Medical Research Council (UK)

Medical Research Council (UK)

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The Medical Research Council (the MRC) is a publicly-funded agency responsible for co-ordinating and funding medical research in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern IrelandIn the United Kingdom and Dependencies, other languages have been officially recognised as legitimate autochthonous languages under the European Charter for Regional or Minority Languages...

. It is one of seven Research Council
Research Council
The UK Research Councils, of which there are currently seven, are publicly-funded agencies responsible for co-ordinating and funding particular areas of research, including the arts, humanities, all areas of science and engineering...

s in the UK and is answerable to, although politically independent from, the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills
Department for Business, Innovation and Skills
The Department for Business, Innovation and Skills is a ministerial department of the United Kingdom Government created on 5 June 2009 by the merger of the Department for Innovation, Universities and Skills and the Department for Business, Enterprise and Regulatory Reform .-Ministers:The BIS...

. The organisation is dedicated to "improving human health through world-class medical research".

The MRC focuses on high-impact research and has provided the financial support and scientific expertise behind a number of medical breakthroughs, such as the development of penicillin, the structure of DNA and the link between smoking and cancer. Research funded by the MRC has produced 29 Nobel Prize winners to date.

History


The MRC was founded as the Medical Research Committee and Advisory Council in 1913, with its prime role being the distribution of medical research funds under the terms of the National Insurance Act 1911
National Insurance Act 1911
The National Insurance Act 1911 is an Act of Parliament of the United Kingdom. The Act is often regarded as one of the foundations of modern social welfare in the United Kingdom and forms part of the wider social welfare reforms of the Liberal Government of 1906-1914...

. This was a consequence of the recommendation of the Royal Commission on Tuberculosis, which recommended the creation of a permanent medical research body. The mandate was not limited to tuberculosis, however.

In 1920, it became the Medical Research Council under Royal Charter
Royal Charter
A royal charter is a formal document issued by a monarch as letters patent, granting a right or power to an individual or a body corporate. They were, and are still, used to establish significant organizations such as cities or universities. Charters should be distinguished from warrants and...

. A supplementary Charter was formally approved by the Queen on 17 July 2003.

Notable research


Important work carried out under MRC auspices includes:
  • Identification of the dietary cause of rickets
    Rickets
    Rickets is a softening of bones in children due to deficiency or impaired metabolism of vitamin D, magnesium , phosphorus or calcium, potentially leading to fractures and deformity. Rickets is among the most frequent childhood diseases in many developing countries...

     by Sir Edward Mellanby
  • Discovery, in 1918, that influenza
    Influenza
    Influenza, commonly referred to as the flu, is an infectious disease caused by RNA viruses of the family Orthomyxoviridae , that affects birds and mammals...

     is caused by a virus
    Virus
    A virus is a small infectious agent that can replicate only inside the living cells of organisms. Viruses infect all types of organisms, from animals and plants to bacteria and archaea...

  • Description of neurotransmission
    Neurotransmission
    Neurotransmission , also called synaptic transmission, is the process by which signaling molecules called neurotransmitters are released by a neuron , and bind to and activate the receptors of another neuron...

     and the first neurotransmitter
    Neurotransmitter
    Neurotransmitters are endogenous chemicals that transmit signals from a neuron to a target cell across a synapse. Neurotransmitters are packaged into synaptic vesicles clustered beneath the membrane on the presynaptic side of a synapse, and are released into the synaptic cleft, where they bind to...

    , acetylcholine
    Acetylcholine
    The chemical compound acetylcholine is a neurotransmitter in both the peripheral nervous system and central nervous system in many organisms including humans...

    , by Sir Henry Hallett Dale
    Henry Hallett Dale
    Sir Henry Hallett Dale, OM, GBE, PRS was an English pharmacologist and physiologist. For his study of acetylcholine as agent in the chemical transmission of nerve impulses he shared the 1936 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine with Otto Loewi.-Biography:Henry Hallett Dale was born in Islington,...

     and Otto Loewi
    Otto Loewi
    Otto Loewi was a German born pharmacologist whose discovery of acetylcholine helped enhance medical therapy. The discovery earned for him the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1936 which he shared with Sir Henry Dale, whom he met in 1902 when spending some months in Ernest Starling's...

    , leading to a Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine in 1936;
  • Development of penicillin
    Penicillin
    Penicillin is a group of antibiotics derived from Penicillium fungi. They include penicillin G, procaine penicillin, benzathine penicillin, and penicillin V....

     by Sir Alexander Fleming
    Alexander Fleming
    Sir Alexander Fleming was a Scottish biologist and pharmacologist. He wrote many articles on bacteriology, immunology, and chemotherapy...

    , Sir Ernst Boris Chain
    Ernst Boris Chain
    Sir Ernst Boris Chain was a German-born British biochemist, and a 1945 co-recipient of the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine for his work on penicillin.-Biography:...

     and Lord Florey
    Howard Walter Florey
    Howard Walter Florey, Baron Florey OM FRS was an Australian pharmacologist and pathologist who shared the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1945 with Sir Ernst Boris Chain and Sir Alexander Fleming for his role in the making of penicillin. Florey's discoveries are estimated to have saved...

    , gaining them the 1945 Nobel Prize;
  • Linkage of lung cancer
    Lung cancer
    Lung cancer is a disease characterized by uncontrolled cell growth in tissues of the lung. If left untreated, this growth can spread beyond the lung in a process called metastasis into nearby tissue and, eventually, into other parts of the body. Most cancers that start in lung, known as primary...

     to tobacco smoking
    Tobacco smoking
    Tobacco smoking is the practice where tobacco is burned and the resulting smoke is inhaled. The practice may have begun as early as 5000–3000 BCE. Tobacco was introduced to Eurasia in the late 16th century where it followed common trade routes...

     by Sir Richard Doll
    Richard Doll
    Sir William Richard Shaboe Doll CH OBE FRS was a British physiologist who became the foremost epidemiologist of the 20th century, turning the subject into a rigorous science. He was a pioneer in research linking smoking to health problems...

     and Sir Austin Bradford Hill
    Austin Bradford Hill
    Sir Austin Bradford Hill FRS , English epidemiologist and statistician, pioneered the randomized clinical trial and, together with Richard Doll, was the first to demonstrate the connection between cigarette smoking and lung cancer...

     in the British doctors study
    British Doctors Study
    The British Doctors Study is the generally accepted name of a prospective cohort study which ran from 1951 to 2001, and in 1956 provided convincing statistical proof that tobacco smoking increased the risk of lung cancer.-Context:...

    , published in 1956;
  • Discovery of the structure of DNA
    DNA
    Deoxyribonucleic acid is a nucleic acid that contains the genetic instructions used in the development and functioning of all known living organisms . The DNA segments that carry this genetic information are called genes, but other DNA sequences have structural purposes, or are involved in...

     by James D. Watson
    James D. Watson
    James Dewey Watson is an American molecular biologist, geneticist, and zoologist, best known as one of the co-discoverers of the structure of DNA in 1953 with Francis Crick...

    , Francis Crick
    Francis Crick
    Francis Harry Compton Crick OM FRS was an English molecular biologist, biophysicist, and neuroscientist, and most noted for being one of two co-discoverers of the structure of the DNA molecule in 1953, together with James D. Watson...

    , Rosalind Franklin
    Rosalind Franklin
    Rosalind Elsie Franklin was a British biophysicist and X-ray crystallographer who made critical contributions to the understanding of the fine molecular structures of DNA, RNA, viruses, coal and graphite...

     and Professor Maurice Wilkins
    Maurice Wilkins
    Maurice Hugh Frederick Wilkins CBE FRS was a New Zealand-born English physicist and molecular biologist, and Nobel Laureate whose research contributed to the scientific understanding of phosphorescence, isotope separation, optical microscopy and X-ray diffraction, and to the development of radar...

    . They would receive the 1962 Nobel Prize for Physiology and Medicine for their discovery.
  • Development of magnetic resonance imaging
    Magnetic resonance imaging
    Magnetic resonance imaging , nuclear magnetic resonance imaging , or magnetic resonance tomography is a medical imaging technique used in radiology to visualize detailed internal structures...

     in 1973 by Professor Peter Mansfield
    Peter Mansfield
    Sir Peter Mansfield, FRS, , is a British physicist who was awarded the 2003 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for his discoveries concerning magnetic resonance imaging . The Nobel Prize was shared with Paul Lauterbur, who also contributed to the development of MRI...

     and independently by Paul Lauterbur
    Paul Lauterbur
    Paul Christian Lauterbur was an American chemist who shared the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 2003 with Peter Mansfield for his work which made the development of magnetic resonance imaging possible.Dr...

    . This would lead to the 2003 Nobel Prize.
  • Development of monoclonal antibodies by César Milstein
    César Milstein
    César Milstein FRS was an Argentine biochemist in the field of antibody research. Milstein shared the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1984 with Niels K. Jerne and Georges Köhler.-Biography:...

     and Georges Köhler in 1975 (1984 Nobel Prize)
  • The identification, in 1983, of folic acid
    Folic acid
    Folic acid and folate , as well as pteroyl-L-glutamic acid, pteroyl-L-glutamate, and pteroylmonoglutamic acid are forms of the water-soluble vitamin B9...

     as a preventive measure for spina bifida
    Spina bifida
    Spina bifida is a developmental congenital disorder caused by the incomplete closing of the embryonic neural tube. Some vertebrae overlying the spinal cord are not fully formed and remain unfused and open. If the opening is large enough, this allows a portion of the spinal cord to protrude through...

     and neural tube defects
  • Large studies, in the 1970s and 1980s, showing that aspirin
    Aspirin
    Aspirin , also known as acetylsalicylic acid , is a salicylate drug, often used as an analgesic to relieve minor aches and pains, as an antipyretic to reduce fever, and as an anti-inflammatory medication. It was discovered by Arthur Eichengrun, a chemist with the German company Bayer...

     can decrease the risk of cardiovascular disease
    Cardiovascular disease
    Heart disease or cardiovascular disease are the class of diseases that involve the heart or blood vessels . While the term technically refers to any disease that affects the cardiovascular system , it is usually used to refer to those related to atherosclerosis...

    .
  • The publication of the genome
    Genome
    In modern molecular biology and genetics, the genome is the entirety of an organism's hereditary information. It is encoded either in DNA or, for many types of virus, in RNA. The genome includes both the genes and the non-coding sequences of the DNA/RNA....

     of C. elegans
    Caenorhabditis elegans
    Caenorhabditis elegans is a free-living, transparent nematode , about 1 mm in length, which lives in temperate soil environments. Research into the molecular and developmental biology of C. elegans was begun in 1974 by Sydney Brenner and it has since been used extensively as a model...

    , the first multicellular organism to receive this treatment, in 1998.
  • The ongoing Heart Protection Study
    Heart Protection Study
    The Heart Protection Study was a large randomized controlled trialrun by the Clinical Trial Service Unit, and fundedby the Medical Research Council and the British Heart Foundation in the United Kingdom...

    , showing benefits of primary prevention with simvastatin
    Simvastatin
    Simvastatin is a hypolipidemic drug used to control elevated cholesterol, or hypercholesterolemia. Simvastatin is a member of the statin class of pharmaceuticals, is a synthetic derivate of a fermentation product of Aspergillus terreus.-Medical uses:The primary uses of simvastatin is for the...

     in patients at high risk for cardiovascular disease.
  • Nobel Prize for Chemistry 2009 awarded to Dr Venki Ramakrishnan
    Venki Ramakrishnan
    Venkatraman "Venki" Ramakrishnan is an Indian-born American structural biologist, who shared the 2009 Nobel Prize in Chemistry with Thomas A. Steitz and Ada E. Yonath, "for studies of the structure and function of the ribosome"...

     of the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology for showing how ribosomes, the tiny protein-making factories inside cells, function at the atomic level.
  • Discovery that early treatment of HIV-infected babies with anti-retroviral therapy can dramatically increase their chances of survival.
  • Development of a test for detecting infectious prions on surgical instruments which is more accurate than previous tests and 100 times faster.
  • Identification of the second ever genetic variant associated with obesity.
  • The finding that high quality surgery combined with a short course of radiotherapy can halve the rate of recurrence of colorectal cancer.


In all, scientists associated with the MRC have received 29 Nobel Prizes in either Physiology or Medicine or Chemistry.

Organisation and leadership


The MRC is one of seven Research Council
Research Council
The UK Research Councils, of which there are currently seven, are publicly-funded agencies responsible for co-ordinating and funding particular areas of research, including the arts, humanities, all areas of science and engineering...

s and since 6 June 2009 has been answerable to, although politically independent from, the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills
Department for Business, Innovation and Skills
The Department for Business, Innovation and Skills is a ministerial department of the United Kingdom Government created on 5 June 2009 by the merger of the Department for Innovation, Universities and Skills and the Department for Business, Enterprise and Regulatory Reform .-Ministers:The BIS...

 (BIS) (previously Department for Innovation, Universities and Skills
Department for Innovation, Universities and Skills
The Department for Innovation, Universities and Skills was a UK government department created on 28 June 2007 to take over some of the functions of the Department of Education and Skills and of the Department of Trade and Industry. In June 2009 it was merged into the newly formed Department for...

 (DIUS)). In the past, the MRC has been answerable to the Office of Science and Innovation, part of the Department of Trade and Industry.

The MRC is governed by a council of 14 members, which convenes every two months. Its Council, which directs and oversees corporate policy and science strategy, ensures that the MRC is effectively managed, and makes policy and spending decisions. Council members are drawn from industry, academia, government and the NHS. Members are appointed by the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills. Daily management is in the hands of the Chief Executive. Members of the council also chair specialist boards on specific areas of research. For specific subjects, the council convenes committees.

CEOs


As Chief Executive Officers (originally secretaries) served:
  • 1914-33: Sir Walter Morley Fletcher
    Walter Morley Fletcher
    Sir Walter Morley Fletcher, KBE FRS was a British physiologist and administrator. Fletcher graduated from Trinity College, Cambridge and was most significant in his administration of the Medical Research Council during the interwar years...

  • 1933-49: Sir Edward Mellanby
  • 1949-68: Sir Harold Himsworth
  • 1968-77: Sir John Gray
    John Gray
    -Born 18th century:*John Gray , member of the North Carolina General Assembly*John Gray , president of the Bank of Montreal...

  • 1977-87: Sir James Gowans
    James Gowans
    James Gowans DSO was an English-born sportsman who played international rugby union as a wing for Scotland and as a cricketer represented Marylebone Cricket Club.-Personal history:...

  • 1987-96: Sir Dai Rees
  • 1996-2003: Professor Sir George Radda
    George Radda
    Professor Sir George Charles Radda was born in 1936 in Hungary. In 1956, he attended Merton College, Oxford to study chemistry. His early work was concerned with the development and use of fluorescent probes for the study of structure and function of membranes and enzymes...

  • 2003-2007: Professor Colin Blakemore
    Colin Blakemore
    Professor Colin Blakemore, Ph.D., FRS, FMedSci, HonFSB, HonFRCP, is a British neurobiologist who is Professor of Neuroscience at the University of Oxford and University of Warwick specialising in vision and the development of the brain. He was formerly Chief Executive of the British Medical...

  • 2007-2010: Professor Sir Leszek Borysiewicz
    Leszek Borysiewicz
    Sir Leszek Krzysztof Borysiewicz, FRS is a Polish British physician, immunologist and scientific administrator. He is currently the 345th Vice-Chancellor of the University of Cambridge, his term of office started on 1 October 2010...

  • 2010–present: Sir John Savill
    John Savill
    Sir John Stewart Savill is the Chief Executive of the Medical Research Council , having previously been appointed as the Head of the College of Medicine and Veterinary Medicine and a Vice Principal of the University of Edinburgh....


Chairmen

  • 1913-1916: The Rt Hon. Lord Moulton
  • 1916-1920: Major The Hon.Waldorf Astor
  • 1920-1924: The Viscount Goschen
  • 1924: The Rt Hon. Edward F.L.Wood
  • 1924-1929: The Rt Hon. the Earl of Balfour
  • 1929-1934: The Rt Hon. Viscount D'Abernon
  • 1934-1936: The Most Hon. The Marquess of Linlithgow
  • 1936-1948: Lord Balfour of Burleigh
  • 1948-1951: The Rt Hon. Viscount Addison
  • 1952-1960: The Earl of Limerick
  • 1960-1961: The Rt Hon. The Viscount Amory
  • 1961-1965: The Rt Hon. Lord Shawcross
  • 1965-1969: The Rt Hon. The Viscount Amory
  • 1969-1978: His Grace the Duke of Northumberland
  • 1978-1982: The Rt Hon. The Lord Shepherd
  • 1982-1990: The Rt Hon. Earl Jellicoe
  • 1990-1998: Sir David Plastow
  • 1998-2006: Sir Anthony Cleaver
  • 2006-Present: Sir John Chisholm

Institutes, centres and units


The MRC has 27 units and three institutes in the UK and one unit in each of The Gambia and Uganda. It also has 28 centres offering partnerships with UK universities to develop centres of scientific excellence: Three 'lifelong health' research centres were announced in 2008, funded by the MRC, the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council, the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council and the Economic and Social Research Council, as part of the Lifelong Health and Wellbeing programme:

The MRC National Institute for Medical Research (NIMR)
National Institute for Medical Research
The National Institute for Medical Research, commonly abbreviated to NIMR, is a medical research facility situated in Mill Hill, on the outskirts of London, England. It is mainly funded by the Medical Research Council, or MRC, and is its largest establishment and the only one designated as an...

 is planned to move to the new Francis Crick Institute in 2015. The Francis Crick Institute is a partnership between the MRC, Cancer Research UK
Cancer Research UK
Cancer Research UK is a cancer research and awareness charity in the United Kingdom, formed on 4 February 2002 by the merger of The Cancer Research Campaign and the Imperial Cancer Research Fund. Its aim is to reduce the number of deaths from cancer. As the world's largest independent cancer...

, the Wellcome Trust
Wellcome Trust
The Wellcome Trust was established in 1936 as an independent charity funding research to improve human and animal health. With an endowment of around £13.9 billion, it is the United Kingdom's largest non-governmental source of funds for biomedical research...

 and University College London
University College London
University College London is a public research university located in London, United Kingdom and the oldest and largest constituent college of the federal University of London...

.

The following is a list of the MRC's current institutes, centres and units:

Birmingham
  • MRC/University of Birmingham Centre for Immune Regulation (based at the University of Birmingham
    University of Birmingham
    The University of Birmingham is a British Redbrick university located in the city of Birmingham, England. It received its royal charter in 1900 as a successor to Birmingham Medical School and Mason Science College . Birmingham was the first Redbrick university to gain a charter and thus...

    )


Brighton
  • MRC/University of Sussex Centre in Genome Damage and Stability (based at the University of Sussex
    University of Sussex
    The University of Sussex is an English public research university situated next to the East Sussex village of Falmer, within the city of Brighton and Hove. The University received its Royal Charter in August 1961....

    )


Bristol
  • MRC Centre for Causal Analyses in Translational Epidemiology
  • MRC/University of Bristol Centre for Synaptic Plasticity (based at the University of Bristol
    University of Bristol
    The University of Bristol is a public research university located in Bristol, United Kingdom. One of the so-called "red brick" universities, it received its Royal Charter in 1909, although its predecessor institution, University College, Bristol, had been in existence since 1876.The University is...

    )


Cardiff
  • MRC Centre for Neuropsychiatric Genetics and Genomics (based at Cardiff University
    Cardiff University
    Cardiff University is a leading research university located in the Cathays Park area of Cardiff, Wales, United Kingdom. It received its Royal charter in 1883 and is a member of the Russell Group of Universities. The university is consistently recognised as providing high quality research-based...

    )


Cambridge
  • MRC Biostatistics Unit
  • MRC Cancer Cell Unit
    MRC Cancer Cell Unit
    The Medical Research Council Cancer Cell Unit is located in Cambridge and was established in 2001. Category:Medical Research Council...

  • MRC Centre for Behavioural and Clinical Neuroscience Institute (BCNI) (based at the University of Cambridge
    University of Cambridge
    The University of Cambridge is a public research university located in Cambridge, United Kingdom. It is the second-oldest university in both the United Kingdom and the English-speaking world , and the seventh-oldest globally...

    )
  • MRC Centre for Nutritional Epidemiology in Cancer Prevention and Survival (CNC) (based at the University of Cambridge)
  • MRC Centre for Obesity and Related Metabolic Diseases (based at the University of Cambridge)
  • MRC Centre for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine (based at the University of Cambridge)
  • MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit
    Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit
    The ' is a branch of the UK Medical Research Council, based in Cambridge, England. The CBSU is a world-leading centre for cognitive neuroscience, with a mission to improve human health by understanding and enhancing cognition and behaviour in health, disease and disorder...

     (CBSU)
  • MRC Epidemiology Unit
  • MRC Human Nutrition Research
    MRC Human Nutrition Research
    MRC Human Nutrition Research is the largest research institute in the UK for human nutrition, and is based in Cambridge.-History:In 1998 MRC Human Nutrition Research was formed out of the restructuring of the Dunn Human Nutrition Unit following the resignation of Professor Roger Whitehead....

  • MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology
    Laboratory of Molecular Biology
    The Laboratory of Molecular Biology is a research institute in Cambridge, England, which was at the forefront of the revolution in molecular biology which occurred in the 1950–60s, since then it remains a major medical research laboratory with a much broader focus.-Early beginnings: 1947-61:Max...

     (LMB)
  • MRC Mitochondrial Biology Unit
    Dunn Human Nutrition Unit
    The MRC Mitochondrial Biology Unit is an institution of the Medical Research Council based at the Addenbrooke’s Hospital site in Cambridge, England...



Dundee
  • MRC Protein Phosphorylation Unit (based at the University of Dundee
    University of Dundee
    The University of Dundee is a university based in the city and Royal burgh of Dundee on eastern coast of the central Lowlands of Scotland and with a small number of institutions elsewhere....

    )


Edinburgh
  • MRC Centre for Cognitive Ageing and Cognitive Epidemiology (based at the University of Edinburgh
    University of Edinburgh
    The University of Edinburgh, founded in 1583, is a public research university located in Edinburgh, the capital of Scotland, and a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The university is deeply embedded in the fabric of the city, with many of the buildings in the historic Old Town belonging to the university...

    )
  • MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine (based at the University of Edinburgh)
  • MRC Human Genetics Unit
    MRC Human Genetics Unit
    The Medical Research Council Human Genetics Unit is situated at the Western General Hospital in Edinburgh. It is one of the largest MRC research establishments, housing over two hundred scientists, support staff, research fellows, PhD students, and visiting workers.-Directors:* 1956 - 1969 Dr...

  • MRC Scottish Collaboration for Public Health Research and Policy
  • MRC/University of Edinburgh Centre for Inflammation Research (based at the University of Edinburgh)


Entebbe
  • MRC/UVRI Uganda Research Unit on AIDS


Fajarra
  • MRC (UK) The Gambia


Glasgow
  • MRC/CSO Social and Public Health Sciences Unit (based at the University of Glasgow
    University of Glasgow
    The University of Glasgow is the fourth-oldest university in the English-speaking world and one of Scotland's four ancient universities. Located in Glasgow, the university was founded in 1451 and is presently one of seventeen British higher education institutions ranked amongst the top 100 of the...

    )
  • MRC Institute of Hearing Research (based at the University of Glasgow)
  • MRC-University of Glasgow Centre for Virus Research (based at the University of Glasgow)


Harwell
  • MRC Mammalian Genetics Unit
  • Research Complex at Harwell (RCaH)


Leicester
  • MRC Toxicology Unit (based at the University of Leicester
    University of Leicester
    The University of Leicester is a research-led university based in Leicester, England. The main campus is a mile south of the city centre, adjacent to Victoria Park and Wyggeston and Queen Elizabeth I College....

    )


Liverpool
  • MRC Centre for Drug Safety Science (based at the University of Liverpool
    University of Liverpool
    The University of Liverpool is a teaching and research university in the city of Liverpool, England. It is a member of the Russell Group of large research-intensive universities and the N8 Group for research collaboration. Founded in 1881 , it is also one of the six original "red brick" civic...

    )


London
  • MRC Asthma UK Centre in Allergic Mechanisms of Asthma (based at King's College London
    King's College London
    King's College London is a public research university located in London, United Kingdom and a constituent college of the federal University of London. King's has a claim to being the third oldest university in England, having been founded by King George IV and the Duke of Wellington in 1829, and...

    )
  • MRC Cell Biology Unit (based at University College London
    University College London
    University College London is a public research university located in London, United Kingdom and the oldest and largest constituent college of the federal University of London...

    )
  • MRC Centre of Epidemiology for Child Health (based at University College London)
  • MRC Centre for Developmental Neurobiology (based at King's College London)
  • MRC-HPA Centre for Environment and Health (jointly based at King's College London and Imperial College London
    Imperial College London
    Imperial College London is a public research university located in London, United Kingdom, specialising in science, engineering, business and medicine...

    )
  • MRC/University College London Centre for Medical Molecular Virology (based at University College London)
  • MRC Centre for Neurodegeneration Research (based at King's College London)
  • MRC Centre for Neuromuscular Diseases (based at University College London)
  • MRC Centre for Outbreak Analysis and Modelling (based at Imperial College London)
  • MRC Centre for Transplantation (based at King's College London)
  • MRC Clinical Sciences Centre (CSC) (based at Imperial College London)
  • MRC Clinical Trials Unit (CTU)
  • The Crucible Centre (based at University College London)
  • MRC General Practice Research Framework (GPRF)
  • MRC International Nutrition Group (based at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine
    London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine
    The London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine is a constituent college of the federal University of London, specialising in public health and tropical medicine...

    )
  • MRC National Institute for Medical Research
    National Institute for Medical Research
    The National Institute for Medical Research, commonly abbreviated to NIMR, is a medical research facility situated in Mill Hill, on the outskirts of London, England. It is mainly funded by the Medical Research Council, or MRC, and is its largest establishment and the only one designated as an...

     (NIMR) including the MRC Biomedical NMR Centre
  • MRC Prion Unit (based at University College London)
  • MRC Social, Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry (SGDP) Centre (based at King's College London)
  • MRC Unit for Lifelong Health and Ageing, home of the National Survey of Health & Development
    National Survey of Health & Development
    The MRC Unit for Lifelong Health and Ageing established in 2008 is the new home of the National Survey of Health and Development .The National Survey of Health & Development is a Medical Research Council longitudinal survey of people born in Britain in March 1946...



Newcastle
  • Centre for Brain Ageing and Vitality (based at Newcastle University)


Nottingham
  • MRC Institute of Hearing Research (based at the University of Nottingham
    University of Nottingham
    The University of Nottingham is a public research university based in Nottingham, United Kingdom, with further campuses in Ningbo, China and Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia...

    )


Oxford
  • MRC Anatomical Neuropharmacology Unit
  • MRC Centre for Genomics and Global Health
  • MRC/Cancer Research UK/BHF Clinical Trial Service Unit & Epidemiological Studies Unit (CTSU)
  • MRC Functional Genomics Unit (based at the University of Oxford
    University of Oxford
    The University of Oxford is a university located in Oxford, United Kingdom. It is the second-oldest surviving university in the world and the oldest in the English-speaking world. Although its exact date of foundation is unclear, there is evidence of teaching as far back as 1096...

    )
  • MRC/Cancer Research UK Gray Institute for Radiation Oncology and Biology (based at the University of Oxford)
  • MRC Human Immunology Unit (based at the University of Oxford)
  • MRC Molecular Haematology Unit


Sheffield
  • MRC Centre for Developmental and Biomedical Genetics (based at the University of Sheffield
    University of Sheffield
    The University of Sheffield is a research university based in the city of Sheffield in South Yorkshire, England. It is one of the original 'red brick' universities and is a member of the Russell Group of leading research intensive universities...

    )


Southampton
  • MRC Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit

External links


Video clips