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Travel literature

Travel literature

Overview

Travel literature is travel writing
Travel writing
Travel writing is a genre that has, as its focus, accounts of real or imaginary places. The genre encompasses a number of styles that may range from the documentary to the evocative, from literary to journalistic, and from the humorous to the serious....

 of literary
Literature
Literature is the art of written works, and is not bound to published sources...

 value. Travel literature typically records the experiences of an author touring
Tourism
Tourism is travel for recreational, leisure or business purposes. The World Tourism Organization defines tourists as people "traveling to and staying in places outside their usual environment for not more than one consecutive year for leisure, business and other purposes".Tourism has become a...

 a place for the pleasure
Pleasure
Pleasure describes the broad class of mental states that humans and other animals experience as positive, enjoyable, or worth seeking. It includes more specific mental states such as happiness, entertainment, enjoyment, ecstasy, and euphoria...

 of travel
Travel
Travel is the movement of people or objects between relatively distant geographical locations. 'Travel' can also include relatively short stays between successive movements.-Etymology:...

. An individual work is sometimes called a travelogue or itinerary. Travel literature may be cross-cultural
Cross-cultural
cross-cultural may refer to*cross-cultural studies, a comparative tendency in various fields of cultural analysis*cross-cultural communication, a field of study that looks at how people from differing cultural backgrounds communicate...

 or transnational
Transnationality
Transnationality is a principle of carrying out an action across national borders, so as to have effects at a more general level. It is commonly referred to with reference to the actions of the European Union , in distinction to 'international' or 'supranational' Transnationality is a principle of...

 in focus, or may involve travel to different region
Region
Region is most commonly found as a term used in terrestrial and astrophysics sciences also an area, notably among the different sub-disciplines of geography, studied by regional geographers. Regions consist of subregions that contain clusters of like areas that are distinctive by their uniformity...

s within the same country. Accounts of spaceflight
Spaceflight
Spaceflight is the act of travelling into or through outer space. Spaceflight can occur with spacecraft which may, or may not, have humans on board. Examples of human spaceflight include the Russian Soyuz program, the U.S. Space shuttle program, as well as the ongoing International Space Station...

 may also be considered travel literature.

Literary travelogues generally exhibit a coherent narrative
Narrative
A narrative is a constructive format that describes a sequence of non-fictional or fictional events. The word derives from the Latin verb narrare, "to recount", and is related to the adjective gnarus, "knowing" or "skilled"...

 or aesthetic
Aesthetics
Aesthetics is a branch of philosophy dealing with the nature of beauty, art, and taste, and with the creation and appreciation of beauty. It is more scientifically defined as the study of sensory or sensori-emotional values, sometimes called judgments of sentiment and taste...

 beyond the logging of dates and events as found in travel journal
Travel journal
A travel journal, also called road journal or travelogue, is a record made by a voyager. Generally in diary form, a travel journal contains descriptions of the traveler's experiences, is normally written during the course of the journey, intended on updating friends or family on the journey...

s or a ship's log
Logbook
A logbook was originally a book for recording readings from the chip log, and is used to determine the distance a ship traveled within a certain amount of time...

.
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Encyclopedia

Travel literature is travel writing
Travel writing
Travel writing is a genre that has, as its focus, accounts of real or imaginary places. The genre encompasses a number of styles that may range from the documentary to the evocative, from literary to journalistic, and from the humorous to the serious....

 of literary
Literature
Literature is the art of written works, and is not bound to published sources...

 value. Travel literature typically records the experiences of an author touring
Tourism
Tourism is travel for recreational, leisure or business purposes. The World Tourism Organization defines tourists as people "traveling to and staying in places outside their usual environment for not more than one consecutive year for leisure, business and other purposes".Tourism has become a...

 a place for the pleasure
Pleasure
Pleasure describes the broad class of mental states that humans and other animals experience as positive, enjoyable, or worth seeking. It includes more specific mental states such as happiness, entertainment, enjoyment, ecstasy, and euphoria...

 of travel
Travel
Travel is the movement of people or objects between relatively distant geographical locations. 'Travel' can also include relatively short stays between successive movements.-Etymology:...

. An individual work is sometimes called a travelogue or itinerary. Travel literature may be cross-cultural
Cross-cultural
cross-cultural may refer to*cross-cultural studies, a comparative tendency in various fields of cultural analysis*cross-cultural communication, a field of study that looks at how people from differing cultural backgrounds communicate...

 or transnational
Transnationality
Transnationality is a principle of carrying out an action across national borders, so as to have effects at a more general level. It is commonly referred to with reference to the actions of the European Union , in distinction to 'international' or 'supranational' Transnationality is a principle of...

 in focus, or may involve travel to different region
Region
Region is most commonly found as a term used in terrestrial and astrophysics sciences also an area, notably among the different sub-disciplines of geography, studied by regional geographers. Regions consist of subregions that contain clusters of like areas that are distinctive by their uniformity...

s within the same country. Accounts of spaceflight
Spaceflight
Spaceflight is the act of travelling into or through outer space. Spaceflight can occur with spacecraft which may, or may not, have humans on board. Examples of human spaceflight include the Russian Soyuz program, the U.S. Space shuttle program, as well as the ongoing International Space Station...

 may also be considered travel literature.

Literary travelogues generally exhibit a coherent narrative
Narrative
A narrative is a constructive format that describes a sequence of non-fictional or fictional events. The word derives from the Latin verb narrare, "to recount", and is related to the adjective gnarus, "knowing" or "skilled"...

 or aesthetic
Aesthetics
Aesthetics is a branch of philosophy dealing with the nature of beauty, art, and taste, and with the creation and appreciation of beauty. It is more scientifically defined as the study of sensory or sensori-emotional values, sometimes called judgments of sentiment and taste...

 beyond the logging of dates and events as found in travel journal
Travel journal
A travel journal, also called road journal or travelogue, is a record made by a voyager. Generally in diary form, a travel journal contains descriptions of the traveler's experiences, is normally written during the course of the journey, intended on updating friends or family on the journey...

s or a ship's log
Logbook
A logbook was originally a book for recording readings from the chip log, and is used to determine the distance a ship traveled within a certain amount of time...

. Travel literature is closely associated with outdoor literature
Outdoor literature
Outdoor literature is a literature genre about or involving the outdoors. Outdoor literature encompasses several different sub-genres variously called Exploration literature, Adventure literature and Nature literature. These genres can include activities such as exploration, survival, sailing,...

 and the genres often overlap with no definite boundaries. Another sub-genre, invented in the 19th century, is the guide book
Guide book
A guide book is a book for tourists or travelers that provides details about a geographic location, tourist destination, or itinerary. It is the written equivalent of a tour guide...

.

History



Early examples of travel literature include Pausanias
Pausanias (geographer)
Pausanias was a Greek traveler and geographer of the 2nd century AD, who lived in the times of Hadrian, Antoninus Pius and Marcus Aurelius. He is famous for his Description of Greece , a lengthy work that describes ancient Greece from firsthand observations, and is a crucial link between classical...

' Description of Greece in the 2nd century CE, and the travelogues of Ibn Jubayr
Ibn Jubayr
Ibn Jubayr was a geographer, traveler and poet from al-Andalus.-Early life:Born in Valencia in Spain, then the seat of an independent emirate. Ibn Jubayr was descendant of a tribe of Andalusian origins, Jubayr was the son of a civil servant...

 (1145–1214) and Ibn Batutta (1304–1377), both of whom recorded their travels across the known world in detail. The travel genre was a fairly common genre in medieval Arabic literature
Arabic literature
Arabic literature is the writing produced, both prose and poetry, by writers in the Arabic language. The Arabic word used for literature is adab which is derived from a meaning of etiquette, and implies politeness, culture and enrichment....

.

One of the earliest known records of taking pleasure in travel, of travelling for the sake of travel and writing about it, is Petrarch's (1304–1374) ascent of Mount Ventoux in 1336. He states that he went to the mountaintop for the pleasure of seeing the top of the famous height. His companions who stayed at the bottom he called frigida incuriositas ("a cold lack of curiosity"). He then wrote about his climb, making allegorical comparisons between climbing the mountain and his own moral progress in life.

Michault Taillement, a poet for the Duke of Burgundy
Duke of Burgundy
Duke of Burgundy was a title borne by the rulers of the Duchy of Burgundy, a small portion of traditional lands of Burgundians west of river Saône which in 843 was allotted to Charles the Bald's kingdom of West Franks...

, travelled through the Jura Mountains
Jura mountains
The Jura Mountains are a small mountain range located north of the Alps, separating the Rhine and Rhone rivers and forming part of the watershed of each...

 in 1430 and left us with his personal reflections, his horrified reaction to the sheer rock faces, and the terrifying thunderous cascades of mountain streams. Antoine de la Sale
Antoine de la Sale
Antoine de la Sale or la Salle was a French writer.-Family and Early Years:He was born in Provence, probably at Arles, the illegitimate son of Bernardon de la Salle, a celebrated Gascon mercenary, mentioned in Froissart's Chronicles. His mother was a peasant, Perrinette Damendel.-At the Court of...

 (c. 1388–c. 1462), author of Petit Jehan de Saintre, climbed to the crater of a volcano in the Lipari Islands in 1407, leaving us with his impressions. "Councils of mad youth" were his stated reasons for going. In the mid 15th century, Gilles le Bouvier, in his Livre de la description des pays, gave us his reason to travel and write:
Because many people of diverse nations and countries delight and take pleasure, as I have done in times past, in seeing the world and things therein, and also because many wish to know without going there, and others wish to see, go, and travel, I have begun this little book.


In 1589, Richard Hakluyt
Richard Hakluyt
Richard Hakluyt was an English writer. He is principally remembered for his efforts in promoting and supporting the settlement of North America by the English through his works, notably Divers Voyages Touching the Discoverie of America and The Principal Navigations, Voiages, Traffiques and...

 (c. 1552–1616) published Voyages, a foundational text of the travel literature genre.

Other later examples of travel literature include accounts of the Grand Tour
Grand Tour
The Grand Tour was the traditional trip of Europe undertaken by mainly upper-class European young men of means. The custom flourished from about 1660 until the advent of large-scale rail transit in the 1840s, and was associated with a standard itinerary. It served as an educational rite of passage...

. Aristocrats, clergy, and others with money and leisure time travelled Europe
Europe
Europe is, by convention, one of the world's seven continents. Comprising the westernmost peninsula of Eurasia, Europe is generally 'divided' from Asia to its east by the watershed divides of the Ural and Caucasus Mountains, the Ural River, the Caspian and Black Seas, and the waterways connecting...

 to learn about the art and architecture of its past. One tourism literature pioneer was Robert Louis Stevenson
Robert Louis Stevenson
Robert Louis Balfour Stevenson was a Scottish novelist, poet, essayist and travel writer. His best-known books include Treasure Island, Kidnapped, and Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde....

 (1850–1894).

Travel literature also became popular during the Song Dynasty
Song Dynasty
The Song Dynasty was a ruling dynasty in China between 960 and 1279; it succeeded the Five Dynasties and Ten Kingdoms Period, and was followed by the Yuan Dynasty. It was the first government in world history to issue banknotes or paper money, and the first Chinese government to establish a...

 (960–1279) of medieval China
China
Chinese civilization may refer to:* China for more general discussion of the country.* Chinese culture* Greater China, the transnational community of ethnic Chinese.* History of China* Sinosphere, the area historically affected by Chinese culture...

. The genre was called 'travel record literature' (youji wenxue), and was often written in narrative
Narrative
A narrative is a constructive format that describes a sequence of non-fictional or fictional events. The word derives from the Latin verb narrare, "to recount", and is related to the adjective gnarus, "knowing" or "skilled"...

, prose
Prose
Prose is the most typical form of written language, applying ordinary grammatical structure and natural flow of speech rather than rhythmic structure...

, essay
Essay
An essay is a piece of writing which is often written from an author's personal point of view. Essays can consist of a number of elements, including: literary criticism, political manifestos, learned arguments, observations of daily life, recollections, and reflections of the author. The definition...

 and diary
Diary
A diary is a record with discrete entries arranged by date reporting on what has happened over the course of a day or other period. A personal diary may include a person's experiences, and/or thoughts or feelings, including comment on current events outside the writer's direct experience. Someone...

 style. Travel literature authors such as Fan Chengda
Fan Chengda
Fan Chengda , courtesy name Zhineng , was one of the best-known Chinese poets of the Song Dynasty , a government official, and an academic authority in geography , especially the southern provinces of China...

 (1126–1193) and Xu Xiake
Xu Xiake
Xu Xiake , born Xu Hongzu , courtesy name Zhenzhi , was a Chinese travel writer and geographer of the Ming Dynasty known best for his famous geographical treatise, and noted for his bravery and humility. He traveled throughout China for more than 30 years, documenting his travels extensively...

 (1587–1641) incorporated a wealth of geographical and topographical information into their writing, while the 'daytrip essay' Record of Stone Bell Mountain by the noted poet and statesman Su Shi
Su Shi
Su Shi , was a writer, poet, artist, calligrapher, pharmacologist, gastronome, and statesman of the Song Dynasty, and one of the major poets of the Song era. His courtesy name was Zizhan and his pseudonym was Dongpo Jushi , and he is often referred to as Su Dongpo...

 (1037–1101) presented a philosophical and moral argument as its central purpose.

In the 18th century, travel literature was commonly known as the book of travels, which mainly consisted of maritime diaries
Diary
A diary is a record with discrete entries arranged by date reporting on what has happened over the course of a day or other period. A personal diary may include a person's experiences, and/or thoughts or feelings, including comment on current events outside the writer's direct experience. Someone...

. In 18th century England, almost every famous writer worked in the travel literature form. Captain James Cook's diaries (1784) were the equivalent of today's best sellers.

Travelogues


The Americans, Paul Theroux
Paul Theroux
Paul Edward Theroux is an American travel writer and novelist, whose best known work of travel writing is perhaps The Great Railway Bazaar . He has also published numerous works of fiction, some of which were made into feature films. He was awarded the 1981 James Tait Black Memorial Prize for his...

, Bill Bryson
Bill Bryson
William McGuire "Bill" Bryson, OBE, is a best-selling American author of humorous books on travel, as well as books on the English language and on science. Born an American, he was a resident of Britain for most of his adult life before moving back to the US in 1995...

 and William Least Heat-Moon
William Least Heat-Moon
William Least Heat-Moon, the byname of William Lewis Trogdon is an American travel writer of English, Irish and Osage Nation ancestry. He is the author of a bestselling trilogy of topographical U.S. travel writing.-Biography:...

, Welsh
Wales
Wales is a country that is part of the United Kingdom and the island of Great Britain, bordered by England to its east and the Atlantic Ocean and Irish Sea to its west. It has a population of three million, and a total area of 20,779 km²...

 author Jan Morris
Jan Morris
Jan Morris CBE is a Welsh nationalist, historian, author and travel writer. She is known particularly for the Pax Britannica trilogy, a history of the British Empire, and for portraits of cities, notably Oxford, Venice, Trieste, Hong Kong, and New York City.With an English mother and Welsh father,...

 and Englishman Eric Newby
Eric Newby
George Eric Newby CBE MC was an English travel author. Newby's best known works include A Short Walk in the Hindu Kush, The Last Grain Race, and Round Ireland in Low Gear.-Life:...

 are or were widely acclaimed as travel writers although Morris is also a historian and Theroux a novelist.

Travel literature often intersects with essay
Essay
An essay is a piece of writing which is often written from an author's personal point of view. Essays can consist of a number of elements, including: literary criticism, political manifestos, learned arguments, observations of daily life, recollections, and reflections of the author. The definition...

 writing, as in V. S. Naipaul
V. S. Naipaul
Sir Vidiadhar Surajprasad "V. S." Naipaul, TC is a Nobel prize-winning Indo-Trinidadian-British writer who is known for his novels focusing on the legacy of the British Empire's colonialism...

's India: A Wounded Civilization
India: A Wounded Civilization
India: A Wounded Civilization, by V. S. Naipaul, is the second book of his "India" trilogy, after An Area of Darkness, and before India: A Million Mutinies Now....

, where a trip becomes the occasion for extended observations on a nation and people. This is similarly the case in Rebecca West
Rebecca West
Cicely Isabel Fairfield , known by her pen name Rebecca West, or Dame Rebecca West, DBE was an English author, journalist, literary critic and travel writer. A prolific, protean author who wrote in many genres, West was committed to feminist and liberal principles and was one of the foremost public...

's work on Yugoslavia, Black Lamb and Grey Falcon
Black Lamb and Grey Falcon
Black Lamb and Grey Falcon: A Journey Through Yugoslavia is a travel book written by Dame Rebecca West, published in 1941.The book is of exceptional length . It gives an account of Balkan history and ethnography, and the significance of Nazism, structured about West's six week trip to Yugoslavia in...

.

Sometimes a writer will settle into a locality for an extended period, absorbing a sense of place while continuing to observe with a travel writer's sensibility. Examples of such writings include Lawrence Durrell
Lawrence Durrell
Lawrence George Durrell was an expatriate British novelist, poet, dramatist, and travel writer, though he resisted affiliation with Britain and preferred to be considered cosmopolitan...

's Bitter Lemons
Bitter Lemons
Bitter Lemons is an autobiographical work by writer Lawrence Durrell, describing the three years he spent on the island of Cyprus...

, Deborah Tall's The Island of the White Cow and Peter Mayle
Peter Mayle
Peter Mayle is a British author famous for his series of books detailing life in Provence, France. He spent fifteen years in the advertising industry before leaving the business in 1975 to write educational books, including a series on sex education for children and young people...

's best-selling A Year in Provence
A Year in Provence
A Year in Provence is a 1989 bestselling autobiographical novel by Peter Mayle about his first year in Provence, and the local events and customs. It was adapted into a television miniseries starring John Thaw and Lindsay Duncan. Reviewers praised its honest style, wit and its refreshing humor...

 and its sequels.

Travel and nature writing merge in many of the works by Sally Carrighar
Sally Carrighar
Sally Carrighar was an American naturalist and writer. She is especially known for her series of nature books chronicling the lives of wild animals. Humans are often absent from these tales....

, Ivan T. Sanderson
Ivan T. Sanderson
Ivan Terence Sanderson was a naturalist and writer born in Edinburgh, Scotland, who became a naturalized citizen of the United States. Sanderson is remembered for his nature writing and his interest in cryptozoology and paranormal subjects.-Biography:Born in Scotland, Sanderson traveled widely in...

 and Gerald Durrell
Gerald Durrell
Gerald "Gerry" Malcolm Durrell, OBE was a naturalist, zookeeper, conservationist, author and television presenter...

. These authors are naturalists
Natural history
Natural history is the scientific research of plants or animals, leaning more towards observational rather than experimental methods of study, and encompasses more research published in magazines than in academic journals. Grouped among the natural sciences, natural history is the systematic study...

, who write in support of their fields of study. Charles Darwin
Charles Darwin
Charles Robert Darwin FRS was an English naturalist. He established that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestry, and proposed the scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection.He published his theory...

 wrote his famous account of the journey of HMS Beagle
HMS Beagle
HMS Beagle was a Cherokee-class 10-gun brig-sloop of the Royal Navy. She was launched on 11 May 1820 from the Woolwich Dockyard on the River Thames, at a cost of £7,803. In July of that year she took part in a fleet review celebrating the coronation of King George IV of the United Kingdom in which...

 at the intersection of science, natural history and travel.

Literary travel writing also occurs when an author, famous in another field, travels and writes about his or her experiences. Examples of such writers are Samuel Johnson
Samuel Johnson
Samuel Johnson , often referred to as Dr. Johnson, was an English author who made lasting contributions to English literature as a poet, essayist, moralist, literary critic, biographer, editor and lexicographer...

, Charles Dickens
Charles Dickens
Charles John Huffam Dickens was an English novelist, generally considered the greatest of the Victorian period. Dickens enjoyed a wider popularity and fame than had any previous author during his lifetime, and he remains popular, having been responsible for some of English literature's most iconic...

, Mary Wollstonecraft
Mary Wollstonecraft
Mary Wollstonecraft was an eighteenth-century British writer, philosopher, and advocate of women's rights. During her brief career, she wrote novels, treatises, a travel narrative, a history of the French Revolution, a conduct book, and a children's book...

, Robert Louis Stevenson
Robert Louis Stevenson
Robert Louis Balfour Stevenson was a Scottish novelist, poet, essayist and travel writer. His best-known books include Treasure Island, Kidnapped, and Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde....

, Hilaire Belloc
Hilaire Belloc
Joseph Hilaire Pierre René Belloc was an Anglo-French writer and historian who became a naturalised British subject in 1902. He was one of the most prolific writers in England during the early twentieth century. He was known as a writer, orator, poet, satirist, man of letters and political activist...

, D. H. Lawrence
D. H. Lawrence
David Herbert Richards Lawrence was an English novelist, poet, playwright, essayist, literary critic and painter who published as D. H. Lawrence. His collected works represent an extended reflection upon the dehumanising effects of modernity and industrialisation...

, Rebecca West
Rebecca West
Cicely Isabel Fairfield , known by her pen name Rebecca West, or Dame Rebecca West, DBE was an English author, journalist, literary critic and travel writer. A prolific, protean author who wrote in many genres, West was committed to feminist and liberal principles and was one of the foremost public...

 and John Steinbeck
John Steinbeck
John Ernst Steinbeck, Jr. was an American writer. He is widely known for the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel The Grapes of Wrath and East of Eden and the novella Of Mice and Men...

.

Fiction


Fiction
Fiction
Fiction is the form of any narrative or informative work that deals, in part or in whole, with information or events that are not factual, but rather, imaginary—that is, invented by the author. Although fiction describes a major branch of literary work, it may also refer to theatrical,...

al travelogues make up a large proportion of travel literature. Although it may be desirable in some contexts to distinguish fiction
Fiction
Fiction is the form of any narrative or informative work that deals, in part or in whole, with information or events that are not factual, but rather, imaginary—that is, invented by the author. Although fiction describes a major branch of literary work, it may also refer to theatrical,...

al from non-fiction
Non-fiction
Non-fiction is the form of any narrative, account, or other communicative work whose assertions and descriptions are understood to be fact...

al works, such distinctions have proved notoriously difficult to make in practice, as in the famous instance of the travel writings of Marco Polo
Marco Polo
Marco Polo was a Venetian merchant traveler from the Venetian Republic whose travels are recorded in Il Milione, a book which did much to introduce Europeans to Central Asia and China. He learned about trading whilst his father and uncle, Niccolò and Maffeo, travelled through Asia and apparently...

 or John Mandeville
John Mandeville
"Jehan de Mandeville", translated as "Sir John Mandeville", is the name claimed by the compiler of The Travels of Sir John Mandeville, a book account of his supposed travels, written in Anglo-Norman French, and first circulated between 1357 and 1371.By aid of translations into many other languages...

. Many "fictional" works of travel literature are based on factual journeys – Joseph Conrad
Joseph Conrad
Joseph Conrad was a Polish-born English novelist.Conrad is regarded as one of the great novelists in English, although he did not speak the language fluently until he was in his twenties...

's Heart of Darkness
Heart of Darkness
Heart of Darkness is a novella written by Joseph Conrad. Before its 1903 publication, it appeared as a three-part series in Blackwood's Magazine. It was classified by the Modern Library website editors as one of the "100 best novels" and part of the Western canon.The story centres on Charles...

 and presumably, Homer
Homer
In the Western classical tradition Homer , is the author of the Iliad and the Odyssey, and is revered as the greatest ancient Greek epic poet. These epics lie at the beginning of the Western canon of literature, and have had an enormous influence on the history of literature.When he lived is...

's Odyssey
Odyssey
The Odyssey is one of two major ancient Greek epic poems attributed to Homer. It is, in part, a sequel to the Iliad, the other work ascribed to Homer. The poem is fundamental to the modern Western canon, and is the second—the Iliad being the first—extant work of Western literature...

 (c. 8th cent. BCE
8th century BC
The 8th century BC started the first day of 800 BC and ended the last day of 701 BC.-Overview:The 8th century BC was a period of great changes in civilizations. In Egypt, the 23rd and 24th dynasties led to rule from Nubia in the 25th Dynasty...

) – while other works, though based on imaginary and even highly fantastic journeys – Dante
Dante Alighieri
Durante degli Alighieri, mononymously referred to as Dante , was an Italian poet, prose writer, literary theorist, moral philosopher, and political thinker. He is best known for the monumental epic poem La commedia, later named La divina commedia ...

's Divine Comedy, Jonathan Swift
Jonathan Swift
Jonathan Swift was an Irish satirist, essayist, political pamphleteer , poet and cleric who became Dean of St...

's Gulliver's Travels
Gulliver's Travels
Travels into Several Remote Nations of the World, in Four Parts. By Lemuel Gulliver, First a Surgeon, and then a Captain of Several Ships, better known simply as Gulliver's Travels , is a novel by Anglo-Irish writer and clergyman Jonathan Swift that is both a satire on human nature and a parody of...

, Voltaire
Voltaire
François-Marie Arouet , better known by the pen name Voltaire , was a French Enlightenment writer, historian and philosopher famous for his wit and for his advocacy of civil liberties, including freedom of religion, free trade and separation of church and state...

's Candide
Candide
Candide, ou l'Optimisme is a French satire first published in 1759 by Voltaire, a philosopher of the Age of Enlightenment. The novella has been widely translated, with English versions titled Candide: or, All for the Best ; Candide: or, The Optimist ; and Candide: or, Optimism...

 or Samuel Johnson
Samuel Johnson
Samuel Johnson , often referred to as Dr. Johnson, was an English author who made lasting contributions to English literature as a poet, essayist, moralist, literary critic, biographer, editor and lexicographer...

's The History of Rasselas, Prince of Abissinia
The History of Rasselas, Prince of Abissinia
The History of Rasselas, Prince of Abissinia, often abbreviated to Rasselas, is an apologue about happiness by Samuel Johnson. The book's original working title was “The Choice of Life". He wrote the piece to help support his seriously ill mother with an intended completion date of January 22, 1759...

 – nevertheless contain factual elements.

Jack Kerouac
Jack Kerouac
Jean-Louis "Jack" Lebris de Kerouac was an American novelist and poet. He is considered a literary iconoclast and, alongside William S. Burroughs and Allen Ginsberg, a pioneer of the Beat Generation. Kerouac is recognized for his spontaneous method of writing, covering topics such as Catholic...

's On the Road
On the Road
On the Road is a novel by American writer Jack Kerouac, written in April 1951, and published by Viking Press in 1957. It is a largely autobiographical work that was based on the spontaneous road trips of Kerouac and his friends across mid-century America. It is often considered a defining work of...

 (1957) and The Dharma Bums
The Dharma Bums
The Dharma Bums is a 1958 novel by Beat Generation author Jack Kerouac. The semi-fictional accounts in the novel are based upon events that occurred years after the events of On the Road...

 (1958) are fictionalized accounts of his travels across the United States during the late 1940s and early 1950s.

One contemporary example of a real life journey transformed into a work of fiction is travel writer Kira Salak's novel, The White Mary
The White Mary
The White Mary is Kira Salak's third book and her first novel.- Plot:For years, war reporter Marika Vecera has risked her life, traveling to the world’s most dangerous places to offer a voice for the oppressed and suffering. But one day her luck nearly runs out: while covering the genocide in...

, which takes place in Papua New Guinea and the Congo and is largely based on her own experiences in those countries.

Travel literature in criticism


The systematic study of travel literature emerged as a legitimate field of scholarly inquiry in the mid-1990s, with its own conferences, organizations, journals, monographs, anthologies, and encyclopedias. Among the most important, pre-1995 monographs are: Abroad (1980) by Paul Fussell
Paul Fussell
Paul Fussell is an American cultural and literary historian, author and university professor. His writings cover a variety of genres, from scholarly works on eighteenth-century English literature to commentary on America’s class system...

, an exploration
Exploration
Exploration is the act of searching or traveling around a terrain for the purpose of discovery of resources or information. Exploration occurs in all non-sessile animal species, including humans...

 of British interwar travel writing as escapism; Gone Primitive: Modern Intellects, Savage Minds (1990) by Marianna Torgovnick, an inquiry into the primitivist
Primitivism
Primitivism is a Western art movement that borrows visual forms from non-Western or prehistoric peoples, such as Paul Gauguin's inclusion of Tahitian motifs in paintings and ceramics...

 presentation of foreign cultures; Haunted Journeys: Desire and Transgression in European Travel Writing (1991) by Dennis Porter, a close look at the psychological correlatives of travel; Discourses of Difference: An Analysis of Women’s Travel Writing by Sara Mills, an inquiry into the intersection of gender and colonialism
Colonialism
Colonialism is the establishment, maintenance, acquisition and expansion of colonies in one territory by people from another territory. It is a process whereby the metropole claims sovereignty over the colony and the social structure, government, and economics of the colony are changed by...

 during the nineteenth century; Imperial Eyes: Travel Writing and Transculturation (1992), Mary Louise Pratt
Mary Louise Pratt
Mary Louise Pratt is a Silver Professor and Professor of Spanish and Portuguese Languages and Literatures at New York University.Her first book, Toward a Speech Act Theory of Literary Discourse, made an important contribution to critical theory by demonstrating that the foundation of written...

's influential study of Victorian
Victorian era
The Victorian era of British history was the period of Queen Victoria's reign from 20 June 1837 until her death on 22 January 1901. It was a long period of peace, prosperity, refined sensibilities and national self-confidence...

 travel writing’s dissemination of a colonial mind-set; and Belated Travelers (1994), an analysis of colonial anxiety by Ali Behdad.

The study of travel writing developed most extensively in the late 1990s, encouraged by the currency of Foucauldian
Michel Foucault
Michel Foucault , born Paul-Michel Foucault , was a French philosopher, social theorist and historian of ideas...

 criticism and Edward Said
Edward Said
Edward Wadie Saïd was a Palestinian-American literary theorist and advocate for Palestinian rights. He was University Professor of English and Comparative Literature at Columbia University and a founding figure in postcolonialism...

's postcolonial
Postcolonialism
Post-colonialism is a specifically post-modern intellectual discourse that consists of reactions to, and analysis of, the cultural legacy of colonialism...

 landmark study Orientalism
Orientalism (book)
Orientalism is a book published in 1978 by Edward Said that has been highly influential and controversial in postcolonial studies and other fields. In the book, Said effectively redefined the term "Orientalism" to mean a constellation of false assumptions underlying Western attitudes toward the...

. This growing interdisciplinary preoccupation with cultural diversity, globalization
Globalization
Globalization refers to the increasingly global relationships of culture, people and economic activity. Most often, it refers to economics: the global distribution of the production of goods and services, through reduction of barriers to international trade such as tariffs, export fees, and import...

, and migration is expressed in other fields of literary study, most notably Comparative Literature
Comparative literature
Comparative literature is an academic field dealing with the literature of two or more different linguistic, cultural or national groups...

. The first international travel writing conference, “Snapshots from Abroad”, organized by Donald Ross at the University of Minnesota
University of Minnesota
The University of Minnesota, Twin Cities is a public research university located in Minneapolis and St. Paul, Minnesota, United States. It is the oldest and largest part of the University of Minnesota system and has the fourth-largest main campus student body in the United States, with 52,557...

 in 1997, attracted over one hundred scholars and led to the foundation of the International Society for Travel Writing (ISTW). The first issue of Studies in Travel Writing was published the same year, edited by Tim Youngs. Annual scholarly conferences about travel writing, held in the USA, Europe and Asia, saw an unprecedented upswing in the number of published travel literature monographs and essay collections, as well as a proliferation of travel writing anthologies.

Major directions in recent travel writing scholarship include: studies about the role of gender in travel and travel writing (e.g. Women Travelers in Colonial India: The Power of the Female Gaze [1998] by Indira Ghose); explorations of the political functions of travel (e.g. Radicals on the Road: The Politics of English Travel Writing in the 1930s [2001] by Bernard Schweizer
Bernard Schweizer
Bernard Schweizer is an associate professor of English at Long Island University, Brooklyn. He has published several books and essay collections on topics in British and European literatures. He is a leading Rebecca West scholar and has edited or co-edited a number of Rebecca West’s previously...

); postcolonial
Postcolonialism
Post-colonialism is a specifically post-modern intellectual discourse that consists of reactions to, and analysis of, the cultural legacy of colonialism...

 perspectives on travel (e.g. English Travel Writing: From Pilgrimages to Postcolonial Explorations (2000) by Barbara Korte); and studies about the function of language in travel and travel writing (e.g. Across the Lines: Travel, Language, and Translation [2000] by Michael Cronin). Tim Youngs is a driving force behind the growth of the field, notably through the journal Studies in Travel Writing, through his two co-edited volumes of essays on travel writing, Cambridge Companion to Travel Writing (2002), co-edited with T. Hulme, and Perspectives in Travel Writing (2004), co-edited with G. Hooper. Youngs also co-organized the 2005 travel writing conference, “Mobilis in Mobile”, in Hong Kong. Kristi Siegel is another prolific editor of travel writing scholarship, having edited Issues in Travel Writing: Empire, Spectacle and Displacement (2002), as well as Gender, Genre, and Identity in Women’s Travel Writing (2004).

8th century BC

  • Homer
    Homer
    In the Western classical tradition Homer , is the author of the Iliad and the Odyssey, and is revered as the greatest ancient Greek epic poet. These epics lie at the beginning of the Western canon of literature, and have had an enormous influence on the history of literature.When he lived is...

     (fl. 8th century BC)
    Odyssey
    Odyssey
    The Odyssey is one of two major ancient Greek epic poems attributed to Homer. It is, in part, a sequel to the Iliad, the other work ascribed to Homer. The poem is fundamental to the modern Western canon, and is the second—the Iliad being the first—extant work of Western literature...

     — epic poem accounting the travels of the Greek hero, Odysseus
    Odysseus
    Odysseus or Ulysses was a legendary Greek king of Ithaca and the hero of Homer's epic poem the Odyssey. Odysseus also plays a key role in Homer's Iliad and other works in the Epic Cycle....

    , on his voyage home from Troy.

5th century BC

  • Xenophon
    Xenophon
    Xenophon , son of Gryllus, of the deme Erchia of Athens, also known as Xenophon of Athens, was a Greek historian, soldier, mercenary, philosopher and a contemporary and admirer of Socrates...

     (431–355 BC)
    Anabasis
    Anabasis (Xenophon)
    Anabasis is the most famous work, in seven books, of the Greek professional soldier and writer Xenophon. The journey it narrates is his best known accomplishment and "one of the great adventures in human history," as Will Durant expressed the common assessment.- The account :Xenophon accompanied...

     - about the expedition of Cyrus the Younger
    Cyrus the Younger
    Cyrus the Younger, son of Darius II of Persia and Parysatis, was a Persian prince and general. The time of his birth is unknown, but he died in 401 B.C. The history of Cyrus and of the retreat of the Greeks is told by Xenophon in his Anabasis. Another account, probably from Sophaenetus of...

    , a Persian prince, against his brother, King Artaxerxes II

2nd century AD

  • Lucian of Samosata (c. 125 – after c. 180)
    True History
    True History
    True History or True Story is a travel tale by the Greek-speaking Syrian author Lucian of Samosata, the earliest known fiction about travelling to outer space, alien life-forms and interplanetary warfare. Written in the 2nd century, the novel has been referred to as "the first known text that...

     — documents a fantastic voyage that parodies many mythical travels recounted by other authors, such as Homer; considered to be among the first works of science fiction
    Science fiction
    Science fiction is a genre of fiction dealing with imaginary but more or less plausible content such as future settings, futuristic science and technology, space travel, aliens, and paranormal abilities...

    .
  • Pausanias
    Pausanias (geographer)
    Pausanias was a Greek traveler and geographer of the 2nd century AD, who lived in the times of Hadrian, Antoninus Pius and Marcus Aurelius. He is famous for his Description of Greece , a lengthy work that describes ancient Greece from firsthand observations, and is a crucial link between classical...

     (fl. 2nd century)
    Description of Greece

4th century

  • Decimus Magnus Ausonius (c. 310 395)
    Mosella (The Moselle, c. 370) — describes the poet's trip to the banks of the river Moselle, then in Gaul.
  • Faxian
    Faxian
    Faxian was a Chinese Buddhist monk who traveled to India, Sri Lanka and Kapilavastu in today's Nepal between 399 and 412 to acquire Buddhist scriptures...

     (c. 337 – c. 422), Chinese traveler to India and Ceylon
    A Record of Buddhistic Kingdoms: Being an Account by the Chinese Monk Fâ-Hien of His Travels in India and Ceylon (A.D. 399-414) in Search of the Buddhist Books of Discipline

5th century

  • Rutilius Claudius Namatianus
    Rutilius Claudius Namatianus
    Rutilius Claudius Namatianus was a Roman Imperial poet, notable as the author of a Latin poem, De Reditu Suo, in elegiac metre, describing a coastal voyage from Rome to Gaul in 416...

     (fl. 5th century)
    De reditu suo (Concerning His Return, c. 416) — the poet describes his voyage along the Mediterranean seacoast from Rome to Gaul.

7th century

  • Xuanzang
    Xuanzang
    Xuanzang was a famous Chinese Buddhist monk, scholar, traveler, and translator who described the interaction between China and India in the early Tang period...

     (602 664)
    Great Tang Records on the Western Regions
    Great Tang Records on the Western Regions
    The Great Tang Records on the Western Regions is a narrative of Xuanzang's nineteen year journey through Chang'an to Central Asia and eventually South Asia between 626 and 645...

     (646) — narrative of the Buddhist monk's journey from China to India.

8th century

  • Ennin
    Ennin
    Ennin , who is better known in Japan by his posthumous name, Jikaku Daishi , was a priest of the Tendai school.- Birth and origin :...

     (c. 793 or 794 864), Japanese Buddhist monk who chronicled his travels in Tang China
    The Record of a Pilgrimage to China in Search of the Law
    Ennin's Diary: The Record of a Pilgrimage to China in Search of the Law
    is a four volume diary written by Ennin, a Japanese Buddhist monk in China during the ninth century. He was one of eight Japanese Buddhists who studied in China at that time. He wrote his diary while he went on a Buddhist pilgrimage to China for nine and a half years . The books are translated...

     (838-847)

10th century

  • Ahmad ibn Fadlan
    Ahmad ibn Fadlan
    Ahmad ibn Fadlān ibn al-Abbās ibn Rāšid ibn Hammād was a 10th century Arab traveler, famous for his account of his travels as a member of an embassy of the Arab Abbasid Caliph of Baghdad to the king of the Volga Bulgars...

     (fl.
    Floruit
    Floruit , abbreviated fl. , is a Latin verb meaning "flourished", denoting the period of time during which something was active...

     10th century)
    Kitāb ilā Mulk al-Saqāliba (كتاب إلى ملك الصقالبة) (A letter to the king al-Saqāliba, Ibn Faḍlān's account of the caliphal embassy from Baghdad to the King of the Volga Bulghārs, c. 921)

11th century

  • Nasir Khusraw
    Nasir Khusraw
    Abu Mo’in Hamid ad-Din Nasir ibn Khusraw al-Qubadiani or Nāsir Khusraw Qubādiyānī [also spelled as Nasir Khusrow and Naser Khosrow] Abu Mo’in Hamid ad-Din Nasir ibn Khusraw al-Qubadiani or Nāsir Khusraw Qubādiyānī [also spelled as Nasir Khusrow and Naser Khosrow] Abu Mo’in Hamid ad-Din Nasir ibn...

     (1004 1088), Persian traveler in the Middle East
    Safarnama
    Safarnama
    Safarnāma or Safarnāmé , also spelled as safarnameh, is a travel literature written during the 11th century by Nasir Khusraw . It is also known as the Book of Travels and was a work that shaped the future of classical Persian travel writing.It is an account of Khusraw's seven year journey through...

     (c. 1046)

12th century

  • Abu ad-Din al-Husayn Muhammad ibn Ahmad ibn Jubayr
    Ibn Jubayr
    Ibn Jubayr was a geographer, traveler and poet from al-Andalus.-Early life:Born in Valencia in Spain, then the seat of an independent emirate. Ibn Jubayr was descendant of a tribe of Andalusian origins, Jubayr was the son of a civil servant...

     (1145 1217)
    The Travels of Ibn Jubayr (c. 1185)
  • Gerald of Wales (1146 1223)
    Itinerarium Cambriae (Journey Through Wales, 1191)

13th century

  • Yaqut al-Hamawi
    Yaqut al-Hamawi
    Yāqūt ibn-'Abdullah al-Rūmī al-Hamawī) was an Islamic biographer and geographer renowned for his encyclopedic writings on the Muslim world. "al-Rumi" refers to his Greek descent; "al-Hamawi" means that he is from Hama, Syria, and ibn-Abdullah is a reference to his father's name, Abdullah...

     (1179–1229)
    Mu'jam Al-Buldan
    Mu'jam Al-Buldan
    Mu'jam al-buldan is a book by Yaqut al-Hamawi, a Muslim scholar who is famous for his encyclopedic books.Al-Hamawi started the book in 1224 and finished in 1228, one year before he died....

     (Dictionary of Countries)
  • Marco Polo
    Marco Polo
    Marco Polo was a Venetian merchant traveler from the Venetian Republic whose travels are recorded in Il Milione, a book which did much to introduce Europeans to Central Asia and China. He learned about trading whilst his father and uncle, Niccolò and Maffeo, travelled through Asia and apparently...

     (1254 1324 or 1325), Venetian traveller to China and the Mongol Empire
    Il Milione
    The Travels of Marco Polo
    Books of the Marvels of the World or Description of the World , also nicknamed Il Milione or Oriente Poliano and commonly called The Travels of Marco Polo, is a 13th-century travelogue written down by Rustichello da Pisa from stories told by Marco Polo, describing the...

     (1298)

14th century

  • Ibn Battuta
    Ibn Battuta
    Abu Abdullah Muhammad Ibn Battuta , or simply Ibn Battuta, also known as Shams ad–Din , was a Muslim Moroccan Berber explorer, known for his extensive travels published in the Rihla...

     (1304 1368 or 1369), Moroccan world traveler
    Rihla
    Rihla
    Rihla is a medieval book which recounts the journey of the 14th-century Berber Moroccan scholar and traveler Ibn Battuta.The oeuvre was written by Ibn Juzayy after he was commissioned by the Marinid Sultan Abu Inan who was impressed by the story and journey of Ibn Battuta.The term Rihla is a...

     (1355) literally entitled: "A Gift to Those Who Contemplate the Wonders of Cities and the Marvels of Traveling".

15th century

  • Afanasy Nikitin
    Afanasy Nikitin
    Afanasy Nikitin was a Russian merchant and one of the first Europeans to travel to and document his visit to India. He described his trip in a narrative known as The Journey Beyond Three Seas .-The voyage:In 1466, Nikitin left his hometown of Tver on a commercial trip to India...

     (?1474), Russian merchant, traveler and writer
    A Journey Beyond the Three Seas
    A Journey Beyond the Three Seas
    A Journey Beyond the Three Seas is a Russian literary monument in the form of travel notes, made by a merchant from Tver Afanasiy Nikitin during his journey to India in 1466-1472....


16th century

  • Ẓahīr ud-Dīn Muḥammad Bābur
    Babur
    Babur was a Muslim conqueror from Central Asia who, following a series of setbacks, finally succeeded in laying the basis for the Mughal dynasty of South Asia. He was a direct descendant of Timur through his father, and a descendant also of Genghis Khan through his mother...

     (1483-1531), founder of the Mughal Empire
    Mughal Empire
    The Mughal Empire ,‎ or Mogul Empire in traditional English usage, was an imperial power from the Indian Subcontinent. The Mughal emperors were descendants of the Timurids...

    Baburnama
    Baburnama
    Bāburnāma is the name given to the memoirs of Ẓahīr ud-Dīn Muḥammad Bābur , founder of the Mughal Empire and a great-great-great-grandson of Timur...

    , memoirs, including his descriptions of the places he lived and/or conquered.
  • Duarte Barbosa
    Duarte Barbosa
    Duarte Barbosa was a Portuguese writer and Portuguese India officer between 1500 and 1516–17, with the post of scrivener in Cannanore factory and sometimes interpreter of the local language...

     (?–1521), Portuguese writer and explorer
    Exploration
    Exploration is the act of searching or traveling around a terrain for the purpose of discovery of resources or information. Exploration occurs in all non-sessile animal species, including humans...

     who died in Magellan
    Ferdinand Magellan
    Ferdinand Magellan was a Portuguese explorer. He was born in Sabrosa, in northern Portugal, and served King Charles I of Spain in search of a westward route to the "Spice Islands" ....

    's circumnavigation
    The book of Duarte Barbosa: an account of the countries bordering the Indian Ocean and their inhabitants (1516, originally known through the testimony of Italian Giovanni Battista Ramusio
    Giovanni Battista Ramusio
    Giovanni Battista Ramusio was an Italian geographer and travel writer.Born in Treviso, Italy, Ramusio was the son of Paolo Ramusio, a magistrate in the city-state of Venice...

    )
  • Fernão Mendes Pinto
    Fernão Mendes Pinto
    Fernão Mendes Pinto was a Portuguese explorer and writer. His exploits are known through the posthumous publication of his memoir Pilgrimage in 1614, an autobiographical work whose truthfulness is nearly impossible to assess...

     (1509–1583), Portuguese explorer
    Exploration
    Exploration is the act of searching or traveling around a terrain for the purpose of discovery of resources or information. Exploration occurs in all non-sessile animal species, including humans...

     and writer
    Peregrinação (meaning "Pilgrimage", published posthumously in 1614) memoir of his travels in the Middle and Far East, Ethiopia, Arabian Sea, India and Japan
    Japan
    Japan is an island nation in East Asia. Located in the Pacific Ocean, it lies to the east of the Sea of Japan, China, North Korea, South Korea and Russia, stretching from the Sea of Okhotsk in the north to the East China Sea and Taiwan in the south...

    , as one of the first Europeans to reach it in 1542.
  • Richard Hakluyt
    Richard Hakluyt
    Richard Hakluyt was an English writer. He is principally remembered for his efforts in promoting and supporting the settlement of North America by the English through his works, notably Divers Voyages Touching the Discoverie of America and The Principal Navigations, Voiages, Traffiques and...

     (c. 1552–1616)
    The Principall Navigations, Voiages and Discoveries of the English Nation (1589) — a foundational text of the travel literature genre.

17th century

  • Evliya Çelebi
    Evliya Çelebi
    Evliya Çelebi was an Ottoman traveler who journeyed through the territory of the Ottoman Empire and neighboring lands over a period of forty years.- Life :...

    , (1610–1683)
    Seyahatname
    Seyahatname
    Seyâhatnâme is a Persian term, also used in Ottoman Turkish, which means "book of travels", denoting a literary form and tradition whose examples can be found throughout centuries in the Middle Ages around the Islamic world, starting with the Arab travellers of the Umayyad period.An outstanding...

  • Johann Sigmund Wurffbain (1613–1661)
    Reise Nach Den Molukken Und Vorder-Indien, 1632-1646 (Travel to the Moluccas and the Middle East Indies, 1632-1646) (1646)
  • François de La Boullaye-Le Gouz
    François de La Boullaye-Le Gouz
    François de La Boullaye-Le Gouz , was a French aristocrat and extensive traveller.He published a French-language travelogue, enriched with firsthand accounts of India, Persia, Greece, the Middle East, Denmark, Germany, Netherlands, England, Ireland, and Italy...

     (1623–1668)
    Les voyages et observations du sieur de La Boullaye Le gouz (1653 & 1657) — one of the very first true travel books.
  • Matsuo Bashō
    Matsuo Basho
    , born , then , was the most famous poet of the Edo period in Japan. During his lifetime, Bashō was recognized for his works in the collaborative haikai no renga form; today, after centuries of commentary, he is recognized as a master of brief and clear haiku...

     (1644–1694)
    Kashima Kikō (A Visit to Kashima Shrine) (1687)
    Oi no Kobumi, or Utatsu Kikō (Record of a Travel-Worn Satchel) (1688)
    Sarashina Kikō (A Visit to Sarashina Village) (1688)
    The Narrow Road to the Deep North and Other Travel Sketches (trans. 1967)
  • Jonathan Swift
    Jonathan Swift
    Jonathan Swift was an Irish satirist, essayist, political pamphleteer , poet and cleric who became Dean of St...

     (1667–1745)
    Gulliver's Travels
    Gulliver's Travels
    Travels into Several Remote Nations of the World, in Four Parts. By Lemuel Gulliver, First a Surgeon, and then a Captain of Several Ships, better known simply as Gulliver's Travels , is a novel by Anglo-Irish writer and clergyman Jonathan Swift that is both a satire on human nature and a parody of...

     (1726, amended 1735)
  • Lady Mary Wortley Montagu
    Lady Mary Wortley Montagu
    The Lady Mary Wortley Montagu was an English aristocrat and writer. Montagu is today chiefly remembered for her letters, particularly her letters from Turkey, as wife to the British ambassador, which have been described by Billie Melman as “the very first example of a secular work by a woman about...

     (1689–1762) — known for the letters she wrote during several trips abroad, which were important for later female travel writers. These letters include:
    Turkish Embassy Letters — letters describing her life as an ambassador's wife in Turkey, important as one of the earliest discussions of the Muslim world by a woman

18th century

  • Samuel Johnson
    Samuel Johnson
    Samuel Johnson , often referred to as Dr. Johnson, was an English author who made lasting contributions to English literature as a poet, essayist, moralist, literary critic, biographer, editor and lexicographer...

     (1709–1784)
    A Journey to the Western Islands of Scotland
    A Journey to the Western Islands of Scotland
    A Journey to the Western Islands of Scotland is a travel narrative by Samuel Johnson about an eighty-three day journey through Scotland, in particular the islands of the Hebrides, in the late summer and autumn of 1773...

     (1775) — the lexicographer and his friend James Boswell
    James Boswell
    James Boswell, 9th Laird of Auchinleck was a lawyer, diarist, and author born in Edinburgh, Scotland; he is best known for the biography he wrote of one of his contemporaries, the English literary figure Samuel Johnson....

     (1740–1795) visit Scotland
    Scotland
    Scotland is a country that is part of the United Kingdom. Occupying the northern third of the island of Great Britain, it shares a border with England to the south and is bounded by the North Sea to the east, the Atlantic Ocean to the north and west, and the North Channel and Irish Sea to the...

     in 1773.
  • Laurence Sterne
    Laurence Sterne
    Laurence Sterne was an Irish novelist and an Anglican clergyman. He is best known for his novels The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman, and A Sentimental Journey Through France and Italy; but he also published many sermons, wrote memoirs, and was involved in local politics...

     (1713–1768)
    A Sentimental Journey Through France and Italy
    A Sentimental Journey Through France and Italy
    A Sentimental Journey Through France and Italy is a novel by the Irish-born English author Laurence Sterne, written and first published in 1768, as Sterne was facing death. In 1765, Sterne travelled through France and Italy as far south as Naples, and after returning determined to describe his...

     (1768)
  • Thomas Jefferson
    Thomas Jefferson
    Thomas Jefferson was the principal author of the United States Declaration of Independence and the Statute of Virginia for Religious Freedom , the third President of the United States and founder of the University of Virginia...

     (1743–1826)
    Thomas Jefferson Travels: Selected Writings, 1784-1789 — record of Jefferson's travels in France, Holland, Germany and Italy, included in his Complete Works with selected portions in various collections of his writings.
  • Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
    Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
    Johann Wolfgang von Goethe was a German writer, pictorial artist, biologist, theoretical physicist, and polymath. He is considered the supreme genius of modern German literature. His works span the fields of poetry, drama, prose, philosophy, and science. His Faust has been called the greatest long...

     (1743 1832)
    Italienische Reise
    Italian Journey
    Italian Journey is Johann Wolfgang von Goethe's report on his travels to Italy from 1786–7, published in 1816–7. The book is based on Goethe's diaries...

     (1816–1817)
  • Mary Wollstonecraft
    Mary Wollstonecraft
    Mary Wollstonecraft was an eighteenth-century British writer, philosopher, and advocate of women's rights. During her brief career, she wrote novels, treatises, a travel narrative, a history of the French Revolution, a conduct book, and a children's book...

     (1759–1797)
    A Short Residence in Sweden (1796)
    Letters Written in Sweden, Norway, and Denmark
    Letters Written in Sweden, Norway, and Denmark
    Letters Written During a Short Residence in Sweden, Norway, and Denmark is a personal travel narrative by the eighteenth-century British feminist writer Mary Wollstonecraft. The twenty-five letters cover a wide range of topics, from sociological reflections on Scandinavia and its peoples to...

     (1796)
  • Johann Gottfried Seume
    Johann Gottfried Seume
    Johann Gottfried Seume , German author, was born at Poserna .He was educated, first at Borna, then at the Nikolai school and University of Leipzig. The study of Shaftesbury and Bolingbroke wakened his interest in theology, and, breaking off his studies, he set out for Paris...

     (1763–1810)
    Spaziergang nach Syrakus (1803)
  • Jippensha Ikku
    Jippensha Ikku
    was the pen name of Shigeta Sadakazu , a Japanese writer active during the late Edo period of Japan. He lived primarily in Edo in the service of samurai, but also spent some time in Osaka as a townsman...

     (1765–1831)
    Tōkaidōchū Hizakurige (The Shank's Mare) one of the most famous of the Edo period
    Edo period
    The , or , is a division of Japanese history which was ruled by the shoguns of the Tokugawa family, running from 1603 to 1868. The political entity of this period was the Tokugawa shogunate....

     michiyuki
    Michiyuki
    Michiyuki is the term for a journey scene in Japanese theatre, which shows the characters dancing or conversing while travelling.The term michiyuki in its generic sense of michi wo yuku "to go on a road" is used in lyrical descriptions of journeys from the 8th century...

     (journey) novels.
  • John Quincy Adams
    John Quincy Adams
    John Quincy Adams was the sixth President of the United States . He served as an American diplomat, Senator, and Congressional representative. He was a member of the Federalist, Democratic-Republican, National Republican, and later Anti-Masonic and Whig parties. Adams was the son of former...

     (1767–1848)
    Letters on Silesia: Written During a Tour Through That Country in the Years 1800, 1801 (1804)
  • Sir Henry Holland, 1st Baronet
    Sir Henry Holland, 1st Baronet
    Sir Henry Holland, 1st Baronet FRS, DCL , was a British physician and travel writer.-Private Life:Born in Knutsford, Cheshire, Holland was the son of the physician Peter Holland and his wife Mary Willets. Peter's sister Elizabeth was the mother of the novelist Elizabeth Gaskell, and Mary was the...

     (1788–1873)
    Travels in the Ionian Isles, Albania, Thessaly, Macedonia, &c., during the years 1812 and 1813 (1815)
  • James Fenimore Cooper
    James Fenimore Cooper
    James Fenimore Cooper was a prolific and popular American writer of the early 19th century. He is best remembered as a novelist who wrote numerous sea-stories and the historical novels known as the Leatherstocking Tales, featuring frontiersman Natty Bumppo...

     (1789–1851)
    Gleanings in Europe: Switzerland (1836)
    Gleanings in Europe: The Rhine (1836)
    Gleanings in Europe: England (1837)
  • Marquis de Custine
    Marquis de Custine
    Astolphe-Louis-Léonor, Marquis de Custine was a French aristocrat and writer who is best known for his travel writing, in particular his account of his visit to Russia in 1839 Empire of the Czar: A Journey Through Eternal Russia...

     (1790–1857)
    Empire of the Czar: A Journey Through Eternal Russia (1838)
  • Heinrich Heine
    Heinrich Heine
    Christian Johann Heinrich Heine was one of the most significant German poets of the 19th century. He was also a journalist, essayist, and literary critic. He is best known outside Germany for his early lyric poetry, which was set to music in the form of Lieder by composers such as Robert Schumann...

     (1797–1856)
    Reisebilder (1826–33), Harzreise (1853)

19th century

  • Karl Baedeker
    Karl Baedeker
    Karl Baedeker was a German publisher whose company Baedeker set the standard for authoritative guidebooks for tourists.- Biography :...

     (1801–1859), German publisher whose company set the standard for authoritative guidebooks for tourists
  • Rifa'a el-Tahtawi
    Rifa'a el-Tahtawi
    Rifa'a al-Tahtawi was an Egyptian writer, teacher, translator, Egyptologist and renaissance intellectual...

     (1801–1873), Egyptian traveler to France
    Takhlis al-Ibriz fi Talkhis Bariz ("An Imam in Paris: Account of a Stay in France by an Egyptian Cleric (1826-1831)", 1834)
  • George Borrow
    George Borrow
    George Henry Borrow was an English author who wrote novels and travelogues based on his own experiences around Europe. Over the course of his wanderings, he developed a close affinity with the Romani people of Europe. They figure prominently in his work...

     (1803–1881)
    The Bible in Spain
    The Bible in Spain
    The Bible in Spain, subtitled "or the Journey, Adventures, and Imprisonment of an Englishman in an Attempt to Circulate the Scriptures in the Peninsula" published in London in 1843 is the most famous work of George Borrow...

     (1843)
    Wild Wales
    Wild Wales
    Wild Wales: Its People, Language and Scenery is a travel book by the English Victorian gentleman writer George Borrow, , first published in 1862....

     (1862)
  • John Lloyd Stephens
    John Lloyd Stephens
    John Lloyd Stephens was an American explorer, writer, and diplomat. Stephens was a pivotal figure in the rediscovery of Maya civilization throughout Middle America and in the planning of the Panama railroad....

     (1805–1852)
    Incidents of Travel in Egypt, Arabia Petræa and the Holy Land (1837)
    Incidents of Travel in Greece, Turkey, Russia and Poland (1838)
    Incidents of Travel in Central American, Chiapas and Yucatan (1841)
    Incidents of Travel in Yucatan (1843)
  • Alexis de Tocqueville
    Alexis de Tocqueville
    Alexis-Charles-Henri Clérel de Tocqueville was a French political thinker and historian best known for his Democracy in America and The Old Regime and the Revolution . In both of these works, he explored the effects of the rising equality of social conditions on the individual and the state in...

     (1805–1859)
    Journey to America (1831–1832)
  • Hans Christian Andersen
    Hans Christian Andersen
    Hans Christian Andersen was a Danish author, fairy tale writer, and poet noted for his children's stories. These include "The Steadfast Tin Soldier," "The Snow Queen," "The Little Mermaid," "Thumbelina," "The Little Match Girl," and "The Ugly Duckling."...

     (1805–1875)
    The Improvisatore
    The Improvisatore
    The Improvisatore is an autobiographical novel by Hans Christian Andersen . First published in 1835, it was an immediate success and is considered to be Andersen's breakthrough...

     (1835)
  • Charles Darwin
    Charles Darwin
    Charles Robert Darwin FRS was an English naturalist. He established that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestry, and proposed the scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection.He published his theory...

     (1809–1882)
    The Voyage of the Beagle
    The Voyage of the Beagle
    The Voyage of the Beagle is a title commonly given to the book written by Charles Darwin and published in 1839 as his Journal and Remarks, bringing him considerable fame and respect...

     (1839)
  • Alexander Kinglake (1809–1891)
    Eothen (1844)
  • Charles Dickens
    Charles Dickens
    Charles John Huffam Dickens was an English novelist, generally considered the greatest of the Victorian period. Dickens enjoyed a wider popularity and fame than had any previous author during his lifetime, and he remains popular, having been responsible for some of English literature's most iconic...

     (1812–1870)
    American Notes
    American Notes
    American Notes for General Circulation is a travelogue by Charles Dickens detailing his trip to North America from January to June, 1842. While there he acted as a critical observer of these societies almost as if returning a status report on their progress...

     (1842)
    Pictures from Italy
    Pictures from Italy
    Pictures from Italy is a travelogue by Charles Dickens, written in 1846. The book reveals the concerns of its author as he presents, according to Kate Flint, the country "like a chaotic magic-lantern show, fascinated both by the spectacle it offers, and by himself as spectator".-Background:In...

     (1844–1845)
  • Herman Melville
    Herman Melville
    Herman Melville was an American novelist, short story writer, essayist, and poet. He is best known for his novel Moby-Dick and the posthumous novella Billy Budd....

     (1819–1891)
    Typee: A Peep at Polynesian Life
    Typee
    Typee is American writer Herman Melville's first book, a classic in the literature of travel and adventure partly based on his actual experiences as a captive on the island Nuku Hiva in the South Pacific Marquesas Islands, in 1842...

     (1846)
    Omoo: A Narrative of Adventures in the South Seas
    Omoo
    Omoo: A Narrative of the South Seas is Herman Melville's sequel to Typee, and, as such, was also autobiographical. After leaving Nuku Hiva, the main character ships aboard a whaling vessel which makes its way to Tahiti, after which there is a mutiny and the majority of the crew are imprisoned on...

     (1847) — chronicles of Melville's experiences as a sailor in Polynesia
    Polynesia
    Polynesia is a subregion of Oceania, made up of over 1,000 islands scattered over the central and southern Pacific Ocean. The indigenous people who inhabit the islands of Polynesia are termed Polynesians and they share many similar traits including language, culture and beliefs...

    .
  • Gustave Flaubert
    Gustave Flaubert
    Gustave Flaubert was a French writer who is counted among the greatest Western novelists. He is known especially for his first published novel, Madame Bovary , and for his scrupulous devotion to his art and style.-Early life and education:Flaubert was born on December 12, 1821, in Rouen,...

     (1821–1880) — left travel notes and letters, including:
    Flaubert in Egypt: A Sensibility on Tour (publ.1972) — letters
  • Fran Levstik
    Fran Levstik
    Fran Levstik was a Slovene writer, political activist, playwright and critic. he was one of the most prominent exponents of the Young Slovene political movement.-Life and work:...

     (1831–1887)
    Popotovanje od Litije do Čateža (1858) — a journey from Litija
    Litija
    Litija is a town and a municipality in central Slovenia. It is located in the valley of the river Sava, to the east of the capital Ljubljana. Traditionally, the area was situated on the border between the historical provinces of Carniola and Styria. Most of the municipality belonged to the...

     to Čatež that includes a very influential Slovenian literary programme.
  • William Morris
    William Morris
    William Morris 24 March 18343 October 1896 was an English textile designer, artist, writer, and socialist associated with the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood and the English Arts and Crafts Movement...

     (1834–1896)
    Icelandic Journals (1911)
  • Mark Twain
    Mark Twain
    Samuel Langhorne Clemens , better known by his pen name Mark Twain, was an American author and humorist...

     (1835–1910)
    The Innocents Abroad (1869)
    Roughing It
    Roughing It
    Roughing It is a book of semi-autobiographical travel literature written by American humorist Mark Twain. It was written during 1870–71 and published in 1872 as a prequel to his first book Innocents Abroad...

     (1872)
    A Tramp Abroad
    A Tramp Abroad
    A Tramp Abroad is a work of non-fiction travel literature by American author Mark Twain, published in 1880. The book details a journey by the author, with his friend Harris , through central and southern Europe...

     (1880)
    Following the Equator
    Following the Equator
    Following the Equator or More Tramps Abroad is a non-fiction travelogue published by American author Mark Twain in 1897....

     (1897)
  • John Burroughs
    John Burroughs
    John Burroughs was an American naturalist and essayist important in the evolution of the U.S. conservation movement. According to biographers at the American Memory project at the Library of Congress,...

     (1837–1921)
    Fresh Fields (1884)
  • William Dean Howells
    William Dean Howells
    William Dean Howells was an American realist author and literary critic. Nicknamed "The Dean of American Letters", he was particularly known for his tenure as editor of the Atlantic Monthly as well as his own writings, including the Christmas story "Christmas Every Day" and the novel The Rise of...

     (1837–1920)
    Certain Delightful English Towns (1906)
  • Henry James
    Henry James
    Henry James, OM was an American-born writer, regarded as one of the key figures of 19th-century literary realism. He was the son of Henry James, Sr., a clergyman, and the brother of philosopher and psychologist William James and diarist Alice James....

     (1843–1916)
    A Little Tour in France
    A Little Tour in France
    A Little Tour in France is a book of travel writing by Henry James. Originally published under the title En Province in 1883–1884 as a serial in The Atlantic Monthly, the book recounts a six-week tour James made of many provincial towns in France, including Tours, Bourges, Nantes, Toulouse, Arles...

     (1884)
    English Hours
    English Hours
    English Hours is a book of travel writing by Henry James published in 1905. The book collected various essays James had written on England over a period of more than thirty years, beginning in the 1870s. The essays had originally appeared in such periodicals as The Nation, The Century Magazine,...

     (1905)
    The American Scene
    The American Scene
    The American Scene is a book of travel writing by Henry James about his trip through the United States in 1904-1905. Ten of the fourteen chapters of the book were published in the North American Review, Harper's and the Fortnightly Review in 1905 and 1906...

     (1907)
    Italian Hours
    Italian Hours
    Italian Hours is a book of travel writing by Henry James published in 1909. The book collected essays that James had written over nearly forty years about a country he knew and loved well. James extensively revised and sometimes expanded the essays to create a more consistent whole...

     (1909)
  • Joshua Slocum
    Joshua Slocum
    Joshua Slocum was the first man to sail single-handedly around the world. He was a Canadian born, naturalised American seaman and adventurer, and a noted writer. In 1900 he told the story of this in Sailing Alone Around the World...

     (1844–1909)
    Sailing Alone Around the World
    Sailing Alone Around the World
    Sailing Alone Around the World is a sailing memoir by Joshua Slocum about his single-handed global circumnavigation aboard the sloop Spray. Slocum was the first person to sail around the world alone...

     (1899)
  • Octave Mirbeau
    Octave Mirbeau
    Octave Mirbeau was a French journalist, art critic, travel writer, pamphleteer, novelist, and playwright, who achieved celebrity in Europe and great success among the public, while still appealing to the literary and artistic avant-garde...

     (1848–1917)
    La 628-E8
    La 628-E8
    La 628-E8 is a 'novel' by the French novelist and playwright Octave Mirbeau, published by Fasquelle in 1907. La 628-E8 is noteworthy for its genre indeterminacy. Part travelogue, part fantasy, part cultural commentary and critique, Mirbeau’s book highlights its own unclassifiability: “Is it a...

     (1908)
  • Robert Louis Stevenson
    Robert Louis Stevenson
    Robert Louis Balfour Stevenson was a Scottish novelist, poet, essayist and travel writer. His best-known books include Treasure Island, Kidnapped, and Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde....

     (1850–1894)
    An Inland Voyage
    An Inland Voyage
    An Inland Voyage is a travelogue by Robert Louis Stevenson about a canoeing trip through France and Belgium in 1876. It is Stevenson's earliest book and a pioneering work of outdoor literature....

     (1878)
    Travels with a Donkey in the Cévennes
    Travels with a Donkey in the Cévennes
    Travels with a Donkey in the Cévennes is one of Robert Louis Stevenson's earliest published works and is considered a pioneering classic of outdoor literature.-Background:...

     (1879)
    The Silverado Squatters
    The Silverado Squatters
    The Silverado Squatters is Robert Louis Stevenson's travel memoir of his two-month honeymoon trip with Fanny Vandegrift to Napa Valley, California in the late spring and early summer of 1880....

     (1883)
  • Theodore Roosevelt
    Theodore Roosevelt
    Theodore "Teddy" Roosevelt was the 26th President of the United States . He is noted for his exuberant personality, range of interests and achievements, and his leadership of the Progressive Movement, as well as his "cowboy" persona and robust masculinity...

     (1858–1919)
    Ranch Life and the Hunting Trail (1888)
    Through the Brazilian Wilderness (1914)
  • Jelena Dimitrijević
    Jelena Dimitrijevic
    Jelena Dimitrijević was a short story writer, novelist, poet, traveller, social worker, feminist, and a polyglot. Almost forgotten today, she was one of the most remarkable women of her age, along with her contemporaries, poets Draga Dejanović and Danica Marković, and writers Isidora Sekulić and...

     (1862–1945)
    Letters from Niš Regarding Harems (1897)
    Letters from Salonica on Young Turk Revolution (1918)
    Letters from India (1928)
    Letters from Egypt (1929)
    The New World, alias: In America for a Year (1934)
  • Prince Bojidar Karageorgevitch
    Prince Bojidar Karageorgevitch
    Prince Bojidar Karageorgevitch was a member of the Serbian House of Karađorđević. He was a world traveller...

     (1862–1908)
    Enchanted India (1898)
  • Mary Kingsley
    Mary Kingsley
    Mary Henrietta Kingsley was an English writer and explorer who greatly influenced European ideas about Africa and African people.-Early life:Kingsley was born in Islington, London on 13 October 1862...

     (1862–1900)
    Travels in West Africa (1897)
  • J. Smeaton Chase
    J. Smeaton Chase
    J. Smeaton Chase was an English author and photographer.Joseph Smeaton Chase has become an integral part of California literature: revered for his poignant descriptions of California landscapes...

     (1864–1923)
    Yosemite Trails (1911)
    California Coast Trails (1913)
    California Desert Trails (1919)
  • Carl Gustaf Emil Mannerheim
    Carl Gustaf Emil Mannerheim
    Baron Carl Gustaf Emil Mannerheim was the military leader of the Whites in the Finnish Civil War, Commander-in-Chief of Finland's Defence Forces during World War II, Marshal of Finland, and a Finnish statesman. He was Regent of Finland and the sixth President of Finland...

     (1867–1951)
    Across Asia from West to East in 1906-1908 (English trans. 1940) — explorations by Czarist spy who would later become President of Finland.
  • Norman Douglas
    Norman Douglas
    George Norman Douglas was a British writer, now best known for his 1917 novel South Wind.-Life:Norman Douglas was born in Thüringen, Austria . His mother was Vanda von Poellnitz...

     (1868–1962)
    Old Calabria (1915)
  • André Gide
    André Gide
    André Paul Guillaume Gide was a French author and winner of the Nobel Prize in literature in 1947. Gide's career ranged from its beginnings in the symbolist movement, to the advent of anticolonialism between the two World Wars.Known for his fiction as well as his autobiographical works, Gide...

     (1869–1951)
    Voyage au Congo (1927)
    Le retour de Tchad (1928)
    Retour de l'U. R. S. S. (1936)
    Retouches â mon retour de l'U. R. S. S (1937)
  • Ernest Peixotto
    Ernest Peixotto
    Ernest Clifford Peixotto was an American artist, illustrator, and author. Although he was known mainly for his murals and his travel literature, his artwork also regularly appeared in Scribner's Magazine...

     (1869–1940)
    Our Hispanic Southwest (1916) — contains the first usage of the ethnic slur "spic
    Spic
    Spic is an ethnic slur used in the United States for a person of Hispanic background.-Etymology:Some in the United States believe the word is a play on their pronunciation of the English "speak."...

    "
  • Hilaire Belloc
    Hilaire Belloc
    Joseph Hilaire Pierre René Belloc was an Anglo-French writer and historian who became a naturalised British subject in 1902. He was one of the most prolific writers in England during the early twentieth century. He was known as a writer, orator, poet, satirist, man of letters and political activist...

     (1870–1953)
    The Path To Rome (1902) — a ramble by foot from central France to Rome in 1901.
  • W. Somerset Maugham
    W. Somerset Maugham
    William Somerset Maugham , CH was an English playwright, novelist and short story writer. He was among the most popular writers of his era and, reputedly, the highest paid author during the 1930s.-Childhood and education:...

     (1874–1965)
    On a Chinese Screen (1922) — vignettes of China in the '30s from the master of the short story.
  • Yone Noguchi
    Yone Noguchi
    Yone Noguchi, or Yonejirō Noguchi, born 野口 米次郎 / Noguchi Yonejirō , was an influential Japanese writer of poetry, fiction, essays, and literary criticism in both English and Japanese. He was the father of the sculptor Isamu Noguchi.-Early life:Noguchi was born in the town of Tsushima, near Nagoya...

     (1875–1947)
    The American Diary of a Japanese Girl
    The American Diary of a Japanese Girl
    The American Diary of a Japanese Girl is the first English novel published in the United States by a person of Japanese ancestry. Acquired for Frank Leslie's Illustrated Monthly Magazine by editor Ellery Sedgwick in 1901, it appeared in two excerpted installments in November and December of that...

     (1903)
  • Isidora Sekulić
    Isidora Sekulic
    Isidora Sekulić was a famous Serbian prose writer, novelist, essayist, adventurer, polyglot and art critic....

     (1877–1958)
    Pisma iz Norveške / Letters from Norway (1914)
  • D. H. Lawrence
    D. H. Lawrence
    David Herbert Richards Lawrence was an English novelist, poet, playwright, essayist, literary critic and painter who published as D. H. Lawrence. His collected works represent an extended reflection upon the dehumanising effects of modernity and industrialisation...

     (1885–1930)
    Sea and Sardinia
    Sea and Sardinia
    Sea and Sardinia is a travel book by the English writer D. H. Lawrence. It describes a brief excursion undertaken by Lawrence and Frieda, his wife aka Queen Bee, from Taormina in Sicily to the interior of Sardinia. They visited Cagliari, Mandas, Sorgono, and Nuoro...

     (1921)
  • Henry Vollam Morton
    Henry Vollam Morton
    Henry Canova Vollam Morton, was a journalist and pioneering travel writer from Lancashire, England, best known for his prolific and popular books on Britain and the Holy Land...

     (1892–1979)
    The Heart of London (1925)
    In Search of England (1927)
  • Rebecca West
    Rebecca West
    Cicely Isabel Fairfield , known by her pen name Rebecca West, or Dame Rebecca West, DBE was an English author, journalist, literary critic and travel writer. A prolific, protean author who wrote in many genres, West was committed to feminist and liberal principles and was one of the foremost public...

     (1892–1983)
    Black Lamb and Grey Falcon
    Black Lamb and Grey Falcon
    Black Lamb and Grey Falcon: A Journey Through Yugoslavia is a travel book written by Dame Rebecca West, published in 1941.The book is of exceptional length . It gives an account of Balkan history and ethnography, and the significance of Nazism, structured about West's six week trip to Yugoslavia in...

     (1941) — an 1,181-page look at Yugoslavia
    Yugoslavia
    Yugoslavia refers to three political entities that existed successively on the western part of the Balkans during most of the 20th century....

     before the tragedies of World War II
    World War II
    World War II, or the Second World War , was a global conflict lasting from 1939 to 1945, involving most of the world's nations—including all of the great powers—eventually forming two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis...

     and the 1990s wars.
  • Mahapandit Rahul Sankrityayan (1893–1963)
    Volga Se Ganga
    Volga Se Ganga
    Volga Se Ganga is a collection of stories by great scholar and Writer Rahul Sankrityayan. Rahul Sankrityayan was a true vagabond who traveled to far lands like Russia, Korea, Japan, China and many others...

     ("A Journey From Volga to Ganga", 1944)
  • Thomas Raucat
    Roger Poidatz
    Roger Poidatz was a French writer best known by his pseudonym, Thomas Raucat.Roger Poidatz was born in Paris and graduated from the Paris École Polytechnique, subsequently becoming a pilot in the French Air Force during World War I, flying reconnaissance aircraft...

     (1894–1976)
    L'honorable partie de campagne ("The honorable picnic", 1924)
    De Shang-Haï à Canton ("From Shanghai to Canton", 1927)
  • J. Slauerhoff
    J. Slauerhoff
    Jan Jacob Slauerhoff, who published as J. Slauerhoff, was a Dutch poet and novelist. He is considered one of the most important Dutch language writers.-Youth:...

     (1898–1936)
    Alleen de havens zijn ons trouw ("Only the Ports Are Loyal to Us", 1992 [1927–1932])
  • Peter Aufschnaiter
    Peter Aufschnaiter
    Peter Aufschnaiter was an Austrian mountaineer, agricultural scientist, geographer and cartographer.-Life:...

     (1899–1973)
    Eight Years in Tibet (1983)
  • Emily Kimbrough
    Emily Kimbrough
    -Biography:Emily Kimbrough was born in Muncie, Indiana on October 23, 1899. In 1921 she graduated from Bryn Mawr College and went on a trip to Europe with her friend Cornelia Otis Skinner. The two friends co-authored the memoir Our Hearts Were Young and Gay based on their European adventures...

     (1899–1989) — writer of travel humor
    And a Right Good Crew (1958)
  • Gordon Sinclair
    Gordon Sinclair
    Allan Gordon Sinclair, OC, FRGS was a Canadian journalist, writer and commentator.-Early life:Sinclair was born in the Cabbagetown neighbourhood of Toronto, Ontario. In 1916, before finishing his first year of high school, Sinclair dropped out to take a job with the Bank of Nova Scotia...

     (1900–1984)
    Khyber Caravan: Through Kashmir, Waziristan, Afghanistan, Baluchistan and Northern India (1936) — a somewhat curmudgeonly account of 1934 travels in British India by a later famous Canadian journalist and television personality.
  • Richard Halliburton
    Richard Halliburton
    Richard Halliburton was an American traveler, adventurer, and author. Best known today for having swum the length of the Panama Canal and paying the lowest toll in its history—thirty-six cents—Halliburton was headline news for most of his brief career...

     (1900–1939), one of the most famous explorers and adventure writers of his generation
    The Royal Road to Romance (1925)
    The Glorious Adventure (1927)
    New Worlds to Conquer (1929)
    The Flying Carpet (1932)
    Seven League Boots (1935)

20th century

  • John Steinbeck
    John Steinbeck
    John Ernst Steinbeck, Jr. was an American writer. He is widely known for the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel The Grapes of Wrath and East of Eden and the novella Of Mice and Men...

     (1902–1968)
    A Russian Journal
    A Russian Journal
    A Russian Journal, published by John Steinbeck in 1948, is an eyewitness account of his travels through the Soviet Union during the early years of the Cold War era. Accompanied by the distinguished war photographer Robert Capa, Steinbeck set out with the intent to record the real attitudes and...

     (1948) — A trip through Russia
    Russia
    Russia or , officially known as both Russia and the Russian Federation , is a country in northern Eurasia. It is a federal semi-presidential republic, comprising 83 federal subjects...

    , Ukraine
    Ukraine
    Ukraine is a country in Eastern Europe. It has an area of 603,628 km², making it the second largest contiguous country on the European continent, after Russia...

     and Georgia
    Georgia (country)
    Georgia is a sovereign state in the Caucasus region of Eurasia. Located at the crossroads of Western Asia and Eastern Europe, it is bounded to the west by the Black Sea, to the north by Russia, to the southwest by Turkey, to the south by Armenia, and to the southeast by Azerbaijan. The capital of...

     in the Soviet Union
    Soviet Union
    The Soviet Union , officially the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics , was a constitutionally socialist state that existed in Eurasia between 1922 and 1991....

     shortly after World War II
    World War II
    World War II, or the Second World War , was a global conflict lasting from 1939 to 1945, involving most of the world's nations—including all of the great powers—eventually forming two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis...

     with the friend and renowned war photographer Robert Capa
    Robert Capa
    Robert Capa was a Hungarian combat photographer and photojournalist who covered five different wars: the Spanish Civil War, the Second Sino-Japanese War, World War II across Europe, the 1948 Arab-Israeli War, and the First Indochina War...

    .
    Travels with Charley: In Search of America
    Travels With Charley: In Search of America
    Travels with Charley: In Search of America is a travelogue written by American author John Steinbeck. It recounts tales of a 1960 road trip with his French standard poodle, Charley, around the United States. He wrote that he was moved by a desire to see his country on a personal level, since he...

     (1962) — an American road book describing Steinbeck's journeys with his poodle, Charley.
  • Chiang Yee
    Chiang Yee
    Chiang Yee , self-styled as "The Silent Traveller", was a Chinese poet, author, painter and calligrapher.-1903-1933: China:Chiang Yee was born in Jiujiang, China, on a day variously recorded as May 19 or June 14...

     (1903–1977)
    The Silent Traveller series — 11 books about his travels in Britain, the USA and Japan
  • Evelyn Waugh
    Evelyn Waugh
    Arthur Evelyn St. John Waugh , known as Evelyn Waugh, was an English writer of novels, travel books and biographies. He was also a prolific journalist and reviewer...

     (1903–1966)
    Waugh Abroad: Collected Travel Writing — an account of the English novelist's restless wanderings around the world in the 1930s and later.
  • Graham Greene
    Graham Greene
    Henry Graham Greene, OM, CH was an English author, playwright and literary critic. His works explore the ambivalent moral and political issues of the modern world...

     (1904–1991)
    Journey Without Maps
    Journey Without Maps
    Journey Without Maps is a travel account by Graham Greene, about a 350-mile, 4-week walk through the interior of Liberia in 1935. It was Greene's first trip outside of Europe. He hoped to leave civilization and find the "heart of darkness" in Africa...

     (1936)
  • Jean Baudrillard
    Jean Baudrillard
    Jean Baudrillard was a French sociologist, philosopher, cultural theorist, political commentator, and photographer. His work is frequently associated with postmodernism and post-structuralism.-Life:...

     (1929–2007)
    "America" (1986)
  • Robert Byron
    Robert Byron
    Robert Byron was a British travel writer, best known for his travelogue The Road to Oxiana. He was also a noted writer, art critic and historian....

     (1905–1941)
    The Road to Oxiana
    The Road to Oxiana
    The Road to Oxiana is a travelogue by Robert Byron, first published in 1937. It is considered by many modern travel writers to be the first example of great travel writing. The word "Oxiana" in the title refers to the region along Afghanistan's northern border.The book is an account of Byron's...

     (1937) — travels in Persia
    Iran
    Iran , officially the Islamic Republic of Iran , is a country in Southern and Western Asia. The name "Iran" has been in use natively since the Sassanian era and came into use internationally in 1935, before which the country was known to the Western world as Persia...

     and Afghanistan
    Afghanistan
    Afghanistan , officially the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan, is a landlocked country located in the centre of Asia, forming South Asia, Central Asia and the Middle East. With a population of about 29 million, it has an area of , making it the 42nd most populous and 41st largest nation in the world...

  • Laurens van der Post
    Laurens van der Post
    Sir Laurens Jan van der Post, CBE was a 20th century Afrikaner author of many books, farmer, war hero, political adviser to British heads of government, close friend of Prince Charles, godfather of Prince William, educator, journalist, humanitarian, philosopher, explorer, and...

     (1906–1996)
    The Lost World of the Kalahari (1958) — Auberon Waugh
    Auberon Waugh
    Auberon Alexander Waugh was a British author and journalist, son of the novelist Evelyn Waugh. He was known to his family and friends as Bron Waugh.-Life and career:...

     (1939–2001) described van der Post as the person in whose company he'd most like to spend an evening. This book by the South African soldier/explorer/writer suggests why.
  • Robert A. Heinlein
    Robert A. Heinlein
    Robert Anson Heinlein was an American science fiction writer. Often called the "dean of science fiction writers", he was one of the most influential and controversial authors of the genre. He set a standard for science and engineering plausibility and helped to raise the genre's standards of...

     (1907–1988)
    Tramp Royale
    Tramp Royale
    Tramp Royale is a nonfiction travelogue by science fiction writer Robert A. Heinlein, describing how he and his wife, Ginny, went around the world by ship and plane between 1953–1954...

     (1992)
  • Ian Fleming
    Ian Fleming
    Ian Lancaster Fleming was a British author, journalist and Naval Intelligence Officer.Fleming is best known for creating the fictional British spy James Bond and for a series of twelve novels and nine short stories about the character, one of the biggest-selling series of fictional books of...

     (1908–1964)
    Thrilling Cities
    Thrilling Cities
    Thrilling Cities is the title of a collection of non-fiction travel articles by James Bond creator Ian Fleming. The book was published in Great Britain in 1963, followed by an American edition in 1964....

     (1963)
  • Paul Bowles
    Paul Bowles
    Paul Frederic Bowles was an American expatriate composer, author, and translator.Following a cultured middle-class upbringing in New York City, during which he displayed a talent for music and writing, Bowles pursued his education at the University of Virginia before making various trips to Paris...

     (1910–1999)
    Yallah (1957)
    Their Heads Are Green and Their Hands Are Blue (1963)
  • Wilfred Thesiger
    Wilfred Thesiger
    Sir Wilfred Patrick Thesiger, CBE, DSO, FRAS, FRGS was a British explorer and travel writer born in Addis Ababa, the capital of Ethiopia.-Family:...

     (1910–2003)
    Arabian Sands (1959)
  • Gavin Young
    Gavin Young
    Gavin David Young was born in Bude, Cornwall, England. His father, Gavin Young, was a Lieutenant-Colonel in the Welsh Guards. Daphne, his mother, was the daughter of Sir Charles Leolin Forestier-Walker, Bt, of Monmouthshire. Young spent most of his youth in Cornwall and South Wales...

     (1928–2001)
    Return to the Marshes (1977)
    Iraq: Land of Two Rivers (1980)
    Slow Boats to China (1981)
    Halfway Around the World: An Improbable Journey (1983)
    Slow Boats Home (1985)
  • Lawrence Durrell
    Lawrence Durrell
    Lawrence George Durrell was an expatriate British novelist, poet, dramatist, and travel writer, though he resisted affiliation with Britain and preferred to be considered cosmopolitan...

     (1912–1990)
    Prospero's Cell: A Guide to the Landscape and Manners of the Island of Corcyra (1945) — this text describes Durrell's time in Corfu
    Corfu
    Corfu is a Greek island in the Ionian Sea. It is the second largest of the Ionian Islands, and, including its small satellite islands, forms the edge of the northwestern frontier of Greece. The island is part of the Corfu regional unit, and is administered as a single municipality. The...

    . It should be read in tandem with his brother Gerald's My Family and Other Animals.
    Reflections on a Marine Venus (1953) — experiences in Rhodes
    Rhodes
    Rhodes is an island in Greece, located in the eastern Aegean Sea. It is the largest of the Dodecanese islands in terms of both land area and population, with a population of 117,007, and also the island group's historical capital. Administratively the island forms a separate municipality within...

    .
    Bitter Lemons (1957) — travels in Cyprus
    Cyprus
    Cyprus , officially the Republic of Cyprus , is a Eurasian island country, member of the European Union, in the Eastern Mediterranean, east of Greece, south of Turkey, west of Syria and north of Egypt. It is the third largest island in the Mediterranean Sea.The earliest known human activity on the...

    .
  • Heinrich Harrer
    Heinrich Harrer
    Heinrich Harrer was an Austrian mountaineer, sportsman, geographer, and author.He is best known for his books Seven Years in Tibet and The White Spider .-Athletics:...

     (1912–2006)
    Seven Years in Tibet
    Seven Years in Tibet
    Seven Years in Tibet is an autobiographical travel book written by Austrian mountaineer Heinrich Harrer based on his real life experiences in Tibet between 1944 and 1951 during the Second World War and the interim period before the Communist Chinese People's Liberation Army invaded Tibet in...

     (1952)
  • Gavin Maxwell
    Gavin Maxwell
    Gavin Maxwell FRSL, FIAL, FZS , FRGS was a Scottish naturalist and author, best known for his work with otters. He wrote the book Ring of Bright Water about how he brought an otter back from Iraq and raised it in Scotland...

     (1914–1969)
    People of the Reeds (1957)
  • Patrick Leigh Fermor
    Patrick Leigh Fermor
    Sir Patrick "Paddy" Michael Leigh Fermor, DSO, OBE was a British author, scholar and soldier, who played a prominent role behind the lines in the Cretan resistance during World War II. He was widely regarded as "Britain's greatest living travel writer", with books including his classic A Time of...

     (b. 1915)
    A Time Of Gifts
    A Time Of Gifts
    A Time of Gifts is regarded by many critics as one of the classics of travel literature. Written by Patrick Leigh Fermor and published by John Murray in 1977 when the author was 62, it is an account of the first part of the author's journey on foot across Europe from the Hook of Holland to...

     (1977) — a journey by an 18 year old in 1933/4 overland from the Hook of Holland to Hungary, rewritten in old age from long lost notes.
  • Roger Pilkington (1915–2003) — author of the "Small Boat" series
    Small Boat on the Thames (1966)
    Small Boat on the Moselle (1968)
  • Camilo José Cela
    Camilo José Cela
    Camilo José Cela y Trulock, 1st Marquis of Iria Flavia was a Spanish novelist and short story writer. He was awarded the 1989 Nobel Prize in Literature "for a rich and intensive prose, which with restrained compassion forms a challenging vision of man's vulnerability".-Biography:Cela published his...

     (1916–2002)
    Viaje a la Alcarria (1948)
  • Eric Newby
    Eric Newby
    George Eric Newby CBE MC was an English travel author. Newby's best known works include A Short Walk in the Hindu Kush, The Last Grain Race, and Round Ireland in Low Gear.-Life:...

     (1919–2006), popular English travel writer
    A Short Walk in the Hindu Kush (1958)
  • Lucjan Wolanowski
    Lucjan Wolanowski
    Lucjan Wilhelm Wolanowski , pseudonyms: Wilk; Waldemar Mruczkowski; W. Lucjański; ; lu; Lu; ; WOL., Polish journalist, writer and traveller....

     (1920–2006)
    Post to Never-Never Land
    Outback
    The Outback is the vast, remote, arid area of Australia, term colloquially can refer to any lands outside the main urban areas. The term "the outback" is generally used to refer to locations that are comparatively more remote than those areas named "the bush".-Overview:The outback is home to a...

     (Poland
    Poland
    Poland , officially the Republic of Poland , is a country in Central Europe bordered by Germany to the west; the Czech Republic and Slovakia to the south; Ukraine, Belarus and Lithuania to the east; and the Baltic Sea and Kaliningrad Oblast, a Russian exclave, to the north...

    , 1968) reports from Australia
    Australia
    Australia , officially the Commonwealth of Australia, is a country in the Southern Hemisphere comprising the mainland of the Australian continent, the island of Tasmania, and numerous smaller islands in the Indian and Pacific Oceans. It is the world's sixth-largest country by total area...

    .
    Heat and fever (Poland
    Poland
    Poland , officially the Republic of Poland , is a country in Central Europe bordered by Germany to the west; the Czech Republic and Slovakia to the south; Ukraine, Belarus and Lithuania to the east; and the Baltic Sea and Kaliningrad Oblast, a Russian exclave, to the north...

    , 1970) reports from the work in World Health Organization
    World Health Organization
    The World Health Organization is a specialized agency of the United Nations that acts as a coordinating authority on international public health. Established on 7 April 1948, with headquarters in Geneva, Switzerland, the agency inherited the mandate and resources of its predecessor, the Health...

     Information department in Geneva
    Geneva
    Geneva In the national languages of Switzerland the city is known as Genf , Ginevra and Genevra is the second-most-populous city in Switzerland and is the most populous city of Romandie, the French-speaking part of Switzerland...

    , travels in New Delhi
    New Delhi
    New Delhi is the capital city of India. It serves as the centre of the Government of India and the Government of the National Capital Territory of Delhi. New Delhi is situated within the metropolis of Delhi. It is one of the nine districts of Delhi Union Territory. The total area of the city is...

    , Bangkok
    Bangkok
    Bangkok is the capital and largest urban area city in Thailand. It is known in Thai as Krung Thep Maha Nakhon or simply Krung Thep , meaning "city of angels." The full name of Bangkok is Krung Thep Mahanakhon Amon Rattanakosin Mahintharayutthaya Mahadilok Phop Noppharat Ratchathani Burirom...

     and Manila
    Manila
    Manila is the capital of the Philippines. It is one of the sixteen cities forming Metro Manila.Manila is located on the eastern shores of Manila Bay and is bordered by Navotas and Caloocan to the north, Quezon City to the northeast, San Juan and Mandaluyong to the east, Makati on the southeast,...

    , 1967-1968.
  • Jože Javoršek
    Jože Javoršek
    Jože Javoršek was the pen name of Jože Brejc , a Slovenian playwright, writer, poet, translator and essayist. He is regarded as one of the greatest masters of style and language among Slovene authors...

     (1920-1990)
    Indija Koromandija (1962), a travelogue through India
    India
    India , officially the Republic of India , is a country in South Asia. It is the seventh-largest country by geographical area, the second-most populous country with over 1.2 billion people, and the most populous democracy in the world...

     by one of the most important Slovenian essayists of the 20th century
  • Zulfikar "Zuko" Džumhur
    Zuko Džumhur
    Zulfikar "Zuko" Džumhur was a Bosnian writer, painter and caricaturist. Džumhur's bohemian nature, versatility of a polymath and extremely creative personality have made him a unique figure of the Yugoslav culture in the second half of the 20th century.Džumhur was born in Konjic, northern...

     (1921, Konjic
    Konjic
    Konjic is a town and municipality in Bosnia and Herzegovina. It is located in northern Herzegovina, around southwest of Sarajevo. It is a mountainous, heavily wooded area, and is above sea level. The municipality extends on both sides of the Neretva River. The town of Konjic, housed about a third...

    , Bosnia and Herzegovina
    Bosnia and Herzegovina
    Bosnia and Herzegovina , sometimes called Bosnia-Herzegovina or simply Bosnia, is a country in Southern Europe, on the Balkan Peninsula. Bordered by Croatia to the north, west and south, Serbia to the east, and Montenegro to the southeast, Bosnia and Herzegovina is almost landlocked, except for the...

     – 1989) was a Bosnian
    Bosnians
    Bosnians are people who reside in, or come from, Bosnia and Herzegovina. By the modern state definition a Bosnian can be anyone who holds citizenship of the state. This includes, but is not limited to, members of the constituent ethnic groups of Bosnia and Herzegovina: Bosniaks, Bosnian Serbs and...

     writer, painter and caricaturist. He wrote screenplays and hosted TV show Hodoljublje, a travel documentary
    Travel documentary
    A travel documentary is a documentary film or television program that describes travel in general or tourist attractions in a non-commercial way....

    . He successfully produced this show for over ten years for television TV Sarajevo.
    Hodoljublja (1982, "TV Sarajevo" Bosnia and Herzegovina
    Bosnia and Herzegovina
    Bosnia and Herzegovina , sometimes called Bosnia-Herzegovina or simply Bosnia, is a country in Southern Europe, on the Balkan Peninsula. Bordered by Croatia to the north, west and south, Serbia to the east, and Montenegro to the southeast, Bosnia and Herzegovina is almost landlocked, except for the...

    ) (Travelogue - a travel documentary
    Travel documentary
    A travel documentary is a documentary film or television program that describes travel in general or tourist attractions in a non-commercial way....

     with focus on culture, traditions, art and nature of Bosnia and Herzegovina, (ex) Yugoslavia and countries he sojourned, primarily Islamic and countries of Mediterranean Basin
    Mediterranean Basin
    In biogeography, the Mediterranean Basin refers to the lands around the Mediterranean Sea that have a Mediterranean climate, with mild, rainy winters and hot, dry summers, which supports characteristic Mediterranean forests, woodlands, and scrub vegetation...

    .)
    Nekrolog jednoj čaršiji (1958) (Obituary of a čaršija (the downtown/main street Ottoman-Turkish style bazaar)) (with an introduction by Ivo Andrić
    Ivo Andric
    Ivan "Ivo" Andrić was a Yugoslav novelist, short story writer, and the 1961 winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature. His writings dealt mainly with life in his native Bosnia under the Ottoman Empire...

    )
    Pisma iz Azije (1973) (Letters from Asia)
    Pisma iz Afrike i Evrope (Letters from Africa & Europe)
    Stogodišnje priče (Centennial tales)
    Putovanje bijelom Ladom (1982) (Voyage with white "Lada" ("Lada" is a brand of Russian automobile))
    Adakale
    Zelena čoja Montenegra (Green carpet of Montenegro - co-authored with Serbian novelist Momo Kapor
    Momo Kapor
    Momčilo "Momo" Kapor was a Serbian novelist, painter, and short story writer.. Several successful films have been based upon his novels. He was born in Sarajevo, Kingdom of Yugoslavia and died in Belgrade, Serbia.Kapor was born in Sarajevo in 1937 and graduated from the Academy of Fine Arts in...

    )
  • Gerald Durrell
    Gerald Durrell
    Gerald "Gerry" Malcolm Durrell, OBE was a naturalist, zookeeper, conservationist, author and television presenter...

     (1925–1995)
    My Family and Other Animals
    My Family and Other Animals
    My Family and Other Animals is an autobiographical work by naturalist Gerald Durrell, telling of the part of his childhood he spent on the Greek island of Corfu between 1935 and 1939. It describes the life of the Durrell Family on the island in a humorous manner, and also richly discusses the fauna...

     (1956) — a description of an idyllic childhood on Corfu in the 1930s by the brother of Lawrence Durrell (1912–1990). This text combines natural observations, humour, storytelling, and travel.
    Fillets of Plaice (1971)
  • Jan Morris
    Jan Morris
    Jan Morris CBE is a Welsh nationalist, historian, author and travel writer. She is known particularly for the Pax Britannica trilogy, a history of the British Empire, and for portraits of cities, notably Oxford, Venice, Trieste, Hong Kong, and New York City.With an English mother and Welsh father,...

     (b. 1926)
    Trieste and the Meaning of Nowhere (2001) — author of many works, especially about cities; prior to the 1970s, her work was published under her previous name, "James Morris."
  • Che Guevara
    Che Guevara
    Ernesto "Che" Guevara , commonly known as el Che or simply Che, was an Argentine Marxist revolutionary, physician, author, intellectual, guerrilla leader, diplomat and military theorist...

     (1928–1967)
    The Motorcycle Diaries (1952) — Traces the 8000 km trip through South America of Marxist revolutionary Ernesto 'Che' Guevara, then a 23-year-old medical student, and his friend Alberto Granado
    Alberto Granado
    Alberto Granado was an Argentine–Cuban biochemist, doctor, writer, and scientist. He was also the youthful friend and traveling companion of revolutionary Che Guevara during their 1952 trip around Latin America, and later founded the Santiago School of Medicine in Cuba...

     a 29-year-old biochemist (who also published his own diaries of the event in Travelling with Che Guevara).
  • Primož Kozak
    Primož Kozak
    Primož Kozak was a Slovenian playwright and essayist. He was, together with Dominik Smole, Dane Zajc and Taras Kermauner, the most visible representative of the so-called Critical generation, a group of Slovenian authors and intellectuals that reflected on the paradoxes of the Communist regime,...

     (1929-1981)
    Peter Klepec in America (1971), a travelogue through the United States
    United States
    The United States of America is a federal constitutional republic comprising fifty states and a federal district...

     by one of the most important Slovenian essayists of the 20th century
  • Juan Goytisolo
    Juan Goytisolo
    Juan Goytisolo is a Spanish poet, essayist, and novelist. He currently lives in a voluntary self-exile in Marrakech.-Background:Juan Goytisolo was born to an aristocratic family...

     (b. 1931)
    Campos de Nijar (1959)
  • Ted Simon
    Ted Simon
    Ted Simon is a British journalist born in Germany in 1931, noted for circumnavigating the world twice by motorcycle. He was raised in London by a German mother and a Romanian father....

     (b. 1931)
    Jupiter's Travels (1979)
  • Ryszard Kapuściński
    Ryszard Kapuscinski
    Ryszard Kapuściński was a Polish journalist and writer whose dispatches in book form brought him a global reputation. Also a photographer and poet, he was born in Pińsknow in Belarusin the Kresy Wschodnie or eastern borderlands of the second Polish Republic, into poverty: he would say later that...

     (1932–2007)
    Another Day of Life
    Another Day of Life
    Another Day of Life is a non-fiction record of three months of the Angolan Civil War by the Polish writer Ryszard Kapuściński.It is made up of a notable description of the degradation of the Angolan capital, Luanda, an analysis of the various weaknesses of the Popular Movement for the Liberation of...

     (1976)
    The Soccer War
    Football War
    The Football War , also known as the Soccer War or 100 hour War, was a four-day war fought by El Salvador and Honduras in 1969. It was caused by political conflicts between Hondurans and Salvadorans, namely issues concerning immigration from El Salvador to Honduras...

     (1978)
    The Emperor: Downfall of an Autocrat
    The Emperor (book)
    The Emperor: Downfall of an Autocrat, published in 1978, is Polish journalist Ryszard Kapuściński's analysis of the decline and fall of Haile Selassie's regime in Ethiopia...

     (1978)
    Shah of Shahs
    Shah of Shahs
    Shah of Shahs, published in 1982, is Polish journalist Ryszard Kapuściński's analysis of the decline and fall of Mohammad Reza Pahlavi, the last Shah of Iran....

     (1982)
    Imperium
    Imperium
    Imperium is a Latin word which, in a broad sense, translates roughly as 'power to command'. In ancient Rome, different kinds of power or authority were distinguished by different terms. Imperium, referred to the sovereignty of the state over the individual...

     (1993)
    The Shadow of the Sun
    The Shadow of the Sun
    The Shadow of the Sun is a non-fiction book by the Polish writer Ryszard Kapuściński, published in English translation in 2001.Kapuściński, a journalist who covered Africa from 1957 to the 1990s, wrote a number of books about his experiences in the continent and all over the world which have been...

     (2001)
  • Cees Nooteboom
    Cees Nooteboom
    Cees Nooteboom is a Dutch author. He has won numerous literary awards and has been mentioned as a candidate for the Nobel Prize in literature.-Life:...

     (b. 1933), Dutch travel writer
    Berlijnse Notities (1990)
    Roads to Santiago (1992)
    Nootebooms Hotel (2002)
  • Barbara Grizzuti Harrison
    Barbara Grizzuti Harrison
    Barbara Grizzuti Harrison was an American journalist, essayist and memoirist. She is best known for her autobiographical work, particularly her account of growing up as one of Jehovah's Witnesses, and for her travel writing.- Early life :Barbara Grizzuti was born in Queens, New York City, on 14...

     (1934–2002)
    Italian Days (1989)
  • David Lodge
    David Lodge (author)
    David John Lodge CBE, is an English author.In his novels, Lodge often satirises academia in general and the humanities in particular. He was brought up Catholic and has described himself as an "agnostic Catholic". Many of his characters are Catholic and their Catholicism is a major theme...

     (b. 1935)
    Paradise News
    Paradise News
    Paradise News is a novel by British author David Lodge.-Plot summary:The story begins with Bernard, a laicised Catholic priest, escorting his unwilling father Jack to Hawaii at the request of his aunt Ursula, who is dying of cancer. On the day after arrival, Jack is hit by a car and sent to hospital...

    , 1991
  • Rubén Caba
    Rubén Caba
    Rubén Caba, born in Madrid, is a Spanish novelist and essayist. Degrees in Law and in Philosophy at de Universidad Complutense de Madrid. And graduated in Sociology at Instituto de Estudios Políticos, Madrid.-Bibliography:...

     (b. 1935)
    Por la ruta serrana del Arcipreste (1976, 1977, 1995)
  • Venedict Yerofeyev (1938–1990)
    Moskva–Pеtushki
    Moscow-Petushki
    Moscow-Petushki, also published as Moscow to the End of the Line, Moscow Stations, and Moscow Circles, is a pseudo-autobiographical postmodernist prose poem by Russian writer and satirist Venedikt Erofeev....

     (1973) — a Russian tale of alcohol, love, and a train ride; translated into English as Moscow to the End of the Line.
  • William Least Heat-Moon
    William Least Heat-Moon
    William Least Heat-Moon, the byname of William Lewis Trogdon is an American travel writer of English, Irish and Osage Nation ancestry. He is the author of a bestselling trilogy of topographical U.S. travel writing.-Biography:...

     (b. 1939)
    Blue Highways: A Journey into America (1982)
  • Peter Mayle
    Peter Mayle
    Peter Mayle is a British author famous for his series of books detailing life in Provence, France. He spent fifteen years in the advertising industry before leaving the business in 1975 to write educational books, including a series on sex education for children and young people...

     (b. 1939)
    A Year in Provence
    A Year in Provence
    A Year in Provence is a 1989 bestselling autobiographical novel by Peter Mayle about his first year in Provence, and the local events and customs. It was adapted into a television miniseries starring John Thaw and Lindsay Duncan. Reviewers praised its honest style, wit and its refreshing humor...

     (1989)
  • Colin Thubron
    Colin Thubron
    Colin Gerald Dryden Thubron, CBE is a British travel writer and novelist.In 2008, The Times ranked him 45th on their list of the 50 greatest postwar British writers. He is a contributor to The New York Review of Books, The Times, The Times Literary Supplement and The New York Times. His books...

     (b. 1939)
    Mirror to Damascus (1967)
  • Bruce Chatwin
    Bruce Chatwin
    Charles Bruce Chatwin was an English novelist and travel writer. He won the James Tait Black Memorial Prize for his novel On the Black Hill...

     (1940–1989), an English stylist of the 20th century
    In Patagonia
    In Patagonia
    -Preparations:In 1972, Chatwin was hired by the Sunday Times Magazine as an adviser on art and architecture. His association with the magazine cultivated his narrative skills and he travelled on many international assignments, writing on such subjects as Algerian migrant workers and the Great Wall...

     (1977)
    The Songlines
    The Songlines
    The Songlines is a 1986 book written by Bruce Chatwin, combining fiction and non-fiction. Chatwin describes a trip to Australia which he has taken for the express purpose of researching Aboriginal song and its connections to nomadic travel...

     (1987)
  • Frances Mayes
    Frances Mayes
    Frances Mayes is an American university professor, poet, memoirist, essayist, and novelist.Born and raised in Fitzgerald, Georgia, Mayes attended Randolph-Macon Woman's College in Lynchburg, Virginia, and obtained her BA from the University of Florida...

     (b. 1940)
    Under the Tuscan Sun (1996) — a memoir of buying, renovating, and living in an abandoned villa in rural Tuscany
    Tuscany
    Tuscany is a region in Italy. It has an area of about 23,000 square kilometres and a population of about 3.75 million inhabitants. The regional capital is Florence ....

     in Italy
    Italy
    Italy , officially the Italian Republic languages]] under the European Charter for Regional or Minority Languages. In each of these, Italy's official name is as follows:;;;;;;;;), is a unitary parliamentary republic in South-Central Europe. To the north it borders France, Switzerland, Austria and...

    .
  • Paul Theroux
    Paul Theroux
    Paul Edward Theroux is an American travel writer and novelist, whose best known work of travel writing is perhaps The Great Railway Bazaar . He has also published numerous works of fiction, some of which were made into feature films. He was awarded the 1981 James Tait Black Memorial Prize for his...

     (b. 1941)
    The Great Railway Bazaar
    The Great Railway Bazaar
    The Great Railway Bazaar: By Train Through Asia is a 1975 travelogue written by the American novelist Paul Theroux. It recounts Theroux's four-month journey across Asia by train, travelling through Europe, the Middle East, the Indian subcontinent and Southeast Asia, before finally returning via the...

     (1975) — perhaps Theroux's most popular travel work.
  • Jonathan Raban
    Jonathan Raban
    Jonathan Raban is a British travel writer and novelist. He has received several awards, such as the National Book Critics Circle Award, The Royal Society of Literature's Heinemann Award, the Thomas Cook Travel Book Award, the PEN West Creative Nonfiction Award, the Pacific Northwest Booksellers...

     (b. 1942)
    Old Glory: An American Voyage
    Old Glory: An American Voyage
    Old Glory is a travel book by Jonathan Raban. It is the winner of The Royal Society of Literature's Heinemann Award and the Thomas Cook Travel Book Award.- Plot summary :...

     (1981)
  • Michael Crichton
    Michael Crichton
    John Michael Crichton , best known as Michael Crichton, was an American best-selling author, producer, director, and screenwriter, best known for his work in the science fiction, medical fiction, and thriller genres. His books have sold over 200 million copies worldwide, and many have been adapted...

     (1942–2008)
    Travels
    Travels (book)
    Travels is a nonfiction book by Michael Crichton that details Crichton's attempts to leave his medical education at Harvard Medical School, followed by his subsequent travel to Los Angeles and adventures continuing his professional writing career, beginning with The Great Train Robbery...

     (1988)

21st century

  • Michael Palin
    Michael Palin
    Michael Edward Palin, CBE FRGS is an English comedian, actor, writer and television presenter best known for being one of the members of the comedy group Monty Python and for his travel documentaries....

     (b. 1943)
    Sahara
    Sahara (Michael Palin)
    Sahara is the book that Michael Palin wrote to accompany the BBC television documentary series Sahara with Michael Palin.This book, like the other books that Palin wrote following each of his seven trips for the BBC, consists both of his text and of many photographs to illustrate the trip...

     (2002)
  • Julian Barnes
    Julian Barnes
    Julian Patrick Barnes is a contemporary English writer, and winner of the 2011 Man Booker Prize, for his book The Sense of an Ending...

     (b. 1946)
    A History of the World in 10½ Chapters
    A History of the World in 10½ Chapters
    A History of the World in 10½ Chapters is a novel by Julian Barnes published in 1989. It is a collection of short stories in different styles; however, at some points they echo each other and have subtle connection points. Most are fictional but some are historical.-Background:One of the many...

     (1989)
    England, England
    England, England
    England, England is a satirical science fiction novel by Julian Barnes which was shortlisted for the Booker Prize. The novel is set in the Britain of the not-too-distant future, and chronicles the creation of a giant England themed amusement park, called "England, England", which also operates as...

     (1998)
  • Tom Miller
    Tom Miller (travel writer)
    Tom Miller is an American author primarily known for travel literature. His ten books include The Panama Hat Trail, On the Border, Trading With the Enemy, and Jack Ruby's Kitchen Sink...

     (b. 1947)
    Best Travel Writing 2005, introduction, pp. xvii-xxi, (2005)
    A Sense of Place: Great Travel Writers Talk About Their Craft, Lives, and Inspiration, (2004) pp. 325–343.
    Writing on the Edge: A Borderlands Reader, (ed.) (2003)
    Travelers' Tales—Cuba, (ed.) (2001)
    Jack Ruby's Kitchen Sink: Offbeat Travels Through America's Southwest (2000)
    Trading With the Enemy: A Yankee Travels Through Castro's Cuba (1992)
    The Panama Hat Trail: A Journey From South America (1986)
    Arizona: The Land and the People, (ed.) (1986)
    On the Border: Portraits of America's Southwestern Frontier (1981)
  • Mikirō Sasaki
    Mikiro Sasaki
    Mikirō Sasaki , also Mikio Sasaki, is a Japanese poet and travel author, winner of the 2003 Yomiuri Prize for travel essays. Sasaki won the award for his book Ajia kaidō kikō: umi wa toshi de aru . He has published more than a score of poetry collections and travel books...

     (b. 1947), Japanese poet and travel essayist
    Ajia kaidō kikō: umi wa toshi de aru (A Travel Journal of the Asian Seaboard, 2002)
  • Lawrence Millman
    Lawrence Millman
    Lawrence Millman in is an adventure travel writer and mycologist from Cambridge, Massachusetts....

     (b. 1948)
    An Evening Among Headhunters: And Other Reports from Roads Less Taken (1999)
    Last Places: A Journey in the North (2000)
    Northern Latitudes (2000)
    Lost in the Arctic: Explorations on the Edge (2002)
  • Chris Stewart
    Chris Stewart (author)
    Christopher 'Chris' Stewart , was the original drummer and a founding member of Genesis. He is now a farmer and an author.-Background and musical career:...

     (b. 1950)
    Driving Over Lemons: An Optimist in Andalucia (1999)
    A Parrot in the Pepper Tree (2002)
    The Almond Blossom Appreciation Society (2007)
  • Bill Bryson
    Bill Bryson
    William McGuire "Bill" Bryson, OBE, is a best-selling American author of humorous books on travel, as well as books on the English language and on science. Born an American, he was a resident of Britain for most of his adult life before moving back to the US in 1995...

     (b. 1951)
    The Palace Under the Alps (1985) — an early work that is more of a travel guide than a narrative.
    Neither Here Nor There: Travels in Europe
    Neither Here Nor There: Travels in Europe
    Neither Here Nor There: Travels in Europe is a 1991 humorous travelogue by American writer Bill Bryson. It documents the author's tour of Europe in 1990, with many flash-backs to two summer tours he made in 1972 and 1973 in his college days...

     (1992)
    Notes from a Small Island
    Notes from a Small Island
    Notes from a Small Island is a humorous travel book on Great Britain by American author Bill Bryson, first published in 1995.-Overview:Bryson wrote Notes from a Small Island when he decided to move back to his native United States, but wanted to take one final trip around Great Britain, which had...

     (1995) — travels in the United Kingdom
    United Kingdom
    The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern IrelandIn the United Kingdom and Dependencies, other languages have been officially recognised as legitimate autochthonous languages under the European Charter for Regional or Minority Languages...

    .
    A Walk in the Woods: Rediscovering America on the Appalachian Trail (1999)
    In a Sunburned Country (2001)
  • Douglas Adams
    Douglas Adams
    Douglas Noel Adams was an English writer and dramatist. He is best known as the author of The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, which started life in 1978 as a BBC radio comedy before developing into a "trilogy" of five books that sold over 15 million copies in his lifetime, a television...

     (1952–2001)
    Last Chance to See (1990)
  • Vikram Seth
    Vikram Seth
    Vikram Seth is an Indian poet, novelist, travel writer, librettist, children's writer, biographer and memoirist.-Early life:Vikram Seth was born on 20 June 1952 to Leila and Prem Seth in Calcutta...

     (b. 1952)
    From Heaven Lake: Travels Through Sinkiang and Tibet (1983)
  • Predrag Miletić
    Predrag Miletic
    Predrag Miletić, , born in Niš, Serbia, on , is a Serbian actor. He finished the Faculty of Drama Arts in Belgrade in the class of Ognjenka Milićević, professor. He was a full-time member of National Theatre in Niš, since 1972 to 1976, and after that, he entered Faculty of Dramatic Arts in Belgrade...

     (b. 1952)
    By bicycle to Hilandar
    Biciklom do Hilandara
    Biciklom do Hilandara is the travelogue book written by Serbian actor Predrag Miletić. Book was published in 2004, in Serbian language.- Plot :...

     (2004)
  • Quim Monzó
    Quim Monzó
    thumb|Quim MonzóQuim Monzó , is a contemporary Catalan writer of novels, short stories and discursive prose, mostly in Catalan. In the early 1970s, Monzó reported from Vietnam, Cambodia, Northern Ireland and East Africa for the Barcelona newspaper Tele/eXprés...

     (b. 1952)
    Guadalajara (1997)
    Barcelona und andere Erzählungen (2007)
  • Neil Peart
    Neil Peart
    Neil Ellwood Peart , OC, is a Canadian musician and author. He is the drummer for the rock band Rush.Peart grew up in Port Dalhousie, Ontario . During adolescence, he floated from regional band to regional band in pursuit of a career as a full-time drummer...

     (b. 1952), drummer for the Canadian rock band Rush
    Rush (band)
    Rush is a Canadian rock band formed in August 1968, in the Willowdale neighbourhood of Toronto, Ontario. The band is composed of bassist, keyboardist, and lead vocalist Geddy Lee, guitarist Alex Lifeson, and drummer and lyricist Neil Peart...

    The Masked Rider: Cycling in West Africa
    The Masked Rider: Cycling in West Africa
    The Masked Rider: Cycling in West Africa is a 1996 non-fiction book written by Rush drummer Neil Peart about his bicycling travel through the African country of Cameroon.-Synopsis:...

     (1996)
    Ghost Rider: Travels on the Healing Road (2002) – a chronicle of motorcycle trips through North and Central America
    Traveling Music: The Soundtrack of My Life and Times (2004) – a contemplative road trip
    Road trip
    A road trip is any journey taken on roads, regardless of stops en route. Typically, road trips are long distances traveled by automobile.-Pre-automobile road trips:...

  • Kenn Kaufman
    Kenn Kaufman
    Kenn Kaufman is an American author, artist, naturalist, and conservationist, known for his work on several popular field guides of birds and butterflies in North America....

     (b. 1954)
    Kingbird Highway: The Story of a Natural Obsession That Got a Little Out of Hand (1997)
  • Rory MacLean
    Rory MacLean
    Rory MacLean is a Canadian travel writer living in the UK and Berlin whose best known works are Stalin’s Nose, a black and surreal travelogue through eastern Europe after the fall of the Berlin Wall, and Magic Bus, a history of the Asia Overland hippie trail.-Biography:MacLean was born in...

     (b. 1954)
    Stalin’s Nose (1992)
    The Oatmeal Ark (1997)
    Under the Dragon (1998)
    Next Exit Magic Kingdom (2000)
    Falling for Icarus (2004)
    Magic Bus (2006)
  • Dennison Berwick
    Dennison Berwick
    Dennison Berwick is a travel writer. Educated at Trinity College, Glenalmond, he emigrated to Canada in 1980...

     (b. 1956)
    Savages, The Life and Killing of the Yanomami (1992)
    Amazon (1990)
    A Walk along The Ganges (1986)
  • Pico Iyer
    Pico Iyer
    Pico Iyer is a British-born essayist and novelist. He is the author of numerous books on travel including Video Night in Kathmandu. His shorter pieces regularly appear in Time, Harper's, NYRB and many other publications.-Life and career:...

     (b. 1957)
    Video Night in Kathmandu: And Other Reports from the Not-so-Far East (1988)
    Falling off the Map: Some Lonely Places of the World (1993)
    Tropical Classical: Essays from Several Directions (1997)
    Global Soul: Jet Lag, Shopping Malls, and the Search for Home (2000) — three excellent collections of essays on the postmodern experience of travel.
  • Tony Horwitz
    Tony Horwitz
    Tony Horwitz is an American journalist and writer. His works include Blue Latitudes or Into the Blue, One for the Road, Confederates In The Attic, Baghdad Without A Map, and A Voyage Long and Strange: Rediscovering the New World. His next book Midnight Rising: John Brown and the Raid That Sparked...

     (b. 1958)
    One for the Road: An Outback Adventure (1987)
    Baghdad without a Map and Other Misadventures in Arabia (1991)
    Confederates in the Attic: Dispatches from the Unfinished Civil War
    Confederates in the Attic
    Confederates in the Attic is a work of non-fiction by Pulitzer Prize-winning author Tony Horwitz. Horwitz explores his deep interest in the American Civil War and investigates America's lingering ties to a war that ended more than 130 years previous....

     (1998)
    Blue Latitudes: Boldly Going Where Captain Cook Has Gone Before
    Blue Latitudes
    Blue Latitudes: Boldly Going Where Captain Cook Has Gone Before , or Into the Blue: Boldly Going Where Captain Cook Has Gone Before , is a travel book by Tony Horwitz....

     (2002)
    A Voyage Long and Strange: Rediscovering the New World (2008)
  • Jeffrey Tayler
    Jeffrey Tayler
    Jeffrey Tayler is a U.S.-born author and journalist. He is the Russia correspondent for the Atlantic Monthly and a contributor to several other magazines as well as to NPR's All Things Considered...

     (b. 1962)
    Siberian Dawn: A Journey Across the New Russia (1999)
    Facing the Congo: A Modern-Day Journey into the Heart of Darkness (2000)
    Glory in a Camel's Eye: Trekking Through the Moroccan Sahara (2003)
    Angry Wind: Through Muslim Black Africa by Truck, Bus, Boat, and Camel (2005)
    River of No Reprieve: Descending Siberia's Waterway of Exile, Death, and Destiny (2006)
  • Karl Taro Greenfeld
    Karl Taro Greenfeld
    Karl Taro Greenfeld is a journalist and author known primarily for his articles on life in modern Asia and both his fiction and non-fiction in The Paris Review....

     (b. 1964)
    Speed Tribes: Days and Nights with Japan's Next Generation
    Speed Tribes
    Speed Tribes: Days and Nights with Japan's Next Generation is a 1995 book by Karl Taro Greenfeld. It is a collection of fiction short stories, each focusing on a specific Japanese youth in the early 1990s, a turbulent time in Japan following the collapse of the late 1980s "bubble" economy...

     (1995)
    Standard Deviations: Growing Up and Coming Down in the New Asia — an exploration of the traveler/backpacker subcultures in the Far East during the 1990s by a writer who was there.
  • William Dalrymple (b.1965)
    In Xanadu
    In Xanadu
    In Xanadu is a 1989 travel book by William Dalrymple.Unlike typical travel books, In Xanadu traces the path taken by Marco Polo from the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem to the site of Shangdu, famed as Xanadu in English literature, in Inner Mongolia, China.The book begins with William...

    : A Quest (1989)
    City of Djinns
    City of Djinns
    City of Djinns is a travelogue by William Dalrymple about the historical capital of India, Delhi. It is his second book, and culminated as a result of his six-year stay in New Delhi....

     (1992)
    From the Holy Mountain
    From the Holy Mountain
    From the Holy Mountain is a 1997 historical travel book by William Dalrymple.Dalrymple's third book From the Holy Mountain: A Journey in the Shadow of Byzantium saw him trace the ties of Eastern Orthodox congregations scattered in the Middle East to their ancient origins; it also deals with the...

     (1994)
    The Age of Kali
    The Age of Kali
    The Age of Kali is a 1998 travel book by William Dalrymple. The book's theme is trouble in the Indian subcontinent and the Hindu belief in a time called the Kali Yuga when many problems will come to exist in the world....

     (1995)
    Nine Lives: In Search of the Sacred in Modern India (2009)
  • Tahir Shah
    Tahir Shah
    Tahir Shah , né Sayyid Tahir al-Hashimi is an Anglo-Afghan Indian author, journalist and documentary maker. He lives in Casablanca, Morocco.-Family origins and life:...

     (b. 1966)
    Sorcerer's Apprentice
    In Search of King Solomon's Mines
    Trail of Feathers
    The Caliph's House
    In Arabian Nights
    House of the Tiger King
    Beyond the Devil's Teeth
  • J. Maarten Troost
    J. Maarten Troost
    J. Maarten Troost is the author of three books about his experiences in the Pacific Islands and 3-month trip to China. Troost writes about the part of his life spent in the South Pacific in Getting Stoned with Savages and The Sex Lives of Cannibals -- and one on a trip to China: Lost on Planet...

     (b. 1969)
    The Sex Lives of Cannibals: Adrift in the Equatorial Pacific
    The Sex Lives of Cannibals
    The Sex Lives of Cannibals: Adrift in the Equatorial Pacific is a 2004 travelogue by author J. Maarten Troost describing the two years he and his girlfriend spent living on the Tarawa atoll in the Pacific island nation of Kiribati...

     (2004)
    Getting Stoned with Savages: A Trip Through the Islands of Fiji and Vanuatu
    Getting Stoned with Savages
    Getting Stoned with Savages: A Trip Through the Islands of Fiji and Vanuatu is a 2007 travelog by J. Maarten Troost. The book is a humorous account of the author and his wife's time on the Pacific island nations of Vanuatu and Fiji. It is a follow-up to Troost's first work The Sex Lives of...

     (2006)
  • Cleo Paskal
    Cleo Paskal
    Cleo Paskal is an Associate Fellow at Chatham House, , Adjunct Faculty in the Department of Geopolitics, Manipal University, India and Adjunct Professor of Global Change, School of Communication and Management Studies, Kochi, India. Also she was a consultant for the U.S...

    Navigating Customs: New Travel Stories by 12 Writers [Less Than] 25 (2007)
  • Kira Salak
    Kira Salak
    Kira Salak is an American writer, adventurer, and journalist known for her travels in Mali and Papua New Guinea. She has written two books of nonfiction and a book of fiction based on her travels and is a contributing editor at National Geographic magazine....

     (b. 1971)
    Four Corners: A Journey into the Heart of Papua New Guinea (2001)
    The Cruelest Journey
    Kira Salak
    Kira Salak is an American writer, adventurer, and journalist known for her travels in Mali and Papua New Guinea. She has written two books of nonfiction and a book of fiction based on her travels and is a contributing editor at National Geographic magazine....

    : 600 Miles to Timbuktu (2004)
  • Tom Bissell
    Tom Bissell
    Tom Bissell is a journalist, critic, and fiction writer, originally from Escanaba, Michigan and currently based in Portland, Oregon.-Life:...

     (b. 1974)
    Chasing the Sea: Lost Among the Ghosts of Empire in Central Asia (2003)
  • Bishwanath Ghosh
    Bishwanath Ghosh
    Bishwanath Ghosh is an Indian writer and a journalist. He is the author of the bestselling travel book, Chai, Chai: Travels in Places Where You Stop but Never Get Off, published in September 2009, which The Telegraph called "a delightful travelogue with a difference."He has also contributed two...

     (b. 1970)
    Chai, Chai: Travels in Places Where You Stop But Never Get Off (2009)

See also

  • Autobiogeography
    Autobiogeography
    Autobiogeography is a self referential map or other geographic document created by the subject. It is a convergence of autobiography and geography that indicates geolocation of personal experiences such as travel, personal migration or important experiences. The first use of autobiogeography...

  • Beautiful England
    Beautiful England
    "Beautiful England" was the title of a series of short, illustrated travel/guide books first published in Britain by Blackie & Son around 1910 and continuing in print until the 1950s...

  • British Guild of Travel Writers
    British Guild of Travel Writers
    The British Guild of Travel Writers was formed in 1960. It is a membership organisation that admits authors whose work focuses on travel. It also includes among its membership many other professionals who generate travel-related content for print, broadcast and online media...

  • Dolman Best Travel Book Award
    Dolman Best Travel Book Award
    The Dolman Best Travel Book Award is one of the two principal annual travel book awards in Britain, and the only one that is open to all writers...

     (begun 2006)
  • Picador Travel Classics
    Picador Travel Classics
    Picador Travel Classics is a series of 17 hard-cover books published by Picador during the 1990s. All of the titles are re-prints of what the publishers thought of as "classic" travel literature...

  • Thomas Cook Travel Book Award
    Thomas Cook Travel Book Award
    The Thomas Cook Travel Book Award originated as an initiative of Thomas Cook AG in 1980, with the aim of encouraging and rewarding the art of literary travel writing. The awards stopped in 2005...

     (ran from 1980–2004)

External links