Global warming

Global warming

 
What can a common man do to reduce the global warming?
 
Posts  1 - 43  of  43
Global warming discussion
 
grymile
What can a common man do to reduce the global warming?
           
 
devil13
replied to: grymile
Replied To:  What can a common man do to reduce the global warming?
Haven't you heard, trying to stop global warming is pointless, America dosen't do it, so why should we? It just takes away the pleasures of life such as warm houses and easy car travel. If you want to lower your carbon footprint, lower the heat in your house, travel less by car and turn off electicals when you are not using them.
           
 
mmh1516
replied to: grymile
Replied To:  What can a common man do to reduce the global warming?
Don't listen to the spider, of course reducing global warming isn't pointless!
           
 
mmh1516
replied to: grymile
Replied To:  What can a common man do to reduce the global warming?
Plant trees, turn off lights, take shorter showers......there are a lot of things u can do!
           
 
Blogengeezer
replied to: mmh1516
Replied To:  Plant trees, turn off lights, take shorter showers......there are a...
These are things that everyone can do, out of common sense economy. It will have absolutely zero effect on the climate of the planet earth. If only the 'Maunder' effect is taken into the equation, the earth will warm until approximately 2050, after which it will cool for the next 400 years. Of course there are many other cyclic effects in play, Milankovitch, Svensmark, are just a couple more. The measuring and recording of temperatures, are deeply flawed due to political and profit motives. The internet allows research. Do not read only one source and make up your mind from there. Enjoy the universal availability of knowledge..
           
 
mmh1516
replied to: Blogengeezer
Replied To:  These are things that everyone can do, out of common sense economy....
How can u say that? it isn't pointless to do these things u know
           
 
auria1069
replied to: grymile
Replied To:  What can a common man do to reduce the global warming?
Plant some trees, and encourage others to do so. Collectively we can achieve much.
On a very hot day, do you prefer to stand in the sun, or under a tree? Feel the temperature of the ground below a tree – then out in the sun. When you have millions of hectares of land, denuded of vegetation, it is little wonder the land gets hot and dry. We must give something back to Nature, by planting rows of trees. Planting the right diversity of trees will cool the land below them - while physically bringing moisture to the surface, to encourage the growth of other plants. The plants attract insects, which in turn attract birds that eat them. The birds then fly over the surrounding countryside, dropping Nature’s perfect ‘fertiliser’, to improve the nutrient levels of the surrounding soil. The accumulative effect of this is enormous, it just need people to start the ball rolling - the simple action of many of us planting trees on just a modest area of cleared land has the potential to restore our planet.
           
 
Blogengeezer
replied to: auria1069
Replied To:  Plant some trees, and encourage others to do so. Collectively we ca...
All excellent suggestions. Everyone can do something to save resources. I and All my family lived through very harsh times. There was Nothing to waste. String, metal and containers were All recycled, there was NO choice. Same bag was used for the rare store trip. Money was the problem. Grandmother sold butchered chickens and eggs for the cash.

Bags of feed for our chickens that provided our eggs and meat, were carefully taken apart and re-sewn into clothing. Worn out clothing, beyond patching, was cut into strips and braided into rugs to be used and sold. Winter socks were 'darned' on a ball to fix the holes. Winter Shoes were worn through, wrapped with tape and worn until nothing was left. In summer we went without. Summer earned some money to buy winter shoes, wood, oil and coal so we did not freeze to death. Many did.

Grew all of our own food in a large 'Victory' garden and Canned for the Winter. Two Hogs, one beef, lasted us all year. Hundreds of chickens were our staple food source. Pheasants and rabbits were a treat. Horses pulled the plows, mowers, and machinery. Hay stored for the winter was lifted into the loft by a team of horses and a pulley rope.

Times today are so simple and ppl don't appreciate it. Most
all ppl would die immediately if forced to return. Pray you never have to, and Count your Blessings.
           
 
314565
replied to: grymile
Replied To:  What can a common man do to reduce the global warming?
Do not waste water and plant trees more and more . One can do anything if one think great.
           
 
auria1069
replied to: grymile
Replied To:  What can a common man do to reduce the global warming?
I suggest you get onto your MP and ask for some answers on the following: we have all heard that people have discovered how to run cars (and obviously other machines) on water, but they were discouraged from proceeding with their inventions by being 'paid off' by oil companies. If governments are serious about trying to reduce emissions, they should insist these inventions are developed, but they won't because they make more per litre from petrol etc than the oil companies - without any investment or risk.
Also governments discourage people from growing industrial hemp, because they have been bought off by the manufacturers of man-made-fibres and to a lesser extent by the cotton industry and their supporters - ie the fertiliser/chemical companies. Hemp uses considerably less water to produce than cotton and does not require fertilisers or pest control. It will grow just about anywhere - even on impoverished soils. In the war, the bans on growing hemp were removed as the US government needed hemp for naval ropes, but at the end of the war, they reimposed the bans.
Governments and politicians are just in it for what they can get out of it, not for the benefit of the people or the planet.
You can help farmers like myself to grow trees, I have planted 500,000 myself since 2001 on my property Auria (this is the word Australia from which 'salt' has been removed - and that is another of my ambitions, to fight salinity), some people help physically, others help by purchasing trees for me to plant on their behalf. This is a start! I have discovered how to grow trees in deserts - but nobody wants to follow my example because they will not get a return on their investment quickly enough.
I hope more people will try and do their bit - every little bit helps:)
           
 
Blogengeezer
replied to: auria1069
Replied To:  I suggest you get onto your MP and ask for some answers on the foll...
The one nation that is the International leader in 'Irrigation Technology', is easily recognized. Take a tour to 'The Holy Land'(group tours are reasonable).

Be sure to visit both Israel and the surrounding nations. Take careful note of what all you see. Notice especially the different approaches taken to protect and utilize the land to its best resources... Only after awakening, can the human being, realize the beauty and full potential of the Earth...
           
 
lehmann520
replied to: Blogengeezer
Replied To:  The one nation that is the International leader in 'Irrigation Tech...
I would go further than trees.
Plant tough, drought resistant grasses preferably those native to the areas you live in. They should have dense root structures that hold top soil. Americans often consider such plants to be weeds. Most are far more useful to the individual than say a field full of Russett-Burbanks.
Trees are great for pumping water into soil. Their root structures take the moisture down deep but you need to hold the surface soil as well.

thanks
Dawn
           
 
auria1069
replied to: lehmann520
Replied To:  I would go further than trees. Plant tough, drought resistant gra...
I agree Dawn, any plant is better than nothing. The right selection of trees offers so many benefits . socially and environmentally. They provide shade - and it has been proven that those trees that can survive in really arid regions actually bring water up from great depths - and distribute it for the benefit of other plants surrounding them. This has been proven by scientists in Australia (you may care to Google Dr Jennifer Carter with the CSIRO ). This is part of my own arid region forestry research - looking at the symbiotic relationships between different species of plants. My property name is Auria which is the word "Australia" from which "salt" has been removed - we have major salinity problems - and that is one of my ambitions - to remove salt from Australia, while also elevating rural income in low rainfall regions and enhancing rainfall.

David
           
 
Blogengeezer
replied to: auria1069
Replied To:  I agree Dawn, any plant is better than nothing. The right selectio...
Nature has it's own Intelligently Designed magic. The amazing Cypress family of trees, for just one example (of course there are many, as you know), has a few 'tricks' of it's own, in dealing with 'Salts' :>)
           
 
auria1069
replied to: grymile
Replied To:  What can a common man do to reduce the global warming?
Hi grymile - when it is 50deg C on my property, it is remarkably comfortable in the shade of my trees, which are now producing an oasis in the middle of a vast area of 'The Wheatbelt' of Western Australia. This area that was once covered in native vegetation has been cleared for agriculture over the past 100years.
Just imagine a vast area heating up through our summers where it is frequently over 38deg C (100degF) The trees absorb the heat and use the energy to do amazing things, provide food for insects that get eaten by the birds that get eaten by other things - we have so much to answer for - and must plant more trees

David
           
 
lehmann520
replied to: auria1069
Replied To:  Hi grymile - when it is 50deg C on my property, it is remarkably c...
I can see you love your trees. Hell , I love your trees and I've never seen them, never will. Anything giving relief in 50c heat has GOT to be beautiful. I'm amazed you choose to live in such a place.

Dawn
           
 
lehmann520
replied to: Blogengeezer
Replied To:  Nature has it's own Intelligently Designed magic. The amazing Cypre...
Lots of natural fixes for common problems but most of them are cheap and easy. That doesn't go down well with the power that be.

I used to raise horses, had a nice piece of property and a large chunk of it was pretty soggy most of the time. My then husband looked into having 'professionals in drainage' fix the issue. They could do it if we paid them enough and didn't mind tearing up the beautiful thick sod that took years to develop and that my horses depended on for feed in the summer. (I fed almost no grain to those on 'light work' because of the quality of that grass)

a friend said, plant a willow, it'll suck up that water. I planted two. That did it and they were beautiful too. I lost a little grass right around the trees but that was all.
gotta give props to nature. it's figured out all the angles.

Dawn
           
 
lehmann520
replied to: auria1069
Replied To:  Hi grymile - when it is 50deg C on my property, it is remarkably c...
David, I wanted to ask you about the dust situation in Australia. Are you having problems? What is being done? Is this part of your tree project?

I noticed the comment about native plants vs. wheat, very similar to conditions for US dust bowl which interests me.

Dawn
           
 
Blogengeezer
replied to: lehmann520
Replied To:  David, I wanted to ask you about the dust situation in Australia. A...
Pardon my interference Dawn, Interesting about 'US Dust Bowl', years. As you are probably aware, the Moldboard Plow has been replaced with the modern disc and tooth 'Harrow' mechanisms in the USA.

The root structure of each season's crop is now left intact as an anchor at sub-surface. The removal of some Wind-Break tree lines, planted during the post dust-bowl years is somewhat unnerving for me to see though as we travel Texas.

The huge aquifer (Ogalalla?)is being utilized with far less waste as well (good thing). Far more sustainable than the old 'spray it into the wind' method.

Still not anywhere as efficient as Israel's 'state of the art' systems.

California's fantastic breadbasket, Sacramento Valley, appears to be slowly switching to that 'drip' system (as I noted during last fall's trip)

Apparently the far less intrusive, modern Harrow system works across Mid America. Even in this last big Texas Drought, the dirt remained in Texas (they don't want to lose it:>), in spite of the high winds.

During the years of my HS education, the Dust went all of the way from Texas through the Midwest Great Lakes region. Has not done that since. Coincides with end of deep 'Plowing' and that generation's super drought.... Coincidence?
Sorry to butt in Dawn, just adding my humble observance, here in the States..

           
 
auria1069
replied to: lehmann520
Replied To:  David, I wanted to ask you about the dust situation in Australia. A...
Hi Dawn, the dust problem has been getting worse here in Australia, people just do not learn form other people's experience such as that of the US Dust Bowl. Here in Western Australia we experience dust storms - I look upon such events as my property getting a top-dressing of nutrients from neighbouring properties!

In China, the Ghobi Desert is spreading at an alarming rate, resulting in cities such as Beijing suffering major air quality problems as we saw with the Olympics.

Our farmers have adopted 'no-till' practices, in which there is minimal disturbance of the soil structure, but some burn their stubble, resulting in black ash being blown away in the wind, or washed away if we happen to get a decent rainfall event.

Belts of trees are known to be very effective wind-breaks - if they are designed correctly - and my thoughts are that 20metre wide belts of trees should be planted in typical agricultural regions at 400metre intervals. Obviously they become more effective as the trees grow taller. Shame one is not able to submit photos here, or references to web sites, as my property Auria website and Flickr display a few photos of general interest regarding my techniques.

David.
           
 
Blogengeezer
replied to: auria1069
Replied To:  Hi Dawn, the dust problem has been getting worse here in Australia,...
David, noticing your mention of the dust in Australia. I had checked on this report a few years ago. It came to my memory when the comments turned to dust. Not really turning the comments 'to Dust' :>)

Here is a link explaining a process that the earth depends on to maintain a viable source of Oxygen, and at the same time a massive source of CO2 sequestration. I don't think we would want to reverse this Media attacked 'Desertification'...would we?

http://www.iop.org/EJ/abstract/1748-9326/1/1/014005

There is more. I am still in the process of researching the Gobi you mentioned. It's 'dust' and the industrial dust from China have been finding their way to the arctic. Of course the Media always attacks anything we do not fully understand.

The 'Dust' from china contains significant iron. The dust then covers the arctic Ocean. Yes it does warm the surface of the Ice causing seasonal melting. At the same time, it adds 'nutrients to the Arctic Ocean.

The chain of life uses these nutrients to 'fertilize' the food chain and thereby causing the best fishing/crabbing in decades. 'Deadliest Catch' on TV, would not be able to put on a show, if the catch were not plentiful. :>)

If Canada were melting as the Media hysterically repeats, The TV 'Ice Road Truckers' could not drive on the frozen lakes:>)

One other TV show is the about the 'Logging Truckers' of Northern Maine US. Their work for the last few years has been complicated by record low temps of -40 degrees. They have been in business for over 40 years and even to them, that is really cold. :>)

Now we have to figure out what Australia's Dust is managing to 'improve', well besides your land :>)

           
 
auria1069
replied to: Blogengeezer
Replied To:  David, noticing your mention of the dust in Australia. I had checke...
Dear Blogengeezer,

Seems like there is just the 3 of us in this chat :) at this time. You may care to Google the Green Wall of China with regard to their endeavours to stop the spread of the Gobi Desert. It is a massive venture.

It is recognised that the top soil is where most of the nutrients reside, so it is detrimental to the land on which farmers are trying to grow crops. In Australia we have some of the most nutrient-defficient soils on the planet, we cannot afford to let the top-soil blow away.

I am ignorant about the the lakes still being frozen in Canada, but have heard how the tundra is melting in what was the USSR, so much so that all the infrastructure such as oil pipe lines and roads are collapsing into the ground. The planet is in turmoil, however you look at it, with different problems in different areas.

Just now I hear of a massive earth quake in Chile, I think the planet is flexing its muscles ........... it will be interesting to see what happens in 21/12?2012

Not really able to talk authoritatively about any location other that with which I am familiar, but Australia is rapidly being turned into one vast desert, current practices are clearly not sustainable. Every effort should be made to plant trees to enhance rainfall and rural prosperity in many parts of the world.

I can assure you the local dust does nothing to improve the health of our lungs.

David.

           
 
Blogengeezer
replied to: auria1069
Replied To:  Dear Blogengeezer, Seems like there is just the 3 of us in this...
Thank you David for your reply. I have read of the re-forestation ongoing in the southern edge of the Gobi. All good things to slow change and enhance humanity's habitat.

During our documented travels across the USA in a high profile vehicle (motor home), I have waited out 70 mph (113kph) winds for sustained hours/days in the arid western Texas (Big Springs) farmland (cotton) During exceptionally dry periods, including the last several years drought (cycle now being broken). My direct observations over the last half century, indicate that the New methods of tilling and irrigation are sustainable. The soil stays stuck to the ground now. That was not possible over 50 years ago.

Without the Mega-Agriculture approach, humanity would have a very harsh existence. Only after the industrial age, was humanity allowed to flourish to over 6 times population of it's pre-industrial period. The law of diminishing returns is a hard law to break. It allows for 0 tolerance. The industrial age has 'warped' the law, enough to allow far more shared prosperity, than history ever has shown:>)

Have you viewed Professor Bob Carters 4 pt series (Global Cooling) on You Tube? It explains natural 'Cycles' far better than most 'agenda' biased publications. Take note of the story of 'Glacier Girl' (internet) and the depth of ICE they had to melt through, to get to that P-51 squadron 'parked' on the glacier, 60 years before.
Main Stream Media never mentions those things, it flies in the face of their 'Agenda'.

Added note: A year ago the airliner that had just completed a Polar route from Asia to England's Heatherow International air terminal, slammed into the ground short of the runway. The cause was frozen crystals in the fuel. Pilots could not escape the extended record low temps ('below' minus 40 degrees) encountered. The commercial aviation fuel is now being reformulated for Polar routes. Mil spec aviation can withstand -80 degrees.
A Delta flight experienced the same failure over Montana USA....in September. :>)
           
 
lehmann520
replied to: Blogengeezer
Replied To:  Thank you David for your reply. I have read of the re-forestation o...
Hi Blog and David. Looks like we scared off all those 'concerned environmentalists'

any hoo, You are both educated as well as intelligent. I am not educated but I am intelligent. I would like to ask a question that I've been considering.

My interest in dust bowls is not for land management by for dry land.

Dry land gets cold fast, stays cold easier (thus less transfer of heat back to the air).

I am interested in the REAL effect of the greenhouse gases. They are not warming the planet, may be in fact, affecting the rate of cooling instead.
There is very little credible research that I can find about what the 'greenhouse effect' is actually doing, if anything.

Could it be affecting the weather by drying it out?

If we are heading toward a cooling trend like Little Ice, could the 'greenhouse effect' of drying things out make the land more susceptible to permanent freezing? In other words, make what would have been a relatively minor cold period like Little Ice, into something far more dangerous for humans?

I ask this because we have the beginnings of weather manipulation/ cloud seeding and might be able to affect the drying in a positive way (for humans) if we concentrated on the tech.

If I'm way off and talking out an orifice that no one likes to hear from, please tell me.

Thanks
Dawn
           
 
Blogengeezer
replied to: lehmann520
Replied To:   Hi Blog and David. Looks like we scared off all those 'concerned e...
Hi Dawn, always fun to talk to you as well as anyone with inquisitive Intelligence. As is said, "Do not mistake Education for Intelligence. The Intelligent person will educate themselves, the Educated person is as educated as they will ever be"..

The 'Greenhouse' effect is overwhelmingly driven by overall water vapor volume, thousands of times more powerful (on Earth) than any of the other individual gasses. CO2 is one of the least, Methane and nitrous oxide is much more powerful per unit but not in enough volume to do much on their own. CO2 appears to be self regulating, as Bob Carter pointed out. The ocean itself, emits and absorbs it like a living breathing monster. One more part of the "Intriguing Design" :>)

For an interesting excursion, check out Bronze/copper age, Amazing 'Oetzi', the Iceman. He died after a battle, and his body was covered, preserved in the Ice of 'The Priora Oscillation' (approx 5k yrs ago). It was finally exposed just several years ago. Also slowly being uncovered, were the high mountain settlements from his Pre-oscillation times.

I wrote and posted a short, somewhat personally visualized account of his last battle. http:/daflikkers.blogspot.com/ right sidebar, scroll down near bottom of archives. His link to the story is posted. click on it and there he is with all links available back then.
           
 
lehmann520
replied to: Blogengeezer
Replied To:  Hi Dawn, always fun to talk to you as well as anyone with inquisiti...
Hey Blog...are we alone out here?

So, are you saying no way is the so called greenhouse effect causing the 'drying'? I will totally go with that because I'm not convinced it's having any effect except on the breathing health of people in large cities and the theft of billions from good honest people.

Dawn
           
 
Blogengeezer
replied to: lehmann520
Replied To:  Hey Blog...are we alone out here? So, are you saying no way is t...
I moved from the green, wet, mosquito infested, icy wintered, Midwest as a wild young Buck, seeking my fortune. I ended up stuck in dry, sand storm blizzard, New Mexico. One car was sandblasted down to bare metal on the right side, the windshield became frosted glass.

There were some huge sand dunes along the dry Puerco river, where I rode motorcycles and hiked, looking for rattle snakes. That was 1965. Slowly the huge sand dunes North of Socorro NM, became overgrown with grasses.

The ferocious wind storms started leaving the sand on the ground, anchored by the increasing vegetation (obviously more moisture). The dunes, remnants of the mini dust bowl years, of the 50's mid 1960's are now just grassy hills. The 'Dunes Roadside Rest Area' is now totally overgrown with grass to the horizon.

To be absolutely correct 'The Climate Changed'. A winter ski area in southern Colorado had been prosperous for years not far from Cortez. During this same number of years, the weather pattern slipped and the entire operation was removed. Climate Changed there as well.

Durango Colorado, same latitude to the East, was another story. Record snowfalls periodically, has intensified their ski area. A super building boom, revitalized what was an 1800's Victorian Ghost town in the 1950's, into a small ski and mountain recreational metropolis (still Victorian). Climate changed there as well. All in all the shifts are obvious, unpredictable, with good and bad results for each area.

This years cold and snow, has left our mountain still covered (rare). Ruidoso over a hundred miles south, has 164 inches of the white stuff, and spring is just around the corner (recreational business is booming)..

800 years ago the 'Anasazi' people of Northwest NM, were prosperous and wetter, they left when the weather patterns 'Changed' to desertification. Their amazing ancient dwellings at Chaco, are partially restored now, and tourism is prolific. Change again brings good as well as bad. They are now the Pueblo people of the Rio Grande Valley. That was a big change for them (they own casinos:>)

It is interesting to see all of this as it happens. Gives more understanding to the word Change. So far, so good the way I see it. As is said, "Don't Sweat the Petty things, and don't Pet the Sweaty Things :>)
           
 
auria1069
replied to: mmh1516
Replied To:  Plant trees, turn off lights, take shorter showers......there are a...
Good to hear your positive comments - mmh1516 am sure you have a name :)
I just wish people would recognise that it is possible to grow trees exceptionally well - in arid and semi-arid regions where it has always been considered impossible.

Unfortunately if people are told something is not possible - too few of us take up the challenge - and even when we prove we can 'do the impossible', nobody wants to know.

Wish I could find people to help me plant trees - I have planted over 500,000 since 2001, which sounds great, but it is a drop in the ocean compared with what is needed. We need positive action by governments, to implement massive plantings in such areas, and demonstrate what can be achieved. That done, others will follow. David.
           
 
auria1069
replied to: Blogengeezer
Replied To:  Hi Dawn, always fun to talk to you as well as anyone with inquisiti...
I am not a scientist by any means, but if we are to believe what some claim, it took billions of years for plant-life to sequester carbon from the carbon dioxide that enveloped the planet from creation, and reduce the level of CO2 in the atmosphere to a level that enabled other forms of life to develop.

If this is so, then it makes me wonder just how many thousands of years of plant-growth in those ancient times, (that locked up in the fossil fuels we burn today), are released back into the atmosphere each day?

Desert areas should be seen as a challenge for us to take on and reafforest - this in turn will restore rainfall - as trees, as well as transpiring water from elevated water-tables, (that have brought about secondary salinity in many parts of the world), also release some chemical compounds into the atmosphere (according to some scientists), that seeds moisture particles to produce rainfall - naturally.
           
 
Blogengeezer
replied to: auria1069
Replied To:  I am not a scientist by any means, but if we are to believe what so...
The Sacramento Valley of California USA, is reluctantly acknowledged as the Bread basket of the USA and source of an immense U.S. export business. The Israeli style 'drip' irrigation system is being implemented as the 'crop' trees age past useful maturity, and are being replaced.

The horizon to horizon orchards, are interspersed with other crops such as vineyards. The irrigation distribution system is closely monitored and nutrients are added on an 'as needed' basis (less waste, more profit).

The water source is an engineering marvel, extending for hundreds of miles from the mountains. Most notable of which is Mt Shasta and Shasta Dam. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers built facilities, including RV/tent camping is an added enjoyable asset.

One must see this entire fantastic infrastructure, to appreciate each aspect. The ignorant world Media has absolutely no idea of the importance a food source like this, is to humanity. Private Mega-agriculture methods are the Drive to keep it viable. Remove the Profit motivation, stockholder investments, and it will collapse as fast as it expanded.
           
 
auria1069
replied to: Blogengeezer
Replied To:  The Sacramento Valley of California USA, is reluctantly acknowledge...
Sounds great - a remarkable achievement - we have similar areas here in Australia, what concerns me most is the dependence on chemicals, we need a greater diversity of plants for bees and other insects to survive and play their vital role in maintaining a healthy - sustainable environment.

It seems we have interfered with Nature so much, we are now suffering all sorts of ailments and allergies - possibly because our natural defence mechanism has not been challenged.
           
 
Blogengeezer
replied to: auria1069
Replied To:  Sounds great - a remarkable achievement - we have similar areas her...
Reply to Auria: Agree on natural defense mech, not being challenged. Humanity seems inclined to not allow natural defense mechanisms to run their course. Media driven Courts in the USA, now force medical interference on certain individuals, against their will, especially in the case of Minors.

BEES, as you have wisely mentioned, are an extremely valued and treasured resource. The hugely successful U.S. Beekeepers industry, profits by maintaining thousands of healthy 'mobile' colonies of Hives, transported across the nation, from area to area, as required by crop germination cycles. My own small hives of wild Bees, living in large Raptor boxes I have built, have produced countless healthy swarms, with little interference.

For several educational hours, may I suggest... HULU.com Modern Marvels ...There are 15 separate segments, Each 40 to 50 minutes in length. Without the 'Economy of Scale' used in modern food production, the present scale of humanity on this planet, could not be supported, especially in the quality expected by today's educated population.
Blogengeezer
           
 
Blogengeezer
replied to: auria1069
Replied To:  I am not a scientist by any means, but if we are to believe what so...
Reply to Auria: Be very cautious of the sources you trust for information. Question their motivation, their 'facts', test them, note the effects, and question them some more, using opposing opinion.

The Politically driven Control Agenda, has affected a dangerously large segment of financially desperate Science, including the extremely 'Vocal' segment of gullible and emotionally dedicated followers. The 'Only Now Controversial' film, forced and Mass Marketed upon the worlds population, "An Inconvenient Truth", has twisted and warped the education system.

The UK, wisely and scientifically digested the information so Vividly presented by the Hollywood production devices, and regulated it's content. So much is now questioned, it's entire 'Crisis and profit Driven' prophesy, is now close to total failure.

In the US, Union controlled educational system, it is fraudulently used to brainwash and terrify children. Add in professional filmmaker contrived, emotional images of drowning Polar Bears, and you obtain yet one more 'Crisis Hysteria' agenda for unscrupulous, Control motivated Profiteers.
Blogengeezer
           
 
lehmann520
replied to: Blogengeezer
Replied To:  Reply to Auria: Be very cautious of the sources you trust for infor...
HI David and Blog... I return from the land of research where I've been reading about Israeli farm and land reclamation methods. I don't think I've ever been more interested to see and experience a place in my life. What they are doing and have done is truly amazing. In fact, I put it in the current novel that will make no money residing in my computer.

and, it's so harmonious with nature...that really got me. Not control...guidance. I'm blown away. Thanks for the tip Blog and David, I'll plant trees with ya guy. I'm all about shade and ice cold lemonade. You got any vodka?
::::grinning::::

Dawn
           
 
Blogengeezer
replied to: auria1069
Replied To:  I am not a scientist by any means, but if we are to believe what so...
Auria I noticed the 'billions of years' you mentioned to sequester the CO2 :>) You may find this 5 part series on 'You Tube' interesting. The 'Siberian Traps' coincided with the Permo-Triassic Extinction. Be sure to watch all five. The plot thickens as you progress through the Mystery.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=scm9DyAMN3g

You might be surprised at the statistics. I have watched the series and read the story, a few times on various sites. Quite the wild events of our Earth in the past. Makes it seem rather petty, the cycles of 'Crisis Perceived' Climate variance we experience during our own minuscule habitation time frame :>) Enjoy..
'Blogengeezer'
           
 
rajasshreya
replied to: grymile
Replied To:  What can a common man do to reduce the global warming?
1)every month we can save some money and seedlings of plants
2)we must save electricity and water
3)we should use paper bags instead of plastics
           
 
persada
replied to: rajasshreya
Replied To:  1)every month we can save some money and seedlings of plants 2)we...
We all should be aware that the world need us to conserve the earth tobe a better place. then to do that,people must coorperate with eeach other. if none of us take this chances and only one of us aware of this thing than it is POINTLES!! But i guss it is better to do it than not to do anything with it! so i plea to ll of you start working together as one..and make a diffrence in this world..it is better to take actions than sitting here talking about it..
           
 
josa1961
replied to: grymile
Replied To:  What can a common man do to reduce the global warming?
You can take some advice and not worry about it for one.
           
 
grymile
replied to: josa1961
Replied To:  You can take some advice and not worry about it for one.
Thank u all for the lovely conversations.. u all have got such great ideas.. global warming has become a great threat to our planet.. i myself live in a small country, of tropical islands surrounded by water just one meter or so above the sea level.. i believe we are in great danger of global warming and sea-level rise.. the beautiful beaches of Maldivian islands are in great danger.. the tsunami in2004 was an alarm for the upcoming danger.. if we dont act now then it will be too late.. just think once.. thank u.. -grymile-
           
 
lehmann520
replied to: grymile
Replied To:  Thank u all for the lovely conversations.. u all have got such grea...
Why would you maintain a residence in such a place if you think the ocean is about to swallow it whole? It doesn't seem too smart.

Global warming is not going to destroy the planet though having a warmer climate might make such tenuous living circumstances an impossibility. The Earth has already been much warmer than it is now and not too long ago but that small fact is left out of most graphs and "scientific " papers. The medieval warm period must have had a great loss of glaciation in Iceland as well as the poles. Nothing outwardly bad happened. Of course we have a lot of coastal cities now so a rising ocean will be an inconvenience IF it occurs.

the "climate change" uproar is all about getting you to part with your dollars and your freedoms. It is not real science. The wisest of us take it with a large grain of salt and turn up our air conditioning...or dig our cars out of snow drifts, which I am off to do...

You might want to consider higher stilts for your house or a new address on higher ground.

           
 
JamesDMcAllister
replied to: grymile
Replied To:  What can a common man do to reduce the global warming?
Hold your breath for 100 years...
           
 
quantum
replied to: persada
Replied To:  We all should be aware that the world need us to conserve the earth...
Just want to post about time here that may serve as finding reason about global warming.

Present is from t=me to t=me
only past and future are changing
but present never change
so is the gravity dont change
but present is depend upon the past and future

At present we learned from past
for us how to face the future
because future is the difference of past and present.
           
 
Anny2012
replied to: grymile
Replied To:  What can a common man do to reduce the global warming?
I have come to the conclusion that we all have a little blame global warming and its consequences and guilt even more politicians who do not slow down.

http://www.globalwarmingweb.com/