University of Sussex

University of Sussex

Overview
The University of Sussex is an English public
Public university
A public university is a university that is predominantly funded by public means through a national or subnational government, as opposed to private universities. A national university may or may not be considered a public university, depending on regions...

 research university situated next to the East Sussex
East Sussex
East Sussex is a county in South East England. It is bordered by the counties of Kent, Surrey and West Sussex, and to the south by the English Channel.-History:...

 village of Falmer
Falmer
Falmer is a small village and civil parish in the Lewes District of East Sussex, England, lying between Brighton and Lewes, approximately five miles north-east of the former. It is also the site for Brighton & Hove Albion's new stadium....

, within the city of Brighton and Hove. The University received its Royal Charter
Royal Charter
A royal charter is a formal document issued by a monarch as letters patent, granting a right or power to an individual or a body corporate. They were, and are still, used to establish significant organizations such as cities or universities. Charters should be distinguished from warrants and...

 in August 1961.

The university
University
A university is an institution of higher education and research, which grants academic degrees in a variety of subjects. A university is an organisation that provides both undergraduate education and postgraduate education...

 is currently ranked 8th in the UK, 16th in Europe and 79th in the world by the Times Higher Education World University Rankings. The Guardian
The Guardian
The Guardian, formerly known as The Manchester Guardian , is a British national daily newspaper in the Berliner format...

university guide 2012 placed Sussex joint 11th, and the Times Good University Guide 2012 ranks Sussex at 14th place.
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Encyclopedia
The University of Sussex is an English public
Public university
A public university is a university that is predominantly funded by public means through a national or subnational government, as opposed to private universities. A national university may or may not be considered a public university, depending on regions...

 research university situated next to the East Sussex
East Sussex
East Sussex is a county in South East England. It is bordered by the counties of Kent, Surrey and West Sussex, and to the south by the English Channel.-History:...

 village of Falmer
Falmer
Falmer is a small village and civil parish in the Lewes District of East Sussex, England, lying between Brighton and Lewes, approximately five miles north-east of the former. It is also the site for Brighton & Hove Albion's new stadium....

, within the city of Brighton and Hove. The University received its Royal Charter
Royal Charter
A royal charter is a formal document issued by a monarch as letters patent, granting a right or power to an individual or a body corporate. They were, and are still, used to establish significant organizations such as cities or universities. Charters should be distinguished from warrants and...

 in August 1961.

The university
University
A university is an institution of higher education and research, which grants academic degrees in a variety of subjects. A university is an organisation that provides both undergraduate education and postgraduate education...

 is currently ranked 8th in the UK, 16th in Europe and 79th in the world by the Times Higher Education World University Rankings. The Guardian
The Guardian
The Guardian, formerly known as The Manchester Guardian , is a British national daily newspaper in the Berliner format...

university guide 2012 placed Sussex joint 11th, and the Times Good University Guide 2012 ranks Sussex at 14th place. Sussex is also a founder member of the 1994 Group
1994 Group
The 1994 Group is a coalition of 19 top "smaller research-intensive universities" in the United Kingdom founded in 1994 to defend their interests following the creation of the Russell Group by larger research-intensive universities earlier that year...

 of research-intensive universities.

History



The University of Sussex began as an idea for the construction of a university to serve Brighton
Brighton
Brighton is the major part of the city of Brighton and Hove in East Sussex, England on the south coast of Great Britain...

. In December 1911 there was a public meeting at the Royal Pavilion
Royal Pavilion
The Royal Pavilion is a former royal residence located in Brighton, England. It was built in three campaigns, beginning in 1787, as a seaside retreat for George, Prince of Wales, from 1811 Prince Regent. It is often referred to as the Brighton Pavilion...

 in order to discover ways to fund the construction of a university. However, the project was halted by the First World War, and the money raised was used instead for books for the Municipal Technical College. The idea was revived in the 1950s and, in June 1958, the government approved the corporation's scheme for a university at Brighton
Brighton
Brighton is the major part of the city of Brighton and Hove in East Sussex, England on the south coast of Great Britain...

, the first of a new generation of what came to be known as plate glass universities
Plate glass university
The term plate glass university has come into use by some to refer to one of the several universities founded in the United Kingdom in the 1960s in the era of the Robbins Report on higher education. In some cases these were older schools with new Royal Charters, now making them universities...

. The University was established as a company in 1959, with a Royal Charter
Royal Charter
A royal charter is a formal document issued by a monarch as letters patent, granting a right or power to an individual or a body corporate. They were, and are still, used to establish significant organizations such as cities or universities. Charters should be distinguished from warrants and...

 being granted on 16 August 1961. The University's organisation broke new ground in seeing the campus divided into Schools of Study, with students able to benefit from a multidisciplinary teaching environment. Sussex was in many ways innovatory, emphasising cross-disciplinary activity, so that students would emerge from the university with a range of background or 'contextual' knowledge to complement their specialist 'core' skills in a particular subject area.

Since then Sussex has made a number of distinguished contributions, across the spread of university activity. Harry Kroto discovered buckminsterfullerene
Buckminsterfullerene
Buckminsterfullerene is a spherical fullerene molecule with the formula . It was first intentionally prepared in 1985 by Harold Kroto, James Heath, Sean O'Brien, Robert Curl and Richard Smalley at Rice University...

 (C60), for which he won a Nobel prize. In the arts Sussex became known for the study of English literature and also for art history and the history of ideas. In the social sciences the Institute of Development Studies and the Science Policy research Unit achieved international recognition ; these are just a few relevant examples of distinguished research activity.

Sussex quickly came to be identified with postwar social change and developed a reputation for radicalism
Political radicalism
The term political radicalism denotes political principles focused on altering social structures through revolutionary means and changing value systems in fundamental ways...

 which it retains. In 1973, 500 students forcibly prevented United States government adviser Samuel Huntington from giving a speech on campus due to his involvement in the Vietnam War
Vietnam War
The Vietnam War was a Cold War-era military conflict that occurred in Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia from 1 November 1955 to the fall of Saigon on 30 April 1975. This war followed the First Indochina War and was fought between North Vietnam, supported by its communist allies, and the government of...

. In an attempt to appeal to a modern audience, the university chose in 2004 to simplify its logo from a coat of arms to the current "us" logo. The Vice-Chancellor of the University described the new visual identity as "the starting point for what will be a fresh look and feel for Sussex. It is based on the university's vision and values, themselves a statement of what it aspires to be: pioneering, creative, international, excellent, engaging and challenging."

Sussex has won University Challenge twice.

Campus




The campus, designed by Sir Basil Spence
Basil Spence
Sir Basil Urwin Spence, OM, OBE, RA was a Scottish architect, most notably associated with Coventry Cathedral in England and the Beehive in New Zealand, but also responsible for numerous other buildings in the Modernist/Brutalist style.-Training:Spence was born in Bombay, India, the son of Urwin...

, is in the village of Falmer
Falmer
Falmer is a small village and civil parish in the Lewes District of East Sussex, England, lying between Brighton and Lewes, approximately five miles north-east of the former. It is also the site for Brighton & Hove Albion's new stadium....

, next to its railway station, and accessed by car from the A27 road
A27 road
The A27 is a major road in England. It runs from its junction with the A36 at Whiteparish in the county of Wiltshire. It closely parallels the south coast, where it passes through West Sussex and terminates at Pevensey in East Sussex.Between Portsmouth and Lewes, it is one of the busiest trunk...

. It is situated next to the Sussex Downs, which influenced Sir
Sir
Sir is an honorific used as a title , or as a courtesy title to address a man without using his given or family name in many English speaking cultures...

 Basil Spence
Basil Spence
Sir Basil Urwin Spence, OM, OBE, RA was a Scottish architect, most notably associated with Coventry Cathedral in England and the Beehive in New Zealand, but also responsible for numerous other buildings in the Modernist/Brutalist style.-Training:Spence was born in Bombay, India, the son of Urwin...

's design of the campus. The campus is self contained with facilities, shops and a number retail outlets.

Sir Basil Spence's designs were appreciated in the architecture community, with many of the buildings on the University's campus winning awards. The gatehouse
Gatehouse
A gatehouse, in architectural terminology, is a building enclosing or accompanying a gateway for a castle, manor house, fort, town or similar buildings of importance.-History:...

-inspired Falmer House won a bronze medal
Bronze medal
A bronze medal is a medal awarded to the third place finisher of contests such as the Olympic Games, Commonwealth Games, etc. The practice of awarding bronze third place medals began at the 1904 Olympic Games in St...

 from the Royal Institute of British Architects
Royal Institute of British Architects
The Royal Institute of British Architects is a professional body for architects primarily in the United Kingdom, but also internationally.-History:...

. Another campus building, The Meeting House, won the Civic Trust
Civic Trust
The Civic Trust of England was a charitable organisation founded in 1957. It ceased operations in 2009 and went into administration due to lack of funds/...

 award in 1969. In 1993, the buildings which made up the core of Sir Basil Spence
Basil Spence
Sir Basil Urwin Spence, OM, OBE, RA was a Scottish architect, most notably associated with Coventry Cathedral in England and the Beehive in New Zealand, but also responsible for numerous other buildings in the Modernist/Brutalist style.-Training:Spence was born in Bombay, India, the son of Urwin...

's designs were given listed building status, with Falmer House being one of only two buildings to be given a Grade 1 status of "exceptional interest".

Sussex claimed to be “the only English university located entirely within a designated Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty”. It is now entirely surrounded by the newly founded South Downs National Park
South Downs National Park
The South Downs National Park is England's newest National Park, having become fully operational on 1 April 2011. The park, covering an area of in southern England, stretches for from Winchester in the west to Eastbourne in the east through the counties of Hampshire, West Sussex and East Sussex...

.

The Gardner Arts Centre, another of Basil Spence's designs, was opened in 1969 as the first university campus arts centre. It had a 480 seat purpose built theatre, a visual art gallery and studio space and was regularly used for theatre and dance as well as showing a range of films on a modern cinema screen. The Centre closed in the summer of 2007: withdrawal of funding and the cost of renovating the building were given as the key reasons. Following an extensive refurbishment, the centre will reopen in 2012, renamed as the Attenborough Centre for the Creative Arts (ACCA).

Organisation and administration


The university was founded with the unusual structure of "Schools of Study" (ubiquitously abbreviated to "schools") rather than traditional university departments within arts and science faculties. The Schools were intended to promote high-quality teaching and research.

In the early 1990s, the University promoted the system by claiming, "Clusters of faculty [come] together within schools to pursue new areas of intellectual enquiry. The schools also foster broader intellectual links. Physics with Management Studies, Science and Engineering with European Studies, Economics with Mathematics all reach beyond conventional Arts/Science divisions." By this time, the original schools had been developed somewhat and were:
  • African and Asian Studies (abbreviated to AFRAS)
  • Biological Sciences (BIOLS)
  • Chemistry and Molecular Sciences (MOLS)
  • Cognitive and Computing Sciences (COGS)
  • Cultural and Community Studies (CCS)
  • Engineering and Applied Sciences (ENGG, formerly EAPS)
  • English and American Studies (ENGAM or EAM)
  • European Studies (EURO)
  • Mathematical and Physical Sciences (MAPS)
  • Social Sciences (SOC)


There was also the Institute for Development Studies (IDS).

In 2001, as the university was celebrating its 40th anniversary, the then Vice Chancellor Alasdair Smith proposed
major changes to the curriculum across the 'Arts schools', and structural changes were agreed by the senate which would create two Arts schools and a "Sussex Institute" in place of the five schools then in place. Corresponding changes would be made in Sciences.

The changes were finally implemented in September 2003. After discussion in senate and the schools, the university adopted for the first time in its history the concept of a department. All subjects were located firmly in one school, and undergraduates were offered straightforward degree subjects rather than the distinctive Sussex differentiation based on the context provided by school courses.

The new schools were:
  • Humanities (HUMS)
  • Life Sciences (LIFESCI)
  • Science and Technology (SCITECH)
  • Social Sciences and Cultural Studies (SOCCUL)
  • Sussex Institute (SI)


In 2009 the university adopted a new organisational structure. The term "Schools of Studies" was retained, but each was headed by a "Head of School" rather than the traditional "Dean". Many of these new heads were appointed from outside Sussex rather than from existing faculty.
The schools as of 2009 are listed below.
The term "department" has been retained in some cases, where a school contains separate disciplines.
  • Engineering and Design
  • Informatics
  • Life Sciences (Includes: Biology, Environmental Science, Chemistry and Biochemistry and houses the Centre for Genome Damage and Stability)
  • Mathematical and Physical Sciences (Includes: Mathematics, Physics and Astronomy)
  • Psychology
  • Business, Management and Economics
  • Education and Social Work
  • Global Studies (Includes: Anthropology, Geography and International Relations, as well as interdisciplinary programmes in Development Studies)
  • Law, Politics and Sociology
  • English
  • History, Art History and Philosophy
  • Media, Film and Music

The changes did not affect the Brighton and Sussex Medical School
Brighton and Sussex Medical School
Brighton and Sussex Medical School is a medical school formed as a partnership of the University of Brighton and the University of Sussex. Like other UK medical schools it is based on the principles and standards of 'Tomorrow's Doctor', an initiative by the General Medical Council outlining the...

 (BSMS).

Educational partners


Brighton and Sussex Medical School
Brighton and Sussex Medical School
Brighton and Sussex Medical School is a medical school formed as a partnership of the University of Brighton and the University of Sussex. Like other UK medical schools it is based on the principles and standards of 'Tomorrow's Doctor', an initiative by the General Medical Council outlining the...

 (BSMS) is a partnership between the University of Brighton
University of Brighton
The University of Brighton is an English university of the United Kingdom, with a community of over 23,000 students and 2,600 staff based on campuses in Brighton, Eastbourne and Hastings. It has one of the best teaching quality ratings in the UK and a strong research record, factors which...

 and the University of Sussex. The school, which is the first medical school in the South East
South East England
South East England is one of the nine official regions of England, designated in 1994 and adopted for statistical purposes in 1999. It consists of Berkshire, Buckinghamshire, East Sussex, Hampshire, Isle of Wight, Kent, Oxfordshire, Surrey and West Sussex...

 outside London, gained its license in 2002 and opened in 2003.

The Institute of Development Studies
Institute of Development Studies
The Institute of Development Studies based at the University of Sussex is a global organisation for research, teaching and communications on international development....

 offers research, teaching and communications related to international development. IDS was founded in 1966 as a research institute based at the University of Sussex. It is financially and constitutionally independent under the status of a charitable company limited by guarantee.

The Centre for Research in Innovation Management is a research-based school of the University of Brighton
University of Brighton
The University of Brighton is an English university of the United Kingdom, with a community of over 23,000 students and 2,600 staff based on campuses in Brighton, Eastbourne and Hastings. It has one of the best teaching quality ratings in the UK and a strong research record, factors which...

, established in 1990. It is located in the Freeman Centre building with the Science Policy Research Unit (SPRU) on the University of Sussex campus.

The Sussex Innovation Centre is a business incubator. Opened in 1996, it provides support for the creation and growth of technology and knowledge based companies in the South East. It offers a business environment to over 40 companies in the IT, Biotech, Media and Engineering sectors.

Study Group works in partnership with the University to provide the Sussex University International Study Centre (ISC). It offers a course of academic subjects, study skills and English language training for students who wish to study a degree at the university but who do not yet possess the necessary qualifications to start a degree. The ISC course provides students with English language and academic skills to start at Sussex the following year.

The British Institute of Modern Music has BA courses
Bachelor of Arts
A Bachelor of Arts , from the Latin artium baccalaureus, is a bachelor's degree awarded for an undergraduate course or program in either the liberal arts, the sciences, or both...

 in Modern Musicianship validated by the University of Sussex at its centres in Brighton and Bristol.

Chancellors and Vice-Chancellors


The current and fifth Chancellor
Chancellor (education)
A chancellor or vice-chancellor is the chief executive of a university. Other titles are sometimes used, such as president or rector....

 of the university is Sanjeev Bhaskar
Sanjeev Bhaskar
Sanjeev Bhaskar, OBE is a British Indian comedian, actor and broadcaster, best known for his work in the BBC Two comedy series Goodness Gracious Me and as host of The Kumars at No. 42...

, who succeeded Lord Attenborough
Richard Attenborough
Richard Samuel Attenborough, Baron Attenborough , CBE is a British actor, director, producer and entrepreneur. As director and producer he won two Academy Awards for the 1982 film Gandhi...

 in 2009.
  1. Viscount Monckton of Brenchley
    Walter Monckton, 1st Viscount Monckton of Brenchley
    Walter Turner Monckton, 1st Viscount Monckton of Brenchley, GCVO, KCMG, MC, PC was a British politician.-Early years:...

     (1961–65)
  2. Lord Shawcross (1965–85)
  3. The Duke of Richmond and Gordon
    Charles Gordon-Lennox, 10th Duke of Richmond
    Charles Henry Gordon-Lennox, 10th Duke of Richmond, 10th Duke of Lennox and 5th Duke of Gordon is a British Peer. He was styled Lord Settrington until 1935 and Earl of March and Kinrara between 1935 and 1989, and is currently styled His Grace The Duke of Richmond, Lennox and Gordon.The son of...

     (1985–98)
  4. Lord Attenborough
    Richard Attenborough
    Richard Samuel Attenborough, Baron Attenborough , CBE is a British actor, director, producer and entrepreneur. As director and producer he won two Academy Awards for the 1982 film Gandhi...

     (1998–2008)
  5. Sanjeev Bhaskar OBE
    Sanjeev Bhaskar
    Sanjeev Bhaskar, OBE is a British Indian comedian, actor and broadcaster, best known for his work in the BBC Two comedy series Goodness Gracious Me and as host of The Kumars at No. 42...

     (2009–Present)


The university has had seven Vice-Chancellors:
  1. John Fulton, later The Lord Fulton
    John Fulton, Baron Fulton
    John Scott Fulton, Baron Fulton was a British university administrator and public servant. In education, he served as Vice-Chancellor of the University of Wales and of the University of Sussex, and was chair of the Universities Central Council on Admissions between 1961 and 1964...

     (1961–67)
  2. Professor Asa Briggs (1967–76)
  3. Sir Denys Wilkinson
    Denys Wilkinson
    Sir Denys Haigh Wilkinson FRS is a British nuclear physicist. He was educated at Loughborough Grammar School and Jesus College, Cambridge. He holds the higher degree of ScD, an HonFilDr degree and an HonLLD degree...

     (1976–87)
  4. Sir Leslie Fielding (1987–92)
  5. Professor Gordon Conway
    Gordon Conway
    Sir Gordon Richard Conway, KCMG, FRS, FRGS, is an agricultural ecologist and former President of the Royal Geographical Society. He often speaks about biotechnology and global food security.-Early life:...

     (1992–98)
  6. Professor Alasdair Smith
    Alasdair Smith
    Alasdair Smith is a professor of economics and former Vice-Chancellor at the University of Sussex and former Chair of the 1994 Group. He is a noted international economist whose studies have been used by the European Union.Smith was born on the Isle of Lewis in Scotland and is married to Sherry...

     (1998–2007)
  7. Professor Michael Farthing
    Michael Farthing
    Professor Michael Farthing is a British academic administrator, physician and medical researcher. He is the Vice Chancellor of the University of Sussex, having succeeded Professor Alasdair Smith in September 2007. Prior to his appointment as Vice Chancellor at Sussex, his academic career was in...

     (2007–Present)

Academic profile


The university
University
A university is an institution of higher education and research, which grants academic degrees in a variety of subjects. A university is an organisation that provides both undergraduate education and postgraduate education...

 is currently ranked 8th in the UK, 16th in Europe and 79th in the world by the Times Higher Education World University Rankings According to the 2008 and 2010 Guardian university rankings, Sussex had Britain's best chemistry department, although the 2012 rankings showed a significant 10 place drop to 11th. The current head of Chemistry at Sussex professor Geoff Cloke was in 2007 elected a fellow
Fellow
A fellow in the broadest sense is someone who is an equal or a comrade. The term fellow is also used to describe a person, particularly by those in the upper social classes. It is most often used in an academic context: a fellow is often part of an elite group of learned people who are awarded...

 of The Royal Society.
UK University Rankings
League tables of British universities
Rankings of universities in the United Kingdom are published annually by The Guardian, The Independent, The Sunday Times and The Times...

2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1998 1997 1996 1995 1994 1993
Times Good University Guide 14th 21st 35th 38th 35th 27th 37th 39th 41st 44th 43rd 34th= 34th= 38th= 35th 39th= 20th= 29th= 23rd= 19th=
Guardian University Guide 11th= 15th 18th 34th 24th 37th 37th 16th 28th 33rd
Sunday Times University Guide 19th 21st 22nd 22nd 30th 27th 20th 30th 25th 30th 34th 31st 29th 34th
Daily Telegraph 26th 41st
FT 34th 33rd 30th 38th
Independent - Complete University Guide 19th 19th 29th 26th

Research


Sussex had its research funding cut by £1.15 million in 2009; this was the ninth biggest cut in the country.

Sussex performed well in the 2008 national Research Assessment Exercise
Research Assessment Exercise
The Research Assessment Exercise is an exercise undertaken approximately every 5 years on behalf of the four UK higher education funding councils to evaluate the quality of research undertaken by British higher education institutions...

 with 18 departments ranking in the top 20 in the U.K.

In respect of teaching quality, 13 of the 15 subjects assessed under the current teaching quality assessment scheme have scored 21 or more points (out of 24), with Philosophy and Sociology achieving the maximum score. Law at Sussex has a very strong reputation, and every year the School of Law receives a significantly larger amount of applicants than places actually available on the course, and so admission into one of the Law programs is very competitive and highly sought after, both nationally and internationally.

Housing


The early campus included five "Park Houses" (Essex, Kent, Lancaster, Norwich, and York, named after other 1960s universities) and Park Village. The "houses", of which all but Kent House were based on a courtyard design, featured several long corridors with kitchens and bathrooms at the end and a social space on the ground floor. Park Village, by contrast, consists of individual houses with four bedrooms per floor, a kitchen on both the bottom and the top floor, and bathroom facilities on the middle floor. The houses are arranged in "streets" with a social centre building including porters' office, pigeon-holes for post, and a bar, towards the campus end of the area.

Essex House also featured a self-contained flat (external but attached by a walkway) which was given over to the Nightline
Nightline (student service)
Nightline is the name given to various confidential and anonymous overnight listening, emotional support, information, and supplies services, run by students for students at universities around the world...

 confidential listening and advice service in 1992. Essex House was reallocated in the late 1990s as postgraduate teaching space. Kent House includes the Kulukundis House wing, developed with easy access for residents with special needs.

Accommodation on campus was expanded in the 1970s with the construction of the unusual split-level flats of East Slope
East Slope (University of Sussex)
East Slope is one of several accommodation blocks at the University of Sussex.East Slope was constructed in the early 1970s. It is located on the side of a hill near the back of the eastern side of the campus. A series of stone steps connect paths which run horizontally along the slope.East Slope...

. This development also has a social building with a porters' office and bar.

In the 1990s, as student numbers rose, further developments were constructed in the corner of campus between East Slope and Park Village. Brighthelm and Lewes Court were constructed in public-private partnership funding arrangements with the Bradford & Northern and Kelsey Housing Associations.

In total there are seven areas of student accommodation on campus. Two newer accommodation areas were completed recently: one next to Falmer railway station
Falmer railway station
Falmer Railway Station is operated by Southern and lies on the East Coastway Line.The station serves the village of Falmer as well as the University of Sussex campus and the University of Brighton Falmer Campus. It also serves Falmer Stadium, the new home of Brighton & Hove Albion F.C....

, named Stanmer Court, and the other next to East Slope, opposite Bramber House, known as Swanborough.

The newest student residences, named Northfield, have been constructed at the top end of campus, beyond Lewes Court, opening in September 2011.

Sport


The University competes in the following sports, usually with both men's and women's teams:
  • Team sports: basketball
    Basketball
    Basketball is a team sport in which two teams of five players try to score points by throwing or "shooting" a ball through the top of a basketball hoop while following a set of rules...

    , cricket
    Cricket
    Cricket is a bat-and-ball game played between two teams of 11 players on an oval-shaped field, at the centre of which is a rectangular 22-yard long pitch. One team bats, trying to score as many runs as possible while the other team bowls and fields, trying to dismiss the batsmen and thus limit the...

    , football
    Football (soccer)
    Association football, more commonly known as football or soccer, is a sport played between two teams of eleven players with a spherical ball...

    , field hockey
    Field hockey
    Field Hockey, or Hockey, is a team sport in which a team of players attempts to score goals by hitting, pushing or flicking a ball into an opposing team's goal using sticks...

    , netball
    Netball
    Netball is a ball sport played between two teams of seven players. Its development, derived from early versions of basketball, began in England in the 1890s. By 1960 international playing rules had been standardised for the game, and the International Federation of Netball and Women's Basketball ...

    , rugby union
    Rugby union
    Rugby union, often simply referred to as rugby, is a full contact team sport which originated in England in the early 19th century. One of the two codes of rugby football, it is based on running with the ball in hand...

    , ultimate frisbee
    Ultimate (sport)
    Ultimate is a sport played with a 175 gram flying disc. The object of the game is to score points by passing the disc to a player in the opposing end zone, similar to an end zone in American football or rugby...

     and volleyball
    Volleyball
    Volleyball is a team sport in which two teams of six players are separated by a net. Each team tries to score points by grounding a ball on the other team's court under organized rules.The complete rules are extensive...

    .

  • Racquet sports: badminton
    Badminton
    Badminton is a racquet sport played by either two opposing players or two opposing pairs , who take positions on opposite halves of a rectangular court that is divided by a net. Players score points by striking a shuttlecock with their racquet so that it passes over the net and lands in their...

     and squash
    Squash (sport)
    Squash is a high-speed racquet sport played by two players in a four-walled court with a small, hollow rubber ball...

    .

  • Individual sports: archery
    Archery
    Archery is the art, practice, or skill of propelling arrows with the use of a bow, from Latin arcus. Archery has historically been used for hunting and combat; in modern times, however, its main use is that of a recreational activity...

    , fencing and trampolining
    Trampolining
    Trampolining is a competitive Olympic sport in which gymnasts perform acrobatics while bouncing on a trampoline. These can include simple jumps in the pike, tuck or straddle position to more complex combinations of forward or backward somersaults and twists....

    .

  • Outdoor pursuits: sailing
    Sailing
    Sailing is the propulsion of a vehicle and the control of its movement with large foils called sails. By changing the rigging, rudder, and sometimes the keel or centre board, a sailor manages the force of the wind on the sails in order to move the boat relative to its surrounding medium and...

    , mountain biking, mountaineering
    Mountaineering
    Mountaineering or mountain climbing is the sport, hobby or profession of hiking, skiing, and climbing mountains. While mountaineering began as attempts to reach the highest point of unclimbed mountains it has branched into specialisations that address different aspects of the mountain and consists...

    , skiing
    Skiing
    Skiing is a recreational activity using skis as equipment for traveling over snow. Skis are used in conjunction with boots that connect to the ski with use of a binding....

     and snowboarding
    Snowboarding
    Snowboarding is a sport that involves descending a slope that is covered with snow on a snowboard attached to a rider's feet using a special boot set onto mounted binding. The development of snowboarding was inspired by skateboarding, sledding, surfing and skiing. It was developed in the U.S.A...

    , sub aqua, surfing
    Surfing
    Surfing' is a surface water sport in which the surfer rides a surfboard on the crest and face of a wave which is carrying the surfer towards the shore...

     and windsurfing
    Windsurfing
    Windsurfing or sailboarding is a surface water sport that combines elements of surfing and sailing. It consists of a board usually two to four metres long, powered by the orthogonal effect of the wind on a sail. The rig is connected to the board by a free-rotating universal joint and comprises a...

    .

  • Martial arts: mixed martial arts
    Mixed martial arts
    Mixed Martial Arts is a full contact combat sport that allows the use of both striking and grappling techniques, both standing and on the ground, including boxing, wrestling, Brazilian jiu-jitsu, muay Thai, kickboxing, karate, judo and other styles. The roots of modern mixed martial arts can be...

    , kickboxing
    Kickboxing
    Kickboxing refers to a group of martial arts and stand-up combat sports based on kicking and punching, historically developed from karate, Muay Thai and western boxing....

    , Shaolin Kung Fu
    Shaolin kung fu
    Shaolin Kung Fu refers to a collection of Chinese martial arts that claim affiliation with the Shaolin Monastery.Of the multitude styles of kung fu and wushu, only some are actually related to Shaolin...

    , aikido
    Aikido
    is a Japanese martial art developed by Morihei Ueshiba as a synthesis of his martial studies, philosophy, and religious beliefs. Aikido is often translated as "the Way of unifying life energy" or as "the Way of harmonious spirit." Ueshiba's goal was to create an art that practitioners could use to...

     and sport aikido.

Campus media

  • The Badger is the Union’s weekly newspaper and is written and designed entirely by Sussex students. It aims to represent the views and interests of students and communicate the work of the Union, as well as informing members about local, national and international issues that affect them as students. It has interviewed such celebrities as Leonardo DiCaprio, Bruce Willis and Sir Michael Caine.

  • The Pulse, Sussex's termly on-line magazine, complements the Badger by providing in-depth feature articles, interviews with local and national stars, and analysis of the latest happenings in Brighton.

  • University Radio Falmer was one of the first student radio stations in the country. It broadcasts locally on 1431AM and to the world via the Internet urfonline. The station has a busy daytime schedule and during the evening offers a range of genre programming, all from Sussex students from 10 am to 2 am daily. URF also runs a news service which is independent of the control of the Student Union and is bound by legal regulations to remain neutral and unbiased. It won a bronze award in the best scripted programming category in the 2008 UK Student Radio Awards.

  • "University of Sussex Student Television", abbreviated to UniTV is a new student television channel launched in September 2010.

International students


Of the 10,500 students at Sussex, around a quarter are international. Sussex has academic staff from over 50 countries and students from over 120 countries.

The University includes people from many different religious and cultural backgrounds, and there are several places for religious worship on campus.

English Language courses for speakers of other languages are provided by the Language Institute. "English in the Vacation" is intensive practice of spoken and written English. An International Foundation Year offered by the ISC offers routes directly to Sussex degrees.

The International Summer School runs for four and eight weeks starting in July, providing intensive courses. It is predominantly attended by foreign students. The ISS trips office provides excursions to prominent cities, theatres, and activities.

Sussex students may also spend a year abroad as part of their degree.

Notable faculty


In the sciences Sussex counts among its past and present faculty five Nobel Prize winners: Sir Anthony Leggett, Sir Paul Nurse
Paul Nurse
Sir Paul Maxime Nurse, PRS is a British geneticist and cell biologist. He was awarded the 2001 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine with Leland H. Hartwell and R...

, Archer Martin
Archer John Porter Martin
Archer John Porter Martin, FRS was a British chemist who shared the 1952 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for the invention of partition chromatography with Richard Synge....

, Sir John Cornforth
John Cornforth
Sir John Warcup 'Kappa' Cornforth, AC, CBE, FRS , is an Australian scientist who won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1975 for his work on the stereochemistry of enzyme-catalyzed reactions....

 and Professor Harry Kroto
Harold Kroto
Sir Harold Walter Kroto, FRS , born Harold Walter Krotoschiner, is a British chemist and one of the three recipients to share the 1996 Nobel Prize in Chemistry with Robert Curl and Richard Smalley....

. Sir Harry, the first Briton to win the chemistry prize in over ten years, received the prize in 1996 for the discovery of a new class of carbon compounds known as the fullerene
Fullerene
A fullerene is any molecule composed entirely of carbon, in the form of a hollow sphere, ellipsoid, or tube. Spherical fullerenes are also called buckyballs, and they resemble the balls used in association football. Cylindrical ones are called carbon nanotubes or buckytubes...

s. The University has 15 Fellows of the Royal Society - the highest number per science student of any British university other than Cambridge. In the arts, there are six members of faculty - an unusually high proportion - who have the distinction of being Fellows of the British Academy. Faculty publish around 3,000 papers, journal articles and books each year, as well as being involved in consultative work across the world. Sussex has counted two Nobel Prize
Nobel Prize
The Nobel Prizes are annual international awards bestowed by Scandinavian committees in recognition of cultural and scientific advances. The will of the Swedish chemist Alfred Nobel, the inventor of dynamite, established the prizes in 1895...

 winners, 13 Fellows of the Royal Society
Royal Society
The Royal Society of London for Improving Natural Knowledge, known simply as the Royal Society, is a learned society for science, and is possibly the oldest such society in existence. Founded in November 1660, it was granted a Royal Charter by King Charles II as the "Royal Society of London"...

, six fellows of the British Academy
British Academy
The British Academy is the United Kingdom's national body for the humanities and the social sciences. Its purpose is to inspire, recognise and support excellence in the humanities and social sciences, throughout the UK and internationally, and to champion their role and value.It receives an annual...

 and a winner of the prestigious Crafoord Prize
Crafoord Prize
The Crafoord Prize is an annual science prize established in 1980 by Holger Crafoord, a Swedish industrialist, and his wife Anna-Greta Crafoord...

 in its faculty.

Other prominent academics associated with the University include Geoffrey Bennington
Geoffrey Bennington
Geoffrey Bennington is Asa Griggs Candler Professor of French and Professor of Comparative Literature, Emory University, Professor of Philosophy at European Graduate School in Saas-Fee , as well as a member of the International College of Philosophy...

, the creator of the MA programme in Modern French Thought (Derrida, Lyotard); Homi K. Bhabha
Homi K. Bhabha
Homi K. Bhabha is the Anne F. Rothenberg Professor of English and American Literature and Language, and the Director of the Humanities Center at Harvard University. He is one of the most important figures in contemporary post-colonial studies, and has coined a number of the field's neologisms and...

 (postcolonialism); Rachel Bowlby (feminism, Woolf, Freud); Jonathan Dollimore
Jonathan Dollimore
Jonathan Dollimore is a British sociologist and social theorist in the fields of Renaissance literature , gender studies, queer theory , art, censorship, history of ideas, death studies, decadence, and cultural theory...

 (Renaissance literature, gender and queer studies); Katy Gardner
Katy Gardner
Katy Gardner is a British author, best known for her novel Losing Gemma, which was turned into a two part mini series for ITV1 in 2006.As well as being a writer of fiction, she is a Professor of Social Anthropology at Sussex University...

 (social anthropology); Gabriel Josipovici
Gabriel Josipovici
Gabriel David Josipovici FBA, FRSL is a British novelist, short story writer, critic, literary theorist, and playwright.-Biography:...

 (Dante, the Bible); Laura Marcus (Woolf); Peter Nicholls (Pound, modernism); Jacqueline Rose
Jacqueline Rose
Jacqueline Rose is a British academic who is currently Professor of English at Queen Mary, University of London.-Life and work:...

 (feminism, psychoanalysis); Nicholas Royle (modern literature and theory; deconstruction); Alan Sinfield
Alan Sinfield
Alan Sinfield is an English theorist in the fields of Shakespeare and sexuality, modern theatre, gender studies, queer theory , post 1945 politics and cultural theory. Literature, Politics and Culture in Postwar Britain first published in 1989, is a revolutionary socialist interpretation of the...

 (Shakespeare, sexuality, queer theory); Norman Vance (Victorian, classical reception); Knud Haakonssen (intellectual history); Cedric Watts (Conrad, Greene); Marcus Wood (postcolonialism); John Maynard Smith
John Maynard Smith
John Maynard Smith,His surname was Maynard Smith, not Smith, nor was it hyphenated. F.R.S. was a British theoretical evolutionary biologist and geneticist. Originally an aeronautical engineer during the Second World War, he took a second degree in genetics under the well-known biologist J.B.S....

(evolutionary biology).

External links