University College London

University College London

Overview
University College London (UCL) is a public
Public university
A public university is a university that is predominantly funded by public means through a national or subnational government, as opposed to private universities. A national university may or may not be considered a public university, depending on regions...

 research university located in London, United Kingdom and the oldest and largest constituent college of the federal University of London
University of London
-20th century:Shortly after 6 Burlington Gardens was vacated, the University went through a period of rapid expansion. Bedford College, Royal Holloway and the London School of Economics all joined in 1900, Regent's Park College, which had affiliated in 1841 became an official divinity school of the...

. Founded in 1826, UCL was the first university institution to be founded in London and the first in England to be established on an entirely secular basis, to admit students regardless of their religion and to admit women on equal terms with men.
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Encyclopedia
University College London (UCL) is a public
Public university
A public university is a university that is predominantly funded by public means through a national or subnational government, as opposed to private universities. A national university may or may not be considered a public university, depending on regions...

 research university located in London, United Kingdom and the oldest and largest constituent college of the federal University of London
University of London
-20th century:Shortly after 6 Burlington Gardens was vacated, the University went through a period of rapid expansion. Bedford College, Royal Holloway and the London School of Economics all joined in 1900, Regent's Park College, which had affiliated in 1841 became an official divinity school of the...

. Founded in 1826, UCL was the first university institution to be founded in London and the first in England to be established on an entirely secular basis, to admit students regardless of their religion and to admit women on equal terms with men. UCL became one of the two founding colleges of the University of London in 1836.
UCL is organised into 10 constituent faculties, within which there are over 100 departments, institutes and research centres. UCL's main campus is located in the Bloomsbury
Bloomsbury
-Places:* Bloomsbury is an area in central London.* Bloomsbury , related local government unit* Bloomsbury, New Jersey, New Jersey, USA* Bloomsbury , listed on the NRHP in Maryland...

 area of Central London
Central London
Central London is the innermost part of London, England. There is no official or commonly accepted definition of its area, but its characteristics are understood to include a high density built environment, high land values, an elevated daytime population and a concentration of regionally,...

, with a number of institutes and teaching hospitals located elsewhere in Central London. There is a UCL campus in Doha, Qatar specialised in archaeology, conservation and museum studies, and the UCL School of Energy and Resources is based in Adelaide
Adelaide
Adelaide is the capital city of South Australia and the fifth-largest city in Australia. Adelaide has an estimated population of more than 1.2 million...

, Australia. UCL is a major centre for biomedical research; it is part of three of the 11 biomedical research centres established by the NHS
National Health Service (England)
The National Health Service or NHS is the publicly funded healthcare system in England. It is both the largest and oldest single-payer healthcare system in the world. It is able to function in the way that it does because it is primarily funded through the general taxation system, similar to how...

 in England and is a founding member of UCL Partners
UCL Partners
UCL Partners is an academic health science centre located in London, United Kingdom. It is the largest academic health science centre in Europe, treats more than 1.5 million patients each year, has an annual turnover of around £2 billion and includes around 3,500 scientists, senior researchers and...

, the largest academic health science centre
Academic health science centre
An academic health science centre is a partnership between one or more universities and healthcare providers focusing on research, clinical services, education and training...

 in Europe. For the period 1999 to 2009 it was the 13th most-cited university in the world (and the most-cited in Europe). UCL had a total income of £762 million in 2009/10, of which £275 million was from research grants and contracts.
UCL has over 4,000 academic and research staff and 648 professors, the highest number of any British university. There are currently 46 Fellows of the Royal Society, 55 Fellows of the British Academy, 10 Fellows of the Royal Academy of Engineering and 99 Fellows of the Academy of Medical Sciences amongst UCL academic and research staff. There are 26 Nobel Prize winners and three Fields Medal
Fields Medal
The Fields Medal, officially known as International Medal for Outstanding Discoveries in Mathematics, is a prize awarded to two, three, or four mathematicians not over 40 years of age at each International Congress of the International Mathematical Union , a meeting that takes place every four...

ists amongst UCL’s alumni and current and former staff, the most recent being Sir Charles K. Kao
Charles K. Kao
The Honorable Sir Charles Kuen Kao, GBM, KBE, FRS, FREng is a pioneer in the development and use of fiber optics in telecommunications...

, who received the Nobel Prize for Physics
Nobel Prize in Physics
The Nobel Prize in Physics is awarded once a year by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences. It is one of the five Nobel Prizes established by the will of Alfred Nobel in 1895 and awarded since 1901; the others are the Nobel Prize in Chemistry, Nobel Prize in Literature, Nobel Peace Prize, and...

 in 2009. UCL is ranked 20th in the world (and 3rd in Europe) in the 2011 Academic Ranking of World Universities
Academic Ranking of World Universities
The Academic Ranking of World Universities , commonly known as the Shanghai ranking, is a publication that was founded and compiled by the Shanghai Jiaotong University to rank universities globally. The rankings have been conducted since 2003 and updated annually...

, 7th in the world (and 4th in Europe) in the 2011 QS World University Rankings
QS World University Rankings
The QS World University Rankings is a ranking of the world’s top 500 universities by Quacquarelli Symonds using a method that has published annually since 2004....

and 17th in the world (and 5th in Europe) in the 2011 Times Higher Education World University Rankings
Times Higher Education World University Rankings
The Times Higher Education World University Rankings is an international ranking of universities published by the British magazine Times Higher Education in partnership with Thomson Reuters, which provided citation database information...

.
UCL is a member of the Association of Commonwealth Universities
Association of Commonwealth Universities
The Association of Commonwealth Universities represents over 480 universities from Commonwealth countries.- History :In 1912, the University of London took the initiative to assemble 53 representatives of universities in London to hold a Congress of Universities of the Empire...

, the European University Association
European University Association
The European University Association represents and supports more than 850 institutions of higher education in 46 countries, providing them with a forum for cooperation and exchange of information on higher education and research policies...

, the G5
G5 (education)
The G5 is an informal grouping of five British universities first identified by Times Higher Education in 2004. According to Times Higher Education, the five members are the University of Cambridge, Imperial College London, the London School of Economics, the University of Oxford and University...

, the League of European Research Universities
League of European Research Universities
The League of European Research Universities is a consortium of Europe's most prominent and renowned research universities.-History and Overview:...

, the Russell Group
Russell Group
The Russell Group is a collaboration of twenty UK universities that together receive two-thirds of research grant and contract funding in the United Kingdom. It was established in 1994 to represent their interests to the government, parliament and other similar bodies...

, UNICA
Institutional Network of the Universities from the Capitals of Europe
The Institutional Network of the Universities from the Capitals of Europe , is a network of 42 universities, gathering main Higher Education Institutions located in the European capital cities. It was founded in 1990 on the initiative of Université Libre de Bruxelles...

 and Universities UK
Universities UK
Universities UK began life as the Committee of Vice-Chancellors and Principals of the Universities of the United Kingdom in the nineteenth century when there were informal meetings involving Vice-Chancellors of a number of universities and Principals of university colleges...

. It forms part of the 'Golden Triangle'
Golden Triangle (UK universities)
The "Golden Triangle" is a term used to describe a number of leading British research universities based in Cambridge, London and Oxford.The city of Cambridge, represented by the University of Cambridge, and the city of Oxford, represented by the University of Oxford, form two corners of the triangle...

 of British universities.

History





19th century


UCL was founded in 1826 under the name "London University" as a secular alternative to the religious universities of Oxford and Cambridge. Although the philosopher Jeremy Bentham
Jeremy Bentham
Jeremy Bentham was an English jurist, philosopher, and legal and social reformer. He became a leading theorist in Anglo-American philosophy of law, and a political radical whose ideas influenced the development of welfarism...

 is commonly seen as the father of UCL, he personally took no part in its creation. Bentham's radical ideas on education and society were the inspiration to the institution's founders however, particularly the Scotsmen James Mill
James Mill
James Mill was a Scottish historian, economist, political theorist, and philosopher. He was a founder of classical economics, together with David Ricardo, and the father of influential philosopher of classical liberalism, John Stuart Mill.-Life:Mill was born at Northwater Bridge, in the parish of...

 (1773–1836) and Henry Brougham (1778–1868). In 1827 the Chair of Political Economy at London University was created, establishing the first Department of Economics in England. In 1828 the university became the first in England to offer English as a degree subject and the teaching of Classics and medicine began.

In 1830 London University founded the London University School, which was to later become University College School
University College School
University College School, generally known as UCS, is an Independent school charity situated in Hampstead, north west London, England. The school was founded in 1830 by University College London and inherited many of that institution's progressive and secular views...

. In 1833 the university appointed Captain Alexander Maconochie, Secretary to the Royal Geographical Society, as the first professor of geography in the UK. In 1834 University College Hospital
University College Hospital
University College Hospital is a teaching hospital located in London, United Kingdom. It is part of the University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust and is closely associated with University College London ....

 opened as a teaching hospital for the university medical school. In 1836, London University became formally known as "University College, London" (the comma between the words College and London was commonly used until recently), when, under a Royal Charter
Royal Charter
A royal charter is a formal document issued by a monarch as letters patent, granting a right or power to an individual or a body corporate. They were, and are still, used to establish significant organizations such as cities or universities. Charters should be distinguished from warrants and...

, it worked with the recently established King's College, London
King's College London
King's College London is a public research university located in London, United Kingdom and a constituent college of the federal University of London. King's has a claim to being the third oldest university in England, having been founded by King George IV and the Duke of Wellington in 1829, and...

, to create the federal University of London
University of London
-20th century:Shortly after 6 Burlington Gardens was vacated, the University went through a period of rapid expansion. Bedford College, Royal Holloway and the London School of Economics all joined in 1900, Regent's Park College, which had affiliated in 1841 became an official divinity school of the...

. The Slade School of Fine Art
Slade School of Fine Art
The Slade School of Fine Art is a world-renownedart school in London, United Kingdom, and a department of University College London...

 was founded in 1871 as the result of a bequest from Felix Slade
Felix Slade
Felix Joseph Slade FRA , was an English lawyer and collector of glass, books and engravings.A fellow of the Society of Antiquaries and a philanthropist who endowed three Slade Professorships of Fine Art at Oxford University and Cambridge University, and at University College London, where he also...

. In 1878 UCL became the first British university to admit women on equal terms to men. In 1898 William Ramsay discovered the elements krypton
Krypton
Krypton is a chemical element with the symbol Kr and atomic number 36. It is a member of Group 18 and Period 4 elements. A colorless, odorless, tasteless noble gas, krypton occurs in trace amounts in the atmosphere, is isolated by fractionally distilling liquified air, and is often used with other...

, neon
Neon
Neon is the chemical element that has the symbol Ne and an atomic number of 10. Although a very common element in the universe, it is rare on Earth. A colorless, inert noble gas under standard conditions, neon gives a distinct reddish-orange glow when used in either low-voltage neon glow lamps or...

 and xenon
Xenon
Xenon is a chemical element with the symbol Xe and atomic number 54. The element name is pronounced or . A colorless, heavy, odorless noble gas, xenon occurs in the Earth's atmosphere in trace amounts...

 whilst professor of chemistry at UCL.

20th century


Sir Gregory Foster
Gregory Foster
Sir Gregory Foster was the Provost of University College London from 1904–1929, and Vice-Chancellor of the University of London from 1928 to 1930....

 became UCL’s first Provost
Provost (education)
A provost is the senior academic administrator at many institutions of higher education in the United States, Canada and Australia, the equivalent of a pro-vice-chancellor at some institutions in the United Kingdom and Ireland....

 in 1906, a post that he held for the next 23 years. In the same year the Cruciform Building was opened as the new home for University College Hospital
University College Hospital
University College Hospital is a teaching hospital located in London, United Kingdom. It is part of the University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust and is closely associated with University College London ....

. In 1907 the University of London was formally reconstituted with a new Royal charter, and a number of new institutions joined the federation. As part of this reorganisation each of the constituent institutions, including UCL, lost their legal independence, and henceforth all offered degrees awarded by the University of London. UCL sustained considerable bomb damage during the Second World War, including to the Great Hall and the Carey Foster Physics Laboratory. The first UCL student magazine, Pi Magazine
Pi Magazine
Pi is the name of the official student publications of the University College London Union.-History:Pi was originally launched as a newspaper. In the aftermath of World War II, there was strong popular support amongst college and UCL Union officials for some sort of community project that would...

, was published for the first time on 21 February 1946. The Institute of Jewish Studies
Institute of Jewish Studies at University College London
The Institute of Jewish Studies at University College London is an institute located in London, United Kingdom dedicated to the academic study of all branches of Jewish history and civilization...

 relocated to UCL in 1959. The Mullard Space Science Laboratory
Mullard Space Science Laboratory
The UCL Mullard Space Science Laboratory is the United Kingdom's largest university space research group. MSSL is the Department of Space and Climate Physics of the University College London. UCL was one of the first universities in the world to conduct space research...

 was established in 1966. In 1973 UCL became the first international link to the ARPANET, the precursor of the internet, sending the world's first e-mail in the same year.

In 1977 a new charter restored UCL's legal independence, although not – at that time – the power to award its own degrees. In 1986 UCL merged with the Institute of Archaeology. In 1988 UCL merged with the Institute of Laryngology & Otology, the Institute of Orthopaedics, the Institute of Urology & Nephrology and Middlesex Hospital Medical School
Middlesex Hospital
The Middlesex Hospital was a teaching hospital located in the Fitzrovia area of London, United Kingdom. First opened in 1745 on Windmill Street, it was moved in 1757 to Mortimer Street where it remained until it was finally closed in 2005. Its staff and services were transferred to various sites...

. In 1994 the University College London Hospitals NHS Trust
University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust
University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust is an NHS foundation trust based in London, United Kingdom. It comprises the Eastman Dental Hospital, The Heart Hospital, the Hospital for Tropical Diseases, the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, the Royal London Hospital for...

 was established. UCL merged with the College of Speech Sciences and the Institute of Ophthalmology
UCL Institute of Ophthalmology
The UCL Institute of Ophthalmology is an institute within the Faculty of Brain Sciences of University College London and is based in London, United Kingdom...

 in 1995, the School of Podiatry in 1996 and the Institute of Neurology
UCL Institute of Neurology
The UCL Institute of Neurology is an institute within the Faculty of Brain Sciences of University College London and is located in London, United Kingdom...

 in 1997. In 1998 UCL merged with the Royal Free Hospital Medical School to create the Royal Free and University College Medical School (renamed the UCL Medical School in October 2008). In 1999 UCL merged with the School of Slavonic and East European Studies and the Eastman Dental Institute
UCL Eastman Dental Institute
The UCL Eastman Dental Institute is an academic department of the Faculty of Medical Sciences of University College London located in London, United Kingdom...

.

21st century



The UCL Jill Dando Institute of Crime Science, the first university department in the world devoted specifically to reducing crime, was founded in 2001. The London Centre for Nanotechnology
London Centre for Nanotechnology
The London Centre for Nanotechnology is a multidisciplinary research centre in physical and biomedical nanotechnology in London, United Kingdom. It brings together two institutions that are world leaders in nanotechnology, University College London and Imperial College London...

 was established in 2003 as a joint venture between UCL and Imperial College London
Imperial College London
Imperial College London is a public research university located in London, United Kingdom, specialising in science, engineering, business and medicine...

. In 2005 UCL was again granted its own taught and research degree awarding powers and all new UCL students registered from 2007/08 qualified with UCL degrees rather than University of London degrees. The majority of continuing students who were enrolled on taught-degree programmes before the academic year 2007/08 were given the choice of whether to receive a UCL degree or a University of London degree. Also in 2005 a major new 76,000 m² building was opened for University College Hospital on Euston Road
Euston Road
Euston Road is an important thoroughfare in central London, England, and forms part of the A501. It is part of the New Road from Paddington to Islington, and was opened as part of the New Road in 1756...

, and the UCL Ear Institute
UCL Ear Institute
The UCL Ear Institute is an academic department of the Faculty of Brain Sciences of University College London located in London, United Kingdom...

 was opened on Gray's Inn Road
Gray's Inn Road
Gray's Inn Road, formerly Gray's Inn Lane, is a major road in central London, in the London Borough of Camden. It is named after Gray's Inn, one of the main Inns of Court. The road starts in Holborn, near Chancery Lane tube station and the boundaries of the City of London and the London Borough...

 adjacent to the Royal National Throat Nose and Ear Hospital. Another major campus addition was the opening of the award-winning 16 Taviton Street building – purpose-built as the home for the now UCL School of Slavonic and East European Studies (SSEES), following the University of London
University of London
-20th century:Shortly after 6 Burlington Gardens was vacated, the University went through a period of rapid expansion. Bedford College, Royal Holloway and the London School of Economics all joined in 1900, Regent's Park College, which had affiliated in 1841 became an official divinity school of the...

 School's merger with UCL.

UCL merged with the Institute of Child Health
UCL Institute of Child Health
The UCL Institute of Child Health is an academic department of the Faculty of Biomedical Sciences of University College London located in London, United Kingdom. It is a leading biomedical research centre and has a history in children's medical research which dates back to its founding.ICH...

 in 2006, which became the largest division of the newly formed Faculty of Biomedical Sciences. In 2007 the UCL Cancer Institute was opened in the newly constructed Paul O'Gorman Building. In August 2008 UCL formed UCL Partners
UCL Partners
UCL Partners is an academic health science centre located in London, United Kingdom. It is the largest academic health science centre in Europe, treats more than 1.5 million patients each year, has an annual turnover of around £2 billion and includes around 3,500 scientists, senior researchers and...

, the largest academic health science centre
Academic health science centre
An academic health science centre is a partnership between one or more universities and healthcare providers focusing on research, clinical services, education and training...

 in Europe, with Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Trust, Moorfields Eye Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Royal Free Hampstead NHS Trust
Royal Free Hampstead NHS Trust
The Royal Free Hampstead NHS Trust is an NHS trust based in London, United Kingdom. It comprises The Royal Free Hospital, The Royal National Throat, Nose and Ear Hospital and clinics run by the Trust at Edgware Community Hospital, Barnet and Chase Farm Hospital, Finchley Memorial Hospital and North...

 and University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust
University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust
University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust is an NHS foundation trust based in London, United Kingdom. It comprises the Eastman Dental Hospital, The Heart Hospital, the Hospital for Tropical Diseases, the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, the Royal London Hospital for...

. In 2008 UCL became the first UK university to sign agreements for a campus in Australia, establishing the UCL School of Energy & Resources, Australia in Adelaide. In 2009, UCL announced that it would join some of the other elite institutions of Higher Education in the United Kingdom, such as Cambridge and LSE
London School of Economics
The London School of Economics and Political Science is a public research university specialised in the social sciences located in London, United Kingdom, and a constituent college of the federal University of London...

 by implementing the requirement of an A* at A Level for undergraduates to be admitted to some of its most popular courses.

In 2009, an alliance was formed between UCL, Yale and both universities’ affiliated hospitals to conduct research focused on the direct improvement of patient care—a growing field known as translational medicine. Yale's President Richard Levin noted that Yale has hundreds of other partnerships across the world, but "no existing collaboration matches the scale of the new partnership with UCL". The first joint master's degree has been set up, and a joint PhD programme is in the pipeline. "If we do things right, that will be the best biological PhD programme in the world," said Michael Simons, Robert W. Berliner Professor of Medicine at Yale .

As part of the protests against the UK Government's plans to increase student fees
2010 UK student protests
The 2010 UK student protests were a series of demonstrations that began in November 2010 in several areas of the United Kingdom, with the focal point of protests centred in London. The initial event was the largest student protest in the UK since the Labour government first proposed the Teaching...

, around 200 students occupied the Jeremy Bentham Room and part of the Slade School of Fine Art
Slade School of Fine Art
The Slade School of Fine Art is a world-renownedart school in London, United Kingdom, and a department of University College London...

 for over two weeks during November and December 2010. The university successfully obtained a court order to evict the students but stated that it did not intend to enforce the order if possible. It was decided on 13 May 2011, after a consultation and development process, that the School of Pharmacy, University of London would merge with UCL.

Campus



UCL is primarily based in the Bloomsbury
Bloomsbury
-Places:* Bloomsbury is an area in central London.* Bloomsbury , related local government unit* Bloomsbury, New Jersey, New Jersey, USA* Bloomsbury , listed on the NRHP in Maryland...

 area of central London
Central London
Central London is the innermost part of London, England. There is no official or commonly accepted definition of its area, but its characteristics are understood to include a high density built environment, high land values, an elevated daytime population and a concentration of regionally,...

. The main campus
UCL Main Building
The Main Building at University College London, includes the Octagon, Quad, Cloisters, Main Library, Flaxman Gallery and the Wilkins building. The North Wing, South Wing, Chadwick Building and Pearson Building are also considered part of the main UCL building .- History :In 1827, a year after the...

 is located around Gower Street
Gower Street (London)
Gower Street is a street in Bloomsbury, Central London, England, running between Euston Road to the north and Montague Place to the south.North Gower Street is a separate street running north of the Euston Road...

 and includes the biology, chemistry, economics, engineering, geography, history, languages, mathematics, philosophy, politics and physics departments, the preclinical facilities of the UCL Medical School, the London Centre for Nanotechnology
London Centre for Nanotechnology
The London Centre for Nanotechnology is a multidisciplinary research centre in physical and biomedical nanotechnology in London, United Kingdom. It brings together two institutions that are world leaders in nanotechnology, University College London and Imperial College London...

, the Slade School of Fine Art
Slade School of Fine Art
The Slade School of Fine Art is a world-renownedart school in London, United Kingdom, and a department of University College London...

, the UCL Union, the main UCL Library, the UCL Science Library, the Bloomsbury Theatre
The UCL Bloomsbury
The Bloomsbury Theatre is a theatre on Gordon Street, Bloomsbury, in the London Borough of Camden, owned by University College London.The Theatre has a seating capacity of 535 and offers a professional programme of innovative music, drama, comedy and dance all year round.Funded by a UGC grant and a...

 and the Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology
Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology
The Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology in London, England, which is part of University College LondonMuseums & Collections. The museum contains over 80,000 objects and ranks among some of the world's leading collections of Egyptian and Sudanese material...

. Close by in Bloomsbury are the UCL Cancer Institute, the UCL Ear Institute
UCL Ear Institute
The UCL Ear Institute is an academic department of the Faculty of Brain Sciences of University College London located in London, United Kingdom...

, the UCL Eastman Dental Institute
UCL Eastman Dental Institute
The UCL Eastman Dental Institute is an academic department of the Faculty of Medical Sciences of University College London located in London, United Kingdom...

, the UCL Faculty of the Built Environment (The Bartlett)
The Bartlett
The Bartlett is the Faculty of the Built Environment at University College London. University College London created the first chair of architecture in 1841, and the school is named after the original benefactor, Sir Herbert Bartlett.-External links:*...

, the UCL Faculty of Laws, the UCL Institute of Archaeology, the UCL Institute of Child Health
UCL Institute of Child Health
The UCL Institute of Child Health is an academic department of the Faculty of Biomedical Sciences of University College London located in London, United Kingdom. It is a leading biomedical research centre and has a history in children's medical research which dates back to its founding.ICH...

, the UCL Institute of Neurology
UCL Institute of Neurology
The UCL Institute of Neurology is an institute within the Faculty of Brain Sciences of University College London and is located in London, United Kingdom...

, the UCL School of Slavonic and East European Studies and University College Hospital
University College Hospital
University College Hospital is a teaching hospital located in London, United Kingdom. It is part of the University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust and is closely associated with University College London ....

.

Elsewhere in central London are the UCL Institute of Ophthalmology
UCL Institute of Ophthalmology
The UCL Institute of Ophthalmology is an institute within the Faculty of Brain Sciences of University College London and is based in London, United Kingdom...

 (based in Clerkenwell
Clerkenwell
Clerkenwell is an area of central London in the London Borough of Islington. From 1900 to 1965 it was part of the Metropolitan Borough of Finsbury. The well after which it was named was rediscovered in 1924. The watchmaking and watch repairing trades were once of great importance...

), the Windeyer Institute (based in Fitzrovia
Fitzrovia
Fitzrovia is a neighbourhood in central London, near London's West End lying partly in the London Borough of Camden and partly in the City of Westminster ; and situated between Marylebone and Bloomsbury and north of Soho. It is characterised by its mixed-use of residential, business, retail,...

), the UCL Institute of Orthopedics and Musculoskeletal Science (based in Stanmore
Stanmore
Stanmore is a suburban area of the London Borough of Harrow, in northwest London. It is situated northwest of Charing Cross. The area is home to Stanmore Hill, one of the highest points of London, high.-Toponymy:...

), The Royal Free Hospital
Royal Free Hospital
The Royal Free Hospital is a major teaching hospital in Hampstead, London, England and part of the Royal Free Hampstead NHS Trust....

 and the Whittington Hospital
Whittington Hospital
The Whittington Hospital is a British hospital in Archway, Islington, London. It is named after Richard Whittington.It is a district general hospital, although it is also a teaching hospital of the UCL Medical School and Middlesex University School of Health and Social Sciences.- History :Although...

 campuses of the UCL Medical School, and a number of other teaching hospitals. The Department of Space and Climate Physics (Mullard Space Science Laboratory)
Mullard Space Science Laboratory
The UCL Mullard Space Science Laboratory is the United Kingdom's largest university space research group. MSSL is the Department of Space and Climate Physics of the University College London. UCL was one of the first universities in the world to conduct space research...

 is based in Holmbury St Mary
Holmbury St Mary
Holmbury St. Mary is a village near Abinger in the Mole Valley district of Surrey, England located within the Hurtwood, the largest area of common land in Surrey. Nearby to the south is Holmbury Hill, which at is the fourth highest point in Surrey. The village itself is named after the hill and...

, Surrey and the UCL School of Energy and Resources is based in Adelaide
Adelaide
Adelaide is the capital city of South Australia and the fifth-largest city in Australia. Adelaide has an estimated population of more than 1.2 million...

, Australia. Since September 2010 UCL has been running a University Preparatory Certificate course in maths and physics at Nazarbayev University in Astana
Astana
Astana , formerly known as Akmola , Tselinograd and Akmolinsk , is the capital and second largest city of Kazakhstan, with an officially estimated population of 708,794 as of 1 August 2010...

, Kazakhstan.

A number of important institutions are based near to the main campus, including the British Library
British Library
The British Library is the national library of the United Kingdom, and is the world's largest library in terms of total number of items. The library is a major research library, holding over 150 million items from every country in the world, in virtually all known languages and in many formats,...

, the British Medical Association
British Medical Association
The British Medical Association is the professional association and registered trade union for doctors in the United Kingdom. The association does not regulate or certify doctors, a responsibility which lies with the General Medical Council. The association’s headquarters are located in BMA House,...

, the British Museum
British Museum
The British Museum is a museum of human history and culture in London. Its collections, which number more than seven million objects, are amongst the largest and most comprehensive in the world and originate from all continents, illustrating and documenting the story of human culture from its...

, Cancer Research UK
Cancer Research UK
Cancer Research UK is a cancer research and awareness charity in the United Kingdom, formed on 4 February 2002 by the merger of The Cancer Research Campaign and the Imperial Cancer Research Fund. Its aim is to reduce the number of deaths from cancer. As the world's largest independent cancer...

, the Institute for Fiscal Studies
Institute for Fiscal Studies
The Institute for Fiscal Studies is an economic research institute based in London, United Kingdom which specialises in UK taxation and public policy...

, the Medical Research Council
Medical Research Council (UK)
The Medical Research Council is a publicly-funded agency responsible for co-ordinating and funding medical research in the United Kingdom. It is one of seven Research Councils in the UK and is answerable to, although politically independent from, the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills...

, RADA
Rada
Rada is the term for "council" or "assembly"borrowed by Polish from the Low Franconian "Rad" and later passed into the Czech, Ukrainian, and Belarusian languages....

, the Royal Academy of Art, the Royal Institution
Royal Institution
The Royal Institution of Great Britain is an organization devoted to scientific education and research, based in London.-Overview:...

 and the Wellcome Trust
Wellcome Trust
The Wellcome Trust was established in 1936 as an independent charity funding research to improve human and animal health. With an endowment of around £13.9 billion, it is the United Kingdom's largest non-governmental source of funds for biomedical research...

. Many University of London schools and institutes are also close by, including Birkbeck, University of London
Birkbeck, University of London
Birkbeck, University of London is a public research university located in London, United Kingdom and a constituent college of the federal University of London. It offers many Master's and Bachelor's degree programmes that can be studied either part-time or full-time, though nearly all teaching is...

, the Institute of Education
Institute of Education
The Institute of Education is a public research university located in London, United Kingdom specialised in postgraduate study and research in the field of education and a constituent college of the federal University of London. It is the largest education research body in the United Kingdom, with...

, London Business School
London Business School
London Business School is an international business school and a constituent college of the federal University of London, located in central London, beside Regent's Park...

, the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine
London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine
The London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine is a constituent college of the federal University of London, specialising in public health and tropical medicine...

, the Royal Veterinary College
Royal Veterinary College
The Royal Veterinary College is a veterinary school located in London, United Kingdom and a constituent college of the federal University of London. The RVC was founded in 1791 and joined the University of London in 1949...

, the School of Advanced Study
School of Advanced Study
The School of Advanced Study, a postgraduate institution of the University of London, is the UK's national centre for the promotion and facilitation of research in the humanities and social sciences...

, the School of Oriental and African Studies
School of Oriental and African Studies
The School of Oriental and African Studies is a public research university located in London, United Kingdom and a constituent college of the University of London...

, The School of Pharmacy and the Senate House Library
Senate House (University of London)
Senate House is the administrative centre of the University of London, situated in the heart of Bloomsbury, London between the School of Oriental and African Studies to the north, with the British Museum to the south...

. The nearest London Underground
London Underground
The London Underground is a rapid transit system serving a large part of Greater London and some parts of Buckinghamshire, Hertfordshire and Essex in England...

 station is Euston Square
Euston Square tube station
Euston Square is a London Underground station at the corner of Euston Road and Gower Street, just north of University College London and within walking distance of Euston railway station. It is between Great Portland Street and King's Cross St. Pancras on the Circle, Hammersmith & City and...

, with Goodge Street
Goodge Street tube station
Goodge Street is a London Underground station on Tottenham Court Road. It is on the Northern Line between Tottenham Court Road and Warren Street, and is in Travelcard Zone 1.-History:...

, Russell Square
Russell Square tube station
Russell Square is a London Underground station on Bernard Street, Bloomsbury in the London Borough of Camden. It is a small but busy station, often used by office workers and by tourists who are staying in Bloomsbury's numerous hotels. The station is a Grade II listed building.-History:The station...

 and Warren Street
Warren Street tube station
Warren Street tube station is a London Underground station, located at the intersection of Tottenham Court Road and Euston Road. It is on the branch of the Northern Line, between and , and the Victoria Line between and Euston. It is in Travelcard Zone 1 and is the nearest tube station to...

 all nearby. The mainline railway stations at Euston
Euston railway station
Euston railway station, also known as London Euston, is a central London railway terminus in the London Borough of Camden. It is the sixth busiest rail terminal in London . It is one of 18 railway stations managed by Network Rail, and is the southern terminus of the West Coast Main Line...

, King's Cross and St Pancras
St Pancras railway station
St Pancras railway station, also known as London St Pancras and since 2007 as St Pancras International, is a central London railway terminus celebrated for its Victorian architecture. The Grade I listed building stands on Euston Road in St Pancras, London Borough of Camden, between the...

 are all within walking distance.

Notable buildings



Notable UCL buildings include:
  • The UCL Main Building
    UCL Main Building
    The Main Building at University College London, includes the Octagon, Quad, Cloisters, Main Library, Flaxman Gallery and the Wilkins building. The North Wing, South Wing, Chadwick Building and Pearson Building are also considered part of the main UCL building .- History :In 1827, a year after the...

    , including the Octagon, Quad, Cloisters and the Wilkins building designed by William Wilkins
    William Wilkins (architect)
    William Wilkins RA was an English architect, classical scholar and archaeologist. He designed the National Gallery and University College in London, and buildings for several Cambridge colleges.-Life:...

  • University College Hospital
    University College Hospital
    University College Hospital is a teaching hospital located in London, United Kingdom. It is part of the University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust and is closely associated with University College London ....

    , 235 Euston Road
  • The Bloomsbury Theatre, 15 Gordon Street

Organisation and administration


Although UCL voluntarily remains a constituent college of the University of London it is in most ways comparable with free-standing, self-governing and independently funded universities, and it awards its own degrees.

The current Provost and President of UCL is Professor Malcolm Grant
Malcolm Grant
Malcolm John Grant, CBE is the Provost and President of University College London. He took up the post – the principal academic and administrative officer and head of UCL – on 1 August 2003. Since then, UCL has developed as one of the world's leading universities and he has tackled critical...

.

Faculties and departments


UCL’s research and teaching is organised within a network of faculties and academic departments. Faculties and academic departments are formally established by the UCL Council, the governing body of UCL, on the advice of the Academic Board, which is UCL’s senior academic authority.

UCL currently has the following 10 constituent faculties:
  • UCL Faculty of Arts and Humanities
    UCL Faculty of Arts and Humanities
    The UCL Faculty of Arts and Humanities is one of the 10 constituent faculties of University College London .The current Executive Dean is Professor Henry Woudhuysen, who was elected a Fellow of the British Academy in 2010.-Departments:...

  • UCL Faculty of Brain Sciences
  • UCL Faculty of the Built Environment (The Bartlett)
    The Bartlett
    The Bartlett is the Faculty of the Built Environment at University College London. University College London created the first chair of architecture in 1841, and the school is named after the original benefactor, Sir Herbert Bartlett.-External links:*...

  • UCL Faculty of Engineering Sciences
    UCL Faculty of Engineering Sciences
    The UCL Faculty of Engineering Sciences is one of the 10 constituent faculties of University College London . The Faculty, the UCL Faculty of Mathematical and Physical Sciences and the UCL Faculty of the Built Envirornment together form the UCL School of the Built Environment, Engineering and...

  • UCL Faculty of Laws
  • UCL Faculty of Life Sciences
    UCL Faculty of Life Sciences
    The UCL Faculty of Life Sciences is one of the 10 constituent faculties of University College London . The Faculty forms part of the UCL School of Life and Medical Sciences, together with the Faculty of Brain Sciences, the Faculty of Medical Sciences and the Faculty of Population Health...

  • UCL Faculty of Mathematical and Physical Sciences
    UCL Faculty of Mathematical and Physical Sciences
    The UCL Faculty of Mathematical and Physical Sciences is one of the 10 constituent faculties of University College London . The Faculty, the UCL Faculty of Engineering Sciences and the UCL Faculty of the Built Envirornment together form the UCL School of the Built Environment, Engineering and...

  • UCL Faculty of Medical Sciences (incorporating the UCL Medical School)
  • UCL Faculty of Population Health Sciences
  • UCL Faculty of Social and Historical Sciences
    UCL Faculty of Social and Historical Sciences
    The UCL Faculty of Social and Historical Sciences is one of the 10 constituent faculties of University College London .The current Dean is Professor Stephen Smith.-19th century:...



The UCL School of Slavonic and East European Studies
School of Slavonic and East European Studies
The UCL School of Slavonic and East European Studies is a school of University College London . It is the largest centre for the study and research of Central, Eastern and South-Eastern Europe, and Russia in the United Kingdom...

 exists as an academic unit outside of the faculty structure.

In order to facilitate greater interdisciplinary interaction in research and teaching UCL has also established three strategic faculty groupings:
  • UCL School of Life and Medical Sciences (comprising the Faculties of Brain Sciences, Life Sciences, Medical Sciences and Population Health Sciences)
  • UCL School of the Built Environment, Engineering and Mathematical and Physical Sciences (comprising the UCL Faculty of the Built Environment, UCL Faculty of Engineering Sciences and UCL Faculty of Mathematical & Physical Sciences)
  • UCL Faculty of Arts & Humanities, UCL Faculty of Laws, UCL Faculty of Social & Historical Sciences and the UCL School of Slavonic & East European Studies.

Finances


In the financial year ended 31 July 2010, UCL had total income (including share of joint ventures) of £762.4 million (2008/09 – £719.4 million) and total expenditure of £732.4 million (2008/09 – £707.5 million). Key sources of income included £275.1 million from research grants and contracts (2008/09 – £254.3 million), £201.0 million from Funding Council grants (2008/09 – £209.9 million), £150.5 million from academic fees and support grants (2008/09 – £126.7 million) and £5.0 million from endowment and investment income (2008/09 – £8.2 million). During the 2009/10 financial year UCL had a capital expenditure of £40 million (2008/09 – £66 million).

At year end UCL had endowments of £67.9 million (2008/09 – £57.2 million) and total net assets of £640.3 million (2008/09 – £598.0 million).

Logo, arms and colours


Whereas most universities primarily use their logo on mundane documents but their coat of arms on official documents such as degree certificates, UCL exclusively uses its logo. UCL does have a coat of arms however, which depicts a raised bent arm dressed in armour holding a green upturned open wreath.

The blazon
Blazon
In heraldry and heraldic vexillology, a blazon is a formal description of a coat of arms, flag or similar emblem, from which the reader can reconstruct the appropriate image...

 of these arms is:

Purpure, on a wreath of the colours Argent and Blue Celeste, an arm in armour embowed Argent holding an upturned wreath of laurel Vert, beneath which two branches of laurel Or crossed at the nombril and bound with a bowed cord Or, beneath the nombril a motto of Blue Celeste upon which Cuncti adsint meritaeque expectent praemia palmae.

UCL's traditional sporting and academic colours of purple and light blue are derived from the arms.

Academics


UCL has hundreds of research and teaching partnerships, including around 150 research links and 130 student-exchange partnerships with European universities. Students from more than 150 countries study at UCL, with non-British students making up almost a third of the student body.

Faculty and staff


As at October 2009, UCL had 4,078 academic and research staff across its (then) eight faculties:
Faculty Number of staff
UCL Faculty of Arts and Humanities
UCL Faculty of Arts and Humanities
The UCL Faculty of Arts and Humanities is one of the 10 constituent faculties of University College London .The current Executive Dean is Professor Henry Woudhuysen, who was elected a Fellow of the British Academy in 2010.-Departments:...

180
UCL Faculty of Biomedical Sciences 1,971
UCL Faculty of the Built Environment (The Bartlett)
The Bartlett
The Bartlett is the Faculty of the Built Environment at University College London. University College London created the first chair of architecture in 1841, and the school is named after the original benefactor, Sir Herbert Bartlett.-External links:*...

136
UCL Faculty of Engineering Sciences
UCL Faculty of Engineering Sciences
The UCL Faculty of Engineering Sciences is one of the 10 constituent faculties of University College London . The Faculty, the UCL Faculty of Mathematical and Physical Sciences and the UCL Faculty of the Built Envirornment together form the UCL School of the Built Environment, Engineering and...

391
UCL Faculty of Laws 62
UCL Faculty of Life Sciences
UCL Faculty of Life Sciences
The UCL Faculty of Life Sciences is one of the 10 constituent faculties of University College London . The Faculty forms part of the UCL School of Life and Medical Sciences, together with the Faculty of Brain Sciences, the Faculty of Medical Sciences and the Faculty of Population Health...

591
UCL Faculty of Mathematical and Physical Sciences
UCL Faculty of Mathematical and Physical Sciences
The UCL Faculty of Mathematical and Physical Sciences is one of the 10 constituent faculties of University College London . The Faculty, the UCL Faculty of Engineering Sciences and the UCL Faculty of the Built Envirornment together form the UCL School of the Built Environment, Engineering and...

445
UCL Faculty of Social and Historical Sciences
UCL Faculty of Social and Historical Sciences
The UCL Faculty of Social and Historical Sciences is one of the 10 constituent faculties of University College London .The current Dean is Professor Stephen Smith.-19th century:...

292


UCL has the highest number of professors of any university in the UK, with 648 established and personal chairs. There are currently 36 Fellows of the Royal Society, 26 Fellows of the British Academy, 10 Fellows of the Royal Academy of Engineering and 78 Fellows of the Academy of Medical Sciences amongst UCL academic and research staff.

Research


UCL has made cross-disciplinary research a priority and orientates its research around four "Grand Challenges". According to Professor David Price, Pro-Provost for Research: "We believe we have a moral obligation to make a difference to global problems, and to combine the knowledge that our research generates to develop wisdom that can be applied in each of the four Grand Challenges: Global Health, Sustainable Cities, Intercultural Interaction and Human Wellbeing".

According to a ranking of universities produced by SCImago Research Group, UCL is ranked 12th in the world (and 1st in Europe) in terms of total research output. According to data released in July 2008 by ISI Web of Knowledge, UCL is the 12th most-cited university in the world (and most-cited in Europe). The analysis covered citations from 1 January 1998 to 30 April 2008, during which 46,166 UCL research papers attracted 803,566 citations. The number of citations generated by academic publications is an important indication of institutional importance and influence. The report covers citations in 21 subject areas and the results revealed some of UCL's key strengths:
  • in Clinical Medicine
    Clinical Medicine
    Clinical Medicine is a peer-reviewed medical journal published bimonthly by the Royal College of Physicians. It was established in 1966 as the Journal of the Royal College of Physicians of London. It was doubly named between 1998 and 2000, and since 2001 it has appeared as Clinical Medicine. Its...

     – 1st outside North America
  • in Neuroscience
    Neuroscience
    Neuroscience is the scientific study of the nervous system. Traditionally, neuroscience has been seen as a branch of biology. However, it is currently an interdisciplinary science that collaborates with other fields such as chemistry, computer science, engineering, linguistics, mathematics,...

     & Behaviour – 1st outside North America and 2nd in the world
  • in Psychiatry
    Psychiatry
    Psychiatry is the medical specialty devoted to the study and treatment of mental disorders. These mental disorders include various affective, behavioural, cognitive and perceptual abnormalities...

    /Psychology
    Psychology
    Psychology is the study of the mind and behavior. Its immediate goal is to understand individuals and groups by both establishing general principles and researching specific cases. For many, the ultimate goal of psychology is to benefit society...

     – 2nd outside North America
  • in Immunology
    Immunology
    Immunology is a broad branch of biomedical science that covers the study of all aspects of the immune system in all organisms. It deals with the physiological functioning of the immune system in states of both health and diseases; malfunctions of the immune system in immunological disorders ; the...

     – 2nd in Europe
  • in Pharmacology
    Pharmacology
    Pharmacology is the branch of medicine and biology concerned with the study of drug action. More specifically, it is the study of the interactions that occur between a living organism and chemicals that affect normal or abnormal biochemical function...

     & Toxicology
    Toxicology
    Toxicology is a branch of biology, chemistry, and medicine concerned with the study of the adverse effects of chemicals on living organisms...

     – 1st outside North America and 4th in the world
  • in Social Sciences
    Social sciences
    Social science is the field of study concerned with society. "Social science" is commonly used as an umbrella term to refer to a plurality of fields outside of the natural sciences usually exclusive of the administrative or managerial sciences...

    , General – 1st outside North America


According to a separate analysis by ISI Web of Knowledge, for the period January 2000 to August 2010 UCL was ranked 16th in the world (and 2nd in Europe) for citations per paper in engineering.

In the Times Higher Education ranking of research council awards 2008-9 UCL is shown to have won the most research awards with 174 awards amounting to £81,365,000. In second place Cambridge won 162 awards amounting to £74,263,000. In third place Oxford won 153 awards amounting to £54,750,000. This is thought to be the first time that a university other than Cambridge or Oxford has headed the table.

There are currently approximately 3,000 PhD students working at UCL.

Medicine


UCL has offered courses in medicine since 1834 but the current UCL Medical School developed from mergers with the medical schools of the Middlesex Hospital
Middlesex Hospital
The Middlesex Hospital was a teaching hospital located in the Fitzrovia area of London, United Kingdom. First opened in 1745 on Windmill Street, it was moved in 1757 to Mortimer Street where it remained until it was finally closed in 2005. Its staff and services were transferred to various sites...

 (founded in 1746) and The Royal Free Hospital
Royal Free Hospital
The Royal Free Hospital is a major teaching hospital in Hampstead, London, England and part of the Royal Free Hampstead NHS Trust....

 (founded as the London School of Medicine for Women
London School of Medicine for Women
The London School of Medicine for Women was established in 1874 and was the first medical school in Britain to train women.The school was formed by an association of pioneering women physicians Sophia Jex-Blake, Elizabeth Garrett Anderson, Emily Blackwell and Elizabeth Blackwell with Thomas Henry...

 in 1874). Clinical medicine is primarily taught at The Royal Free Hospital, University College Hospital
University College Hospital
University College Hospital is a teaching hospital located in London, United Kingdom. It is part of the University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust and is closely associated with University College London ....

 and the Whittington Hospital
Whittington Hospital
The Whittington Hospital is a British hospital in Archway, Islington, London. It is named after Richard Whittington.It is a district general hospital, although it is also a teaching hospital of the UCL Medical School and Middlesex University School of Health and Social Sciences.- History :Although...

, with other associated teaching hospitals including the Eastman Dental Hospital
Eastman Dental Hospital
The Eastman Dental Hospital is a specialist hospital for dental treatment in London, United Kingdom and forms a part of the University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust...

, Great Ormond Street Hospital
Great Ormond Street Hospital
Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children is a children's hospital located in London, United Kingdom...

, Moorfields Eye Hospital
Moorfields Eye Hospital
Moorfields Eye Hospital NHS Foundation Trust is an NHS eye hospital located in London, United Kingdom. It is the oldest and largest eye hospital in the world and is internationally renowned for its comprehensive clinical and research activities...

, the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery
National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery
The National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery is a neurological hospital in London, United Kingdom and part of the University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust...

 and the Royal National Throat, Nose and Ear Hospital
Royal National Throat, Nose and Ear Hospital
The Royal National Throat, Nose and Ear Hospital is a hospital located on the Gray's Inn Road, London in the United Kingdom. It is operated by the Royal Free Hampstead NHS Trust....

.

UCL is a major centre for biomedical research. It is a member of three of the 11 biomedical research centres established by the NHS
National Health Service (England)
The National Health Service or NHS is the publicly funded healthcare system in England. It is both the largest and oldest single-payer healthcare system in the world. It is able to function in the way that it does because it is primarily funded through the general taxation system, similar to how...

 in England – the UCLH/UCL Comprehensive Biomedical Research Centre
UCLH/UCL Comprehensive Biomedical Research Centre
The UCLH/UCL Comprehensive Biomedical Research Centre is a biomedical research centre based in London, United Kingdom. It is a partnership between University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust , University College London and the National Institute for Health Research and is one of five...

, the Moorfields Eye Hospital/UCL Institute of Ophthalmology Biomedical Research Centre and the Great Ormond Street Hospital/UCL Institute of Child Health Biomedical Research Centre. It is also a founding member of UCL Partners
UCL Partners
UCL Partners is an academic health science centre located in London, United Kingdom. It is the largest academic health science centre in Europe, treats more than 1.5 million patients each year, has an annual turnover of around £2 billion and includes around 3,500 scientists, senior researchers and...

, the largest academic health science centre
Academic health science centre
An academic health science centre is a partnership between one or more universities and healthcare providers focusing on research, clinical services, education and training...

 in Europe with a turnover of approximately £2 billion. UCL has joined with the Medical Research Council
Medical Research Council (UK)
The Medical Research Council is a publicly-funded agency responsible for co-ordinating and funding medical research in the United Kingdom. It is one of seven Research Councils in the UK and is answerable to, although politically independent from, the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills...

, Cancer Research UK
Cancer Research UK
Cancer Research UK is a cancer research and awareness charity in the United Kingdom, formed on 4 February 2002 by the merger of The Cancer Research Campaign and the Imperial Cancer Research Fund. Its aim is to reduce the number of deaths from cancer. As the world's largest independent cancer...

 and the Wellcome Trust
Wellcome Trust
The Wellcome Trust was established in 1936 as an independent charity funding research to improve human and animal health. With an endowment of around £13.9 billion, it is the United Kingdom's largest non-governmental source of funds for biomedical research...

 to establish the Francis Crick Institute, a new £600 million medical research centre to be based next to St Pancras railway station
St Pancras railway station
St Pancras railway station, also known as London St Pancras and since 2007 as St Pancras International, is a central London railway terminus celebrated for its Victorian architecture. The Grade I listed building stands on Euston Road in St Pancras, London Borough of Camden, between the...

 and planned to open in 2015. It will be one of the world’s largest medical research centres, housing 1,250 scientists.

Foundation programmes


UCL runs intensive one-year foundation courses that lead to a variety of degree programmes at UCL and other top UK universities. Called the UCL University Preparatory Certificate (UPC)
UCL University Preparatory Certificate (UPC)
UCL University Preparatory Certificate are foundation courses for international students held by University College London . They are intensive one-year courses to prepare international students for a variety of degree programmes at UCL and other top UK universities.The courses are targeted at...

, the courses are targeted at international students of high academic potential whose education systems in their own countries usually do not offer qualifications suitable for direct admission.

There are two pathways. One in science and engineering called the UPCSE; and one in the humanities called UPCH.

Admissions


Admission to UCL is highly selective; many of UCL's courses require three A grades at A Level, or a grade equivalent of 6,6,6 on higher level subjects on the International Baccalaureate Program.

Due to a very high proportion of applicants receiving the highest school grades, UCL, along with institutions such as Imperial College London
Imperial College London
Imperial College London is a public research university located in London, United Kingdom, specialising in science, engineering, business and medicine...

 and the University of Cambridge was one of the first universities in the UK to make use of the A* grade at A-Level (introduced in 2010) for admissions, particularly for very oversubscribed courses such as Economics, Mathematics, Medicine, History, Psychology, and European Social and Political Studies.

Rankings


In the 2011 Academic Ranking of World Universities
Academic Ranking of World Universities
The Academic Ranking of World Universities , commonly known as the Shanghai ranking, is a publication that was founded and compiled by the Shanghai Jiaotong University to rank universities globally. The rankings have been conducted since 2003 and updated annually...

, UCL is ranked 20th overall in the world (and 3rd in Europe), 10th in the world (and 3rd in Europe) for Clinical Medicine & Pharmacy, and 17th in the world (and 4th in Europe) for Life & Agricultural Sciences.

In the 2011 QS World University Rankings
QS World University Rankings
The QS World University Rankings is a ranking of the world’s top 500 universities by Quacquarelli Symonds using a method that has published annually since 2004....

, UCL is ranked 7th overall in the world (and 4th in Europe). In the subject tables it is ranked 20th in the world (and 5th in Europe) for Arts and Humanities, 47th in the world (and 12th in Europe) for Engineering & Technology, 17th in the world (and 4th in Europe) for Life Sciences and Medicine, 39th in the world (and 11th in Europe) for Natural Sciences and 27th in the world (and 4th in Europe) for Social Sciences & Management.

In the 2011-2012 Times Higher Education World University Rankings
Times Higher Education World University Rankings
The Times Higher Education World University Rankings is an international ranking of universities published by the British magazine Times Higher Education in partnership with Thomson Reuters, which provided citation database information...

, UCL is ranked 17th overall in the world (and 5th in Europe). In the subject tables it is ranked 8th in the world (and 3rd in Europe) for Arts and Humanities, 7th in the world (and 4th in Europe) for Clinical, Pre-Clinical and Health, 27th in the world (and 8th in Europe) for Engineering and Technology, 11th in the world (and 4th in Europe) for Life Sciences, 38th in the world (and 11th in Europe) for Physical Sciences, and 8th in the world (and 2nd in Europe) for Social Sciences. In the 2011 Times Higher Education World Reputation Rankings, UCL is ranked 19th overall in the world (and 4th in Europe).

UCL is consistently one of the top multi-faculty universities in UK university rankings
League tables of British universities
Rankings of universities in the United Kingdom are published annually by The Guardian, The Independent, The Sunday Times and The Times...

. UCL is ranked first in the UK for its staff/student ratio in The Times Good University Guide, The Sunday Times University Guide and The Guardian University Guide. In The Guardian University Guide subject tables, UCL is ranked first for Art and Design and Psychology and second for Archaeology, English and Philosophy.

UCL is ranked 20th in the world in the 2011 300 Best World Universities human competitiveness index & analysis produced by Human Resources & Labor Review and published in Chasecareer Network. In a ranking of universities' international reputations produced by The Guardian in 2009, UCL placed 3rd in the UK (behind Oxford and Cambridge). In 2011, UCL was ranked 12th globally (and 3rd in the Europe) in a survey of business leaders at top companies carried out by The New York Times.

Libraries



The UCL library system comprises 16 libraries located across several sites within the main UCL campus and across Bloomsbury
Bloomsbury
-Places:* Bloomsbury is an area in central London.* Bloomsbury , related local government unit* Bloomsbury, New Jersey, New Jersey, USA* Bloomsbury , listed on the NRHP in Maryland...

, linked together by a central networking catalogue and request system called eUCLid. The libraries contain a total of over 1.5 million books. The largest library is the UCL Main Library, which is located in the UCL Main Building
UCL Main Building
The Main Building at University College London, includes the Octagon, Quad, Cloisters, Main Library, Flaxman Gallery and the Wilkins building. The North Wing, South Wing, Chadwick Building and Pearson Building are also considered part of the main UCL building .- History :In 1827, a year after the...

 and contains collections relating to the arts and humanities, economics, history, law and public policy. The second largest library is the UCL Science Library, which is located in the DMS Watson Building on Malet Place and contains collections relating to anthropology, engineering, geography, life sciences, management and the mathematical and physical sciences. Other libraries include the UCL Bartlett
The Bartlett
The Bartlett is the Faculty of the Built Environment at University College London. University College London created the first chair of architecture in 1841, and the school is named after the original benefactor, Sir Herbert Bartlett.-External links:*...

 Library (architecture and town planning), the Cruciform Library (general clinical and medical sciences), the UCL Eastman Dental Institute Library (oral health sciences), the UCL Institute of Archaeology Library (archaeology and egyptology), the UCL Institute of Neurology Rockefeller Medical Library (neurosurgery and neuroscience), the Joint Moorfields Eye Hospital & the UCL Institute of Ophthalmology Library (biomedicine, medicine, nursing, ophthalmology and visual science), the UCL Language & Speech Science Library (audiology, communication disorders, linguistics & phonetics, special education, speech & language therapy and voice) and the UCL School of Slavonic and East European Studies Library (the economics, geography, history, languages, literature and politics of Eastern Europe).

UCL staff and students have full access to the main libraries of the University of London
University of London
-20th century:Shortly after 6 Burlington Gardens was vacated, the University went through a period of rapid expansion. Bedford College, Royal Holloway and the London School of Economics all joined in 1900, Regent's Park College, which had affiliated in 1841 became an official divinity school of the...

—the Senate House Library and the libraries of the Institutes of the School of Advanced Study
School of Advanced Study
The School of Advanced Study, a postgraduate institution of the University of London, is the UK's national centre for the promotion and facilitation of research in the humanities and social sciences...

—which are located close to the main UCL campus in Bloomsbury. These libraries contain over 3.7 million books and focus on the arts, humanities and social sciences. The British Library
British Library
The British Library is the national library of the United Kingdom, and is the world's largest library in terms of total number of items. The library is a major research library, holding over 150 million items from every country in the world, in virtually all known languages and in many formats,...

, which contains around 14 million books, is also located close to the main UCL campus.

Since 2004 UCL Library Services has been collecting the scholarly work of UCL researchers to make it freely available on the internet via an open access repository
Institutional repository
An Institutional repository is an online locus for collecting, preserving, and disseminating - in digital form - the intellectual output of an institution, particularly a research institution....

 known as UCL Eprints. The intention is that material curated by UCL Eprints will remain accessible indefinitely.

Museums and collections


UCL's Special Collections contains UCL's collection of historical or culturally significant works. It is one of the foremost university collections of manuscripts, archives and rare books in the UK. It includes collections of medieval manuscripts and early printed books, as well as significant holdings of 18th-century works, and highly important 19th- and 20th-century collections of personal papers, archival material, and literature, covering a vast range of subject areas. Archives include the Latin American archives, the Jewish collections and the George Orwell
George Orwell
Eric Arthur Blair , better known by his pen name George Orwell, was an English author and journalist...

 Archive. Collections are often displayed in a series of glass cabinets in the Cloisters of the UCL Main Building
UCL Main Building
The Main Building at University College London, includes the Octagon, Quad, Cloisters, Main Library, Flaxman Gallery and the Wilkins building. The North Wing, South Wing, Chadwick Building and Pearson Building are also considered part of the main UCL building .- History :In 1827, a year after the...

.

The most significant works are housed in the Strong Rooms. The special collection includes first editions of Isaac Newton
Isaac Newton
Sir Isaac Newton PRS was an English physicist, mathematician, astronomer, natural philosopher, alchemist, and theologian, who has been "considered by many to be the greatest and most influential scientist who ever lived."...

's Principia
Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica
Philosophiæ Naturalis Principia Mathematica, Latin for "Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy", often referred to as simply the Principia, is a work in three books by Sir Isaac Newton, first published 5 July 1687. Newton also published two further editions, in 1713 and 1726...

, Charles Darwin
Charles Darwin
Charles Robert Darwin FRS was an English naturalist. He established that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestry, and proposed the scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection.He published his theory...

's On the Origin of Species and James Joyce
James Joyce
James Augustine Aloysius Joyce was an Irish novelist and poet, considered to be one of the most influential writers in the modernist avant-garde of the early 20th century...

's Ulysses
Ulysses (novel)
Ulysses is a novel by the Irish author James Joyce. It was first serialised in parts in the American journal The Little Review from March 1918 to December 1920, and then published in its entirety by Sylvia Beach on 2 February 1922, in Paris. One of the most important works of Modernist literature,...

 . The earliest book in the collection is The crafte to lyve well and to dye well, printed in 1505.
UCL is responsible for several museums and collections in a wide range of fields across the arts and sciences:
  • Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology
    Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology
    The Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology in London, England, which is part of University College LondonMuseums & Collections. The museum contains over 80,000 objects and ranks among some of the world's leading collections of Egyptian and Sudanese material...

    : one of the leading collections of Egyptian and Sudanese archaeology in the world. Open to the public on a regular basis.
  • Grant Museum of Zoology And Comparative Anatomy: a diverse Natural History collection covering the whole of the animal kingdom. Includes rare dodo
    Dodo
    The dodo was a flightless bird endemic to the Indian Ocean island of Mauritius. Related to pigeons and doves, it stood about a meter tall, weighing about , living on fruit, and nesting on the ground....

     and quagga
    Quagga
    The quagga is an extinct subspecies of the plains zebra, which was once found in great numbers in South Africa's Cape Province and the southern part of the Orange Free State. It was distinguished from other zebras by having the usual vivid marks on the front part of the body only...

     skeletons. A teaching and research collection, it is named after Robert Edmund Grant, UCL's first professor of comparative anatomy and zoology from 1828, now mainly noted for having tutored the undergraduate Charles Robert Darwin at the University of Edinburgh
    University of Edinburgh
    The University of Edinburgh, founded in 1583, is a public research university located in Edinburgh, the capital of Scotland, and a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The university is deeply embedded in the fabric of the city, with many of the buildings in the historic Old Town belonging to the university...

     in the 1826–1827 session. Open at limited fixed times and by appointment.
  • Geology Collections: founded around 1855. Primarily a teaching resource and may be visited by appointment.
  • Art Collections: these date from 1847 when a collection of sculpture models and drawings of the Neo-classical artist John Flaxman
    John Flaxman
    John Flaxman was an English sculptor and draughtsman.-Early life:He was born in York. His father was also named John, after an ancestor who, according to family tradition, had fought for Parliament at the Battle of Naseby, and afterwards settled as a carrier or farmer in Buckinghamshire...

     was presented to UCL. There are over 10,000 pieces dating from the 15th century onwards including drawings by Turner, etchings by Rembrandt, and works by many leading 20th century British artists. The works on paper are displayed in the Strang Print Room, which has limited regular opening times. The other works may be viewed by appointment.
  • Institute of Archaeology Collections: Items include prehistoric ceramics and stone artefacts from many parts of the world, the Petrie collection of Palestinian artefacts, and Classical Greek and Roman ceramics. Visits by appointment only.
  • Ethnography
    Ethnography
    Ethnography is a qualitative method aimed to learn and understand cultural phenomena which reflect the knowledge and system of meanings guiding the life of a cultural group...

     Collections: This collection exemplifying Material Culture, holds an enormous variety of objects, textiles and artefacts from all over the world. Visits by appointment only.
  • Galton Collection: The scientific instruments, papers and personal memorabilia of Sir Francis Galton
    Francis Galton
    Sir Francis Galton /ˈfrɑːnsɪs ˈgɔːltn̩/ FRS , cousin of Douglas Strutt Galton, half-cousin of Charles Darwin, was an English Victorian polymath: anthropologist, eugenicist, tropical explorer, geographer, inventor, meteorologist, proto-geneticist, psychometrician, and statistician...

    . Housed in the department of biology. Visits by appointment only.
  • Science Collections: Diverse collections primarily accumulated in the course of UCL's own work, including the operating table on which the first anaesthetic was administered. Items may be a viewed by appointment.
  • The Flaxman Gallery: a series of plaster casts of full-size details of sculptures by the Neo-classical sculptor John Flaxman
    John Flaxman
    John Flaxman was an English sculptor and draughtsman.-Early life:He was born in York. His father was also named John, after an ancestor who, according to family tradition, had fought for Parliament at the Battle of Naseby, and afterwards settled as a carrier or farmer in Buckinghamshire...

    , is located inside the Main Library under the central dome of the UCL Main Building.

UCL Union


Founded in 1893, the UCL Union
University College London Union
University College London Union , founded in 1893, has a credible claim to be England's oldest students' union. It was formed with the following objectives: "the promotion of social intercourse and of the means of recreation, physical and mental, of the students of University College, and the...

 has a credible claim to be the oldest students' union in England. UCL Union operates both as the representative voice for UCL students, and as a provider of a wide range of services. It is democratically controlled through General Meetings and referendums, and is run by elected student officers. The Union has provided a prominent platform for political campaigning of all kinds in recent years. It also supports a range of services, including numerous clubs and societies, sports facilities, an advice service, and a number of bars, cafes and shops.

There are currently over 150 clubs and societies under the umbrella of the UCL Union, including:
  • UCL Bloomsbury Fitness
    UCL Bloomsbury Fitness
    Bloomsbury Fitness is the student union gym of University College London. It is the most profitable component of UCL student union and has over 10,000 registered members both from the university and outside....

     (a fitness centre)
  • University College London Boat Club (both Men's and Women's clubs)
  • Pi Media (responsible for Pi Magazine
    Pi Magazine
    Pi is the name of the official student publications of the University College London Union.-History:Pi was originally launched as a newspaper. In the aftermath of World War II, there was strong popular support amongst college and UCL Union officials for some sort of community project that would...

    and Pi Newspaper, UCL's official student publications)
  • UCL Cross Country and Athletics Club
  • University College London Dramatic Society
  • UCL Rugby Club (both Men's and Women's as well as Medical School clubs)
  • The Cheese Grater
    The Cheese Grater
    The Cheese Grater is an award-winning magazine produced at the University College London by a society of UCL Union, a students' union. It was first published in March 2004....

    (a student magazine containing a mix of news investigations and humorous items)


Notable UCL Union-supported campaigns have included:
  • UCLU Free Education Campaign (a campaign for the return of free and non-marketised higher education)
  • The London Living wage Campaign (a campaign for a basic minimum wage for all UCL staff)
  • Disarm UCL (a campaign which successfully persuaded UCL to not invest in defence companies)
  • Save UCL (this name has been used by two campaigns: one in 2006 which opposed a merger between UCL and Imperial College London in 2006, and a more recent one against education cuts)

Student housing


All single first-year undergraduate students entering UCL for the first time and requiring accommodation are generally guaranteed a place. Graduate students may apply for accommodation but places are limited. The majority of second and third-year undergraduate students and graduate students find their own accommodation in the private sector.


UCL's student housing includes:
  • Arthur Tattersall House (115–131 Gower Street)
  • Astor College (99 Charlotte Street)
  • Campbell House East and West (Taviton Street)
  • Ifor Evans & Max Rayne Student Residences (109 Camden Road)
  • Frances Gardner House and Langton Close (Gray's Inn Road)
  • John Tovell House (89 & 93–7 Gower Street)
  • John Dodgson House (Bidborough Street)
  • Prankerd House (195 North Gower Street)
  • Ramsay Hall
    Ramsay Hall
    Ramsay Hall is a building located in London, England, used primarily as a hall of residence for students of University College London. It contains around 450 bedrooms, a dining hall and a number of common rooms and surrounds a central courtyard.- Overview :...

     and Ian Baker House Student Residences (Maple Street)
  • Schafer House Student Residence (Drummond Street)
  • James Lighthill House
    James Lighthill House
    James Lighthill House is one of the halls that acts as student accommodation for University College London in central London, England.It is located on Penton Rise near the Pentonville Road intersection. It contains 209 single en suite rooms across a large main block and a smaller 'lodge' in the...

     (Pentonville Road)
  • Goldsmid House (Gillingham Street)


There is limited UCL accommodation available for married students and those with children at Bernard Johnson House, Hawkridge, Neil Sharp House and the University of London's Lilian Penson Hall.

UCL students are eligible to apply for places in the University of London
University of London
-20th century:Shortly after 6 Burlington Gardens was vacated, the University went through a period of rapid expansion. Bedford College, Royal Holloway and the London School of Economics all joined in 1900, Regent's Park College, which had affiliated in 1841 became an official divinity school of the...

 intercollegiate halls of residence. The halls are:
  • Canterbury Hall, Commonwealth Hall, College Hall, Connaught Hall
    Connaught Hall, London
    Connaught Hall is a fully catered hall of residence owned by the University of London and situated on Tavistock Square, Bloomsbury, London, UK. It is an intercollegiate hall, and as such provides accommodation for full-time students at constituent colleges and institutions of the University of...

    , Hughes Parry Hall and International Hall near Russell Square
    Russell Square
    Russell Square is a large garden square in Bloomsbury, in the London Borough of Camden. It is near the University of London's main buildings and the British Museum. To the north is Woburn Place and to the south-east is Southampton Row...

     in Bloomsbury
    Bloomsbury
    -Places:* Bloomsbury is an area in central London.* Bloomsbury , related local government unit* Bloomsbury, New Jersey, New Jersey, USA* Bloomsbury , listed on the NRHP in Maryland...

  • Lillian Penson Hall (postgraduates only) in Paddington
    Paddington
    Paddington is a district within the City of Westminster, in central London, England. Formerly a metropolitan borough, it was integrated with Westminster and Greater London in 1965...

  • Nutford House in Marble Arch
    Marble Arch
    Marble Arch is a white Carrara marble monument that now stands on a large traffic island at the junction of Oxford Street, Park Lane, and Edgware Road, almost directly opposite Speakers' Corner in Hyde Park in London, England...



Some students are also selected to live in International Students House, London
International Students House, London
International Students House, London is a residence for 700 British and overseas students, interns and trainees whilst staying in London. It is located in Central London close to London's West End at the south side of Regents Park and operates as a financially self supporting charity under a board...

.

Rivalry with King's College London


UCL has a long-running, mostly friendly, rivalry with King's College London
King's College London
King's College London is a public research university located in London, United Kingdom and a constituent college of the federal University of London. King's has a claim to being the third oldest university in England, having been founded by King George IV and the Duke of Wellington in 1829, and...

 (King's), which has historically been known as "Rags". UCL is often referred to by students from King's as the "Godless Scum of Gower Street", in reference to a comment made at the founding of King's, which was based on Christian principles. UCL students refer to King's as "Strand Polytechnic" in a similar attitude.

The King's' mascot, Reggie the Lion, went missing in the 1990s and was recovered after being found dumped in a field. It was restored at the cost of around £15,000 and then placed on display in the students' union. It is in a glass case and filled with concrete to prevent theft, particularly by UCL students who once castrated it. In turn, King's' students are also believed to have once stolen Phineas, a UCL mascot. It is often claimed that King's' students played football with the embalmed head of Jeremy Bentham
Jeremy Bentham
Jeremy Bentham was an English jurist, philosopher, and legal and social reformer. He became a leading theorist in Anglo-American philosophy of law, and a political radical whose ideas influenced the development of welfarism...

. Although the head was indeed stolen, the football story is a myth or legend which is unsupported by official UCL documentation about Bentham available next to his display case (his Auto Icon) in the UCL cloisters. The head is now kept in the UCL vaults.

Notable people


26 Nobel prizes
Nobel Prize
The Nobel Prizes are annual international awards bestowed by Scandinavian committees in recognition of cultural and scientific advances. The will of the Swedish chemist Alfred Nobel, the inventor of dynamite, established the prizes in 1895...

 have been awarded to UCL academics and students (fourteen of which were in Physiology & Medicine) as well as three Fields Medal
Fields Medal
The Fields Medal, officially known as International Medal for Outstanding Discoveries in Mathematics, is a prize awarded to two, three, or four mathematicians not over 40 years of age at each International Congress of the International Mathematical Union , a meeting that takes place every four...

s.

Notable alumni




UCL alumni include the "Father of the Nation" of both India and Kenya, the inventor of the telephone, one of the co-discoverers of the structure of DNA, and all of the members of the band Coldplay.

Artists include Sir William Coldstream
William Coldstream
Sir William Menzies Coldstream was a British realist painter and a long standing art teacher.-Biography:...

 (realist painter), Antony Gormley
Antony Gormley
Antony Mark David Gormley OBE RA is a British sculptor. His best known works include the Angel of the North, a public sculpture in the North of England, commissioned in 1995 and erected in February 1998, Another Place on Crosby Beach near Liverpool, and Event Horizon, a multi-part site...

 (sculptor), Augustus John
Augustus John
Augustus Edwin John OM, RA, was a Welsh painter, draughtsman, and etcher. For a short time around 1910, he was an important exponent of Post-Impressionism in the United Kingdom....

 (painter, draughtsman and etcher), Gerry Judah
Gerry Judah
Gerry Judah is a British artist and designer who has created settings for theatre, film, television, museums and public spaces...

 (artist and designer), Ben Nicholson
Ben Nicholson
Benjamin Lauder "Ben" Nicholson, OM was a British painter of abstract compositions , landscape and still-life.-Background and Training:...

 (abstract painter) and Sir Eduardo Paolozzi
Eduardo Paolozzi
Sir Eduardo Luigi Paolozzi, KBE, RA , was a Scottish sculptor and artist. He was a major figure in the international art sphere, while, working on his own interpretation and vision of the world. Paolozzi investigated how we can fit into the modern world to resemble our fragmented civilization...

 (sculptor and artist).

Authors include Edith Clara Batho
Edith Clara Batho
Dr Edith Clara Batho was Principal of Royal Holloway College, University of London from 1945-1962.-Education:She was educated at Highbury Hill High School, now Highbury Fields School in Islington, London...

, Raymond Briggs
Raymond Briggs
Raymond Redvers Briggs is an English illustrator, cartoonist, graphic novelist, and author who has achieved critical and popular success among adults and children...

, Robert Browning
Robert Browning
Robert Browning was an English poet and playwright whose mastery of dramatic verse, especially dramatic monologues, made him one of the foremost Victorian poets.-Early years:...

, G. K. Chesterton
G. K. Chesterton
Gilbert Keith Chesterton, KC*SG was an English writer. His prolific and diverse output included philosophy, ontology, poetry, plays, journalism, public lectures and debates, literary and art criticism, biography, Christian apologetics, and fiction, including fantasy and detective fiction....

, David Crystal
David Crystal
David Crystal OBE FLSW FBA is a linguist, academic and author.-Background and career:Crystal was born in Lisburn, Northern Ireland. He grew up in Holyhead, North Wales, and Liverpool, England where he attended St Mary's College from 1951....

, Stella Gibbons
Stella Gibbons
Stella Dorothea Gibbons was an English novelist, journalist, poet, and short-story writer.Her first novel, Cold Comfort Farm, won the Femina Vie Heureuse Prize for 1933...

, Clive Sansom
Clive Sansom
-Life and work:Sansom was born on 21 June 1910 in East Finchley, London and educated at Southgate County School, where he matriculated in 1926. He worked as a clerk until 1934, and then studied speech and drama at the Regent Street Polytechnic and the London Speech Institute under Margaret Gullan...

, Marie Stopes
Marie Stopes
Marie Carmichael Stopes was a British author, palaeobotanist, campaigner for women's rights and pioneer in the field of birth control...

 and Rabindranath Tagore
Rabindranath Tagore
Rabindranath Tagore , sobriquet Gurudev, was a Bengali polymath who reshaped his region's literature and music. Author of Gitanjali and its "profoundly sensitive, fresh and beautiful verse", he became the first non-European Nobel laureate by earning the 1913 Prize in Literature...

.

Business people include Lord Digby Jones (Director-General of the Confederation of British Industry (2001–2006)) and Edwin Waterhouse
Edwin Waterhouse
Edwin Waterhouse was an English accountant. He is best known for having co-founded, with Samuel Lowell Price and William Hopkins Holyland, the accountancy practice of Price Waterhouse that now forms part of PricewaterhouseCoopers...

 (a founding partner of what is now the professional services firm PwC
PwC
PricewaterhouseCoopers is a global professional services firm headquartered in London, United Kingdom. It is the world's largest professional services firm measured by revenues and one of the "Big Four" accountancy firms....

).

Engineers and scientists include Alexander Graham Bell
Alexander Graham Bell
Alexander Graham Bell was an eminent scientist, inventor, engineer and innovator who is credited with inventing the first practical telephone....

 (inventor of the telephone), Colin Chapman
Colin Chapman
Anthony Colin Bruce Chapman CBE was an influential British designer, inventor, and builder in the automotive industry, and founder of Lotus Cars....

 (founder of Lotus Cars), Francis Crick
Francis Crick
Francis Harry Compton Crick OM FRS was an English molecular biologist, biophysicist, and neuroscientist, and most noted for being one of two co-discoverers of the structure of the DNA molecule in 1953, together with James D. Watson...

 (co-discoverer of the structure of DNA), John Ambrose Fleming
John Ambrose Fleming
Sir John Ambrose Fleming was an English electrical engineer and physicist. He is known for inventing the first thermionic valve or vacuum tube, the diode, then called the kenotron in 1904. He is also famous for the left hand rule...

 (inventor of the vacuum tube), Jaroslav Heyrovský
Jaroslav Heyrovský
Jaroslav Heyrovský was a Czech chemist and inventor. Heyrovský was the inventor of the polarographic method, father of the electroanalytical method, and recipient of the Nobel Prize in 1959...

 (father of the electroanalytical method), Sir Charles Kuen Kao (winner of the 2009 Nobel Prize in Physics) and Joseph Lister
Joseph Lister
Joseph Lister may refer to:*Joseph Lister, 1st Baron Lister , English surgeon, discovered that cleaning and disinfecting surgical wounds, and bandages, with carbolic acid prevents lethal infections...

 (pioneer of antiseptic surgery).

Entertainers, musicians, composers and filmmakers include Ricky Gervais
Ricky Gervais
Ricky Dene Gervais is an English comedian, actor, director, radio presenter, producer, musician, and writer.Gervais achieved mainstream fame with his television series The Office and the subsequent series Extras, both of which he co-wrote and co-directed with friend and frequent collaborator...

 (comedian and actor), Gustav Holst
Gustav Holst
Gustav Theodore Holst was an English composer. He is most famous for his orchestral suite The Planets....

 (composer), Chris Martin
Chris Martin
Christopher Anthony John "Chris" Martin is an English song-writer, who is the lead vocalist, pianist and rhythm guitarist of the band Coldplay. He is married to actress Gwyneth Paltrow.-Early life:...

 and all three other members of the band Coldplay
Coldplay
Coldplay are a British alternative rock band formed in 1996 by lead vocalist Chris Martin and lead guitarist Jonny Buckland at University College London. After they formed Pectoralz, Guy Berryman joined the group as a bassist and they changed their name to Starfish. Will Champion joined as a...

, Christopher Nolan
Christopher Nolan
Christopher Jonathan James Nolan is a British-American film director, screenwriter and producer.He received serious notice after his second feature Memento , which he wrote and directed based on a story idea by his brother, Jonathan Nolan. Jonathan went to co-write later scripts with him,...

 (director of films including The Dark Knight saga), Franny Armstrong
Franny Armstrong
Franny Armstrong is a British documentary film director working for her own company, Spanner Films, and a former drummer with indie pop group The Band of Holy Joy...

 (director), Tim Rice-Oxley
Tim Rice-Oxley
Timothy James Rice-Oxley , is an English multi-instrumentalist, best known as co-founder, the principal composer and pianist, backing vocalist of piano rock band Keane.-Life and career:...

 and Richard Hughes
Richard Hughes (musician)
Richard David Hughes is an English musician, best known as the drummer of the British piano rock band Keane. He is the eldest member of the band.-Biography:...

 of the band Keane and Jonathan Ross
Jonathan Ross (television presenter)
Jonathan Stephen Ross, OBE is an English television and radio presenter, best known for presenting the BBC One chat show Friday Night with Jonathan Ross from 2001 until he left the BBC in 2010. Ross began hosting a new chat show on ITV1 starting 3 September 2011...

 (television presenter).

Journalists and commentators include A. A. Gill
A. A. Gill
Adrian Anthony Gill is a British writer who uses the byline A. A. Gill. He is currently employed by The Sunday Times as their restaurant reviewer and television critic and Vanity Fair magazine as a restaurant reviewer...

 (columnist), three former editors of The Economist
The Economist
The Economist is an English-language weekly news and international affairs publication owned by The Economist Newspaper Ltd. and edited in offices in the City of Westminster, London, England. Continuous publication began under founder James Wilson in September 1843...

, most notably Walter Bagehot
Walter Bagehot
Walter Bagehot was an English businessman, essayist, and journalist who wrote extensively about literature, government, and economic affairs.-Early years:...

, two editors of The Times Literary Supplement
The Times Literary Supplement
The Times Literary Supplement is a weekly literary review published in London by News International, a subsidiary of News Corporation.-History:...

, and Jonathan Dimbleby
Jonathan Dimbleby
Jonathan Dimbleby is a British presenter of current affairs and political radio and television programmes, a political commentator and a writer. He is the son of Richard Dimbleby and younger brother of British TV presenter David Dimbleby.-Education:Dimbleby was educated at Charterhouse School, a...

 (television and radio current affairs presenter).

Lawyers include a Lord Chancellor (Lord Herschell); Chief Justices of England (Lord Woolf), Hong Kong (Sir Yang Ti-liang
Yang Ti-liang
Dato Seri Paduka Sir Ti-liang Yang, GBM, SPMB, JP , also known as Sir TL, is a retired senior judge in Hong Kong...

), India (A. S. Anand), Ghana (Samuel Azu Crabbe
Samuel Azu Crabbe
Samuel Azu Crabbe was a barrister, solicitor and jurist. He was the fifth Chief Justice of Ghana since it became an independent nation...

) and the Eastern Caribbean Supreme Court (Rt. Hon. Sir Vincent Floissac
Vincent Floissac
Sir Vincent Floissac, QC, OBE, CMG, PC was a Saint Lucian jurist and politician. He was styled The Rt. Hon...

); two Masters of the Rolls (Lord Cozens-Hardy
Herbert Cozens-Hardy, 1st Baron Cozens-Hardy
Herbert Hardy Cozens-Hardy, 1st Baron Cozens-Hardy was a British politician and Master of the Rolls from 1907 until 1918.-Early life:...

 and Sir George Jessel
George Jessel (jurist)
Sir George Jessel , a British judge, was born in London. He was one of the most influential commercial law and equity judges of his time, and served as the Master of the Rolls.-Early life and education:...

); and Attorneys-General of England (Lord Goldsmith and Baroness Scotland), Singapore (Tan Boon Teik and Chao Hick Tin
Chao Hick Tin
Chao Hick Tin is an appellate judge and former Attorney-General of Singapore. He was born in Singapore and studied at Catholic High School. He received his legal education at University College London, where he obtained his Bachelor and Masters of Law degrees in 1965 and 1966 respectively. He was...

) and Gambia (Hassan Bubacar Jallow
Hassan Bubacar Jallow
Hassan Bubacar Jallow is a Gambian lawyer, politician, and jurist and has been the Prosecutor of the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda since 2003....

).

Politicians include Mahatma Gandhi
Mahatma Gandhi
Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi , pronounced . 2 October 1869 – 30 January 1948) was the pre-eminent political and ideological leader of India during the Indian independence movement...

 (leader of the Indian independence movement and "Father of the Nation") and Jomo Kenyatta
Jomo Kenyatta
Jomo Kenyattapron.] served as the first Prime Minister and President of Kenya. He is considered the founding father of the Kenyan nation....

 (first Prime Minister, first President and "Father of the Nation" of Kenya); Chaim Herzog
Chaim Herzog
Chaim Herzog served as the sixth President of Israel , following a distinguished career in both the British Army and the Israel Defense Forces .-Early life:...

 (President of Israel), Itō Hirobumi
Ito Hirobumi
Prince was a samurai of Chōshū domain, Japanese statesman, four time Prime Minister of Japan , genrō and Resident-General of Korea. Itō was assassinated by An Jung-geun, a Korean nationalist who was against the annexation of Korea by the Japanese Empire...

 (first Prime Minister of Japan), Junichiro Koizumi
Junichiro Koizumi
is a Japanese politician who served as Prime Minister of Japan from 2001 to 2006. He retired from politics when his term in parliament ended.Widely seen as a maverick leader of the Liberal Democratic Party , he became known as an economic reformer, focusing on Japan's government debt and the...

 (Prime Minister of Japan), Wu Tingfang
Wu Tingfang
Wu Tingfang was a Chinese diplomat and politician who served as Minister of Foreign Affairs and briefly as Acting Premier during the early years of the Republic of China. He is also known under his Cantonese name Ng Choy -Biography:...

 (Acting Premier during the early years of the Republic of China) and Sir Stafford Cripps (British Chancellor of the Exchequer 1947–1950).

Sports people include David Gower
David Gower
David Ivon Gower OBE is a former English cricketer who became a commentator for Sky Sports. Although he eventually rose to the captaincy of the England cricket team during the 1980s, he is best known for being one of the most stylish left-handed batsmen of the modern era. Gower played 117 Test...

 (former captain of the England cricket team), Patrick Head
Patrick Head
Patrick Head , is co-founder and Engineering Director of the Williams Formula One team.For 25 years from Head was technical director at Williams Grand Prix Engineering, and responsible for many innovations within Formula One. Head oversaw the design and construction of Williams cars until May 2004...

 (co-founder of the Williams Formula One team) and Christine Ohuruogu
Christine Ohuruogu
Christine Ijeoma Ohuruogu MBE is an English athlete, who specialises in the 400 metres; the event for which she is the current Olympic and former World and Commonwealth Champion...

 (Olympic 400 metres
400 metres
The 400 metres, or 400 metre dash, is a common sprinting event in track and field competitions. It has been featured in the athletics programme at the Summer Olympics since 1896 . On a standard outdoor running track, it is exactly one lap around the track. Runners start in staggered positions and...

 gold medalist).

Heads of state, government and international organisations



State/Government Leader Office
 Council of Europe
Terry Davis Secretary General of the Council of Europe
Secretary General of the Council of Europe
The Secretary General of the Council of Europe is appointed by the Parliamentary Assembly on the recommendation of the Committee of Ministers for a period of five years...

 (2004–2009)
 India
Mahatma Gandhi
Mahatma Gandhi
Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi , pronounced . 2 October 1869 – 30 January 1948) was the pre-eminent political and ideological leader of India during the Indian independence movement...

Pre-eminent political and spiritual leader until his death in 1948
 Israel Chaim Herzog
Chaim Herzog
Chaim Herzog served as the sixth President of Israel , following a distinguished career in both the British Army and the Israel Defense Forces .-Early life:...

Sixth President (1983–1993)
 Japan Itō Hirobumi (伊藤 博文)
Ito Hirobumi
Prince was a samurai of Chōshū domain, Japanese statesman, four time Prime Minister of Japan , genrō and Resident-General of Korea. Itō was assassinated by An Jung-geun, a Korean nationalist who was against the annexation of Korea by the Japanese Empire...

First and Four-time Prime Minister (1885–1888, 1892–1896, 1898, 1900–1901)
 Japan Junichiro Koizumi (小泉純一郎)
Junichiro Koizumi
is a Japanese politician who served as Prime Minister of Japan from 2001 to 2006. He retired from politics when his term in parliament ended.Widely seen as a maverick leader of the Liberal Democratic Party , he became known as an economic reformer, focusing on Japan's government debt and the...

Prime Minister (2001–2006)
 Kenya Jomo Kenyatta
Jomo Kenyatta
Jomo Kenyattapron.] served as the first Prime Minister and President of Kenya. He is considered the founding father of the Kenyan nation....

First Prime Minister and President (1963–1978)
 Mauritius Sir Seewoosagur Ramgoolam
Seewoosagur Ramgoolam
Sir Seewoosagur Ramgoolam KT,GCMG,KCMG,LRCP, MRCS is the first Chief Minister, Prime Minister and sixth Governor General of Mauritius....

First Prime Minister (1968–1982), and Governor-General (1983–1985)
 Republic of China Wu Tingfang (伍廷芳)
Wu Tingfang
Wu Tingfang was a Chinese diplomat and politician who served as Minister of Foreign Affairs and briefly as Acting Premier during the early years of the Republic of China. He is also known under his Cantonese name Ng Choy -Biography:...

One of first Acting Premiers (May 1917)
 Trinidad and Tobago
Sir Ellis Clarke
Ellis Clarke
Sir Ellis Emmanuel Innocent Clarke, TC, GCMG was the second and last Governor-General of Trinidad and Tobago and the first President of Trinidad and Tobago. Clarke was one of the main architects of Trinidad and Tobago's 1962 Independence constitution.Clarke attended Saint Mary's College, winning...

Governor-General (1972–1976), and President (1976–1987)

Notable faculty and staff


Notable former UCL faculty and staff include Jocelyn Bell Burnell
Jocelyn Bell Burnell
Susan Jocelyn Bell Burnell, DBE, FRS, FRAS , is a British astrophysicist. As a postgraduate student she discovered the first radio pulsars with her thesis supervisor Antony Hewish. She was president of the Institute of Physics from October 2008 until October 2010, and was interim president...

 (co-discoverer of radio pulsars), A. S. Byatt
A. S. Byatt
Dame Antonia Susan Duffy, DBE is an English novelist, poet and Booker Prize winner...

 (writer), Ronald Dworkin
Ronald Dworkin
Ronald Myles Dworkin, QC, FBA is an American philosopher and scholar of constitutional law. He is Frank Henry Sommer Professor of Law and Philosophy at New York University and Emeritus Professor of Jurisprudence at University College London, and has taught previously at Yale Law School and the...

 (philosopher of law and scholar of constitutional law), Sir A.J. Ayer (philosopher), Lucian Freud
Lucian Freud
Lucian Michael Freud, OM, CH was a British painter. Known chiefly for his thickly impasted portrait and figure paintings, he was widely considered the pre-eminent British artist of his time...

 (painter), Francis Galton
Francis Galton
Sir Francis Galton /ˈfrɑːnsɪs ˈgɔːltn̩/ FRS , cousin of Douglas Strutt Galton, half-cousin of Charles Darwin, was an English Victorian polymath: anthropologist, eugenicist, tropical explorer, geographer, inventor, meteorologist, proto-geneticist, psychometrician, and statistician...

 (founder of psychometrics
Psychometrics
Psychometrics is the field of study concerned with the theory and technique of psychological measurement, which includes the measurement of knowledge, abilities, attitudes, personality traits, and educational measurement...

 and father of fingerprinting), Andrew Huxley
Andrew Huxley
Sir Andrew Fielding Huxley, OM, FRS is an English physiologist and biophysicist, who won the 1963 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for his experimental and mathematical work with Sir Alan Lloyd Hodgkin on the basis of nerve action potentials, the electrical impulses that enable the activity...

 (physiologist
Physiology
Physiology is the science of the function of living systems. This includes how organisms, organ systems, organs, cells, and bio-molecules carry out the chemical or physical functions that exist in a living system. The highest honor awarded in physiology is the Nobel Prize in Physiology or...

 and biophysicist
Biophysics
Biophysics is an interdisciplinary science that uses the methods of physical science to study biological systems. Studies included under the branches of biophysics span all levels of biological organization, from the molecular scale to whole organisms and ecosystems...

), Sir Frank Kermode
Frank Kermode
Sir John Frank Kermode was a highly regarded British literary critic best known for his seminal critical work The Sense of an Ending: Studies in the Theory of Fiction, published in 1967 ....

 (literary critic), Tomáš Garrigue Masaryk (first President of Czechoslovakia
Czechoslovakia
Czechoslovakia or Czecho-Slovakia was a sovereign state in Central Europe which existed from October 1918, when it declared its independence from the Austro-Hungarian Empire, until 1992...

 and "Father of the Nation"), John Stuart Mill
John Stuart Mill
John Stuart Mill was a British philosopher, economist and civil servant. An influential contributor to social theory, political theory, and political economy, his conception of liberty justified the freedom of the individual in opposition to unlimited state control. He was a proponent of...

 (philosopher) and George R. Price
George R. Price
George Robert Price was an American population geneticist. Originally a physical chemist and later a science journalist, he moved to London in 1967, where he worked in theoretical biology at the Galton Laboratory, making three important contributions: first, rederiving W.D...

 (population geneticist
Population genetics
Population genetics is the study of allele frequency distribution and change under the influence of the four main evolutionary processes: natural selection, genetic drift, mutation and gene flow. It also takes into account the factors of recombination, population subdivision and population...

).

All five of the naturally occurring noble gases were discovered at UCL by Sir William Ramsay
William Ramsay
Sir William Ramsay was a Scottish chemist who discovered the noble gases and received the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1904 "in recognition of his services in the discovery of the inert gaseous elements in air" .-Early years:Ramsay was born in Glasgow on 2...

, who was a professor of chemistry and after whom Ramsay Hall is named.

UCL in fiction



Due to its position within London and the historical nature of its buildings, including most notably the UCL Main Building
UCL Main Building
The Main Building at University College London, includes the Octagon, Quad, Cloisters, Main Library, Flaxman Gallery and the Wilkins building. The North Wing, South Wing, Chadwick Building and Pearson Building are also considered part of the main UCL building .- History :In 1827, a year after the...

 and quad, UCL has been used as a location for a number of film and television productions, including Doctor in the House
Doctor in the House
Doctor in the House is a 1954 British comedy film, directed by Ralph Thomas and produced by Betty Box. The screenplay, by Nicholas Phipps, Richard Gordon and Ronald Wilkinson, is based on the novel by Gordon, and follows a group of students through medical school.It was the most popular box office...

(1954), Gladiator
Gladiator (2000 film)
Gladiator is a 2000 historical epic film directed by Ridley Scott, starring Russell Crowe, Joaquin Phoenix, Connie Nielsen, Ralf Möller, Oliver Reed, Djimon Hounsou, Derek Jacobi, John Shrapnel and Richard Harris. Crowe portrays the loyal Roman General Maximus Decimus Meridius, who is betrayed...

(2000), The Dark Knight
The Dark Knight (film)
The Dark Knight is a 2008 superhero film directed, produced and co-written by Christopher Nolan. Based on the DC Comics character Batman, the film is part of Nolan's Batman film series and a sequel to 2005's Batman Begins...

(2008) and Inception
Inception
Inception: The Subconscious Jams 1994-1995 is a compilation of unreleased tracks by the band Download.-Track listing:# "Primitive Tekno Jam" – 3:23# "Bee Sting Sickness" – 8:04# "Weed Acid Techno" – 8:19...

(2010).

External links