Dunsop Bridge is a village within the Ribble Valley borough of Lancashire, England, situated north-west of Clitheroe, south-east of Lancaster and east of Skipton. It is in the civil parish of Bowland Forest High....

    , Yorkshire;
  • 1865: St. Mary, Euxton
    Euxton
    Euxton is a village and civil parish of the Borough of Chorley, in Lancashire, England. The village is pronounced "Exton") and is situated just to the south of Leyland, and to the west of Chorley.-Early Industry:...

    , Lancashire;
  • 1865: St. Catherine, Kingsdown
    Kingsdown (hamlet)
    Kingsdown is a small hamlet surrounded by the villages of Frinsted, Milstead, Doddington and Lynsted in Kent, England.The hamlet is within the civil parish of Milstead and Kingsdown which spans the boundaries of the boroughs of Maidstone and Swale...

    , Kent;
  • 1865-6: Mayfield Boys Orphanage (later Mayfield College, from 2007 converted to residential apartments as Mayfield Grange), Mayfield, Sussex;
  • 1865-7: St. Joseph, York Road, Birkdale
    Birkdale
    Birkdale is a village and district in the southern part of the conurbation of the town of Southport, within the Metropolitan Borough of Sefton, Merseyside, though historically in Lancashire, in the north-west of England. The village is located on the Irish Sea coast, approximately a mile away from...

    , Southport
    Southport
    Southport is a seaside town in the Metropolitan Borough of Sefton in Merseyside, England. During the 2001 census Southport was recorded as having a population of 90,336, making it the eleventh most populous settlement in North West England...

    , Lancashire;
  • 1866: Euxton Hall Chapel
    Euxton Hall Chapel
    Euxton Hall Chapel is situated in the village of Euxton, Lancashire, England. It was designed by the famous architect E. W. Pugin , and built in 1866 as a private chapel for the Anderton family. Set within the grounds of Euxton Hall, and a Grade II listed building within its own right, the small...

    , Euxton, near Chorley, Lancashire;
  • 1866: St Francis Monastery
    Gorton Monastery
    The Church and Friary of St Francis, known locally as Gorton Monastery, is a 19th century former Franciscan friary in Gorton, in east Manchester, England. The Franciscans arrived in Gorton in December 1861 and built their friary between 1863 and 1867. The foundation stone for the church was laid in...

     , Gorton
    Gorton
    Gorton is an area of the city of Manchester, in North West England. It is located to the southeast of Manchester city centre. Neighbouring areas include Longsight and Levenshulme....

    , Manchester
    Manchester
    Manchester is a city and metropolitan borough in Greater Manchester, England. According to the Office for National Statistics, the 2010 mid-year population estimate for Manchester was 498,800. Manchester lies within one of the UK's largest metropolitan areas, the metropolitan county of Greater...

     ;
  • 1866: Our Blessed Lady and St. Joseph, Leadgate, Durham;
  • 1866: Chancel and transepts to Mount St. Mary, Leeds;
  • 1866-8: Meanwood Towers, Meanwood
    Meanwood
    Meanwood is a suburb and former village of north-west Leeds, West Yorkshire, England.-Origins and History:The name Meanwood goes back to the 12th century, and is of Anglo-Saxon derivation: the Meene wude was the boundary wood of the Manor of Alreton, the woods to the east of Meanwood Beck...

    , Leeds;
  • 1866-7: St. Mary, Duke Street, Barrow-in-Furness
    Barrow-in-Furness
    Barrow-in-Furness is an industrial town and seaport which forms about half the territory of the wider Borough of Barrow-in-Furness in the county of Cumbria, England. It lies north of Liverpool, northwest of Manchester and southwest from the county town of Carlisle...

    , Lancashire
    Lancashire
    Lancashire is a non-metropolitan county of historic origin in the North West of England. It takes its name from the city of Lancaster, and is sometimes known as the County of Lancaster. Although Lancaster is still considered to be the county town, Lancashire County Council is based in Preston...

    ;
  • 1866-7: St Michael and All Angels, Mortuary Chapel and Knill Memorial, Brockley
    Brockley
    Brockley is a district of south London, England, located in the London Borough of Lewisham. It is situated south-east of Charing Cross.It is covered by the London postcode districts SE4 and SE14.-History:...

     Cemetery, London
    London
    London is the capital city of :England and the :United Kingdom, the largest metropolitan area in the United Kingdom, and the largest urban zone in the European Union by most measures. Located on the River Thames, London has been a major settlement for two millennia, its history going back to its...

    , destroyed by bombing in 1944;
  • 1867: St Paul's, Maison Dieu Road, Dover
    Dover
    Dover is a town and major ferry port in the home county of Kent, in South East England. It faces France across the narrowest part of the English Channel, and lies south-east of Canterbury; east of Kent's administrative capital Maidstone; and north-east along the coastline from Dungeness and Hastings...

    , Kent
    Kent
    Kent is a county in southeast England, and is one of the home counties. It borders East Sussex, Surrey and Greater London and has a defined boundary with Essex in the middle of the Thames Estuary. The ceremonial county boundaries of Kent include the shire county of Kent and the unitary borough of...

    ;
  • 1867-8: St Mary
    St Mary's Church, Fleetwood
    St Mary's is a Roman Catholic church in Fleetwood, Lancashire, England. Designed by E. W. Pugin, it was built 1867–68. It is an active church in the Roman Catholic Diocese of Lancaster. It has been designated a Grade II listed building by English Heritage....

    , Fleetwood
    Fleetwood
    Fleetwood is a town within the Wyre district of Lancashire, England, lying at the northwest corner of the Fylde. It had a population of 26,840 people at the 2001 Census. It forms part of the Greater Blackpool conurbation. The town was the first planned community of the Victorian era...

    , Lancashire
    Lancashire
    Lancashire is a non-metropolitan county of historic origin in the North West of England. It takes its name from the city of Lancaster, and is sometimes known as the County of Lancaster. Although Lancaster is still considered to be the county town, Lancashire County Council is based in Preston...

    ;
  • 1867-8: All Saints, Barton on Irwell, near Eccles
    Eccles, Greater Manchester
    Eccles is a town in the City of Salford, a metropolitan borough of Greater Manchester in North West England, west of Salford and west of Manchester city centre...

    , Greater Manchester
    Greater Manchester
    Greater Manchester is a metropolitan county in North West England, with a population of 2.6 million. It encompasses one of the largest metropolitan areas in the United Kingdom and comprises ten metropolitan boroughs: Bolton, Bury, Oldham, Rochdale, Stockport, Tameside, Trafford, Wigan, and the...

    ;
  • 1867-8: All Saints' Church
    All Saints' Church, Urmston
    All Saints' Church is a Roman Catholic church in Urmston, Greater Manchester, England, and is located on Redclyffe Road . The church was constructed between 1867 and 1868 and was designed by E. W. Pugin in the Gothic Revival style for Sir Humphrey de Trafford...

     in Urmston
    Urmston
    Urmston is a town within the Metropolitan Borough of Trafford, in Greater Manchester, England, with a population of around 41,000. Historically a part of Lancashire, it lies about six miles to the southwest of Manchester city centre. The southern boundary is marked by the River Mersey and the...

    , Greater Manchester
    Greater Manchester
    Greater Manchester is a metropolitan county in North West England, with a population of 2.6 million. It encompasses one of the largest metropolitan areas in the United Kingdom and comprises ten metropolitan boroughs: Bolton, Bury, Oldham, Rochdale, Stockport, Tameside, Trafford, Wigan, and the...

  • 1867-71: Our Lady and St Paulinus, Dewsbury
    Dewsbury
    Dewsbury is a minster town in the Metropolitan Borough of Kirklees, in West Yorkshire, England. It is to the west of Wakefield, east of Huddersfield and south of Leeds...

    , West Yorkshire
    West Yorkshire
    West Yorkshire is a metropolitan county within the Yorkshire and the Humber region of England with a population of 2.2 million. West Yorkshire came into existence as a metropolitan county in 1974 after the passage of the Local Government Act 1972....

    ;
  • 1868: Two colleges at Mark Cross
    Mark Cross
    Mark Cross is a hard rock and heavy metal drummer. He was born to an English father and German mother, raised in Germany and later moved to Greece...

    , Sussex;
  • 1868: St. Begh, Coach Road, Whitehaven
    Whitehaven
    Whitehaven is a small town and port on the coast of Cumbria, England, which lies equidistant between the county's two largest settlements, Carlisle and Barrow-in-Furness, and is served by the Cumbrian Coast Line and the A595 road...

    , Cumberland
    Cumberland
    Cumberland is a historic county of North West England, on the border with Scotland, from the 12th century until 1974. It formed an administrative county from 1889 to 1974 and now forms part of Cumbria....

    ;
  • 1869-72: Our Lady of the Sacred Heart, Cleator
    Cleator
    Cleator is a village in the English county of Cumbria and within the boundaries of the traditional county of Cumberland.Cleator is 1½ miles south of the town of Cleator Moor on the A5086 road. Cleator was the original village, Cleator Moor being the moor above the village. It is the site of the...

    , Cumberland
    Cumberland
    Cumberland is a historic county of North West England, on the border with Scotland, from the 12th century until 1974. It formed an administrative county from 1889 to 1974 and now forms part of Cumbria....

    ;
  • 1870: Granville Hotel, Ramsgate
    Ramsgate
    Ramsgate is a seaside town in the district of Thanet in east Kent, England. It was one of the great English seaside towns of the 19th century and is a member of the ancient confederation of Cinque Ports. It has a population of around 40,000. Ramsgate's main attraction is its coastline and its main...

    , Kent
    Kent
    Kent is a county in southeast England, and is one of the home counties. It borders East Sussex, Surrey and Greater London and has a defined boundary with Essex in the middle of the Thames Estuary. The ceremonial county boundaries of Kent include the shire county of Kent and the unitary borough of...

  • 1871: Stanbrook Abbey
    Stanbrook Abbey
    Stanbrook Abbey is an abbey built as a contemplative house for Benedictine nuns. It was founded in 1625 in Cambrai, Flanders, then part of the Spanish Netherlands, under the auspices of the English Benedictine Congregation.-History:...

    , Powick
    Powick
    Powick is a Worcestershire village two miles south of the city of Worcester and four miles north of Great Malvern, close to the River Teme. It is a civil parish of the Malvern Hills District, and it includes the village of Callow End and the hamlets of Bastonford, Clevelode, Colletts Green, and...

    , Worcestershire;
  • 1875 Edward Welby Pugin dies;
  • 1875: St. Anne Rommer, Highfield Road, Rockferry, Birkenhead
    Birkenhead
    Birkenhead is a town within the Metropolitan Borough of Wirral in Merseyside, England. It is on the Wirral Peninsula, along the west bank of the River Mersey, opposite the city of Liverpool...

    , Wirral, Cheshire designed by EW Pugin,
  • 1875-76: The English Martyrs, London. EW Pugin design;
  • 1876: Our Lady Star of the Sea, Workington. EW Pugin design;
  • 1877: St Mary's Church, Warrington
    St Mary's Church, Warrington
    St Mary's Church, Warrington is in the town centre of Warrington, Cheshire, England. It has been designated by English Heritage as a Grade II listed building, and is an active Roman Catholic church. The parish was established from St Alban's Church, Warrington by Benedictine monks from...

    , Cheshire
    Cheshire
    Cheshire is a ceremonial county in North West England. Cheshire's county town is the city of Chester, although its largest town is Warrington. Other major towns include Widnes, Congleton, Crewe, Ellesmere Port, Runcorn, Macclesfield, Winsford, Northwich, and Wilmslow...

     EW Pugin design;

Works in association with George Ashlin

  • SS Peter and Paul's, Cork
    Cork (city)
    Cork is the second largest city in the Republic of Ireland and the island of Ireland's third most populous city. It is the principal city and administrative centre of County Cork and the largest city in the province of Munster. Cork has a population of 119,418, while the addition of the suburban...

    , (1859)
  • Convent of Mercy, Clonakilty
    Clonakilty
    Clonakilty , often referred to by locals simply as Clon, is a small town on the N71 national secondary road in West County Cork, Ireland, approximately 45 minutes away by road to the west of Cork City. The town is on the southern coast of the island, and is surrounded by hilly country devoted...

    , County Cork
    County Cork
    County Cork is a county in Ireland. It is located in the South-West Region and is also part of the province of Munster. It is named after the city of Cork . Cork County Council is the local authority for the county...

     (1867);
  • Convent and Orphanage, William Street North, Dublin (1867);
  • SS Augustine and John, Thomas Street, Dublin (1860);

Regarded as Dublin's finest Victorian church, SS Augustine and John (John's Lane Church) in the Liberties area was designed by E.W. Pugin and executed by his partner George Ashlin for the Augustinian Fathers. It was built between 1862 and 1895. It has the tallest spire in Dublin (231 ft), and occupies a prominent position on high ground overlooking the Liffey Valley. It has a striking polychromatic appearance, being built in granite with red sandstone dressings.
The eminent Gothic revivalist Ruskin is said to have praised it, describing it as a "poem in stone".
Statues of the apostles in the niches of the spire are by James Pearse, father of Padraig and Willie, who were executed after the 1916 Easter Rising
Easter Rising
The Easter Rising was an insurrection staged in Ireland during Easter Week, 1916. The Rising was mounted by Irish republicans with the aims of ending British rule in Ireland and establishing the Irish Republic at a time when the British Empire was heavily engaged in the First World War...

.
There is some good stained glass from the Harry Clarke studios.
  • Presentation Convent, Fethard, Co. Tipperary
    Tipperary
    Tipperary is a town and a civil parish in South Tipperary in Ireland. Its population was 4,415 at the 2006 census. It is also an ecclesiastical parish in the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Cashel and Emly, and is in the historical barony of Clanwilliam....

     (1862);
  • Harrington Street Catholic Church, Dublin (1867); http://www.tropicalisland.de/ireland/dublin/city_south/images/DUB%20Dublin%20-%20Saint%20Kevins%20Church%20in%20Harrington%20Street%2001%203008x2000.jpg
  • Donnybrook Catholic Church, Dublin (1863);
  • Monkstown Catholic Church, Co. Dublin (1865);
  • Arles Catholic Church, Stradbally, Co. Laois (1965);
  • Ferrybank Catholic Church, Waterford
    Waterford
    Waterford is a city in the South-East Region of Ireland. It is the oldest city in the country and fifth largest by population. Waterford City Council is the local government authority for the city and its immediate hinterland...

     (1867);
  • Kilanerin Catholic Church, Wexford
    Wexford
    Wexford is the county town of County Wexford, Ireland. It is situated near the southeastern corner of Ireland, close to Rosslare Europort. The town is connected to Dublin via the M11/N11 National Primary Route, and the national rail network...

    (1865);
  • Lady's Island Catholic Church, Co. Wexford; (1863).

Sources


External links