Los Angeles Times

Los Angeles Times

Overview
The Los Angeles Times is a daily newspaper
Newspaper
A newspaper is a scheduled publication containing news of current events, informative articles, diverse features and advertising. It usually is printed on relatively inexpensive, low-grade paper such as newsprint. By 2007, there were 6580 daily newspapers in the world selling 395 million copies a...

 published in Los Angeles, California
Los Ángeles
Los Ángeles is the capital of the province of Biobío, in the commune of the same name, in Region VIII , in the center-south of Chile. It is located between the Laja and Biobío rivers. The population is 123,445 inhabitants...

, since 1881. It was the second-largest metropolitan newspaper in circulation in the United States in 2008 and the fourth most widely distributed newspaper in the country.



The Times was first published on December 4, 1881, as the Los Angeles Daily Times under the direction of Nathan Cole Jr.
Nathan Cole Jr.
Nathan Cole Jr. was one of the two founders of the Los Angeles Daily Times, now the Los Angeles Times. The son of a wealthy St. Louis, Missouri, politician and banker, he was just 21 years old in 1881 when he and a colleague, Thomas Gardiner, put together the first issues of the new venture to be...

 and Thomas Gardiner.
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Encyclopedia
The Los Angeles Times is a daily newspaper
Newspaper
A newspaper is a scheduled publication containing news of current events, informative articles, diverse features and advertising. It usually is printed on relatively inexpensive, low-grade paper such as newsprint. By 2007, there were 6580 daily newspapers in the world selling 395 million copies a...

 published in Los Angeles, California
Los Ángeles
Los Ángeles is the capital of the province of Biobío, in the commune of the same name, in Region VIII , in the center-south of Chile. It is located between the Laja and Biobío rivers. The population is 123,445 inhabitants...

, since 1881. It was the second-largest metropolitan newspaper in circulation in the United States in 2008 and the fourth most widely distributed newspaper in the country.


Otis era


The Times was first published on December 4, 1881, as the Los Angeles Daily Times under the direction of Nathan Cole Jr.
Nathan Cole Jr.
Nathan Cole Jr. was one of the two founders of the Los Angeles Daily Times, now the Los Angeles Times. The son of a wealthy St. Louis, Missouri, politician and banker, he was just 21 years old in 1881 when he and a colleague, Thomas Gardiner, put together the first issues of the new venture to be...

 and Thomas Gardiner. It was printed at the Mirror printing plant, owned by Jesse Yarnell
Jesse Yarnell
Thomas Jesse Yarnell, known as Jesse Yarnell, was a California newspaperman who established the Los Angeles, California, Weekly Mirror, which took over the Los Angeles Times in 1881 and later merged with it....

 and T.J. Caystile
T.J. Caystile
Thomas J. Caystile, known as T.J. Caystile, was a Los Angeles, California, printer and newspaperman, who, with his partners, Jesse Yarnell and S.J...

. Unable to pay the printing bill, Cole and Gardiner turned the paper over to the Mirror Company. In the meantime, S.J. Mathes
S.J. Mathes
Samuel Jay Mathes, known as S.J. Mathes, was a pioneer printer and newspaperman in Los Angeles, California, who in 1881 and 1882 directed the editorial policies of the newly established Los Angeles Daily Times, which later became the Los Angeles Times, until General Harrison Gray Otis took over...

 had joined the firm, and it was at his insistence that the Times continued publication. In July 1882, Harrison Gray Otis moved from Santa Barbara
Santa Barbara, California
Santa Barbara is the county seat of Santa Barbara County, California, United States. Situated on an east-west trending section of coastline, the longest such section on the West Coast of the United States, the city lies between the steeply-rising Santa Ynez Mountains and the Pacific Ocean...

 to become the paper's editor. Otis made the Times a financial success.

Historian Kevin Starr
Kevin Starr
Kevin Starr is an American historian, best known for his multi-volume series on the history of California, collectively called "Americans and the California Dream."-Life:Kevin Starr was born in San Francisco, California....

 wrote that Otis was a businessman "capable of manipulating the entire apparatus of politics and public opinion for his own enrichment." Otis's editorial policy was based on civic boosterism
Boosterism
Boosterism is the act of "boosting," or promoting, one's town, city, or organization, with the goal of improving public perception of it. Boosting can be as simple as "talking up" the entity at a party or as elaborate as establishing a visitors' bureau. It is somewhat associated with American small...

, extolling the virtues of Los Angeles and promoting its growth. Toward those ends, the paper supported efforts to expand the city's water supply by acquiring the watershed of the Owens Valley
Owens Valley
Owens Valley is the arid valley of the Owens River in eastern California in the United States, to the east of the Sierra Nevada and west of the White Mountains and Inyo Mountains on the west edge of the Great Basin section...

, an effort fictionalized in the Roman Polanski
Roman Polanski
Roman Polanski is a French-Polish film director, producer, writer and actor. Having made films in Poland, Britain, France and the USA, he is considered one of the few "truly international filmmakers."...

 movie Chinatown, which is also covered in California Water Wars
California Water Wars
The California Water Wars were a series of conflicts between the city of Los Angeles, farmers and ranchers in the Owens Valley of Eastern California, and environmentalists. As Los Angeles grew in the late 1800s, it started to outgrow its water supply. Fred Eaton, mayor of Los Angeles, realized that...

.


The efforts of the Times to fight local unions led to the October 1, 1910, bombing of its headquarters
Los Angeles Times bombing
The Los Angeles Times bombing was the purposeful dynamiting of the Los Angeles Times building in Los Angeles, California, on October 1, 1910 by a union member belonging to the International Association of Bridge and Structural Iron Workers. The explosion started a fire which killed 21 newspaper...

, killing twenty-one people. Two union leaders, James and Joseph McNamara, were charged. The American Federation of Labor
American Federation of Labor
The American Federation of Labor was one of the first federations of labor unions in the United States. It was founded in 1886 by an alliance of craft unions disaffected from the Knights of Labor, a national labor association. Samuel Gompers was elected president of the Federation at its...

 hired noted trial attorney Clarence Darrow
Clarence Darrow
Clarence Seward Darrow was an American lawyer and leading member of the American Civil Liberties Union, best known for defending teenage thrill killers Leopold and Loeb in their trial for murdering 14-year-old Robert "Bobby" Franks and defending John T...

 to represent the brothers, who eventually pleaded guilty.

Chandler era


Upon Otis's death in 1917, his son-in-law, Harry Chandler
Harry Chandler
Harry Chandler was an American newspaper publisher and investor who became owner of the largest real estate empire in the U.S.-Biography:...

, took control as publisher of the Times. Harry Chandler was succeeded in 1944 by his son, Norman Chandler
Norman Chandler
Norman Chandler was the publisher of the Los Angeles Times from 1945 to 1960, and largely responsible for the success of the newspaper.-Education:...

, who ran the paper during the rapid growth of post-war
Post-war
A post-war period or postwar period is the interval immediately following the ending of a war and enduring as long as war does not resume. A post-war period can become an interwar period or interbellum when a war between the same parties resumes at a later date...

 Los Angeles. Norman's wife, Dorothy Buffum Chandler
Dorothy Buffum Chandler
Dorothy Buffum Chandler was a Los Angeles cultural leader.-Personal life:Born Dorothy Mae Buffum in 1901 in La Fayette, Illinois, she moved to Long Beach, California in 1904 with her family...

, became active in civic affairs and led the effort to build the Los Angeles Music Center
Los Angeles Music Center
The Music Center is one of the three largest performing arts centers in the nation. Located in downtown Los Angeles, the Music Center is home to the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, Ahmanson Theater, Mark Taper Forum and Walt Disney Concert Hall...

, whose main concert hall was named the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion
Dorothy Chandler Pavilion
The Dorothy Chandler Pavilion is one of the halls in the Los Angeles Music Center . The Music Center's other halls include the Mark Taper Forum, Ahmanson Theatre, and Walt Disney Concert Hall.The Pavilion has 3,197 seats spread over four tiers, with chandeliers, wide curving stairways and rich décor...

 in her honor. Family members are buried at the Hollywood Forever Cemetery
Hollywood Forever Cemetery
Hollywood Forever Cemetery, originally called Hollywood Memorial Park Cemetery, is one of the oldest cemeteries in Los Angeles, California. It is located at 6000 Santa Monica Boulevard in the Hollywood...

 near Paramount Studios. The site also includes a memorial to the Times Building bombing victims.


The fourth generation of family publishers, Otis Chandler
Otis Chandler
Otis Chandler was the publisher of the Los Angeles Times between 1960 and 1980, leading a large expansion of the newspaper and its ambitions...

, held that position from 1960 to 1980. Otis Chandler sought legitimacy and recognition for his family's paper, often forgotten in the power centers of the Northeastern United States
Northeastern United States
The Northeastern United States is a region of the United States as defined by the United States Census Bureau.-Composition:The region comprises nine states: the New England states of Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island and Vermont; and the Mid-Atlantic states of New...

 due to its geographic and cultural distance. He sought to remake the paper in the model of the nation's most respected newspapers, notably The New York Times
The New York Times
The New York Times is an American daily newspaper founded and continuously published in New York City since 1851. The New York Times has won 106 Pulitzer Prizes, the most of any news organization...

and Washington Post. Believing that the newsroom was "the heartbeat of the business", Otis Chandler increased the size and pay of the reporting staff and expanded its national and international reporting. In 1962, the paper joined with the Washington Post to form the Los Angeles Times-Washington Post News Service to syndicate articles from both papers for other news organizations.

During the 1960s, the paper won four Pulitzer Prizes, more than its previous nine decades combined.

The paper's early history and subsequent transformation was chronicled in an unauthorized history Thinking Big (1977, ISBN 0-399-11766-0), and was one of four organizations profiled by David Halberstam
David Halberstam
David Halberstam was an American Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist, author and historian, known for his early work on the Vietnam War, his work on politics, history, the Civil Rights Movement, business, media, American culture, and his later sports journalism.-Early life and education:Halberstam...

 in The Powers That Be
The Powers That Be (book)
The Powers That Be is a 1979 book by David Halberstam about the American media.The subjects in the book:*CBS*The New York Times*The Los Angeles Times*The Washington Post*Time...

(1979, ISBN 0-394-50381-3; 2000 reprint ISBN 0-252-06941-2). It has also been the whole or partial subject of nearly thirty dissertations in communications or social science in the past four decades.

Modern era


For the main article, see Los Angeles Times in the 21st century
Los Angeles Times in the 21st century
For the main article, see Los Angeles Times.The Los Angeles Times in the 21st century was beset in its first decade by a change in ownership, a bankruptcy, a rapid succession of editors, reductions in staff, decreases in paid circulation, the need to increase its Web presence, and a series of...

.



The Times was beset in the first decade of the 21st century by a change in ownership, a bankruptcy, a rapid succession of editors, reductions in staff, decreases in paid circulation and the need to increase its Web presence.

Pulitzer prizes


Through 2009 the Times had won thirty-nine Pulitzers, including four in editorial cartooning, and one each in spot news reporting for the 1965 Watts Riots
Watts Riots
The Watts Riots or the Watts Rebellion was a civil disturbance in the Watts neighborhood of Los Angeles, California from August 11 to August 15, 1965. The 5-day riot resulted in 34 deaths, 1,032 injuries, and 3,438 arrests...

 and the 1992 Los Angeles riots
1992 Los Angeles riots
The 1992 Los Angeles Riots or South Central Riots, also known as the 1992 Los Angeles Civil Unrest were sparked on April 29, 1992, when a jury acquitted three white and one hispanic Los Angeles Police Department officers accused in the videotaped beating of black motorist Rodney King following a...

.

Times sportswriter Jim Murray
Jim Murray (sportswriter)
James Patrick Murray was an American sportswriter at the Los Angeles Times from 1961 to 1998.Many of his achievements include winning the NSSA's Sportswriter of the Year award an astounding fourteen times...

 won a Pulitzer in 1990.

In 2004
2004 Pulitzer Prize
The Pulitzer Prizes for 2004 were announced on April 5, 2004.The Los Angeles Times won five journalism awards, the most that the newspaper has ever won in a single year and second only to The New York Times in 2002 for the most won in a year by any paper.-Journalism awards:* Beat Reporting:**Daniel...

, the paper won five prizes, which is the third-most by any paper in one year (behind The New York Times
The New York Times
The New York Times is an American daily newspaper founded and continuously published in New York City since 1851. The New York Times has won 106 Pulitzer Prizes, the most of any news organization...

in 2002
2002 Pulitzer Prize
-Journalism:* Public Service:**The New York Times, for A Nation Challenged, a special section published regularly after the September 11th terrorist attacks on America, which coherently and comprehensively covered the tragic events, profiled the victims, and tracked the developing story, locally...

 (7) and The Washington Post
The Washington Post
The Washington Post is Washington, D.C.'s largest newspaper and its oldest still-existing paper, founded in 1877. Located in the capital of the United States, The Post has a particular emphasis on national politics. D.C., Maryland, and Virginia editions are printed for daily circulation...

in 2008
2008 Pulitzer Prize
The 2008 Pulitzer Prizes were announced on April 7, 2008, the 92nd annual awards.The Washington Post won six awards, second only to the seven won by The New York Times in 2002. Three organizations were awarded prizes for the first time: Reuters, Investor's Business Daily and the Concord Monitor...

 (6)).

Times reporters Bettina Boxall and Julie Cart won a Pulitzer Prize
Pulitzer Prize
The Pulitzer Prize is a U.S. award for achievements in newspaper and online journalism, literature and musical composition. It was established by American publisher Joseph Pulitzer and is administered by Columbia University in New York City...

 for Explanatory Reporting in 2009 "for their fresh and painstaking exploration into the cost and effectiveness of attempts to combat the growing menace of wildfires across the western United States."

Competition and rivalry



In the 19th century, the chief competition to the Times was the Los Angeles Herald
Los Angeles Herald-Examiner
The Los Angeles Herald Examiner was a major Los Angeles daily newspaper, published Monday through Friday in the afternoon, and in the morning on Saturdays and Sundays. It was part of the Hearst syndicate. The afternoon Herald-Express and the morning Examiner, both of which had been publishing in...

,
followed by the smaller Los Angeles Tribune
Los Angeles Tribune
Los Angeles Tribune was a newspaper published in Los Angeles, California between 1943 and 1960.The newspaper had a reputation for feisty and fearless reporting, with articles about the movie industry and Los Angeles police racism.I try to collect some more info :...

.
In December 1903, newspaper magnate William Randolph Hearst
William Randolph Hearst
William Randolph Hearst was an American business magnate and leading newspaper publisher. Hearst entered the publishing business in 1887, after taking control of The San Francisco Examiner from his father...

 began publishing the Los Angeles Examiner as a direct morning competitor to the Times. In the 20th Century, the Los Angeles Express
Los Angeles Herald-Examiner
The Los Angeles Herald Examiner was a major Los Angeles daily newspaper, published Monday through Friday in the afternoon, and in the morning on Saturdays and Sundays. It was part of the Hearst syndicate. The afternoon Herald-Express and the morning Examiner, both of which had been publishing in...

was an afternoon competitor, as was Manchester Boddy's Los Angeles Daily News
Los Angeles Daily News (historic)
The Los Angeles Daily News , often referred to simply as the Daily News, was a newspaper published from 1923 to 1954. It was operated through most of its existence by Manchester Boddy...

, a Democratic newspaper.

By the mid-1940s, the Times was the leading newspaper in terms of circulation in the Los Angeles metropolitan area
Greater Los Angeles Area
The Greater Los Angeles Area, or the Southland, is a term used for the Combined Statistical Area sprawled over five counties in the southern part of California, namely Los Angeles County, Orange County, San Bernardino County, Riverside County and Ventura County...

. In 1948, it launched the Los Angeles Mirror, an afternoon tabloid, to compete with both the Daily News and the merged Herald-Express. In 1954, the Mirror absorbed the Daily News. The combined paper, the Mirror-News, ceased publication in 1962, when the Hearst afternoon Herald-Express was merged with the morning Los Angeles Examiner.

In 1989, the Times's last rival for the Los Angeles daily newspaper market, the Los Angeles Herald Examiner, went out of business, making Los Angeles virtually a one-newspaper city, except the Los Angeles Daily News
Los Angeles Daily News
The Los Angeles Daily News is the second-largest circulating daily newspaper of Los Angeles, California. It is the flagship of the Los Angeles Newspaper Group, a branch of Colorado-based MediaNews Group....

in the San Fernando Valley
San Fernando Valley
The San Fernando Valley is an urbanized valley located in the Los Angeles metropolitan area of southern California, United States, defined by the dramatic mountains of the Transverse Ranges circling it...

 and smaller dailies in surrounding cities like Pasadena
Pasadena, California
Pasadena is a city in Los Angeles County, California, United States. Although famous for hosting the annual Rose Bowl football game and Tournament of Roses Parade, Pasadena is the home to many scientific and cultural institutions, including the California Institute of Technology , the Jet...

, Santa Monica
Santa Monica, California
Santa Monica is a beachfront city in western Los Angeles County, California, US. Situated on Santa Monica Bay, it is surrounded on three sides by the city of Los Angeles — Pacific Palisades on the northwest, Brentwood on the north, West Los Angeles on the northeast, Mar Vista on the east, and...

, Long Beach
Long Beach, California
Long Beach is a city situated in Los Angeles County in Southern California, on the Pacific coast of the United States. The city is the 36th-largest city in the nation and the seventh-largest in California. As of 2010, its population was 462,257...

, and Torrance and the South Bay
Torrance, California
Torrance is a city incorporated in 1921 and located in the South Bay region of Los Angeles County, California, United States. Torrance has of shore-front beaches on the Pacific Ocean, quieter and less well-known by tourists than others on the Santa Monica Bay, such as those of neighboring...

.

Midwinter


For 69 years, from 1885 until 1954, the Times issued on New Year's Day a special annual Midwinter Number or Midwinter Edition that extolled the virtues of Southern California. At first it was called the "Trade Number," and in 1886 it featured a special press run of "extra scope and proportions"; that is, "a twenty-four page paper, and we hope to make it the finest exponent of this [Southern California] country that ever existed." Two years later, the edition had grown to "forty-eight handsome pages (9x15 inches), [which] stitched for convenience and better preservation," was "equivalent to a 150-page book." The last use of the phrase Trade Number was in 1895, when the edition had grown to thirty-six pages split among three separate sections.

The Midwinter Number drew acclamations from other newspapers, including this one from the Kansas City Star in 1923:
In 1948 the Midwinter Edition, as it was then called, had grown to "7 big picture magazines in beautiful rotogravure
Rotogravure
Rotogravure is a type of intaglio printing process; that is, it involves engraving the image onto an image carrier...

 reproduction." The last mention of the Midwinter Edition was in a Times advertisement on January 10, 1954.

Midsummer


Between 1891 and 1895, the Times also issued a similar Midsummer Number, the first one with the theme "The Land and Its Fruits.". Because of its issue date in September, the edition was in 1891 called the Midsummer Harvest Number.

Zoned editions and subsidiaries



In the 1990s, the Times published various editions catering to far-flung areas. Editions included a Ventura County
Ventura County, California
Ventura County is a county in the southern part of the U.S. state of California. It is located on California's Pacific coast. It is often referred to as the Gold Coast, and has a reputation of being one of the safest populated places and one of the most affluent places in the country...

 edition, an Inland Empire edition, a San Diego County
San Diego County, California
San Diego County is a large county located in the southwestern corner of the US state of California. Hence, San Diego County is also located in the southwestern corner of the 48 contiguous United States. Its county seat and largest city is San Diego. Its population was about 2,813,835 in the 2000...

 edition, and a "National Edition" that was distributed to Washington, D.C.
Washington, D.C.
Washington, D.C., formally the District of Columbia and commonly referred to as Washington, "the District", or simply D.C., is the capital of the United States. On July 16, 1790, the United States Congress approved the creation of a permanent national capital as permitted by the U.S. Constitution....

 and the San Francisco Bay Area
San Francisco Bay Area
The San Francisco Bay Area, commonly known as the Bay Area, is a populated region that surrounds the San Francisco and San Pablo estuaries in Northern California. The region encompasses metropolitan areas of San Francisco, Oakland, and San Jose, along with smaller urban and rural areas...

. The National Edition was closed in December 2004.

Some of these editions were folded into Our Times, a group of community supplements included in editions of the regular Los Angeles Metro newspaper.

A subsidiary, Times Community Newspapers, publishes the Burbank Leader
Burbank Leader
The Burbank Leader is a biweekly newspaper published by the Los Angeles Times in Burbank, California.The Burbank Daily Review was founded in 1905, and later acquired by the Copley Press. Copley sold the Daily Review and the Glendale News Press to Morris Newspapers in 1974; however Morris sold off...

, Coastline Pilot of Laguna Beach
Laguna Beach, California
Laguna Beach is a seaside resort city and artist community located in southern Orange County, California, United States, approximately southwest of the county seat of Santa Ana...

, Crescenta Valley Sun, Daily Pilot of Newport Beach
Newport Beach, California
Newport Beach, incorporated in 1906, is a city in Orange County, California, south of downtown Santa Ana. The population was 85,186 at the 2010 census.The city's median family income and property values consistently place high in national rankings...

 and Costa Mesa
Costa Mesa, California
Costa Mesa is a city in Orange County, California. The population was 109,960 at the 2010 census. Since its incorporation in 1953, the city has grown from a semi-rural farming community of 16,840 to a primarily suburban and "edge" city with an economy based on retail, commerce, and light...

, Glendale News-Press, Huntington Beach Independent
Huntington Beach Independent
The Huntington Beach Independent is a weekly newspaper published by the Los Angeles Times in Huntington Beach, California.Ingersoll Publications,who owned the Orange Coast Daily Pilot, bought the paper from Knight Ridder in 1985. Adams Communications bought the Pilot in 1988, but sold it to Page...

and La Cañada Valley Sun.

Features


Among the Times's staff are columnists Steve Lopez
Steve Lopez
Steven M. Lopez is an American journalist who has been a columnist for The Los Angeles Times since 2001. He is the son of Spanish and Italian immigrants.-Life and cars:...

 and Patt Morrison, music critics Robert Hillburn and Randy Lewis, film critic Kenneth Turan and entertainment industry columnist Patrick Goldstein. Sports columnists include Bill Plaschke
Bill Plaschke
William Paul "Bill" Plaschke is an American sports journalist who has written for the Los Angeles Times since 1987. As a child he attended St. Albert the Great Elementary School in Louisville. He then went on to attend Ballard High School. He spent his freshman year at Baylor University in Waco,...

, who is also a panelist on ESPN
ESPN
Entertainment and Sports Programming Network, commonly known as ESPN, is an American global cable television network focusing on sports-related programming including live and pre-taped event telecasts, sports talk shows, and other original programming....

's Around the Horn
Around the Horn
Around the Horn is a daily, half-hour sports roundtable on ESPN filmed in Washington, D.C. It airs at 5:00 pm ET, as part of a sports talk hour with Pardon the Interruption. The show is currently hosted by Tony Reali.-History:Around the Horn premiered on November 4, 2002, hosted by Max Kellerman...

, T.J. Simers, Kurt Streeter and Helene Elliott
Helene Elliott
Helene Elliott is an American sportswriter for the Los Angeles Times who is a general sports columnist. She is the first female journalist to be inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame, receiving the Elmer Ferguson Memorial Award for bringing "honor to journalism and to hockey" in 2005.One of the...

, the first female sportswriter to be inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame
Hockey Hall of Fame
The Hockey Hall of Fame is located in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Dedicated to the history of ice hockey, it is both a museum and a hall of fame. It holds exhibits about players, teams, National Hockey League records, memorabilia and NHL trophies, including the Stanley Cup...

. Former sports editor Bill Dwyre is also a columnist.

One of the Times's features is "Column One," a feature that appears daily on the front page to the left-hand side. Established in September 1968, it is a place for the weird and the interesting; in the How Far Can a Piano Fly? (a compilation of Column One stories) introduction, Patt Morrison
Patt Morrison
Patt Morrison is a journalist, author, and radio—television personality based in Los Angeles and Southern California.-Media:Morrison is a writer for the Los Angeles Times, with the weekly 'Patt Morrison Asks' column, and received the Joseph M. Quinn award in 2000 from the Los Angeles Press Club...

 writes that the column's purpose is to elicit a "Gee, that's interesting, I didn't know that" type of reaction.

The Times also embarked on a number of investigative journalism
Investigative journalism
Investigative journalism is a form of journalism in which reporters deeply investigate a single topic of interest, often involving crime, political corruption, or corporate wrongdoing. An investigative journalist may spend months or years researching and preparing a report. Investigative journalism...

 pieces. A series in December 2004 on the King-Drew Medical Center in Los Angeles led to a Pulitzer Prize and a more thorough coverage of the hospital's troubled history. Lopez wrote a five-part series on the civic and humanitarian disgrace of Los Angeles' Skid Row, which became the focus of the 2009 motion picture, The Soloist
The Soloist
The Soloist is a 2009 American/French/British drama film directed by Joe Wright, and starring Jamie Foxx and Robert Downey, Jr. The screenplay by Susannah Grant is based on the book, The Soloist by Steve Lopez...

.

Festival of Books



In 1996, the Times started the annual Los Angeles Times Festival of Books
Los Angeles Times Festival of Books
The Los Angeles Times Festival of Books is a free, public festival celebrating the written word. Started in 1996, the Festival is held on the last weekend of April hosted by the University of Southern California and features vendors, authors and publishers...

, in association with the University of California, Los Angeles
University of California, Los Angeles
The University of California, Los Angeles is a public research university located in the Westwood neighborhood of Los Angeles, California, USA. It was founded in 1919 as the "Southern Branch" of the University of California and is the second oldest of the ten campuses...

. It has panel discussions, exhibits, and stages during two days at the end of April each year. In 2011, the Festival of Books was moved to the University of Southern California
University of Southern California
The University of Southern California is a private, not-for-profit, nonsectarian, research university located in Los Angeles, California, United States. USC was founded in 1880, making it California's oldest private research university...

.

Book prizes



Since 1980, the Times has awarded annual book prizes. The categories are now biography, current interest, fiction, first fiction, history, mystery/thriller, poetry, science and technology, and young adult fiction. In addition, the Robert Kirsch Award is presented annually to a living author with a substantial connection to the American West whose contribution to American letters deserves special recognition".

Television


The Times-Mirror Company was a founding co-owner of then-CBS
CBS
CBS Broadcasting Inc. is a major US commercial broadcasting television network, which started as a radio network. The name is derived from the initials of the network's former name, Columbia Broadcasting System. The network is sometimes referred to as the "Eye Network" in reference to the shape of...

 turned independent television station KTTV
KTTV
KTTV, channel 11, is an owned-and-operated television station of the News Corporation-owned Fox Broadcasting Company, located in Los Angeles, California. Serving the vast Los Angeles metropolitan area, KTTV is a sister station to KCOP , Los Angeles' MyNetworkTV station...

. It became that station's sole owner in 1951, and remained so until the station was sold to Metromedia
Metromedia
Metromedia was a media company that owned radio and television stations in the United States from 1956 to 1986 and owned Orion Pictures from 1986-1997.- Overview :...

 in 1963. For the next seven years, Times-Mirror had no television station until it purchased the Dallas Times Herald
Dallas Times Herald
The Dallas Times Herald, founded in 1888 by a merger of the Dallas Times and the Dallas Herald, was once one of two major daily newspapers serving the Dallas, Texas area. It won three Pulitzer Prizes, all for photography, and two George Polk Awards, for local and regional reporting...

, the owner of KRLD-TV (now KDFW
KDFW
KDFW, virtual channel 4 , is the Fox owned-and-operated television station in the Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex designated market area....

) in Dallas, Texas, in 1970.

Writers and editors



  • J. A. Adande
    J. A. Adande
    Joshua Ade "J. A." Adande is an American sports columnist who covers the National Basketball Association for ESPN.com. He also serves as a panelist for ESPN's Around the Horn and as a guest host on ESPN's Pardon the Interruption television shows...

    , sports columnist
  • Martin Bernheimer
    Martin Bernheimer
    Martin Bernheimer is an American music critic. He studied at Brown University and the Hochschule für Musik in Munich, along with the famous musicologist Gustave Reese at New York University....

    , Pulitzer Prize for Criticism
    Pulitzer Prize for Criticism
    The Pulitzer Prize for Criticism has been presented since 1970 to a newspaper writer who has demonstrated 'distinguished criticism'. Recipients of the award are chosen by an independent board and officially administered by Columbia University...

     in 1982
  • Bettina Boxall, 2009 Pulitzer Prize
    2009 Pulitzer Prize
    The 2009 Pulitzer Prizes were announced on April 20, 2009, the 93rd annual awards.The New York Times won five awards this year, with the St. Petersburg Times being the only other multi-prize winner with two...

  • Harry Carr
    Harry Carr
    Harry C. Carr , whose byline for most of his career was Harry Carr, was a reporter, editor and columnist for the Los Angeles Times. In 1934 he was given an honorable mention by a Pulitzer Prize committee on awards...

    , reporter, columnist, editor
  • Julie Cart, 2009 Pulitzer Prize
    2009 Pulitzer Prize
    The 2009 Pulitzer Prizes were announced on April 20, 2009, the 93rd annual awards.The New York Times won five awards this year, with the St. Petersburg Times being the only other multi-prize winner with two...

  • Borzou Daragahi
    Borzou Daragahi
    Borzou Daragahi is a print and radio journalist and the former Baghdad bureau chief for the Los Angeles Times. A U.S. citizen of Iranian descent, he was a 2005 Pulitzer Prize finalist for his coverage of Iraq and led the bureau that was named a 2007 Pulitzer finalist for its Iraq coverage...

    , Beirut bureau chief
  • Barbara Demick
    Barbara Demick
    Barbara Demick is an American journalist. She is currently Beijing bureau chief of the Los Angeles Times. She is the author of Logavina Street: Life and Death in a Sarajevo Neighborhood...

    , Beijing bureau chief, author
  • Bob Drogin
    Bob Drogin
    Bob Drogin covers intelligence and national security in the Washington bureau of the Los Angeles Times.-Life:He is a native of Bayonne, N.J., and a graduate of Oberlin College and the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism...

    , national political reporter
  • Bill Dwyre
    Bill Dwyre
    Bill Dwyre is a sportswriter and former newspaper sports editor. Notable for his long tenure as sports editor of the Los Angeles Times beginning in June 1981, he moved to the writing ranks full time in June 2006...

    , sports editor
  • Richard Eder
    Richard Eder
    Richard Eder was for 20 years variously a foreign correspondent, a film reviewer and the drama critic for the New York Times. Subsequently he was book critic for the Los Angeles Times, winning a Pulitzer Prize for Criticism and the National Book Critics Circle annual citation...

    , Pulitzer Prize for Criticism
    Pulitzer Prize for Criticism
    The Pulitzer Prize for Criticism has been presented since 1970 to a newspaper writer who has demonstrated 'distinguished criticism'. Recipients of the award are chosen by an independent board and officially administered by Columbia University...

     in 1987
  • Helene Elliott
    Helene Elliott
    Helene Elliott is an American sportswriter for the Los Angeles Times who is a general sports columnist. She is the first female journalist to be inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame, receiving the Elmer Ferguson Memorial Award for bringing "honor to journalism and to hockey" in 2005.One of the...

    , sports journalist
  • Thomas Francis Ford (1873–1958), member of the U.S. Congress, literary and rotogravure editor, the only person ever sent to the Los Angeles City Council by a write-in vote
  • Carl Greenberg
    Carl Greenberg
    Carl Greenberg was an American newspaper reporter who began as a police reporter; most of his career he was a reporter covering California and U.S. national politics...

    , political writer
  • L. D. Hotchkiss
    L. D. Hotchkiss
    Loyal Durand “L.D.” Hotchkiss was an American newspaper journalist who served as the editor-in-chief of the Los Angeles Times....

    , editor
  • Philip P. Kerby, Pulitzer Prize for Criticism
    Pulitzer Prize for Criticism
    The Pulitzer Prize for Criticism has been presented since 1970 to a newspaper writer who has demonstrated 'distinguished criticism'. Recipients of the award are chosen by an independent board and officially administered by Columbia University...

     in 1976
  • Rick Loomis, reporter, Pulitzer Prize for Explanatory Reporting
    Pulitzer Prize for Explanatory Reporting
    The Pulitzer Prize for Explanatory Reporting has been presented since 1998, for a distinguished example of explanatory reporting that illuminates a significant and complex subject, demonstrating mastery of the subject, lucid writing and clear presentation...

     in 2007
  • Steve Lopez
    Steve Lopez
    Steven M. Lopez is an American journalist who has been a columnist for The Los Angeles Times since 2001. He is the son of Spanish and Italian immigrants.-Life and cars:...

    , columnist
  • Charles Fletcher Lummis
    Charles Fletcher Lummis
    Charles Fletcher Lummis was a United States journalist and Indian activist; he is also acclaimed as a historian, photographer, poet and librarian....

    , editor
  • Al Martinez, columnist
  • Usha Lee McFarling, reporter, Pulitzer Prize for Explanatory Reporting
    Pulitzer Prize for Explanatory Reporting
    The Pulitzer Prize for Explanatory Reporting has been presented since 1998, for a distinguished example of explanatory reporting that illuminates a significant and complex subject, demonstrating mastery of the subject, lucid writing and clear presentation...

     in 2007
  • Doyle McManus
    Doyle McManus
    Doyle McManus is an American journalist, columnist , who appears often on Public Broadcasting Service's Washington Week.-Early life:...

    , Washington bureau chief
  • Alan Miller
    Alan Miller (journalist)
    Alan C. Miller is an American journalist, and president and CEO of the News Literacy Project.-Life:He graduated from Wesleyan University.He worked for The Record of Hackensack, New Jersey, and at The Times Union of Albany, New York....

    , Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting
    Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting
    The Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting has been awarded since 1948 for a distinguished example of reporting on national affairs. The Pulitzer Committee issues an official citation explaining the reasons for the award....

     in 2003
  • J. R. Moehringer
    J. R. Moehringer
    John Joseph "J. R." Moehringer, Jr. is an American journalist and author. Born in New York City and raised in Manhasset, New York, he is a former national correspondent for the Los Angeles Times....

    , national correspondent, 2000 Pulitzer Prize
    2000 Pulitzer Prize
    -Journalism awards:*Public Service:**The Washington Post, notably for the work of Katherine Boo that disclosed wretched neglect and abuse in the city’s group homes for the mentally retarded, which forced officials to acknowledge the conditions and begin reforms....

  • Patt Morrison
    Patt Morrison
    Patt Morrison is a journalist, author, and radio—television personality based in Los Angeles and Southern California.-Media:Morrison is a writer for the Los Angeles Times, with the weekly 'Patt Morrison Asks' column, and received the Joseph M. Quinn award in 2000 from the Los Angeles Press Club...

    , columnist
  • Kim Murphy, reporter, 2005 Pulitzer Prize
    2005 Pulitzer Prize
    The Pulitzer Prizes for 2005 were announced on 2005-04-04.-Journalism:*Beat reporting: Amy Dockser Marcus of The Wall Street Journal for her "stories about patients, families and physicians [of the] world of cancer survivors"....

  • Jim Murray
    Jim Murray (sportswriter)
    James Patrick Murray was an American sportswriter at the Los Angeles Times from 1961 to 1998.Many of his achievements include winning the NSSA's Sportswriter of the Year award an astounding fourteen times...

     (1919–1998), sports columnist, 1989 Pulitzer Prize
    1989 Pulitzer Prize
    -Journalism awards:*Public Service:**Anchorage Daily News, for reporting about the high incidence of alcoholism and suicide among native Alaskans in a series that focused attention on their despair and resulted in various reforms.*General News Reporting:...


  • Sonia Nazario
    Sonia Nazario
    Sonia Nazario has written about social issues for more than two decades, most recently as a projects reporter for the Los Angeles Times. She holds the distinctions of winning the 2003 Pulitzer Prize for Feature Writing, and of being the youngest writer to be hired by the Wall Street Journal.She...

    , feature writing, 2003 Pulitzer Prize
    2003 Pulitzer Prize
    -Journalism awards:-Letters, Drama and Music Awards:-External links:* . The New York Times.* . The New York Times.* . The New York Times....

  • Dan Neil
    Dan Neil
    Dan Neil is an automotive columnist for The Wall Street Journal and a former contributor to the Los Angeles Times, AutoWeek and Car and Driver. He is a panelist on The Car Show with Adam Carolla on Speed Channel, which debuted July 13, 2011.In 1999, Neil received the International Motor Press...

    , columnist, Pulitzer Prize for Criticism
    Pulitzer Prize for Criticism
    The Pulitzer Prize for Criticism has been presented since 1970 to a newspaper writer who has demonstrated 'distinguished criticism'. Recipients of the award are chosen by an independent board and officially administered by Columbia University...

     in 2004
  • Ross Newhan
    Ross Newhan
    Ross Newhan is a former columnist for the Long Beach Press-Telegram and the Los Angeles Times before retiring in 2004. He has garnered the 1997 Associated Press Sports Editors Award for his story on the sale of the Dodgers and was given the 2000 J. G...

    , sports
  • Jack Nelson, (1929–2009), political reporter, Pulitzer Prize for Local Reporting
    Pulitzer Prize for Local Reporting
    The Pulitzer Prize for Local Reporting is awarded to an example of "local reporting that illuminates significant issues or concerns." This Pulitzer Prize was first awarded in 1948. Like most Pulitzers the winner receives a $10,000 award.-History:...

     in 1960
  • Bill Plaschke
    Bill Plaschke
    William Paul "Bill" Plaschke is an American sports journalist who has written for the Los Angeles Times since 1987. As a child he attended St. Albert the Great Elementary School in Louisville. He then went on to attend Ballard High School. He spent his freshman year at Baylor University in Waco,...

    , sports columnist
  • Michael Parks, reporter, 1987 Pulitzer Prize
    1987 Pulitzer Prize
    -Journalism:*Public service: Pittsburgh Press**"For reporting by Andrew Schneider and Matthew Brelis which revealed the inadequacy of the FAA's medical screening of airline pilots and led to significant reforms."...

  • Mike Penner
    Mike Penner
    Mike Penner was a sports writer for the Los Angeles Times. Penner self-identified as being a transsexual in a 2007 column and returned from a vacation writing with the name Christine Daniels, before resuming his original name in 2008 and then committing suicide in 2009 .-Early life and...

     (1957–2009) (Christine Daniels), sportswriter
  • Alex Raksin, editorial writing, 2002 Pulitzer Prize
    2002 Pulitzer Prize
    -Journalism:* Public Service:**The New York Times, for A Nation Challenged, a special section published regularly after the September 11th terrorist attacks on America, which coherently and comprehensively covered the tragic events, profiled the victims, and tracked the developing story, locally...

  • Howard Rosenberg
    Howard Rosenberg
    Howard Rosenberg is a retired TV critic for the Los Angeles Times. He worked there for 25 years and won a Pulitzer Prize for Criticism. In recent years he has written the book No Time to Think: The Menace of Media Speed and the 24-Hour News Cycle with Charles S. Feldman and compiled an anthology of...

    , Pulitzer Prize for Criticism
    Pulitzer Prize for Criticism
    The Pulitzer Prize for Criticism has been presented since 1970 to a newspaper writer who has demonstrated 'distinguished criticism'. Recipients of the award are chosen by an independent board and officially administered by Columbia University...

     in 1985
  • Tim Rutten
    Tim Rutten
    Tim Rutten is an American journalist who worked for the Los Angeles Times between 1971 and 2011.He started at the paper as a copy editor in the View section. Before becoming a columnist for the Calendar section in 2002, he held a number of positions, including city bureau chief and editorial writer...

    , columnist, 1971–2011
  • Kevin Sack, Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting
    Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting
    The Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting has been awarded since 1948 for a distinguished example of reporting on national affairs. The Pulitzer Committee issues an official citation explaining the reasons for the award....

     in 2003
  • Lee Shippey
    Lee Shippey
    Henry Lee Shippey , who wrote under the name Lee Shippey, was an author and journalist whose romance with a French woman during World War I caused a sensation in the United States as a "famous war triangle." Shippey later wrote a popular column in the Los Angeles Times for 22 years.-Early...

     (1884–1969), columnist
  • David Shaw
    David Shaw (writer)
    David Shaw was an American journalist who was best known for his reporting for the Los Angeles Times, where he was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Criticism in 1991...

     (1943–2005), Pulitzer Prize for Criticism
    Pulitzer Prize for Criticism
    The Pulitzer Prize for Criticism has been presented since 1970 to a newspaper writer who has demonstrated 'distinguished criticism'. Recipients of the award are chosen by an independent board and officially administered by Columbia University...

     in 1991
  • Gaylord D. Shaw, reporter, 1978 Pulitzer Prize
    1978 Pulitzer Prize
    -Journalism awards:*PublicService:**The Philadelphia Inquirer, for a series of articles showing abuses of power by the police in its home city.*Local General or Spot News Reporting:...

  • Barry Siegel
    Barry Siegel
    Barry Siegel is a former national correspondent for the Los Angeles Times who won the Pulitzer Prize for Feature Writing in 2002 for his piece "A Father's Pain, a Judge's Duty, and a Justice Beyond Their Reach." In 2003, University of California, Irvine recruited Siegel to chair the school's new...

    , feature writing, 2002 Pulitzer Prize
    2002 Pulitzer Prize
    -Journalism:* Public Service:**The New York Times, for A Nation Challenged, a special section published regularly after the September 11th terrorist attacks on America, which coherently and comprehensively covered the tragic events, profiled the victims, and tracked the developing story, locally...

  • Jack Smith
    Jack Smith (columnist)
    Jack Clifford Smith was a journalist, author, and newspaper columnist who wrote about Los Angeles during its period of greatest growth and increasing influence...

     (1916–1996), columnist
  • Bob Sipchen
    Bob Sipchen
    Bob Sipchen is a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist, author and currently the Communications Director of the Sierra Club, America's oldest, largest and most influential grassroots environmental organization. Sipchen serves as Editor-in-Chief of , a national publication with a circulation of...

    , editorial writing, 2002 Pulitzer Prize
    2002 Pulitzer Prize
    -Journalism:* Public Service:**The New York Times, for A Nation Challenged, a special section published regularly after the September 11th terrorist attacks on America, which coherently and comprehensively covered the tragic events, profiled the victims, and tracked the developing story, locally...

  • Bill Stall
    Bill Stall
    William R. "Bill" Stall was a reporter and staff member of the Los Angeles Times who was awarded the Pulitzer Prize in 2004.-Biography:...

    , editorial writing, 2004 Pulitzer Prize
    2004 Pulitzer Prize
    The Pulitzer Prizes for 2004 were announced on April 5, 2004.The Los Angeles Times won five journalism awards, the most that the newspaper has ever won in a single year and second only to The New York Times in 2002 for the most won in a year by any paper.-Journalism awards:* Beat Reporting:**Daniel...

  • William Tuohy
    William Tuohy
    William, or Bill, Tuohy was a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and author who, for most of his career, was a foreign correspondent for the Los Angeles Times.-Early life:...

    , Pulitzer Prize
    Pulitzer Prize
    The Pulitzer Prize is a U.S. award for achievements in newspaper and online journalism, literature and musical composition. It was established by American publisher Joseph Pulitzer and is administered by Columbia University in New York City...

  • Peter Wallsten
    Peter Wallsten
    Peter Wallsten is a reporter for the Wall Street Journal who covers national politics. Wallsten joined the Journal in October 2009 from the Los Angeles Times, where he authored, with Tom Hamburger, One Party Country: The Republican Plan for Dominance in the 21st Century.A graduate of the...

    , national political reporter
  • Kenneth R. Weiss, Pulitzer Prize for Explanatory Reporting
    Pulitzer Prize for Explanatory Reporting
    The Pulitzer Prize for Explanatory Reporting has been presented since 1998, for a distinguished example of explanatory reporting that illuminates a significant and complex subject, demonstrating mastery of the subject, lucid writing and clear presentation...

     in 2007
  • David Willman
    David Willman
    David Willman is a Pulitzer Prize winning investigative journalist.-Life:He graduated from San Jose State University with a B.A. in Journalism in 1978....

    , Pulitzer Prize for Investigative Reporting
    Pulitzer Prize for Investigative Reporting
    The Pulitzer Prize for Investigative Reporting has been awarded since 1953, under one name or another, for a distinguished example of investigative reporting by an individual or team, presented as a single article or series in print journalism...

     in 2001


Cartoonists



  • Paul Francis Conrad
    Paul Conrad
    Paul Francis Conrad was an American political cartoonist from Cedar Rapids, Iowa. During college, Conrad started cartooning at the University of Iowa for the Daily Iowan. While serving with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, during World War II, Conrad received a B.A. in art in 1950...

    , Pulitzer Prize
    Pulitzer Prize for Editorial Cartooning
    The Pulitzer Prize for Editorial Cartooning has been awarded since 1922 for a distinguished cartoon or portfolio of cartoons published during the year, characterized by originality, editorial effectiveness, quality of drawing, and pictorial effect...

     in 1964, 1971, 1984
  • Frank Interlandi
    Frank Interlandi
    Frank Interlandi was an editorial cartoonist for the Des Moines Register and the Los Angeles Times. While at the Register, he won the prize for best editorial cartoon given in 1961 by Sigma Delta Chi, the professional journalism society. A year later, he joined the Times, where he remained until...

     (1924–2010)

  • Michael Patrick Ramirez
    Michael Ramirez
    Michael Patrick Ramirez is a two-time American Pulitzer Prize-winning editorial cartoonist. His cartoons typically present conservative viewpoints....

    , Pulitzer Prize
    Pulitzer Prize for Editorial Cartooning
    The Pulitzer Prize for Editorial Cartooning has been awarded since 1922 for a distinguished cartoon or portfolio of cartoons published during the year, characterized by originality, editorial effectiveness, quality of drawing, and pictorial effect...

     in 1994, 2008
  • Bruce Russell
    Bruce Russell (cartoonist)
    Bruce Alexander Russell was an American editorial cartoonist.After studying at the Southern branch of the University of California, where he worked for the Cub Californian, he was hired for the Los Angeles Times as a sports cartoonist in 1927. He also drew a nationally syndicated cartoon, Rollo...

    , Pulitzer Prize
    Pulitzer Prize for Editorial Cartooning
    The Pulitzer Prize for Editorial Cartooning has been awarded since 1922 for a distinguished cartoon or portfolio of cartoons published during the year, characterized by originality, editorial effectiveness, quality of drawing, and pictorial effect...

     in 1946


Photographers



  • Don Bartletti, Pulitzer Prize
    Pulitzer Prize for Feature Photography
    The Pulitzer Prize for Feature Photography has been awarded since 1968 for a distinguished example of feature photography in black and white or color, which may consist of a photograph or photographs, a sequence or an album....

     in 2003
  • Carolyn Cole
    Carolyn Cole
    Carolyn Cole is a staff photographer for the Los Angeles Times. She won the Pulitzer Prize for Feature Photography in 2004, for her coverage of the siege of Monrovia, the capital of Liberia.-Biography:...

    , Pulitzer Prize
    Pulitzer Prize for Feature Photography
    The Pulitzer Prize for Feature Photography has been awarded since 1968 for a distinguished example of feature photography in black and white or color, which may consist of a photograph or photographs, a sequence or an album....

     in 2004

  • John L. Gaunt, Jr.
    John L. Gaunt, Jr.
    John L. Gaunt was an American photographer. He won the 1955 Pulitzer Prize for Photography....

    , Pulitzer Prize
    Pulitzer Prize for Photography
    The Pulitzer Prize for Photography was one of the Pulitzer Prizes. It was awarded from 1942 until 1967. In 1968, it was split into two separate prizes: the Pulitzer Prize for Feature Photography and the Pulitzer Prize for Spot News Photography .* 1942: Milton Brooks of Detroit News, for his photo...

     in 1955
  • Clarence Williams, Pulitzer Prize
    Pulitzer Prize for Feature Photography
    The Pulitzer Prize for Feature Photography has been awarded since 1968 for a distinguished example of feature photography in black and white or color, which may consist of a photograph or photographs, a sequence or an album....

     in 1998


Further reading

  • Edward Maddin Ainsworth, History of Los Angeles Times, ca. 1940.
  • Robert Gottlieb and Irene Wolt, Thinking Big, New York: Putnam, 1977.
  • David Halberstam, The Powers That Be, New York: Knopf, 1979.
  • Jack R. Hart, The information empire: The rise of the Los Angeles Times and the Times Mirror Corporation, Washington, D.C.: University Press of America
    University Press of America
    University Press of America is an academic book publisher based in the United States. Part of the independent Rowman & Littlefield Publishing Group, it was founded in 1975 and boasts of having published "more than 10,000 academic, scholarly, and biographical titles in many disciplines"...

    , 1981.

External links