List of Renaissance composers

List of Renaissance composers

Encyclopedia
This is a list of composers active during the Renaissance
Renaissance
The Renaissance was a cultural movement that spanned roughly the 14th to the 17th century, beginning in Italy in the Late Middle Ages and later spreading to the rest of Europe. The term is also used more loosely to refer to the historical era, but since the changes of the Renaissance were not...

 period of European history. Since the 14th century is not usually considered by music historians to be part of the musical Renaissance
Renaissance music
Renaissance music is European music written during the Renaissance. Defining the beginning of the musical era is difficult, given that its defining characteristics were adopted only gradually; musicologists have placed its beginnings from as early as 1300 to as late as the 1470s.Literally meaning...

, but part of the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
The Middle Ages is a periodization of European history from the 5th century to the 15th century. The Middle Ages follows the fall of the Western Roman Empire in 476 and precedes the Early Modern Era. It is the middle period of a three-period division of Western history: Classic, Medieval and Modern...

, composers active during that time can be found in the List of Medieval composers. Composers on this list had some period of significant activity after 1400, before 1600, or in a few cases they wrote music in a Renaissance idiom in the several decades after 1600.

Burgundian



The Burgundian School is a term used to denote a group of composers active in the 15th century in what is now northern and eastern France
France
The French Republic , The French Republic , The French Republic , (commonly known as France , is a unitary semi-presidential republic in Western Europe with several overseas territories and islands located on other continents and in the Indian, Pacific, and Atlantic oceans. Metropolitan France...

, Belgium
Belgium
Belgium , officially the Kingdom of Belgium, is a federal state in Western Europe. It is a founding member of the European Union and hosts the EU's headquarters, and those of several other major international organisations such as NATO.Belgium is also a member of, or affiliated to, many...

, and the Netherlands
Netherlands
The Netherlands is a constituent country of the Kingdom of the Netherlands, located mainly in North-West Europe and with several islands in the Caribbean. Mainland Netherlands borders the North Sea to the north and west, Belgium to the south, and Germany to the east, and shares maritime borders...

, centered on the court of the Dukes of Burgundy
Duchy of Burgundy
The Duchy of Burgundy , was heir to an ancient and prestigious reputation and a large division of the lands of the Second Kingdom of Burgundy and in its own right was one of the geographically larger ducal territories in the emergence of Early Modern Europe from Medieval Europe.Even in that...

. The school also included some English
England
England is a country that is part of the United Kingdom. It shares land borders with Scotland to the north and Wales to the west; the Irish Sea is to the north west, the Celtic Sea to the south west, with the North Sea to the east and the English Channel to the south separating it from continental...

 composers at the time when part of modern France was controlled by England. The Burgundian School was the first phase of activity of the Franco-Flemish School
Franco-Flemish School
In music, the Franco-Flemish School or more precisely the Netherlandish School refers, somewhat imprecisely, to the style of polyphonic vocal music composition in Europe in the 15th and 16th centuries, and to the composers who wrote it...

, the central musical practice of the Renaissance in Europe
Renaissance
The Renaissance was a cultural movement that spanned roughly the 14th to the 17th century, beginning in Italy in the Late Middle Ages and later spreading to the rest of Europe. The term is also used more loosely to refer to the historical era, but since the changes of the Renaissance were not...

.
fl.>
Name Born Died Notes
Johannes Tapissier
Johannes Tapissier
Johannes Tapissier was a French composer and teacher of the late Middle Ages, in the period transitional to the Renaissance style...

 
(Jean de Noyers)
c. 1370 before 1410
Nicolas Grenon
Nicolas Grenon
Nicolas Grenon was a French composer of the early Renaissance. He wrote in all the prevailing musical forms of the time, and was a rare case of a long-lived composer who learned his craft in the late 14th century but primarily practiced during the era during which the Renaissance styles were...

 
c. 1375 1456
Pierre Fontaine
Pierre Fontaine (composer)
Pierre Fontaine was a French composer of the transitional era between the late Middle Ages and early Renaissance, and a member of the Burgundian School of composers. While he was well-known at the time, most of his music has probably been lost...

 
c. 1380 c. 1450
Jacobus Vide
Jacobus Vide
Jacobus Vide was a Franco-Flemish composer of the transitional period between the medieval period and early Renaissance...

 
fl.
Floruit
Floruit , abbreviated fl. , is a Latin verb meaning "flourished", denoting the period of time during which something was active...

1405?
after 1433
Guillaume Legrant
Guillaume Legrant
Guillaume Legrant was a French composer of the early Renaissance, active in Flanders, Italy, and France...

 
(Lemarcherier)
fl. 1405 after 1449
John Dunstaple  c. 1390 1453 Native to England.
Guillaume Dufay
Guillaume Dufay
Guillaume Dufay was a Franco-Flemish composer of the early Renaissance. As the central figure in the Burgundian School, he was the most famous and influential composer in Europe in the mid-15th century.-Early life:From the evidence of his will, he was probably born in Beersel, in the vicinity of...

 
(Guillaume Du Fay)
1397 1474
Johannes Brassart
Johannes Brassart
Johannes Brassart was a Burgundian composer of the early Renaissance. Of his output, only sacred vocal music has survived, and it typifies early 15th century practice.- Life :...

 
c. 1400/1405 1455
Johannes Legrant
Johannes Legrant
Johannes Legrant was a French or Burgundian composer of the early Renaissance.Little is known for certain about his life, and as is common for composers of the early 15th century, there are problems of identification in the existing records. In 1423 and 1424, he may have been a vicar at St....

 
fl. c. 1420 after 1440
Gilles Binchois
Gilles Binchois
Gilles de Binche , also known as Gilles de Bins , was a Franco-Flemish composer, one of the earliest members of the Burgundian School, and one of the three most famous composers of the early 15th century...

 
(Gilles de Bins)
c. 1400 1460
Hugo de Lantins
Hugo de Lantins
Hugo de Lantins was a Franco-Flemish composer of the late Medieval era and early Renaissance. He was active in Italy, especially Venice, and wrote both sacred and secular music; he may have been a relative of Arnold de Lantins, another composer active at the same time in the same area.Little is...

 
fl. c. 1420 after 1430
Arnold de Lantins
Arnold de Lantins
Arnold de Lantins was a Franco–Flemish composer of the late medieval and early Renaissance eras. He is one of a few composers who shows aspects of both medieval and Renaissance style, and was a contemporary of Dufay during Dufay's sojourn in Italy.Very little is known about his life, except...

 
fl. 1423 1431/1432
Reginaldus Libert
Reginaldus Libert
Reginaldus Libert was a French composer of the early Renaissance. He was a minor member of the Burgundian School, a contemporary of Guillaume Dufay, and one of the first to use fauxbourdon in a mass setting.Little to nothing is known of his life...

 
fl. c. 1425 after 1435
Jean Cousin
Jean Cousin (composer)
Jean Cousin was a French or Flemish composer of the Burgundian School and a member of the royal chapel from 1462. He was recorded as taking part in the Tours city election assemblies in 1463-1464.-References:...

 
before 1425 after 1475
Gilles Joye
Gilles Joye
Gilles Joye was a Franco-Flemish composer of the Renaissance. A member of the Burgundian school, he was known mainly for his secular songs which were in a lyrical and graceful style.- Life :...

 
1424/1425 1483
Guillaume le Rouge
Guillaume le Rouge
Guillaume Le Rouge was a Netherlands musician of the Burgundian school. He took a position at the court of Charles d'Orleans, serving in the chapel from 1451 to 1465. One song remains of his compositions, Se je fais duel je n’en ouis mais....

 
fl. 1450 after 1465
Robert Morton  c. 1430 1479
Antoine Busnois
Antoine Busnois
Antoine Busnois was a French composer and poet of the early Renaissance Burgundian School. While also noted as a composer of sacred music, such as motets, he was one of the most renowned 15th-century composers of secular chansons...

 
c. 1430 1492
Adrien Basin
Adrien Basin
Adrien Basin was a Franco-Flemish composer, singer, and diplomat of the Burgundian school of the early Renaissance...

 
fl. 1457 after 1498
Hayne van Ghizeghem
Hayne van Ghizeghem
Hayne van Ghizeghem was a Franco-Flemish composer of the early Renaissance Burgundian School.While many of his works have survived, little is known about his life...

 
c. 1445 after 1476

English


Due in part to its isolation from mainland Europe
Europe
Europe is, by convention, one of the world's seven continents. Comprising the westernmost peninsula of Eurasia, Europe is generally 'divided' from Asia to its east by the watershed divides of the Ural and Caucasus Mountains, the Ural River, the Caspian and Black Seas, and the waterways connecting...

, the English Renaissance
English Renaissance
The English Renaissance was a cultural and artistic movement in England dating from the late 15th and early 16th centuries to the early 17th century. It is associated with the pan-European Renaissance that is usually regarded as beginning in Italy in the late 14th century; like most of northern...

 began later than most other parts of Europe. The Renaissance style also continued into a period in which many other European nations had already made the transition into the Baroque
Baroque
The Baroque is a period and the style that used exaggerated motion and clear, easily interpreted detail to produce drama, tension, exuberance, and grandeur in sculpture, painting, literature, dance, and music...

. While late medieval English
England
England is a country that is part of the United Kingdom. It shares land borders with Scotland to the north and Wales to the west; the Irish Sea is to the north west, the Celtic Sea to the south west, with the North Sea to the east and the English Channel to the south separating it from continental...

 music was influential on the development of the Burgundian style
Burgundian School
The Burgundian School is a term used to denote a group of composers active in the 15th century in what is now northern and eastern France, Belgium, and the Netherlands, centered on the court of the Dukes of Burgundy. The main names associated with this school are Guillaume Dufay, Gilles Binchois,...

, most English music of the 15th century was lost, particularly during the Dissolution of the Monasteries
Dissolution of the Monasteries
The Dissolution of the Monasteries, sometimes referred to as the Suppression of the Monasteries, was the set of administrative and legal processes between 1536 and 1541 by which Henry VIII disbanded monasteries, priories, convents and friaries in England, Wales and Ireland; appropriated their...

 during the time of Henry VIII
Henry VIII of England
Henry VIII was King of England from 21 April 1509 until his death. He was Lord, and later King, of Ireland, as well as continuing the nominal claim by the English monarchs to the Kingdom of France...

. The Tudor period
Tudor period
The Tudor period usually refers to the period between 1485 and 1603, specifically in relation to the history of England. This coincides with the rule of the Tudor dynasty in England whose first monarch was Henry VII...

 of the 16th century was a time of intense interest in music, and Renaissance
Renaissance
The Renaissance was a cultural movement that spanned roughly the 14th to the 17th century, beginning in Italy in the Late Middle Ages and later spreading to the rest of Europe. The term is also used more loosely to refer to the historical era, but since the changes of the Renaissance were not...

 styles began to develop with mutual influence from the mainland. Some English musical trends were heavily indebted to foreign styles, for example the English Madrigal School
English Madrigal School
The English Madrigal School was the brief but intense flowering of the musical madrigal in England, mostly from 1588 to 1627, along with the composers who produced them. The English madrigals were a cappella, predominantly light in style, and generally began as either copies or direct translations...

; others had aspects of continental practice as well as uniquely English traits. Composers included Thomas Tallis
Thomas Tallis
Thomas Tallis was an English composer. Tallis flourished as a church musician in 16th century Tudor England. He occupies a primary place in anthologies of English church music, and is considered among the best of England's early composers. He is honoured for his original voice in English...

, John Dowland
John Dowland
John Dowland was an English Renaissance composer, singer, and lutenist. He is best known today for his melancholy songs such as "Come, heavy sleep" , "Come again", "Flow my tears", "I saw my Lady weepe" and "In darkness let me dwell", but his instrumental music has undergone a major revival, and has...

, Orlando Gibbons
Orlando Gibbons
Orlando Gibbons was an English composer, virginalist and organist of the late Tudor and early Jacobean periods...

 and William Byrd
William Byrd
William Byrd was an English composer of the Renaissance. He wrote in many of the forms current in England at the time, including various types of sacred and secular polyphony, keyboard and consort music.-Provenance:Knowledge of Byrd's biography expanded in the late 20th century, thanks largely...

.

1370–1450

Name Born Died Notes
Forest 
probably John Forest
1365/70 1446 Dean of Wells. One credo
Credo
A credo |Latin]] for "I Believe") is a statement of belief, commonly used for religious belief, such as the Apostles' Creed. The term especially refers to the use of the Nicene-Constantinopolitan Creed in the Mass, either as text, Gregorian chant, or other musical settings of the...

 setting and six antiphon
Antiphon
An antiphon in Christian music and ritual, is a "responsory" by a choir or congregation, usually in Gregorian chant, to a psalm or other text in a religious service or musical work....

s by him survive in the second layer of the Old Hall Manuscript
Old Hall Manuscript
The Old Hall Manuscript is the largest, most complete, and most significant source of English sacred music of the late 14th and early 15th centuries, and as such represents the best source for late Medieval English music. The manuscript somehow survived the Reformation, and until 1873 belonged to St...

; two anonymous settings may also be by him.
Pycard
Pycard
Pycard, also spelt Picard and Picart was an English or French Medieval and Renaissance transitionary composer....

 
fl. c. 1390 after c. 1410 Has works preserved in the first layer of the Old Hall Manuscript
Old Hall Manuscript
The Old Hall Manuscript is the largest, most complete, and most significant source of English sacred music of the late 14th and early 15th centuries, and as such represents the best source for late Medieval English music. The manuscript somehow survived the Reformation, and until 1873 belonged to St...

 and elsewhere. His identity is unclear; probably English, but possibly from France.
Leonel Power
Leonel Power
Leonel Power was an English composer of the late Medieval and early Renaissance eras. Along with John Dunstaple, he was one of the major figures in English music in the early 15th century.-Life:...

 
c. 1370 1445
J. Cooke 
probably John Cooke
c. 1385 1442? Nine pieces attributed to him in the Old Hall Manuscript
Old Hall Manuscript
The Old Hall Manuscript is the largest, most complete, and most significant source of English sacred music of the late 14th and early 15th centuries, and as such represents the best source for late Medieval English music. The manuscript somehow survived the Reformation, and until 1873 belonged to St...

.
Damett 
almost certainly Thomas Damett
c. 1389 1436/7 A significant contributor to the second layer of the Old Hall Manuscript
Old Hall Manuscript
The Old Hall Manuscript is the largest, most complete, and most significant source of English sacred music of the late 14th and early 15th centuries, and as such represents the best source for late Medieval English music. The manuscript somehow survived the Reformation, and until 1873 belonged to St...

 where nine of his works are preserved.
Roy Henry
Roy Henry
Roy Henry was an English composer, almost certainly a king of England, probably Henry V, but also possibly Henry IV...

 
fl. 1410 after 1410 Very likely to be Henry V of England
Henry V of England
Henry V was King of England from 1413 until his death at the age of 35 in 1422. He was the second monarch belonging to the House of Lancaster....

 (1387–1422).
Byttering
Byttering
Byttering was an English composer during the transitional period from Medieval to Renaissance styles. Five of his compositions have survived, all of them in the Old Hall Manuscript.A possible identification of Byttering with a Thomas Byteryng has been made...

 
possibly Thomas Byttering
fl. c. 1410 after 1420
N. Sturgeon 
almost certainly Nicholas Sturgeon
fl. 1413 1454
Richard Smert  c. 1400 1478/9 Has eight carol
Carol (music)
A carol is a festive song, generally religious but not necessarily connected with church worship, and often with a dance-like or popular character....

s for 2 or 3 voices attributed entirely to him in the Ritson Manuscript
Ritson Manuscript
The Ritson Manuscript is a late fifteenth-century English choirbook. Along with the Pepys Manuscript it is much less elaborate than the Eton, Lambeth and Caius Choirbooks; it contains shorter and simpler pieces which appear to have been written for smaller and less able choirs...

; a further four are jointly credited to Smert and John Trouluffe.
John Plummer
John Plummer
John Plummer was an English composer who flourished during the reign of Henry VI of England....

 
c. 1410 c. 1483
Henry Abyngdon
Henry Abyngdon
Henry Abyngdon, Abingdon or Abington was an English ecclesiastic and musician, perhaps the first to receive a university degree in music.-Biography:...

 
c. 1418 1497
John Trouluffe 
John Treloff
fl. 1448 c. 1473 Represented in the Ritson Manuscript
Ritson Manuscript
The Ritson Manuscript is a late fifteenth-century English choirbook. Along with the Pepys Manuscript it is much less elaborate than the Eton, Lambeth and Caius Choirbooks; it contains shorter and simpler pieces which appear to have been written for smaller and less able choirs...

, by three settings of Nesciens mater for three voices and by four carol
Carol (music)
A carol is a festive song, generally religious but not necessarily connected with church worship, and often with a dance-like or popular character....

s. Richard Smert is jointly credited.
Richard Mowere 
possibly the same as Richard Mawere
fl. 1450 after 1470 Has two 3-voice settings in the Ritson Manuscript
Ritson Manuscript
The Ritson Manuscript is a late fifteenth-century English choirbook. Along with the Pepys Manuscript it is much less elaborate than the Eton, Lambeth and Caius Choirbooks; it contains shorter and simpler pieces which appear to have been written for smaller and less able choirs...

.
Walter Frye
Walter Frye
Walter Frye was an English composer of the early Renaissance.-Life:Nothing certain is known about his life. He may have been a "Walter Cantor" at Ely Cathedral between 1443 and 1466, and he may have been the Walter Frye who joined the London Parish Clerks in 1456; he also may have been the Walter...

 
fl. c. 1450 after 1475
William Horwood
William Horwood (composer)
William Horwood was an English polyphonic vocal composer in the late-medieval period . In 1470, he was a singer at Lincoln Cathedral, in 1476, he was a vicar choral at Lincoln, and from 1477 until 1484, he was the Cathedral choirmaster...

 
c. 1430 1484 Some of his music is collected in the Eton Choirbook
Eton Choirbook
The Eton Choirbook is a richly illuminated manuscript collection of English sacred music composed during the late fifteenth century. It was one of very few collections of Latin liturgical music to survive the Reformation, and originally contained music by 24 different composers; however, many of...

.
John Hothby
John Hothby
John Hothby , also known by his Latinised names Johannes Ottobi or Johannes de Londonis, was an English Renaissance composer and musical theorist who travelled widely in Europe and gained an international reputation for his work.-Biography:Little is known of the origins or early life of John Hothby...

 
Johannes Ottobi
c. 1430 1487 English theorist and composer mainly active in Italy.
William Hawte
William Hawte
Sir William Hawte was an English composer about whom little is known. He was knighted in 1465, and is represented in a number of manuscript choirbooks that survive to this day...

 
William Haute
c. 1430 1497
Richard Hygons
Richard Hygons
Richard Hygons was an English composer of the early Renaissance. While only two compositions of this late 15th century composer have survived, one of them, a five-voice setting of the Salve Regina Marian antiphon, has attracted interest from musicologists because of its close relationship to...

 
c. 1435 c. 1509
Gilbert Banester
Gilbert Banester
Gilbert Banester was an English composer. Possibly a native of London, he was Master of the Children of the Chapel Royal beginning in 1478. His works are found in a number of Tudor manuscript collections of church music, including the Pepys Manuscript; there is also an antiphon by his hand in...

 
c. 1445 1487
John Tuder 
John Tudor
fl. c. 1470 after 1470 A number of his works are found in the Pepys Manuscript
Pepys Manuscript
The Pepys Manuscript is a late fifteenth-century English choirbook. Along with the Ritson Manuscript it is much less elaborate than the Eton, Lambeth and Caius Choirbooks, it contains shorter and simpler pieces which appear to have been written for smaller and less able choirs. The book received...

; the most extended piece, a setting of Lamentations, is incomplete (only one voice part is preserved).
Walter Lambe
Walter Lambe
Walter Lambe was an English composer.His works are well represented in Eton Choirbook. Also Lambeth and Caius Choirbook include his works.-List of works in Eton Choirbook:* Ascendit Christus...

 
c. 1450 after 1504 Major contributor to the Eton Choirbook
Eton Choirbook
The Eton Choirbook is a richly illuminated manuscript collection of English sacred music composed during the late fifteenth century. It was one of very few collections of Latin liturgical music to survive the Reformation, and originally contained music by 24 different composers; however, many of...

.
Henry Prentyce 
Harry Prentes
1450s 1514 Has an extant 5-voice Magnificat setting in the Caius Choirbook
Caius Choirbook
The Caius Choirbook is an illuminated choirbook dating to the early sixteenth century and containing much music by Tudor-period composers. The book appears to originate from Arundel in Sussex, and to have been created sometime in the late 1520s; the then Master of Arundel College, Edward Higgons,...

.
Hugh Kellyk  late 15th century 16th century? has two surviving pieces, a five-part Magnificat and a seven-part Gaude flore virginali, in the Eton Choirbook
Eton Choirbook
The Eton Choirbook is a richly illuminated manuscript collection of English sacred music composed during the late fifteenth century. It was one of very few collections of Latin liturgical music to survive the Reformation, and originally contained music by 24 different composers; however, many of...

.
Edmund Turges
Edmund Turges
Edmund Turges thought to be also Edmund Sturges was a Renaissance era composer who came from Petworth, was ordained by Bishop Ridley in 1550, and joined the Fraternity of St...

 
possibly the same as Edmund Sturges
fl. 1507 after 1508 Has a number of works preserved in the Eton Choirbook
Eton Choirbook
The Eton Choirbook is a richly illuminated manuscript collection of English sacred music composed during the late fifteenth century. It was one of very few collections of Latin liturgical music to survive the Reformation, and originally contained music by 24 different composers; however, many of...

; at least three Magnificat settings and two masses have been lost.

1451–1500

  • John Nesbett (fl. 1475–1488), has two surviving works
  • Robert Wilkinson (c. 1450/1 – 1515 or later), or Wylkynson
  • John Browne
    John Browne (composer)
    John Browne is first among the composers of the Eton Choirbook both in size of contribution and excellence of achievement. It is astonishing that work of such exceptional interest should be known to us only from the Eton Choirbook, even given the paucity of late fifteenth- and early...

     (fl. c. 1490) Likely b. 1453. Major contributor to the Eton Choirbook
    Eton Choirbook
    The Eton Choirbook is a richly illuminated manuscript collection of English sacred music composed during the late fifteenth century. It was one of very few collections of Latin liturgical music to survive the Reformation, and originally contained music by 24 different composers; however, many of...

  • Robert Hacomplaynt (c. 1456–1528), also written as Hacomplayne, Hacomblene. He has a single surviving work, a setting of Salve regina, in the Eton Choirbook
    Eton Choirbook
    The Eton Choirbook is a richly illuminated manuscript collection of English sacred music composed during the late fifteenth century. It was one of very few collections of Latin liturgical music to survive the Reformation, and originally contained music by 24 different composers; however, many of...

    . A work known as Haycomplayne's Gaude, dated 1529, has been lost.
  • John Cornysh (late 15th cent. – early 16th cent.) Probably a relative of William Cornysh
    William Cornysh
    William Cornysh the Younger was an English composer, dramatist, actor, and poet.-Life:...

  • William Cornysh the elder (fl. from 1479; died c. 1502), may be the composer of a number of sacred works previously credited to William Cornysh the younger
    William Cornysh
    William Cornysh the Younger was an English composer, dramatist, actor, and poet.-Life:...

  • Thomas Pack (fl. 1489–1499), also written as Packe or Pakke, has five extant works which are preserved in the Ritson Manuscript
    Ritson Manuscript
    The Ritson Manuscript is a late fifteenth-century English choirbook. Along with the Pepys Manuscript it is much less elaborate than the Eton, Lambeth and Caius Choirbooks; it contains shorter and simpler pieces which appear to have been written for smaller and less able choirs...

  • William Corbronde (fl.
    Floruit
    Floruit , abbreviated fl. , is a Latin verb meaning "flourished", denoting the period of time during which something was active...

     1480–1500), represented in the Pepys manuscript
  • Robert Fayrfax
    Robert Fayrfax
    Robert Fayrfax was an English Renaissance composer, considered the most prominent and influential of the reigns of Kings Henry VII and Henry VIII of England.-Biography:...

     (1464–1521) Also spelt Fairfax, Fairfaux, Feyrefax
  • Richard Davy
    Richard Davy
    Richard Davy was a Renaissance composer, organist and choirmaster, one of the most represented in the Eton Choirbook.-Biography:...

     (c. 1465 – c. 1507) Major contributor to the Eton Choirbook
    Eton Choirbook
    The Eton Choirbook is a richly illuminated manuscript collection of English sacred music composed during the late fifteenth century. It was one of very few collections of Latin liturgical music to survive the Reformation, and originally contained music by 24 different composers; however, many of...

  • William Cornysh the younger
    William Cornysh
    William Cornysh the Younger was an English composer, dramatist, actor, and poet.-Life:...

     (c. 1468–1523) Probably the son of William Cornysh the elder
  • Henry Petyr (c. 1470–after 1516), also written Petre or Peter, represented by one surviving mass setting (the is Kyrie missing)
  • Richard Sampson
    Richard Sampson
    Richard Sampson was an English clergyman and composer of sacred music, who was Anglican bishop of Chichester and subsequently of Coventry and Lichfield.-Biography:...

     (c. 1470–1554)
  • Avery Burton (c. 1474–1542 to 1547) Also spelt Avere, Burnet
  • John Norman (fl. 1509–1545). Composed a 5-part mass
    Mass (liturgy)
    "Mass" is one of the names by which the sacrament of the Eucharist is called in the Roman Catholic Church: others are "Eucharist", the "Lord's Supper", the "Breaking of Bread", the "Eucharistic assembly ", the "memorial of the Lord's Passion and Resurrection", the "Holy Sacrifice", the "Holy and...

     Resurrexit Dominus, found in the Forrest-Heyther partbooks, on an Easter
    Easter
    Easter is the central feast in the Christian liturgical year. According to the Canonical gospels, Jesus rose from the dead on the third day after his crucifixion. His resurrection is celebrated on Easter Day or Easter Sunday...

     plainsong
    Plainsong
    Plainsong is a body of chants used in the liturgies of the Catholic Church. Though the Eastern Orthodox churches and the Catholic Church did not split until long after the origin of plainchant, Byzantine chants are generally not classified as plainsong.Plainsong is monophonic, consisting of a...

    ; and a 3-part Miserere Mihi in the Ritson manuscript that is much more elaborate, somewhat resembling John Taverner
    John Taverner
    John Taverner was an English composer and organist, regarded as the most important English composer of his era.- Career :...

    's responds
  • William Rasar (born c. 1491; fl. 1499–c. 1514), or William Rasor. His output includes English and Latin church music. Composed a mass found in the Forrest-Heyther partbooks
  • Thomas Ashewell (c. 1478–after 1513), name also written Ashwelle, Asshwell

  • John Strabridge (fl. before 1548), represented by a single work, a Dum transisset, in the Christchurch partbooks
  • Christopher Hoskins (fl. before 1548), represented by a single work, a Speciosa facta es, in the Gyffard partbooks
    Gyffard partbooks
    The Gyffard Partbooks are an important set of Renaissance choral partbooks containing pieces by renowned Renaissance composers such as Thomas Tallis and John Sheppard, as well as additional unnamed composers, which are not found in other sources.-Contents:The collection consists of mostly 4-part...

  • William, Monk of Stratford Stratford has a single work, a four-part Magnificat, in the Eton Choirbook
    Eton Choirbook
    The Eton Choirbook is a richly illuminated manuscript collection of English sacred music composed during the late fifteenth century. It was one of very few collections of Latin liturgical music to survive the Reformation, and originally contained music by 24 different composers; however, many of...

    .
  • Hugh Aston
    Hugh Aston
    Hugh Aston was an English composer of the early Tudor period. While little of his music survives, he is notable for his innovative keyboard writing.- Life :...

     (c. 1485–1558) Also spelt Ashton, Assheton
  • Richard Bramston (? 1485–1554) Represented in the Peterhouse and Gyffard partbooks
    Gyffard partbooks
    The Gyffard Partbooks are an important set of Renaissance choral partbooks containing pieces by renowned Renaissance composers such as Thomas Tallis and John Sheppard, as well as additional unnamed composers, which are not found in other sources.-Contents:The collection consists of mostly 4-part...

  • Nicholas Ludford
    Nicholas Ludford
    Nicholas Ludford was an English composer of the Tudor period. He is known for his festal masses, which are preserved in two early-16th-century choirbooks, the Caius Choirbook at Caius College, Cambridge, and the Lambeth Choirbook at Lambeth Palace, London, along with those of the older composer...

     (c. 1485–1557)
  • John Mason (c. 1480–1548), has four surviving works, featured in the Peterhouse partbooks
  • Richard Pygott (c. 1485–1549), or Pigott. There are two works by Pygott in the Peterhouse partbooks
  • Edmund Sturton
    Edmund Sturton
    Edmund Sturton was an English composer of the Tudor period. Little is known about his life and career, but he is believed to be the same Sturton whose six-part setting of Ave Maria ancilla Trinitatis is found in the Lambeth Choirbook. Another six-part setting, this of the Gaude virgo mater...

     (fl. late 15th – early 16th cent.) Presumably identical with the Sturton who composed the six-part Ave Maria ancilla Trinitatis in the Lambeth Choirbook
    Lambeth Choirbook
    The Lambeth Choirbook is an illuminated choirbook dating to the sixteenth century and containing much music by Tudor-period composers. The major contributors are Robert Fayrfax and Nicholas Ludford; between them they contributed at least ten of its nineteen pieces...

    , he contributed a Gaude virgo mater Christi to the Eton Choirbook
    Eton Choirbook
    The Eton Choirbook is a richly illuminated manuscript collection of English sacred music composed during the late fifteenth century. It was one of very few collections of Latin liturgical music to survive the Reformation, and originally contained music by 24 different composers; however, many of...

    , the six voices of which cover a fifteen-note range
  • John Redford
    John Redford
    John Redford was a major English composer and organist of the Tudor period.From about 1525 he was organist at St Paul's Cathedral and choirmaster there from 1534. Many of his works are represented in the Mulliner Book...

     (c. 1486–1547) One of the main contributors to The Mulliner Book
    The Mulliner Book
    The Mulliner Book is a historically important musical commonplace book compiled, probably between about 1545 and 1570, by Thomas Mulliner, about whom practically nothing is known, except that he figures in 1563 as modulator organorum of Corpus Christi College, Oxford...

  • Nicholas Huchyn (fl. late 15th – early 16th cent.) A single work, a setting of Salve regina in the Eton Choirbook
    Eton Choirbook
    The Eton Choirbook is a richly illuminated manuscript collection of English sacred music composed during the late fifteenth century. It was one of very few collections of Latin liturgical music to survive the Reformation, and originally contained music by 24 different composers; however, many of...

  • Fawkyner (fl. c. 1480), featured in the Eton Choirbook
    Eton Choirbook
    The Eton Choirbook is a richly illuminated manuscript collection of English sacred music composed during the late fifteenth century. It was one of very few collections of Latin liturgical music to survive the Reformation, and originally contained music by 24 different composers; however, many of...

    . His identity is uncertain, but he may have been Richard Fawkyner (fl. 1482–1484).
  • William Pasche (fl. late 15th – early 16th cent.) Also spelt Pashe. Represented by a Christus resurgens Mass, written on a Sarum chant, two Magnificats, and a motet, Sancta Maria
  • Robert Cowper (c. 1474–1535/1540), also written as Cooper or Coupar. He is represented by a work in the Gyffard partbooks
    Gyffard partbooks
    The Gyffard Partbooks are an important set of Renaissance choral partbooks containing pieces by renowned Renaissance composers such as Thomas Tallis and John Sheppard, as well as additional unnamed composers, which are not found in other sources.-Contents:The collection consists of mostly 4-part...

     and manuscript sources.
  • Thomas Appleby (c. 1488–1563)
  • John Taverner
    John Taverner
    John Taverner was an English composer and organist, regarded as the most important English composer of his era.- Career :...

     (c. 1490–1545)
  • William Whytbroke (fl.
    Floruit
    Floruit , abbreviated fl. , is a Latin verb meaning "flourished", denoting the period of time during which something was active...

     1520–1530) Surviving music includes a four-part Mass apon ye Square, in the Gyffard partbooks
    Gyffard partbooks
    The Gyffard Partbooks are an important set of Renaissance choral partbooks containing pieces by renowned Renaissance composers such as Thomas Tallis and John Sheppard, as well as additional unnamed composers, which are not found in other sources.-Contents:The collection consists of mostly 4-part...

  • Henry VIII of England
    Henry VIII of England
    Henry VIII was King of England from 21 April 1509 until his death. He was Lord, and later King, of Ireland, as well as continuing the nominal claim by the English monarchs to the Kingdom of France...

     (1491–1547)
  • John Dark (c. 1495–c. 1569?), or John Darke. Just one work survives: a 5-part Magnificat in the Peterhouse partbooks
  • Robert Jones (fl. 1520 to 1538) Contributed a Mass and Magnificat to the Peterhouse partbooks, and songs to Wynkyn de Worde's songbook of 1530
  • Thomas Preston
    Thomas Preston (composer)
    Thomas Preston was an English organist and composer who held posts at Magdalen College, Oxford, Trinity College, Cambridge, and St George's Chapel at Windsor Castle.-Further reading:...

     (d. c. 1563) Composed 12 Offertory settings for keyboard, including the popular Felix namque, and an alternatim organ Mass for Easter, containing the only known sequence setting of the time. His keyboard writing is extremely virtuosic for the period

1501–1550

  • Hyett (fl. before 1548) Represented by a single work in the Gyffard partbooks
    Gyffard partbooks
    The Gyffard Partbooks are an important set of Renaissance choral partbooks containing pieces by renowned Renaissance composers such as Thomas Tallis and John Sheppard, as well as additional unnamed composers, which are not found in other sources.-Contents:The collection consists of mostly 4-part...

  • John Ensdale (fl. before 1548) Represented by a single work in the Gyffard partbooks
    Gyffard partbooks
    The Gyffard Partbooks are an important set of Renaissance choral partbooks containing pieces by renowned Renaissance composers such as Thomas Tallis and John Sheppard, as well as additional unnamed composers, which are not found in other sources.-Contents:The collection consists of mostly 4-part...

  • John Hake (fl. before 1548) Represented by a single work in the Gyffard partbooks
    Gyffard partbooks
    The Gyffard Partbooks are an important set of Renaissance choral partbooks containing pieces by renowned Renaissance composers such as Thomas Tallis and John Sheppard, as well as additional unnamed composers, which are not found in other sources.-Contents:The collection consists of mostly 4-part...

  • Walter Erly (16th cent.) Has a single work in the Peterhouse partbooks
  • Arthur Chamberlain (early 16th cent.) Also spelt Chamberlayne. Has a single work in the Peterhouse partbooks
  • John Ambrose (fl. 1520 to 1545) Few pieces survive
  • William Shelby (? – 1570) Also spelt Shelbye, Selby, Selbie, Selbye. Two liturgical keyboard pieces, a Miserere
    Miserere
    Miserere may refer to:* Psalm 51, and its musical settings:** Miserere ** Miserere ** Miserere * Miserere by Zucchero* Plaza Miserere, a plaza in Buenos Aires...

    and Felix namque, survive in The Mulliner Book
    The Mulliner Book
    The Mulliner Book is a historically important musical commonplace book compiled, probably between about 1545 and 1570, by Thomas Mulliner, about whom practically nothing is known, except that he figures in 1563 as modulator organorum of Corpus Christi College, Oxford...

  • Robert Okeland (fl. before 1548) Also spelt Hockland, Ockland. Represented by a single work in the Gyffard partbooks
    Gyffard partbooks
    The Gyffard Partbooks are an important set of Renaissance choral partbooks containing pieces by renowned Renaissance composers such as Thomas Tallis and John Sheppard, as well as additional unnamed composers, which are not found in other sources.-Contents:The collection consists of mostly 4-part...

  • Thomas Tallis
    Thomas Tallis
    Thomas Tallis was an English composer. Tallis flourished as a church musician in 16th century Tudor England. He occupies a primary place in anthologies of English church music, and is considered among the best of England's early composers. He is honoured for his original voice in English...

     (c. 1505–1585)
  • Christopher Tye
    Christopher Tye
    Christopher Tye was an English composer and organist, who studied at Cambridge University and in 1545 became a Doctor of Music both there and at Oxford.He was choirmaster of Ely Cathedral from about 1543 and also organist there from 1559...

     (c. 1505 – ? 1572)
  • John Wood (fl. 1530) He is represented by a single work, an Exsurge Domine et dissipentur inimici, in the Christchurch partbooks
  • John Merbecke (also Marbeck) (c. 1510 – c. 1585) Produced the first musical setting for the English liturgy, publishing The Booke of Common Praier Noted 1549. Surviving works include a Missa Per arma iustitie Almost burnt as a heretic in 1543.
  • Osbert Parsley (1511–1585) Also spelt Parsely Wrote a set of Lamentations for Holy Week
  • E. Strowger (fl. early 16th cent.) Only a single piece for keyboard, a Miserere in a British Museum
    British Museum
    The British Museum is a museum of human history and culture in London. Its collections, which number more than seven million objects, are amongst the largest and most comprehensive in the world and originate from all continents, illustrating and documenting the story of human culture from its...

     MS, can be attributed to him
  • Thomas Knyght (fl. 1530 to 1535) Presumably also spelt Knight. Has a single work in the Peterhouse partbooks, and three works in the Gyffard partbooks
    Gyffard partbooks
    The Gyffard Partbooks are an important set of Renaissance choral partbooks containing pieces by renowned Renaissance composers such as Thomas Tallis and John Sheppard, as well as additional unnamed composers, which are not found in other sources.-Contents:The collection consists of mostly 4-part...

  • Philip Alcocke (fl. before 1548) Represented by a single work in the Gyffard partbooks
    Gyffard partbooks
    The Gyffard Partbooks are an important set of Renaissance choral partbooks containing pieces by renowned Renaissance composers such as Thomas Tallis and John Sheppard, as well as additional unnamed composers, which are not found in other sources.-Contents:The collection consists of mostly 4-part...

  • John Sheppard (c. 1515–1559)
  • John Thorne (d. 1573) Exsultabunt sancti in a British Museum MS
  • Kyrton (fl. 1540 to 1550) Miserere for keyboard in a British Museum
    British Museum
    The British Museum is a museum of human history and culture in London. Its collections, which number more than seven million objects, are amongst the largest and most comprehensive in the world and originate from all continents, illustrating and documenting the story of human culture from its...

     MS
  • John Black
    John Black (composer)
    John Black was a Scottish singer and composer active in the Middle Renaissance period. Black was based in Aberdeen, working as a singer and assistant organist, and eventually became Master of the Song School in the city...

     (c. 1520–1587)
  • Thomas Caustun (c. 1520/1525–1569), or Causton
  • John Blitheman
    John Blitheman
    John Blitheman was an English composer and organist. The Fitzwilliam Virginal Book, which includes the third of his Gloria tibi Trinitas settings, gives his forename as William...

     (c. 1525–1591)
  • Richard Wynslate (d. 1572) Also spelt Wynslade. His keyboard piece Lucem tuamis in a British Museum MS
  • Henry Stenings (fl. before 1548 – after 1600) Also spelt Stonninge, Stoninge, Stoninges, Stoning, Stonings. Surviving consort works on MS are three five-part works - a Miserere, a Browning and an In Nomine - and a simpler, four-part In Nomine. A four-part Latin Magnificat is found in the Gyffard partbooks
    Gyffard partbooks
    The Gyffard Partbooks are an important set of Renaissance choral partbooks containing pieces by renowned Renaissance composers such as Thomas Tallis and John Sheppard, as well as additional unnamed composers, which are not found in other sources.-Contents:The collection consists of mostly 4-part...

  • Richard Allwood (fl. c. 1550–1570) Also spelt Alwood
  • Richard Edwardes
    Richard Edwardes
    Richard Edwardes was an English poet and playwright; he was made a Gentleman of the Chapel Royal, and was master of the singing boys...

     (1525–1566) Also spelt Edwards
  • Hugh Sturmys (16th cent.) Has a single work in the Peterhouse partbooks
  • Thomas Wright (16th cent.) Also spelt Wrighte. He is represented by a single work in the Gyffard partbooks
    Gyffard partbooks
    The Gyffard Partbooks are an important set of Renaissance choral partbooks containing pieces by renowned Renaissance composers such as Thomas Tallis and John Sheppard, as well as additional unnamed composers, which are not found in other sources.-Contents:The collection consists of mostly 4-part...

    , a Nesciens mater
  • William Mundy (c. 1528 – before 1591) Father of John Mundy
    John Mundy (composer)
    John Mundy was an English composer, virginalist and organist of the Renaissance period.-Life and works:...

     His output includes fine examples of both the large-scale Latin votive antiphon and the short English anthem, as well as Masses and Latin psalm settings; his style is vigorous and eloquent. He is represented in The Mulliner Book
    The Mulliner Book
    The Mulliner Book is a historically important musical commonplace book compiled, probably between about 1545 and 1570, by Thomas Mulliner, about whom practically nothing is known, except that he figures in 1563 as modulator organorum of Corpus Christi College, Oxford...

     and in the Gyffard partbooks
    Gyffard partbooks
    The Gyffard Partbooks are an important set of Renaissance choral partbooks containing pieces by renowned Renaissance composers such as Thomas Tallis and John Sheppard, as well as additional unnamed composers, which are not found in other sources.-Contents:The collection consists of mostly 4-part...

    .
  • Robert Parsons
    Robert Parsons (composer)
    Robert Parsons was an English composer.Although little is known about the life of Robert Parsons, it is likely that in his youth he was a choir boy, as until 1561 he was an assistant to Richard Bower, Master of the Children Choristers of the Chapel Royal.Parsons was appointed Gentleman of the...

     (c. 1535–1572) Latin music includes antiphons, Credo quod redemptor, Domine quis habitabit, Magnificat and Jam Christus astra. Also three responds from the Office of the Dead
    Office of the Dead
    The Office of the Dead is a prayer cycle of the Liturgy of the Hours in the Roman Catholic Church, said for the repose of the soul of a decedent. It is the proper reading on All Souls' Day for all souls in Purgatory, and can be a votive office on other days when said for a particular decedent...

    , songs (including Pandolpho), In nomine settings for ensemble, and a galliard.
  • Thomas Whythorne
    Thomas Whythorne
    Thomas Whythorne was an English composer who wrote what some consider to be the earliest surviving autobiography in English.Born in Somerset to a wealthy family, Whythorne attended and matriculated from Magdalen College School, Oxford...

     (1528–1595)
  • John Heath (16th cent.) Contributed a Morning and Communion Service to Day's Certaine Notes, of 1560. Probably the composer of a Christe qui lux for keyboard in MS, ascribed to 'Heath'
  • Clement Woodcock (1540–1590) Also spelt Woodcoke, Woodecock. His Browning my dear is one of several pieces of the period based on a popular tune, also known as The leaves be green
  • John Cuk (16th cent.) An extant mass on Venit dilectus meus in the York MS
  • Robert White
    Robert White (composer)
    Robert White probably born in Holborn, a district of London, was a catholic English composer whose liturgical music to Latin texts is considered particularly fine...

     (1538–1574) Also spelt Whyte
  • William Byrd
    William Byrd
    William Byrd was an English composer of the Renaissance. He wrote in many of the forms current in England at the time, including various types of sacred and secular polyphony, keyboard and consort music.-Provenance:Knowledge of Byrd's biography expanded in the late 20th century, thanks largely...

     (c. 1540–1623)
  • Richard Hunt (16th cent.) Has two works in the Peterhouse partbooks
  • Anthony Holborne
    Anthony Holborne
    Anthony Holborne was a composer of English consort music during the reign of Queen Elizabeth I.-Life:Holborne entered Pembroke College, Cambridge in 1562. He was admitted to the Inner Temple Court in 1565. Holborne married Elisabeth Marten on 14 June 1584. On the title page of both his books he...

     (c. 1545–1602) Also known as Olborner
  • John Johnson
    John Johnson (composer)
    John Johnson was an English lutenist, composer of songs and lute music, attached to the court of Queen Elizabeth I. He was the father of the lutenist and composer Robert Johnson.-Discography:...

     (c. 1545–1594)
  • Thomas Woodson (d. ? 1605) Forty Wayes of 2 pts. in one is found in a British Museum MS, canonic settings of Miserere
  • Thomas Warrock (fl. 1580–1590) Also spelt Warrocke, Warwick. Two pieces in the Fitzwilliam Virginal Book, Nos. 97-8
  • John Baldwin (before 1560–1615)
  • John Cosyn (d. 1609) Published Musicke of six, and five partes in 1585
  • Edward Martyn (16th cent.) Has a single work in the Peterhouse partbooks
  • John Northbrooke (16th cent.) Has a single work in the Peterhouse partbooks
  • Picforth (fl. c. 1580) An In nomine survives in MS, unusual in that each instrumental part consists of notes of only one time-value throughout, the values differing in each of the five parts
  • Poynt (fl. c. 1580) Works survive in manuscript
  • Thomas Oldfield (?) His Praeludium is No. 49 in the Fitzwilliam Virginal Book
  • Jehan Oystermayre (?) Almost certainly German origin. Represented in the Fitzwilliam Virginal Book



1551–1570

  • John Marchant (? – 1611) There survive a Pavan in a Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge MS, an Allemanda in the Fitzwilliam Virginal Book, No. 187; The Marchants Dream in a MS in the British Museum, and a Pavan and Galliard in another British Museum
    British Museum
    The British Museum is a museum of human history and culture in London. Its collections, which number more than seven million objects, are amongst the largest and most comprehensive in the world and originate from all continents, illustrating and documenting the story of human culture from its...

     MS.
  • Richard Martin (fl. c. 1610) His only surviving song Change they mind since she doth change was included in Robert Dowland
    Robert Dowland
    Robert Dowland , son of composer John Dowland, was an English lutenist and composer. He was the author of two collections of music - "A Varietie of Lute Lessons" and "A Musical Banquet". He succeeded his father as royal lutenist in 1626....

    's A Musicall Banquet of 1610
  • Thomas Fardyng (16th cent.) Three rounds in a British Museum
    British Museum
    The British Museum is a museum of human history and culture in London. Its collections, which number more than seven million objects, are amongst the largest and most comprehensive in the world and originate from all continents, illustrating and documenting the story of human culture from its...

     MS (MS 31922)
  • Edward Collard (d. c. 1600?)
  • Edmund Hooper
    Edmund Hooper (organist)
    Edmund Hooper was an English composer and organist.He was employed at Westminster Abbey from 1588 to 1621 and organist of the Chapel Royal from 1618 to 1621.-Background:He was born in North Halberton, Devon, c1553....

     (c. 1553–1621) Also spelt Hoop. He contributed to Michael East
    Michael East (composer)
    Michael East was an English organist and composer. He was a nephew of London music publisher Thomas East , although, once it was thought that he was his son....

    's psalter and William Leighton's Teares, and wrote some intensely expressive anthems. He has two keyboard pieces in the Fitzwilliam Virginal Book
  • Elway Bevin (1554–1638) Possibly Welsh
  • William Inglot (1554–1621) Also spelt Inglott. Two keyboard pieces in the Fitzwilliam Virginal Book; there is also an untitled keyboard piece by 'Englitt' in a MS in the British Museum
  • John Mundy
    John Mundy (composer)
    John Mundy was an English composer, virginalist and organist of the Renaissance period.-Life and works:...

     (c. 1555–1630) Son of William Mundy. Published a volume of Songs and Psalms in 1594, contributed to the Triumphs of Oriana, composed English and Latin sacred music, and is represented with five pieces in the Fitzwilliam Virginal Book. His Goe from my window variations are a particularly fine example of the genre
  • Thomas Morley
    Thomas Morley
    Thomas Morley was an English composer, theorist, editor and organist of the Renaissance, and the foremost member of the English Madrigal School. He was the most famous composer of secular music in Elizabethan England and an organist at St Paul's Cathedral...

     (1557–1603)
  • Nathaniel Giles
    Nathaniel Giles
    Nathaniel Giles was an English Renaissance organist and composer. He was the organist for Worcester Cathedral and did Anglican anthems. While Master of the Children of the Chapel Royal he took over Blackfriars Theatre and there he worked with Ben Jonson on a children's company...

     (c. 1558–1634) Also spelt Gyles
  • Matthew Jeffries (c. 1558 – c. 1615)
  • Ferdinando Richardson
    Ferdinando Richardson
    Ferdinando Richardson was an English courtier and musician.He was a pupil of Thomas Tallis; various works for the keyboard by him survive. He also held the post of Groom of the Privy Chamber under both Elizabeth I of England and James I of England.-References:*Richard Marlow, Sir Ferdinando...

     (? 1558–1618) Also known as Sir Ferdinando Heybourne. There survives a keyboard Pavan and Galliard, each with variation, in the Fitzwilliam Virginal Book
  • Richard Carlton
    Richard Carlton
    Richard Carlton was an English composer.He graduated from Clare College, Cambridge in 1577 and was at some time Master of Choristers at Norwich Cathedral. He is known mainly for his madrigals and was a contemporary of John Wilbye....

     (c. 1558 – ? 1638)
  • William Brade
    William Brade
    William Brade was an English composer, violinist, and viol player of the late Renaissance and early Baroque eras, mainly active in northern Germany. He was the first Englishman to write a canzona, an Italian form, and probably the first to write a piece for solo violin.-Biography:Little is known...

     (1560–1630) Active in Denmark and Germany
  • William Cobbold (1560–1639)
  • James Harding (c. 1560–1626) Also spelt Jeames Harden. Two keyboard fantasias, possibly arrangements, in a British Museum MS; a setting by William Byrd
    William Byrd
    William Byrd was an English composer of the Renaissance. He wrote in many of the forms current in England at the time, including various types of sacred and secular polyphony, keyboard and consort music.-Provenance:Knowledge of Byrd's biography expanded in the late 20th century, thanks largely...

     of a Gagliarda in the Fitzwilliam Virginal Book. Galiard by 'Mr. James' in Berlin State Library
    Berlin State Library
    The Berlin State Library is a library in Berlin, Germany and a property of the Prussian Cultural Heritage Foundation.-Buildings:The State Library runs several premises, three of which are open for users, namely House 1 in Unter den Linden 8, House 2 in Potsdamer Straße 33 and the newspaper archive...

  • Peter Philips
    Peter Philips
    Peter Philips was an eminent English composer, organist, and Catholic priest exiled to Flanders...

     (1560–1628) Exiled to Flanders
  • Thomas Robinson (c. 1560 – after 1609)
  • Robert Hales (fl. 1583–1616) His only surviving song O Eyes, leave off your weeping was included in Robert Dowland
    Robert Dowland
    Robert Dowland , son of composer John Dowland, was an English lutenist and composer. He was the author of two collections of music - "A Varietie of Lute Lessons" and "A Musical Banquet". He succeeded his father as royal lutenist in 1626....

    's A Musicall Banquet of 1610.
  • John Bull
    John Bull (composer)
    John Bull was an English composer, musician, and organ builder. He was a renowned keyboard performer of the virginalist school and most of his compositions were written for this medium.-Life:...

     (1562–1628) Exiled to the Netherlands
  • John Dowland
    John Dowland
    John Dowland was an English Renaissance composer, singer, and lutenist. He is best known today for his melancholy songs such as "Come, heavy sleep" , "Come again", "Flow my tears", "I saw my Lady weepe" and "In darkness let me dwell", but his instrumental music has undergone a major revival, and has...

     (1563–1626)
  • Giles Farnaby
    Giles Farnaby
    Giles Farnaby was an English composer and virginalist of the Renaissance and Baroque periods.-Life:Giles Farnaby was born about 1563, perhaps in Truro, Cornwall, England or near London. His father, Thomas, was a Cittizen and Joyner of London, and Giles may have been related to Thomas Farnaby , the...

     (c. 1563–1640)
  • John Milton
    John Milton (composer)
    John Milton was an English composer and father of poet John Milton. Early in his life he converted to Protestantism and his own father, Richard Milton, subsequently disowned him. He moved to London around 1583 to work as an apprentice scrivener. His work largely pertained to business matters;...

     (c. 1563–1647) Father of the poet John Milton
    John Milton
    John Milton was an English poet, polemicist, a scholarly man of letters, and a civil servant for the Commonwealth of England under Oliver Cromwell...

    . Composed madrigals, one of which was printed in The Triumphs of Oriana, as well as anthems, Psalm settings, a motet, and some consort music including a 6-part In nomine
  • John Danyel
    John Danyel
    John Danyel was an English lute player and songwriter. He was born in Wellow, Somerset, and was the younger brother of poet Samuel Daniel. His surviving works include "Coy Daphne Fled", about the nymph Daphne and her fate, and "Like as the lute delights".Sample lyrics from "Like as the lute...

     (1564 – after 1625) Also spelt Danyell
  • Edward Johnson
    Edward Johnson (composer)
    Edward Johnson was an English composer and lyricist. His perhaps best known work was "Jhonsons Medley"....

     (fl. 1592/4) Contributed to Michael East
    Michael East (composer)
    Michael East was an English organist and composer. He was a nephew of London music publisher Thomas East , although, once it was thought that he was his son....

    's psalter and The Triumphs of Oriana
    The Triumphs of Oriana
    The Triumphs of Oriana is a book of English madrigals, compiled and published in 1601 by Thomas Morley, which first edition has 25 pieces by 23 composers . It was said to have been made in the honour of Queen Elizabeth I...

    and more
  • Mallory (fl. c. 1580) Works survive in MS
  • Michael Cavendish
    Michael Cavendish
    Michael Cavendish was an English composer of the Elizabethan and Jacobean periods.A grandson of Bess of Hardwick and first cousin to Arabella Stuart, he spent much time at court and was for a time composer to the future King Charles I of England. In 1598 he published a set of songs with lute...

     (c. 1565–1628)
  • John Farmer (c. 1565–1605)
  • George Kirbye
    George Kirbye
    George Kirbye was an English composer of the late Tudor period and early Jacobean era. He was one of the members of the English Madrigal School, but also composed sacred music....

     (c. 1565–1634)
  • William Leighton (c. 1565–1622)
  • Leonard Woodson (c. 1565–1641), wrote verse anthems (nine are published in John Barnard’s First Book of Selected Church Musick, 1641). Other surviving pieces include instrumental consort works (four In Nomines a 5) and Mall Sims.
  • Thomas Campion
    Thomas Campion
    Thomas Campion was an English composer, poet and physician. He wrote over a hundred lute songs; masques for dancing, and an authoritative technical treatise on music.-Life:...

     (1567–1620) Also spelt Campian. The only English composer to experiment with musique mesurée
    Musique mesurée
    Musique mesurée, or Musique mesurée à l'antique, was a style of vocal musical composition in France in the late 16th century. In musique mesurée, longer syllables in the French language were set to longer note values, and shorter syllables to shorter, in a homophonic texture but in a situation of...

     and the first to imitate the Florentine monodists
  • John Hilton (d. 1608) Probably father of John Hilton
    John Hilton (composer)
    John Hilton was an English early baroque composer. He is best known for his books Ayres or Fa-Las for Three Voices and Catch That Catch Can.- Life :...

     'the younger' (1599–1657)
  • Edward Gibbons (1568 – c. 1650) Brother of Orlando Gibbons
    Orlando Gibbons
    Orlando Gibbons was an English composer, virginalist and organist of the late Tudor and early Jacobean periods...

  • Richard Gibbs (1568 – c. 1650) Also known as R. Gibbs. 'Allmaine' and 'Corant' in a Christ Church, Oxford
    Christ Church, Oxford
    Christ Church or house of Christ, and thus sometimes known as The House), is one of the largest constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in England...

     MS
  • Philip Rosseter
    Philip Rosseter
    Philip Rosseter was an English composer and musician, as well as a theatrical manager. From 1603 until his death in 1623 he was lutenist for James I of England. Rosseter is best known for A Book of Aires which was written with Thomas Campion...

     (c. 1568–1623)
  • Tobias Hume
    Tobias Hume
    Tobias Hume was a Scottish composer, viol player and soldier.Little is known of his life. Some have suggested that he was born in 1569 because he was admitted to the London Charterhouse in 1629, a pre-requisite to which was being at least 60 years old, though there is no certainty over this...

     (c. 1569–1645) Responsible for the earliest known use of col legno
    Col legno
    In music for bowed string instruments, col legno, or more precisely col legno battuto , is an instruction to strike the string with the stick of the bow, rather than by drawing the hair of the bow across the strings. This results in a quiet but eerie percussive sound.Col legno is used in the final...

     in Western music
  • Nicholas Strogers (fl. 1560–1575) Also spelt Strowger, Strowgers. Three (probably four) keyboard pieces in a Christ Church, Oxford
    Christ Church, Oxford
    Christ Church or house of Christ, and thus sometimes known as The House), is one of the largest constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in England...

    , manuscript, and a Fantasia in the Fitzwilliam Virginal Book (No. 89); an In nomine exists in a Bodleian manuscript
  • Edward Blancks (fl. c. 1590–1620) Also spelt Blanke, Blanks, Blanckes
  • Thomas Bateson
    Thomas Bateson
    Thomas Bateson, Batson or Betson was an English writer of madrigals in the early 17th century.He is said to have been organist of Chester Cathedral in 1599, and is believed to have been the first musical graduate of Trinity College, Dublin. He served as Vicar Choral and organist of Christ Church...

     (c. 1570–1630)
  • John Cooper
    John Cooper (composer)
    John Cooper , also known as Giovanni Coprario or Coperario, was an English composer, viol player and lutenist....

     (c. 1570–1626) Also spelt Coperario, Coprario
  • Benjamin Cosyn (c. 1570–1652 or later) Also spelt Cosin, Cosens. Compiler of the manuscript Cosyn's Virginal Book
  • Francis Cutting
    Francis Cutting
    Francis Cutting was an English Lutenist and Composer during the Renaissance period.He is best known for having composed Packington's Pound and Greensleeves, both pieces originally intended for the lute.-References:...

     (fl. 1595)
  • Francis Pilkington
    Francis Pilkington
    Francis Pilkington was an English composer, lutenist and singer. Pilkington received a B.Mus. degree from Oxford in 1595. In 1602 he became a singing man at Chester Cathedral and spent the rest of his life serving the cathedral. He became a minor canon in 1612, took holy orders in 1614 and was...

     (c. 1570–1638) Lutenist
  • William Tisdale
    William Tisdale
    William Tisdale also written Tisdall was an English musician and composer of the virginal school. No conclusive evidence about him has yet been discovered...

     (b. c. 1570) Also spelt Tisdall
  • Henry Lichfild (d. 1613) Madrigalist



1571–1580

  • Thomas Lupo
    Thomas Lupo
    Thomas Lupo was an English composer and viol player of the late Elizabethan and Jacobean eras. Along with Orlando Gibbons, John Coprario, and Alfonso Ferrabosco, he was one of the principal developers of the repertory for viol consort.-Life:He was part of a distinguished family of musicians, who...

     (1571–1627) Also known as Thomas Lupo The Elder. Composer of several works, but solid attribution of many works to him or another of his relatives is difficult
  • John Ward
    John Ward (composer)
    John Ward was an English composer who was a contemporary of John Dowland.Born in Canterbury, John Ward was a chorister at Canterbury Cathedral. He went to London where he served Sir Henry Fanshawe both as an attorney in the Exchequer and as a musician. Ward married and had three children...

     (1571–1638)
  • Daniel Bacheler
    Daniel Bacheler
    thumb|right|250px|Daniel Bacheler from an engraving by [[Thomas Lant]] of the funeral procession of Sir Philip Sidney in 1586Daniel Bacheler, also variously spelt Bachiler, Batchiler or Batchelar, was an English lutenist and composer...

     (1572–1618)
  • Alfonso Ferrabosco the younger
    Alfonso Ferrabosco the younger
    Alfonso Ferrabosco the younger was an English composer and viol player of Italian descent. He straddles the line between the Renaissance and Baroque eras.-Biography:...

     (c. 1572–1628) Illegitimate son of Alfonso Ferrabosco the elder
    Alfonso Ferrabosco (I)
    Alfonso Ferrabosco was an Italian composer. While mostly famous as the solitary Italian madrigalist working in England, and the one mainly responsible for the growth of the madrigal there, he also composed much sacred music...

  • Martin Peerson
    Martin Peerson
    Martin Peerson was an English composer, organist and virginalist...

     (1572–1650) May be the same person as Martin Pearson. Four keyboard pieces in the Fitzwilliam Virginal Book. Many works also published
  • Thomas Tomkins
    Thomas Tomkins
    Thomas Tomkins was an English composer of the late Tudor and early Stuart period. In addition to being one of the prominent members of the English madrigal school, he was a skilled composer of keyboard and consort music, and the last member of the English virginalist school.-Life:Tomkins was born...

     (1572–1656)
  • Ellis Gibbons
    Ellis Gibbons
    Ellis Gibbons was a composer and one of the older brothers of Orlando Gibbons.His father William was one of the Oxford town waits, but moved to Cambridge between the birth and christening of Orlando...

     (1573–1603) Brother of Orlando Gibbons
    Orlando Gibbons
    Orlando Gibbons was an English composer, virginalist and organist of the late Tudor and early Jacobean periods...

  • John Wilbye
    John Wilbye
    John Wilbye , was an English madrigal composer. The son of a tanner, he was born at Brome, Suffolk, near Diss, and received the patronage of the Cornwallis family. It is thought that he accompanied Elizabeth Cornwallis to Hengrave Hall near Bury St...

     (1574–1638)
  • John Bartlet
    John Bartlet
    John Bartlet, also John Bartlett, was an English Renaissance composer. He was employed as a musician by Sir Edward Seymour, Earl Hertford , and accompanied him on a diplomatic visit to Brussels in 1605...

     (fl. 1606 to 1610)
  • John Bennet
    John Bennet
    John Bennet was a composer of the English madrigal school. His madrigals include All creatures now as well as Weep, O Mine Eyes. The latter is a homage to John Dowland, using part of Dowland's most famous piece, Flow my Tears, also known in its pavane form as Lachrymae Antiquae.- Media :-External...

     (c. 1575 – after 1614)
  • John Coprario (c. 1575–1626)
  • William Simmes
    William Simmes
    William Simmes was an English Renaissance composer and musician. In service to the Earl of Dorset in 1608.-Recordings:*Renaissance Brass Music - Eastman Brass Quintet, Paris Instrumental Ensemble, Florian Hollard. Philip Collins, Daniel Patrylak, Verne Reynolds, Donald Knaub, Cherry Beauregard...

     (c. 1575 – c. 1625)
  • John Holmes
    John Holmes (composer)
    John Holmes was an English cathedral musician and Renaissance composer. His madrigal Thus Bonny-boots The Birthday Celebrated was included in The Triumphs of Oriana, a collection of vocal compositions published in 1601....

     (fl. from 1599; died 1629)
  • William Holborne (fl. 1597)
  • Thomas Greaves
    Thomas Greaves (musician)
    Thomas Greaves was an English composer and lutenist.He was lutenist to Sir Henry Pierrepont. He published in London in 1604 Songes of sundrie kinds...

     (fl. c. 1600)
  • John Maynard
    John Maynard (composer)
    John Maynard was an English composer at the time of James I of England, with an idiosyncratic sense of humour.His best known work is the musical setting of The Twelve Wonders of the World by Sir John Davies, possibly written for a banquet arranged by the poet Thomas Sackville, 1st Earl of Dorset on...

     (c. 1576/7 – between 1614 and 1633) Primarily known from one published work, The XIII Wonders of the World, published in London in 1611. It contains twelve songs, six duets for lute and viol. and seven pieces for lyra viol with optional bass viol.
  • Thomas Weelkes
    Thomas Weelkes
    Thomas Weelkes was an English composer and organist. He became organist of Winchester College in 1598, moving to Chichester Cathedral. His works are chiefly vocal, and include madrigals, anthems and services.-Life:Weelkes was baptised in the little village church of Elsted in Sussex on 25...

     (1576–1623)
  • Richard Sumarte (d. after 1630)
  • Henry Lichfild (fl. 1613 – after 1620)
  • Robert Jones (c. 1577 – after 1615) Published five volumes of simple and melodious lute songs, and one of madrigals
  • John Amner
    John Amner
    John Amner was an English composer.A composer of sacred works, John Amner was born at Ely, Cambridgeshire and had a close association with Ely Cathedral, even before his employment there as Informator choristarum , through his relatives, Michael and Ralph Amner, who were both lay clerks there...

     (1579–1641)
  • Michael East
    Michael East (composer)
    Michael East was an English organist and composer. He was a nephew of London music publisher Thomas East , although, once it was thought that he was his son....

     (c. 1580–1648) Probably the son of Thomas East
    Thomas East
    Thomas East , was an English printer and music publisher.East was made a freeman of the Stationers' Company on 6 December 1565...

  • Thomas Hunt
    Thomas Hunt
    Thomas Hunt may refer to:*Thomas Hunt , MP for Bedford * Thomas Hunt formerly with Norwich City F.C.* Thomas Hunt , Englishman martyred with Thomas Sprott in 1600...

     (fl. 1600)
  • Robert Hall (? – ?) 16th and/or 17th century. Five keyboard pieces extant in the MS Priscilla Bunbury's Virginal Book
    Priscilla Bunbury's Virginal Book
    Priscilla Bunbury's Virginal Book is a musical commonplace book compiled in the late 1630's by two young women from an affluent Cheshire family. It is important more for its fingering indications than for the quality of the music it contains.-The Manuscript:...

  • John Hampton (fl. late 15th cent. – early 16th cent.) He has a single work, a setting of Salve regina, in the Eton Choirbook
    Eton Choirbook
    The Eton Choirbook is a richly illuminated manuscript collection of English sacred music composed during the late fifteenth century. It was one of very few collections of Latin liturgical music to survive the Reformation, and originally contained music by 24 different composers; however, many of...

  • Richard Dering
    Richard Dering
    Richard Dering — also Deering, Dearing, Diringus, etc. — was an English Renaissance and Baroque composer. Despite being English, he lived and worked most of his life in the Spanish-dominated South Netherlands owing to his Roman Catholic faith.-Biography:Dering was likely a Protestant in England...

     (c. 1580–1630)
  • Thomas Ford
    Thomas Ford (composer)
    Thomas Ford was an English composer, lutenist, viol player and poet.He was attached to the court of Henry Frederick, Prince of Wales, son of James I, who died in 1612...

     (c. 1580–1648)
  • Richard Nicholson
    Richard Nicholson
    Richard Nicholson is a Paralympic competitor from Australia. He competed at the 1996 Summer Paralympics, the 2000 Summer Paralympics, 2004 Summer Paralympics and the 2008 Summer Paralympics. At the 2000 Games, he won a silver medal in the powerlifting Men's Up To 60 kg event...

     (d. 1639) Composed English and Latin church music, and consort songs, in humorous rather than melancholy vein, and contributed to The Triumphs of Oriana
    The Triumphs of Oriana
    The Triumphs of Oriana is a book of English madrigals, compiled and published in 1601 by Thomas Morley, which first edition has 25 pieces by 23 composers . It was said to have been made in the honour of Queen Elizabeth I...

  • Thomas Vautor (b. c. 1580/90) Published a volume of five and six part madrigals in 1619. His best-known piece is Sweet Suffolk Owl
  • Henry Youll
    Henry Youll
    Henry Youll was an English Madrigalist and Composer from Suffolk.His work "Canzonets to Three Voyces" ....

     (b. c. 1580/90) His Canzonets to Three Voyces, although clearly the work of an amateur, have charm and individuality
  • George Handford (fl. c. 1609) Book of Ayresin MS bears a dedication to Prince Henry dated 1609, but was never published



1581–1611


  • Robert Tailour (fl. 1615) Possibly Robert Taylor, also spelt Tailer, Taler, Taylour. Published Sacred Hymns, consisting of Fiftie select Psalms in 1615
  • Robert Johnson (c. 1582–1633)
  • Thomas Simpson
    Thomas Simpson (composer)
    Thomas Simpson was an English composer who worked in Germany. Simpson, a generation younger than William Brade is first heard of at Heidelberg in 1608.-References:...

     (1582 – c. 1628) Also spelt Sympson. Active in Denmark
  • Orlando Gibbons
    Orlando Gibbons
    Orlando Gibbons was an English composer, virginalist and organist of the late Tudor and early Jacobean periods...

     (1583–1625)
  • Charles Coleman (d. 1646)
  • William Corkine
    William Corkine
    William Corkine was an English composer, lutenist, gambist and lyra viol player of the Renaissance.In private service in the second decade of the 17th century before traveling to Poland in 1617...

     (fl. 1610–1617)
  • George Mason (fl. 1611 to 1618) Published (with John Earsden) The Ayres That Were Sung And Played, at Brougham Castle in Westmerland, in the Kings Entertainment... 1618. This included some of the few masque songs that survive from the period immediately after 1613
  • Robert Ramsey
    Robert Ramsey (composer)
    Robert Ramsey was an English composer and organist.He graduated as a Bachelor of Music from the University of Cambridge in 1616...

     (d. 1644) Composed mythological and biblical dialogues, such as Dives and Abraham, Saul and the Witch of Endor, and Orpheus and Pluto
  • John Adson
    John Adson
    John Adson was an English musician and composer. Little is known about his early life; indeed, the first certain reference to him comes in 1604, when he was in service to Charles III, Duke of Lorraine as a cornett player...

     (1587–1640)
  • John Lugg  (? 1587 – 165?) Also spelt Lugge. There survive nine plainsong settings, one hexachord, and three voluntaries for double organ in a Christ Church
    Christ Church, Oxford
    Christ Church or house of Christ, and thus sometimes known as The House), is one of the largest constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in England...

     autograph MS, among others
  • Nicholas Lanier
    Nicholas Lanier
    Nicholas Lanier, sometimes Laniere was an English composer, singer, lutenist and painter....

     (1588–1666) Also spelt Lanière
  • Walter Porter (c. 1588–1659) Madrigalist. Publications include instrumental toccatas, sinfonias and ritornellos as well as vocal pieces
  • John Tomkins (1589–1638) Half brother of Thomas Tomkins
    Thomas Tomkins
    Thomas Tomkins was an English composer of the late Tudor and early Stuart period. In addition to being one of the prominent members of the English madrigal school, he was a skilled composer of keyboard and consort music, and the last member of the English virginalist school.-Life:Tomkins was born...

    . John come kiss me now (variations) survives in a British Museum MS
  • Richard Mico
    Richard Mico
    Richard Mico was an English composer. He was born in Taunton, Somerset, the eldest of threesons of Walter Mico. The family, originally called "Micault", had immigrated to England as French Huguenots several generations earlier...

     (1590–1661) Two 18th century arrangements for viols of keyboard pavans in a MS in the British Museum
    British Museum
    The British Museum is a museum of human history and culture in London. Its collections, which number more than seven million objects, are amongst the largest and most comprehensive in the world and originate from all continents, illustrating and documenting the story of human culture from its...

     survive
  • Thomas Ravenscroft
    Thomas Ravenscroft
    Thomas Ravenscroft was an English musician, theorist and editor, notable as a composer of rounds and catches, and especially for compiling collections of British folk music.He probably sang in the choir of St...

     (c. 1590 – c. 1633) Published a book of psalms amongst others
  • Robert Dowland
    Robert Dowland
    Robert Dowland , son of composer John Dowland, was an English lutenist and composer. He was the author of two collections of music - "A Varietie of Lute Lessons" and "A Musical Banquet". He succeeded his father as royal lutenist in 1626....

     (1591–1641) Son of John Dowland
    John Dowland
    John Dowland was an English Renaissance composer, singer, and lutenist. He is best known today for his melancholy songs such as "Come, heavy sleep" , "Come again", "Flow my tears", "I saw my Lady weepe" and "In darkness let me dwell", but his instrumental music has undergone a major revival, and has...

    . Only three works are definitely ascribed to him: two lute pieces in the 'Varietie of Lute Lessons' and one in the 'Margaret Board Lutebook'.
  • John Jenkins
    John Jenkins (composer)
    John Jenkins , English composer, was born in Maidstone, Kent, and died at Kimberley, Norfolk.Little is known of his early life. The son of Henry Jenkins, a carpenter who occasionally made musical instruments, he may have been the "Jack Jenkins" employed in the household of Anne, Countess of Warwick...

     (1592–1678)

Franco-Flemish


The Franco-Flemish School refers, somewhat imprecisely, to the style of polyphonic
Polyphony
In music, polyphony is a texture consisting of two or more independent melodic voices, as opposed to music with just one voice or music with one dominant melodic voice accompanied by chords ....

 vocal music
Vocal music
Vocal music is a genre of music performed by one or more singers, with or without instrumental accompaniment, in which singing provides the main focus of the piece. Music which employs singing but does not feature it prominently is generally considered instrumental music Vocal music is a genre of...

 composition in Europe
Europe
Europe is, by convention, one of the world's seven continents. Comprising the westernmost peninsula of Eurasia, Europe is generally 'divided' from Asia to its east by the watershed divides of the Ural and Caucasus Mountains, the Ural River, the Caspian and Black Seas, and the waterways connecting...

 in the 15th and 16th centuries. See Renaissance music
Renaissance music
Renaissance music is European music written during the Renaissance. Defining the beginning of the musical era is difficult, given that its defining characteristics were adopted only gradually; musicologists have placed its beginnings from as early as 1300 to as late as the 1470s.Literally meaning...

 for a more detailed description of the style. The composers of this time and place, and the music they produced, are also known as the Dutch School. The word "Dutch" here refers to the historical Low Countries
Low Countries
The Low Countries are the historical lands around the low-lying delta of the Rhine, Scheldt, and Meuse rivers, including the modern countries of Belgium, the Netherlands, Luxembourg and parts of northern France and western Germany....

, roughly corresponding to modern Belgium
Belgium
Belgium , officially the Kingdom of Belgium, is a federal state in Western Europe. It is a founding member of the European Union and hosts the EU's headquarters, and those of several other major international organisations such as NATO.Belgium is also a member of, or affiliated to, many...

, northern France
France
The French Republic , The French Republic , The French Republic , (commonly known as France , is a unitary semi-presidential republic in Western Europe with several overseas territories and islands located on other continents and in the Indian, Pacific, and Atlantic oceans. Metropolitan France...

 and the Netherlands. Most artists were born in Hainaut
County of Hainaut
The County of Hainaut was a historical region in the Low Countries with its capital at Mons . In English sources it is often given the archaic spelling Hainault....

, Flanders
Flanders
Flanders is the community of the Flemings but also one of the institutions in Belgium, and a geographical region located in parts of present-day Belgium, France and the Netherlands. "Flanders" can also refer to the northern part of Belgium that contains Brussels, Bruges, Ghent and Antwerp...

 and Brabant
Duchy of Brabant
The Duchy of Brabant was a historical region in the Low Countries. Its territory consisted essentially of the three modern-day Belgian provinces of Flemish Brabant, Walloon Brabant and Antwerp, the Brussels-Capital Region and most of the present-day Dutch province of North Brabant.The Flag of...

.

1370–1450

  • Johannes de Limburgia
    Johannes de Limburgia
    Johannes de Limburgia was a Franco-Flemish School composer.-History:His name indicates that he is from the Duchy of Limburg or perhaps the city itself. He worked at churches in Liège in 1408 - 1419, was succentor at Saint-Jean-l'Évangéliste there in 1426, and in Italy c.1430, perhaps in Venice,...

     (c. 1370–1430) Also spelt Lymburgia; also called Johannes Vinandi
  • Clement Liebert
    Clement Liebert
    Clement Liebert was a Franco-Flemish singer and composer of the early Renaissance, active in Rome and at the Burgundian court.His life is only documented briefly for two periods. Like many composers who originated in the modern-day Low Countries, he spent time in Italy, and sang in the papal...

     (fl. 1433–1454)
  • Johannes Ockeghem
    Johannes Ockeghem
    Johannes Ockeghem was the most famous composer of the Franco-Flemish School in the last half of the 15th century, and is often considered the most...

     (c. 1410–1497)
  • Johannes Regis
    Johannes Regis
    Johannes Regis was a Franco-Flemish composer of the Renaissance. He was a well-known composer at the close of the 15th century, was a principal contributor to the Chigi Codex, and was secretary to Guillaume Dufay.-Life:...

     (c. 1425 – c. 1496)
  • Johannes Tinctoris
    Johannes Tinctoris
    Johannes Tinctoris was a Flemish composer and music theorist of the Renaissance. He is known to have studied in Orléans, and to have been master of the choir there; he also may have been director of choirboys at Chartres...

     (c. 1435–1511)
  • Alexander Agricola
    Alexander Agricola
    Alexander Agricola was a Franco-Flemish composer of the Renaissance. A prominent member of the Grande chapelle, the Habsburg musical establishment, he was a renowned composer in the years around 1500, and his music was widely distributed throughout Europe...

     (? 1446–1506)
  • Johannes Martini
    Johannes Martini
    Johannes Martini was a Franco-Flemish composer of the Renaissance.-Life:He was born in Brabant around 1440, but information about his early life is scanty. He probably received his early training in Flanders, as did most of the composers of his generation...

     (c. 1440–1497/98)
  • Petrus de Domarto
    Petrus de Domarto
    Petrus de Domarto was a Franco-Flemish composer of the Renaissance. He was a contemporary and probable acquaintance of Ockeghem, and was the composer of at least one of the first unified mass cycles to be written in continental Europe....

     (fl.c. 1445–1455)
  • Johannes de Stokem
    Johannes de Stokem
    Johannes de Stokem , or Johannes Stokem, was a Flemish composer of the Renaissance. He is considered to be part of the post-Dufay generation in France. He was a friend of Johannes Tinctoris, another composer of the period.-Life:...

     (c. 1445–1487 or 1501)
  • Gaspar van Weerbeke
    Gaspar van Weerbeke
    Gaspar van Weerbeke was a Netherlandish composer of the Renaissance. He was of the same generation as Josquin des Prez, but unique in his blending of the contemporary Italian style with the older Burgundian style of Dufay.- Life :...

     (c. 1445 – after 1517)
  • Johannes Pullois
    Johannes Pullois
    Johannes Pullois was a Franco-Flemish composer of the Renaissance, active in both the Low Countries and Italy...

     (d. 1478) Active in the Low Countries and Italy
  • Heinrich Isaac
    Heinrich Isaac
    Heinrich Isaac was a Franco-Flemish Renaissance composer of south Netherlandish origin. He wrote masses, motets, songs , and instrumental music. A significant contemporary of Josquin des Prez, Isaac influenced the development of music in Germany...

     (c. 1450–1517)
  • Josquin des Prez
    Josquin Des Prez
    Josquin des Prez [Josquin Lebloitte dit Desprez] , often referred to simply as Josquin, was a Franco-Flemish composer of the Renaissance...

     (c. 1450–1521)
  • Matthaeus Pipelare
    Matthaeus Pipelare
    Matthaeus Pipelare was a Flemish composer, choir director, and possibly wind instrument player of the Renaissance.He was from Louvain, and spent part of his early life in Antwerp. Unlike many of his contemporaries, many of whom traveled to Italy, Spain or elsewhere, he seems never to have left...

     (c. 1450 – c. 1515)
  • Abertijne Malcourt
    Abertijne Malcourt
    Abertijne Malcourt was a Flemish singer, music copyist, and composer of the Renaissance, principally active at the end of the 15th century, contemporary with Johannes Ockeghem...

     (c. 1450 - c. 1510)

1451–1500



  • Philip van Wilder
    Philip van Wilder
    Philip van Wilder, was a South Netherlandish lutenist and composer, active in England....

     (d. 1554) Active in England
  • Jean Japart
    Jean Japart
    Jean Japart was a Franco-Flemish composer of the Renaissance, active in Italy. He was a popular composer of chansons, and may have been a friend of Josquin des Prez.-Life and work:...

     (fl.c. 1474–1481) Active in Italy
  • Jacob Obrecht
    Jacob Obrecht
    Jacob Obrecht was a Flemish composer of the Renaissance. He was the most famous composer of masses in Europe in the late 15th century, being eclipsed by only Josquin des Prez after his death.-Life:...

     (1457/58–1505)
  • Jacobus Barbireau
    Jacobus Barbireau
    Jacobus Barbireau was a Franco-Flemish Renaissance composer from Antwerp. He was considered to be a superlative composer both by his contemporaries and by modern scholars; however, his surviving output is small, and he died young.-Life:Until the 1960s he was confused with another somewhat older...

     (1455–1491)
  • Nycasius de Clibano
    Nycasius de Clibano
    Nycasius de Clibano was a Franco-Flemish singer and composer of the Renaissance, probably active only in his homeland, the southern part of the Netherlands.-Life and work:...

     (fl. 1457–1497)
  • Jheronimus de Clibano
    Jheronimus de Clibano
    Jheronimus de Clibano was a Franco-Flemish composer and singer of the Renaissance...

     (c. 1459–1503)
  • Pierre de La Rue
    Pierre de La Rue
    Pierre de la Rue , called Piersson, was a Franco-Flemish composer and singer of the Renaissance. A member of the same generation as Josquin des Prez, and a long associate of the Habsburg-Burgundian musical chapel, he ranks with Agricola, Brumel, Compère, Isaac, Obrecht, and Weerbeke as one of the...

     (c. 1460–1518) Most famous composer of the Grande chapelle of the Habsburg court
  • Marbrianus de Orto
    Marbrianus de Orto
    Marbrianus de Orto was a Franco-Flemish composer of the Renaissance. He was a contemporary, close associate, and possible friend of Josquin des Prez, and was one of the first composers to write a completely canonic setting of the Ordinary of the Mass.-Life:The illegitimate child of a priest,...

     (c. 1460–1529)
  • Johannes Prioris
    Johannes Prioris
    Johannes Prioris was a Franco-Flemish composer of the Renaissance. He was one of the first composers to write a polyphonic setting of the Requiem mass....

     (c. 1460?–c. 1514)
  • Antonius Divitis
    Antonius Divitis
    Antonius Divitis was a Flemish composer of the Renaissance, of the generation slightly younger than Josquin des Prez. He was important in the development of the parody mass.-Life:He was born in Leuven. He first appears in the historic record in 1501 in Bruges, at the church of St...

     (c. 1470–c. 1530)
  • Johannes Ghiselin
    Johannes Ghiselin
    Johannes Ghiselin was a Flemish composer of the Renaissance, active in France, Italy and in the Low Countries. He was a contemporary of Josquin des Prez, and a significant composer of masses, motets, and secular music...

     (fl. 1491–1507)
  • Nicolas Champion
    Nicolas Champion
    Nicolas Champion was a Franco-Flemish composer and singer of the Renaissance. He was a member of the renowned musical establishments of the Habsburg court, including the chapels of Philip I of Castile and Charles V...

     (c. 1475–1533)
  • Jacotin
    Jacotin (composer)
    Jacotin or Jacob Godebrye was a Franco-Flemish singer and composer. He was born in Flanders between 1440 and 1450, and was the choral vicar at the collegiale of Antwerp, became a chaplain and later took orders. From 1479 to 1528 he was a singer at . He was a contrapuntist, and his motets,...

     (d. 1529) Also called Jacob Godebrye
  • Noel Bauldeweyn
    Noel Bauldeweyn
    Noel Bauldeweyn was a Franco-Flemish composer of the Renaissance, active in the Low Countries. A contemporary of Josquin des Prez, he had a strong reputation until well after the middle of the 16th century...

     (c. 1480 – after 1513)
  • Jean Richafort
    Jean Richafort
    Jean Richafort was a Franco-Flemish composer of the Renaissance.He was probably born in Hainaut, and his native language appears to have been French. He may have studied with Josquin des Prez, though the evidence for this is circumstantial. Richafort served as choir master at St. Rombold...

     (c. 1480–1547)
  • Benedictus Appenzeller
    Benedictus Appenzeller
    Benedictus Appenzeller was a Franco-Flemish singer and composer of the Renaissance, active in Bruges and Brussels...

     (1480 to 1488 – after 1558) Served Mary of Hungary
    Mary of Hungary
    Mary of Anjou was queen regnant of Hungary from 1382 until her death in 1395.-Childhood:...

     for most of his career
  • Pierre Moulu
    Pierre Moulu
    Pierre Moulu was a Franco-Flemish composer of the Renaissance who was active in France, probably in Paris.-Life:Little is known of his life, but internal evidence in his compositions indicates he was probably at the French royal chapel during the first two decades of the 16th century, at least,...

     (c. 1485 – c. 1550) Active in France
  • Pierre Passereau
    Pierre Passereau
    Pierre Passereau was a French composer of the Renaissance. Along with Clément Janequin, he was one of the most popular composers of "Parisian" chansons in France in the 1530s. His output consisted almost exclusively of chansons; most of them were published by printer Pierre Attaingnant...

     (fl. 1509–1547) popular composer of chansons in the 1530s
  • Adrian Willaert
    Adrian Willaert
    Adrian Willaert was a Flemish composer of the Renaissance and founder of the Venetian School. He was one of the most representative members of the generation of northern composers who moved to Italy and transplanted the polyphonic Franco-Flemish style there....

     (c. 1490–1562) Founder of the Venetian School; active in Italy; influential as a teacher as well as a composer
  • Lupus Hellinck
    Lupus Hellinck
    Lupus Hellinck was a Flemish composer of the Renaissance. He was a prominent composer of masses, as well as German chorales and motets...

     (c. 1494–1541)
  • Nicolas Gombert
    Nicolas Gombert
    Nicolas Gombert was a Franco-Flemish composer of the Renaissance. He was one of the most famous and influential composers between Josquin des Prez and Palestrina, and best represents the fully developed, complex polyphonic style of this period in music history.-Life:Details of his early life are...

     (c. 1495 – c. 1560) Prominent contrapuntist of generation after Josquin; worked for Charles V
    Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor
    Charles V was ruler of the Holy Roman Empire from 1519 and, as Charles I, of the Spanish Empire from 1516 until his voluntary retirement and abdication in favor of his younger brother Ferdinand I and his son Philip II in 1556.As...

  • Adrianus Petit Coclico
    Adrianus Petit Coclico
    Adrianus Petit Coclico was a Netherlandish composer of the Renaissance.-Biography:Like many Renaissance composers, very little is known about Coclico's early life. He was raised Catholic but became a Protestant and left Flanders for Germany...

     (1499/1500 – after 1562)




1501–1550

  • Gilles Reingot
    Gilles Reingot
    Gilles Reingot was a Franco-Flemish composer of the Renaissance, associated with the Habsburg court of Philip I of Castile. He was a close associate of composer Pierre de La Rue.-Life:...

     (fl. early 16th cent.)
  • Arnold von Bruck
    Arnold von Bruck
    Arnold von Bruck was a Franco-Flemish composer of the Renaissance, active in several Habsburg courts...

     (c. 1500–1554) Especially active in German-speaking areas during the early Reformation
    Protestant Reformation
    The Protestant Reformation was a 16th-century split within Western Christianity initiated by Martin Luther, John Calvin and other early Protestants. The efforts of the self-described "reformers", who objected to the doctrines, rituals and ecclesiastical structure of the Roman Catholic Church, led...

     period
  • Jacques Buus
    Jacques Buus
    Jacques Buus was a Franco-Flemish composer and organist of the Renaissance, and an early member of the Venetian School. He was one of the earliest composers of the ricercar, the predecessor to the fugue, and he was also a skilled composer of chansons.-Life:Buus was probably born in Ghent around...

     (c. 1500–1565) Active at Venice, and assisted in the development of the instrumental ricercar
    Ricercar
    A ricercar is a type of late Renaissance and mostly early Baroque instrumental composition. The term means to search out, and many ricercars serve a preludial function to "search out" the key or mode of a following piece...

  • Thomas Crecquillon
    Thomas Crecquillon
    Thomas Crecquillon was a Franco-Flemish composer of the Renaissance. He is considered to be a member of the Netherlands school. While his place of birth is unknown, it was probably within the region loosely known at the time as the Netherlands, and he probably died at Béthune.-Biography:Very...

     (c. 1505–1557), a member of Charles V
    Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor
    Charles V was ruler of the Holy Roman Empire from 1519 and, as Charles I, of the Spanish Empire from 1516 until his voluntary retirement and abdication in favor of his younger brother Ferdinand I and his son Philip II in 1556.As...

    's imperial chapel
  • Tielman Susato
    Tielman Susato
    Tielman — or Tylman — Susato was a Renaissance composer, instrumentalist and publisher of music in Antwerp.-Biography:...

     (c. 1510/15 – after 1570) Also spelt Tylman; was also an influential music publisher
  • Jheronimus Vinders
    Jheronimus Vinders
    Jheronimus Vinders was a Franco-Flemish composer of the Renaissance, active at Ghent. He was a minor member of the generation after Josquin des Prez, and he also composed a notable lament on the more famous composer's death.Next to nothing is known about his life, except that he was the...

     (fl. 1525–1526) active at Ghent; influenced by Josquin
  • Jacques Arcadelt
    Jacques Arcadelt
    Jacques Arcadelt was a Franco-Flemish composer of the Renaissance, active in both Italy and France, and principally known as a composer of secular vocal music...

     (? 1505–1568) Most famous of the early madrigalists
  • Jacquet de Berchem
    Jacquet de Berchem
    Jacquet de Berchem was a Franco-Flemish composer of the Renaissance, active in Italy. He was famous in mid-16th-century Italy for his madrigals, approximately 200 of which were printed in Venice, some in multiple printings due to their considerable popularity...

     (c. 1505 – before 1567) Early madrigalist
  • Cornelius Canis
    Cornelius Canis
    Cornelius Canis was a Franco-Flemish composer, singer, and choir director of the Renaissance, active for much of his life in the Grande Chapelle, the imperial Habsburg music establishment during the reign of Emperor Charles V...

     (c. 1500 to 1510–1561) Music director for Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor, in the 1540s and 1550s, after Nicolas Gombert
  • Jean de Latre
    Jean de Latre
    Petit Jean De Latre or Joannes de Latre was a Flemish Renaissance composer and choirmaster who worked in Liège and Utrecht...

     (c. 1505/1510–1569)
  • Johannes Lupi
    Johannes Lupi
    Johannes Lupi was a Franco-Flemish composer of the Renaissance. A representative of the generation after Josquin, he was a minor but skilled composer of polyphony who was mainly active in Cambrai.- Life :...

     (c. 1506–1539)
  • Jacob Clemens non Papa
    Jacob Clemens non Papa
    Jacobus Clemens non Papa was a Flemish composer of the Renaissance based for most of his life in Flanders...

     (c. 1510/1515–c. 1555), also known as Jacques Clément
  • Ghiselin Danckerts
    Ghiselin Danckerts
    Ghiselin Danckerts was a Dutch composer, singer, and music theorist of the Renaissance. He was principally active in Rome, in the service of the Sistine Chapel, and was one of the judges at the famous debate between Nicola Vicentino and Vicente Lusitano in 1551.-Life:He was born in Tholen, in...

     (c. 1510 – c. 1565) Active in Rome
  • Pierre de Manchicourt
    Pierre de Manchicourt
    Pierre de Manchicourt was a Renaissance composer of the Franco-Flemish School.Little is known of his early life other than that he was a choirboy at Arras in 1525; later in life he had a succession of posts in Arras, Tours and Tournai, before going to Spain to be master of the Flemish chapel at...

     (c. 1510–1564) Active in Spain
  • Jan Nasco
    Jan Nasco
    Jan Nasco was a Franco-Flemish composer and writer on music, mainly active in Italy. He was the first director of the Veronese Accademia Filarmonica, and his writings, particularly a group of letters he wrote to the Academy in the 1550s, are important sources of information on performance...

     (c. 1510–1561) Active in northern Italy
  • Dominique Phinot
    Dominique Phinot
    Dominique Phinot was a Franco-Flemish composer of the Renaissance, active in Italy and southern France. He was highly regarded at the time for his motets, which anticipate the style of Palestrina, and in addition he was an early pioneer of polychoral writing....

     (c. 1510 – c. 1556) Active in Italy and southern France
  • Nicolas Payen
    Nicolas Payen
    Nicolas Payen was a Franco-Flemish composer and choirmaster of the Renaissance, associated with the Grande Chapelle, the Habsburg imperial chapel, at the end of the reign of Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor.-Life:Payen was born in Soignies, and received his earliest musical training in that town, in...

     (c. 1512 – c. 1559) Maestro di capilla for Philip II of Spain after Cornelius Canis
  • Hubert Naich
    Hubert Naich
    Hubert Naich was a composer of the Renaissance, probably of Flemish origin, principally active in Rome. He was mainly a composer of madrigals, some in the note nere style.-Life:...

     (c. 1513 – c. 1546) Active in Rome
  • Cypriano de Rore (c. 1515–1565)
  • Hubert Waelrant
    Hubert Waelrant
    Hubert Waelrant was a Flemish composer, teacher, and music editor of the Renaissance...

     (c. 1517–1595)
  • Jean de Bonmarché
    Jean de Bonmarché
    Jean de Bonmarché was a composer of the Franco-Flemish school.Bonmarché was born in Douai. He became dean of Lille Cathedral, then in 1560 master of the choirboys at Old Cambrai Cathedral...

     (c. 1520/1525–1570)
  • Perissone Cambio
    Perissone Cambio
    Perissone Cambio was a Franco-Flemish composer and singer of the Renaissance, active in Venice. He was one of the most prominent students and colleagues of Adrian Willaert during the formative years of the Venetian School, and published several books of madrigals in the 1540s.-Life:Nothing is...

     (c. 1520–c. 1562)
  • Severin Cornet
    Severin Cornet
    Severin Cornet was a Franco-Flemish singer, conductor and composer. He was born about 1530 in Valenciennes and studied music in Naples. After completing his education, he served for a while at Mechlin, took a position as singer in Antwerp, and later a position as music director for the Archduke in...

     (c. 1520–1582) (:de:Séverin Cornet)
  • Philippe de Monte
    Philippe de Monte
    Philippe de Monte , sometimes known as Philippus de Monte, was a Flemish composer of the late Renaissance. He was a member of the 3rd generation madrigalists and wrote more madrigals than any other composer of the time...

     (1521–1603) Prolific composer of madrigals
  • Simon Moreau
    Simon Moreau
    Simon Moreau was a composer of the Franco-Flemish School. He published compositions including settings of Vous Seulement and Sancta et immaculata, 1553.-References:...

     (fl. 1553–1558)
  • Jacobus Vaet
    Jacobus Vaet
    Jacobus Vaet was a Franco-Flemish composer of the Renaissance. He was a representative of the generation between Josquin and Palestrina, writing smooth polyphony with pervasive imitation, and he was a friend both of Clemens non Papa and Lassus.-Life:...

     (c. 1529–1567)
  • Cornelis Symonszoon Boscoop
    Cornelis Boscoop
    Cornelis Boscoop was a Dutch organist, singer, and composer. He was organist at the Oude Kerk in Amsterdam in the middle of the 16th century and was one of the predecessors of Jan Pieterszoon Sweelinck in this position.-Works:...

     (before 1531–1573)
  • Jacobus de Kerle
    Jacobus de Kerle
    Jacobus de Kerle was a Flemish composer and organist of the late Renaissance.-Life:Kerle was trained at the monastery of St. Martin in Ypres, and held positions as a singer in Cambrai and choirmaster in Orvieto, where he also became organist and carillonneur...

     (1531/1532–1591)
  • Orlande de Lassus
    Orlande de Lassus
    Orlande de Lassus was a Franco-Flemish composer of the late Renaissance...

     (c. 1532–1594), also Orlando di Lasso, Roland de Lassus
  • Giaches de Wert
    Giaches de Wert
    Giaches de Wert was a Franco-Flemish composer of the late Renaissance, active in Italy. Intimately connected with the progressive musical center of Ferrara, he was one of the leaders in developing the style of the late Renaissance madrigal...

     (1535–1596) Active in Italy
  • Johannes Matelart
    Johannes Matelart
    Johannes Matelart was a Flemish composer of the late Renaissance, active in Flanders, Bonn, and Rome....

     (before 1538–1607), or Ioanne Matelart
  • Jhan Gero
    Jhan Gero
    Jhan Gero was a Franco-Flemish composer of the Renaissance, apparently active mainly in Italy, particularly Venice...

     (fl. 1540–1555) Active in Venice, Italy
  • Jacob Regnart
    Jacob Regnart
    Jacob Regnart was a Franco-Flemish Renaissance composer. He spent most of his career in Austria and Bohemia, where he wrote both sacred and secular music.-Biography:Regnart was born at Douai...

     (1540s–1599)
  • Andreas Pevernage
    Andreas Pevernage
    Andreas Pevernage or Andries Pevernage was a Flemish composer of the late Renaissance. He was one of the minority of composers from the Low Countries who stayed in his native land throughout the turbulent period of religious conflict in the late 16th century, and was a skilled composer of...

     (1542/3 – 1591)
  • Antonino Barges
    Antonino Barges
    Antonino Barges was a Franco-Flemish composer of the Renaissance, active in Venice and Treviso. While known as a composer of light popular secular forms such as the villotta, he also wrote motets and a Requiem...

     (fl. 1546–1565) Active in Italy
  • George de La Hèle
    George de La Hèle
    George de La Hèle was a Franco-Flemish composer of the Renaissance, mainly active in the Habsburg chapels of Spain and the Low Countries. Among his surviving music is a book of eight masses, some for as many as eight voices...

     (1547–1586) Active in the Habsburg chapels of Spain and the Low Countries
  • Giovanni de Macque
    Giovanni de Macque
    Giovanni de Macque was a Franco-Flemish composer of the late Renaissance and early Baroque, who spent almost his entire life in Italy...

     (c. 1549–1614) Active in Italy

1551–1574

  • Emmanuel Adriaenssen
    Emmanuel Adriaenssen
    Emmanuel Adriaenssen was a Flemish lutenist and influential author of Pratum Musicum...

     (1554–1604)
  • Rinaldo del Mel
    Rinaldo del Mel
    Rinaldo del Mel was a Franco-Flemish composer of the Renaissance, mainly active in Italy, and a member of the Roman School of composition...

     (c. 1554–c. 1598) Active in Italy
  • Carolus Luython
    Carolus Luython
    Carolus Luython, or French: Charles Luython, was a late composer of the "fifth generation" of the Franco-Flemish school.Luython was born in Antwerp, and was recruited as a child to serve in the choir of Maximilian II in Vienna...

     (1557–1620)
  • Philippus Schoendorff
    Philipp Schöndorff
    Philipp Schöndorff or Philippus Schoendorff was a Flemish singer, trumpeter and composer at the court of Rudolf II under kapellmeister Philippe de Monte as a contemporary of Carl Luython, Giorgi Flori and Jacob Regnart....

     (1558–1617)
  • Philippe Rogier
    Philippe Rogier
    Philippe Rogier was a Franco-Flemish composer of the Renaissance, active at the Habsburg court of Philip II in Spain...

     (c. 1561–1596) Active in Spain
  • Jan Pieterszoon Sweelinck
    Jan Pieterszoon Sweelinck
    Jan Pieterszoon Sweelinck was a Dutch composer, organist, and pedagogue whose work straddled the end of the Renaissance and beginning of the Baroque eras. He was among the first major keyboard composers of Europe, and his work as a teacher helped establish the north German organ...

     (1562–1621)
  • Cornelis Verdonck
    Cornelis Verdonck
    Cornelis Verdonck was a Flemish composer of the late Renaissance. He was one of the last members of the Franco-Flemish school of polyphony, and was a notable composer of madrigals in a style that blended both Italian and native Netherlandish idioms.-Life:Verdonck was born in Turnhout...

     (1563–1625)
  • Peeter Cornet
    Peeter Cornet
    Peeter Cornet was a Flemish composer and organist of the early Baroque period. Although few of his compositions survive, he is widely considered one of the best keyboard composers of the early 17th century.-Life:Very little is known about Cornet's life. Much of the information comes from a letter...

     (1570/1580–1633)
  • Géry de Ghersem
    Géry de Ghersem
    Géry de Ghersem was a Franco-Flemish composer of the late Renaissance, active both in Spain at the court of Philip II and Philip III, and in his native Netherlands...

     (1573/1575–1630) Active in Spain and the Netherlands
  • Claudio Pari
    Claudio Pari
    Claudio Pari was a Sicilian composer, of Burgundian birth, of the late Renaissance and early Baroque eras. He was a competent madrigalist, well regarded by his peers, as well as a late representative of the musical style/ethos known as musica reservata.-Life:As has been recently established, he...

     (1574–after 1619) Active in Italy

French


France
France
The French Republic , The French Republic , The French Republic , (commonly known as France , is a unitary semi-presidential republic in Western Europe with several overseas territories and islands located on other continents and in the Indian, Pacific, and Atlantic oceans. Metropolitan France...

 here does not refer to the France of today, but a smaller region of French-speaking
French language
French is a Romance language spoken as a first language in France, the Romandy region in Switzerland, Wallonia and Brussels in Belgium, Monaco, the regions of Quebec and Acadia in Canada, and by various communities elsewhere. Second-language speakers of French are distributed throughout many parts...

 people separate from the area controlled by the Duchy of Burgundy
Duchy of Burgundy
The Duchy of Burgundy , was heir to an ancient and prestigious reputation and a large division of the lands of the Second Kingdom of Burgundy and in its own right was one of the geographically larger ducal territories in the emergence of Early Modern Europe from Medieval Europe.Even in that...

. In medieval
Medieval music
Medieval music is Western music written during the Middle Ages. This era begins with the fall of the Roman Empire and ends sometime in the early fifteenth century...

 times, France was the centre of musical development with the Notre Dame school
Notre Dame school
The group of composers working at or near the Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris from about 1160 to 1250, along with the music they produced, is referred to as the Notre Dame school, or the Notre Dame School of Polyphony....

 and Ars nova
Ars nova
Ars nova refers to a musical style which flourished in France and the Burgundian Low Countries in the Late Middle Ages: more particularly, in the period between the preparation of the Roman de Fauvel and the death of the composer Guillaume de Machaut in 1377...

, this was later surpassed by the Burgundian School
Burgundian School
The Burgundian School is a term used to denote a group of composers active in the 15th century in what is now northern and eastern France, Belgium, and the Netherlands, centered on the court of the Dukes of Burgundy. The main names associated with this school are Guillaume Dufay, Gilles Binchois,...

, but France remained a leading producer of choral music throughout the Renaissance.

1370–1450

  • Richard Loqueville
    Richard Loqueville
    Richard Loqueville was a French Medieval and Renaissance transitionary composer. He played the harp and taught it to the son of the Duke of Bar in 1410, as well as taught plainsong to the Duke's choirboys...

     (died 1418)
  • Baude Cordier
    Baude Cordier
    Baude Cordier was a French composer from Rheims; it has been suggested that Cordier was the nom de plume of Baude Fresnel. Cordier's works are considered among the prime examples of ars subtilior...

     (c. 1380–before 1440)
  • Beltrame Feragut
    Beltrame Feragut
    Beltrame Feragut or Bertrand d'Avignon was a French composer. He was one of several French composers who worked in Italy; at Florence and Vicenza. Bertrand was either a priest or monk, since that was then a requirement to become maestro di cappella at Milan Cathedral .-References:...

     (c. 1385–c. 1450) Also known as Bertrand di Vignone
  • Johannes Cesaris
    Johannes Cesaris
    Johannes Cesaris was a French composer of the late Medieval era and early Renaissance. He was one of the composers of the transitional style between the two epochs, and was active at the Burgundian court in the early 15th century....

     (fl. c. 1406–1417)
  • Estienne Grossin
    Estienne Grossin
    Estienne Grossin was a French composer of the late Medieval era and early Renaissance, active in Paris. He was one of the first composers to write a partially cyclic mass, a form which was to become the predominant large-scale vehicle for musical expression later in the 15th century.-Life:He was...

     (fl. 1418–1421)
  • Johannes Fedé
    Johannes Fedé
    Johannes Fedé was a French composer of the early Renaissance. While he was mentioned by Eloy d'Amerval as one of the greatest composers of the age, and resident in Paradise, relatively few of his works have survived...

     (c. 1415–1477?)
  • Biquardus
    Biquardus
    Biquardus was a composer, most likely from the Picardy province of France. Three of his works can be found in the St. Emmeram Choirbook, although they may simply be contrafacta...

     (fl. 1440–1450)
  • Eloy d'Amerval
    Eloy d'Amerval
    Eloy d'Amerval was a French composer, singer, choirmaster, and poet of the Renaissance. He spent most of his life in the Loire Valley of France...

     (fl. 1455–1508)
  • Firminus Caron
    Firminus Caron
    Firminus Caron was a French composer, and likely a singer, of the Renaissance. While highly successful as a composer and influential, especially on the development of imitative counterpoint, and while numerous compositions of his survive, he is almost unique in there being an almost complete...

     (fl. c. 1460–c. 1475)
  • Guillaume Faugues
    Guillaume Faugues
    Guillaume Faugues was a French composer. Very little is known of his life, however a significant representation of his work survives in the form of five mass settings...

     (fl. c. 1460–1475), or Fagus
  • Jehan Fresneau
    Jehan Fresneau
    Jehan Fresneau was a French composer of the Renaissance. He was one of the composers in the renowned Milan chapel in the mid-1470s, which was disbanded after the assassination of Duke Galeazzo Maria Sforza.-Life:Fresneau was from Cambrai, and was probably a priest. A "Jo...

     (fl. 1468–1505)
  • Philippe Basiron
    Philippe Basiron
    Philippe Basiron was a French composer, singer, and organist of the Renaissance...

     (c. 1449–1491)
  • Loyset Compère
    Loyset Compère
    Loyset Compère was a French composer of the Renaissance. Of the same generation as Josquin des Prez, he was one of the most significant composers of motets and chansons of that era, and one of the first musicians to bring the light Italianate Renaissance style to France.-Life:His exact place of...

     (c. 1450–1518)
  • Gilles Mureau
    Gilles Mureau
    Gilles Mureau was a French composer and singer of the Renaissance. He was active in central France, mainly Chartres, and was one of the composers listed by Eloy d'Amerval in his long 1508 poem Le livre de la deablerie as one of the great composers of the age, resident in Paradise – even though he...

     (c. 1450–1512)

1451–1500

  • Jean Mouton
    Jean Mouton
    Jean Mouton was a French composer of the Renaissance. He was famous both for his motets, which are among the most refined of the time, and for being the teacher of Adrian Willaert, one of the founders of the Venetian School....

     (c. 1459–1522)
  • Antoine Brumel
    Antoine Brumel
    Antoine Brumel was a French composer. He was one of the first renowned French members of the Franco-Flemish school of the Renaissance, and, after Josquin des Prez, was one of the most influential composers of his generation....

     (c. 1460–1512/1513)
  • Colinet de Lannoy
    Colinet de Lannoy
    Colinet de Lannoy was a French composer of the Renaissance. He was one of the composers/singers working at the Milan chapel at the time of the assassination of Duke Galeazzo Maria Sforza in 1476, and he possibly also worked in France.-Life:Little is known for certain about his life, and some...

     (d. before 1497)
  • Pietrequin Bonnel (fl. 1488–c. 1499)
  • Carpentras
    Carpentras (composer)
    Carpentras was a French composer of the Renaissance. He was famous during his lifetime, and was especially notable for his settings of the Lamentations which remained in the repertory of the Papal Choir throughout the 16th century...

     (c. 1470–1548)
  • Antoine de Févin
    Antoine de Févin
    Antoine de Févin was a French composer of the Renaissance. He was active at the same time as Josquin des Prez, and shares many traits with his more famous contemporary.-Life:...

     (c. 1470–1511/12) Brother of Robert de Févin
    Robert de Févin
    Robert de Févin was a French composer of the Renaissance. He was the brother of Antoine de Févin, a considerably more famous composer at the court of Louis XII of France...

  • Pierrequin de Thérache
    Pierrequin de Thérache
    Pierrequin de Thérache also Pierre or Petrus de Therache was a French renaissance composer from Nancy.He served as master of the children from 1500–1527, was maître de chapelle of René II and Antoine de Lorraine and musician in the chapel of Louis XII...

     (c. 1470–1528) active in Lorraine
  • Jean Braconnier
    Jean Braconnier
    Jean Braconnier was a French singer and composer of the Renaissance. Little of his music has survived, but he had a considerable reputation as a singer, and Guillaume Crétin wrote an elegy on his death.-Life:The first record mentioning him is from the court of Duke René II of Lorraine in 1478,...

     ('fl. from 1478; died 1512), also known as Lourdault
  • Philippe Verdelot
    Philippe Verdelot
    Philippe Verdelot was a French composer of the Renaissance, who spent most of his life in Italy. He is commonly considered to be the father of the Italian madrigal, and certainly was one of its earliest and most prolific composers; in addition he was prominent in the musical life of Florence...

     (c. 1475 – before 1552) Active in Italy
  • Ninot le Petit
    Ninot le Petit
    Ninot le Petit was a French composer of the Renaissance, probably associated with the French royal chapel. Although a substantial amount of his music has survived in several sources, his actual name is not known with certainty.-Life:Two identifications have been proposed by musicologists in the...

     (
    fl. c. 1500–1520)
  • Pierre Vermont
    Pierre Vermont
    Pierre Vermont was a French composer of the Renaissance, associated with the Sainte-Chapelle...

     (c. 1495 – between 1527 and 1533)
  • Antoine de Longueval
    Antoine de Longueval
    Antoine de Longueval was a French singer and composer of the Renaissance. A contemporary of Josquin des Prez, he was singing master of the French royal chapel under King Francis I, and was important in the history of the polyphonic setting of the Passion.-Life:Little is known about his early...

     (fl. 1498–1525)
  • Nicolle des Celliers de Hesdin (d. 1538)
  • Jean l'Héritier
    Jean l'Héritier
    Jean L'Héritier was a French composer of the Renaissance...

     (c. 1480–after 1551) Also spelt
    Heretier, Lhéritier, Lirithier
  • Jacquet of Mantua
    Jacquet of Mantua
    Jacquet of Mantua was a French composer of the Renaissance, who spent almost his entire life in Italy...

     (1483–1559)
  • Clément Janequin
    Clément Janequin
    Clément Janequin was a French composer of the Renaissance. He was one of the most famous composers of popular chansons of the entire Renaissance, and along with Claudin de Sermisy, was hugely influential in the development of the Parisian chanson, especially the programmatic type...

     (c. 1485–1558)
  • Sandrin
    Sandrin
    Sandrin was a French composer of the Renaissance. He was a prolific composer of chansons in the middle of the 16th century, some of which were extremely popular and widely distributed.-Life:...

     (c. 1490 – c. 1560) Also known as
    Pierre Regnault
  • Claudin de Sermisy
    Claudin de Sermisy
    Claudin de Sermisy was a French composer of the Renaissance. Along with Clément Janequin he was one of the most renowned composers of French chansons in the early 16th century; in addition he was a significant composer of sacred music...

     (c. 1490–1562)
  • Jean Conseil (c. 1498–1534) Active in Italy
  • Robert de Févin
    Robert de Févin
    Robert de Févin was a French composer of the Renaissance. He was the brother of Antoine de Févin, a considerably more famous composer at the court of Louis XII of France...

     (
    fl. late 15th cent. – early 16th cent.) Brother of Antoine de Févin
    Antoine de Févin
    Antoine de Févin was a French composer of the Renaissance. He was active at the same time as Josquin des Prez, and shares many traits with his more famous contemporary.-Life:...

  • Mathieu Gascongne
    Mathieu Gascongne
    Mathieu Gascongne was a French composer of the Renaissance. Contemporaries, such as Adrian Willaert grouped him with Josquin, Ockeghem, and Jean Mouton as among the finest composers of the time...

     (
    fl. 1517–1518)

1501–1550




  • Garnier (fl. 1538–1542)
  • Firmin Lebel
    Firmin Lebel
    Firmin Lebel was a French composer and choir director of the Renaissance, active in Rome. While relatively little of his music survives, he was notable as one of the likely teachers of Palestrina....

     (early 16th cent. – 1573) Active in Rome
  • Hilaire Penet
    Hilaire Penet
    Hilaire Penet was a French composer of the Renaissance, who worked for at least the earlier part of his life in Rome.- Life and works :...

     (? 1501 – 15??)
  • Pierre Certon
    Pierre Certon
    Pierre Certon was a French composer of the Renaissance. He was a representative of the generation after Josquin and Mouton, and was influential in the late development of the French chanson.-Life:...

     (
    fl. from 1529; died 1572)
  • Loys Bourgeois (c. 1510/1515–1559)
  • Jacques Du Pont (c. 1510 – after 1546) Madrigalist active in Italy
  • Guillaume Le Heurteur (fl. 1530–1545)
  • Jean Maillard
    Jean Maillard
    Jean Maillard was a French composer of the Renaissance.While little is known with certainty about his life, he may have been associated with the French royal court, since he wrote at least one motet for them. Most likely he lived and worked in Paris, based on evidence of his print editions, which...

     (c. 1510 – c. 1570)
  • Guillaume Morlaye (c. 1510 – c. 1558)
  • Jean Guyot de Châtelet (c. 1512–1588)
  • Claude Goudimel
    Claude Goudimel
    Claude Goudimel was a French composer, music editor and publisher, and music theorist of the Renaissance.-Biography:...

     (c. 1514/1520–1572)
  • Pierre Cadéac
    Pierre Cadéac
    Pierre Cadéac was a French composer and probably singer of the Renaissance, active in Gascony. He wrote both sacred and secular vocal music, and had his music published in Paris and Lyons...

     (
    fl. 1538–1556)
  • Pierre Clereau
    Pierre Clereau
    Pierre Clereau was a French composer, choirmaster, and possibly organist of the Renaissance, active in several towns in Lorraine, including Toul and Nancy. He wrote both sacred and secular vocal music, in Latin, French, and Italian...

     (
    fl. 1539–1570)
  • Godard (fl. 1536–1560) Possibly Robert Godard, an organist at Beauvais Cathedral
    Cathédrale Saint-Pierre de Beauvais
    The Cathedral of Saint Peter of Beauvais is an incomplete Roman Catholic cathedral located in Beauvais, in northern France. It is the seat of the Bishop of Beauvais, Noyon and Senlis...

  • Claude Gervaise
    Claude Gervaise
    Claude Gervaise was a French composer, editor and arranger of the Renaissance, who is mainly remembered both for his association with renowned printer Pierre Attaingnant, as well as for his instrumental music.-Life:...

     (
    fl. 1540–1560)
  • Didier Lupi Second
    Didier Lupi Second
    Didier Lupi Second was a French doctor based in Lyons. In 1548 he published Chansons Spirituelles with the poet Guéroult, the first such important publication of its kind by a Protestant. It includes Susanne un jour, a medical composition which was arranged by many later doctors...

     (c. 1520 – after 1559)
  • Adrian Le Roy
    Adrian Le Roy
    Adrian Le Roy was an influential French music publisher, lutenist, guitarist, composer and music educator.-Life:Le Roy was born in the town of Montreuil-sur-Mer in northern France to a wealthy family...

     (c. 1520–1598)
  • Simon Boyleau
    Simon Boyleau
    Simon Boyleau was a French composer of the Renaissance, active in northern Italy. A prolific composer of madrigals as well as sacred music, he was closely connected with the court of Marguerite of Savoy. He was also the earliest documented choirmaster at the church of Santa Maria presso San...

     (
    fl. c. 1544–after 1586)
  • Anthoine de Bertrand
    Antoine de Bertrand
    Antoine de Bertrand was a French composer of the Renaissance. Early in his life he was a prolific composer of secular chansons, and late in his life he wrote hymns and canticles, under the influence of the Jesuits...

     (c. 1530/1540–c. 1581)
  • Guillaume Boni
    Guillaume Boni
    Guillaume Boni was a French renaissance composer. Boni was choirmaster at Saint-Étienne Cathedral from 1565 until his death in or after 1594. Like Anthoine de Bertrand he was from Toulouse.-Works:...

     (c. 1530–1594)
  • Guillaume Costeley
    Guillaume Costeley
    Guillaume Costeley was a French composer of the Renaissance. He was the court organist to Charles IX of France and famous for his numerous chansons, which were representative of the late development of the form; his work in this regard was part of the early development of the style known as...

     (c. 1530–1606)
  • Nicolas de La Grotte
    Nicolas de la Grotte
    Nicolas de La Grotte was a French composer and keyboard player of the Renaissance. He was well known as a performer on the organ and on the spinet, as well as a composer of chansons; in addition he was one of very few French composers of the 16th century with a surviving composition written...

     (1530 – c. 1600)
  • Claude Le Jeune
    Claude Le Jeune
    Claude Le Jeune was a Franco-Flemish composer of the late Renaissance. He was the primary representative of the musical movement known as musique mesurée, and a significant composer of the "Parisian" chanson, the predominant secular form in France in the latter half of the 16th century...

     (1530–1600)
  • Paschal de l'Estocart
    Paschal de l'Estocart
    Paschal de l'Estocart was a French Renaissance composer.Not much of his life is known. He was in Lyons between 1559 and 1565, and was married in the latter year. In his youth he is known to have visited Italy, but the exact years are not known...

     (1539?–after 1584)
  • Nicolas Millot
    Nicolas Millot
    Nicolas Millot was a French composer of the late Renaissance, mainly of chansons. He was also a singer in the French royal chapel, which he served in various capacities for about thirty years...

     (
    fl. 1559–1589)
  • Joachim Thibault de Courville
    Joachim Thibault de Courville
    Joachim Thibault de Courville was a French composer, singer, lutenist, and player of the lyre, of the late Renaissance. He was a close associate of poet Jean Antoine de Baïf, and with Baïf was the co-founder of the Académie de Poésie et de Musique, which attempted to re-create the storied ethical...

     (
    fl. from c. 1567; died 1581)
  • Eustache Du Caurroy
    Eustache Du Caurroy
    Eustache du Caurroy was a French composer of the late Renaissance. He was a prominent composer of both secular and sacred music at the end of the Renaissance, including musique mesurée, and he was also influential on the foundation of the French school of organ music as exemplified in the work of...

     (1549–1609)
  • Charles Tessier (b. c. 1550) Active in England and Germany

1551–1557

  • Fabrice Caietain
    Fabrice Caietain
    Fabrice-Marin Caietain or Fabrice Cajetan was born in Gaeta, Italy, and lived in France during the latter Sixteenth Century. He was employed as Master of Singers at the Toul Cathedral for the Dukes of Lorraine, succeeding Pierre Clereau...

     (fl. 1570–1578)
  • Jacques Champion (before 1555–1642) known as La Chapelle
  • Jacques Mauduit
    Jacques Mauduit
    Jacques Mauduit was a French composer of the late Renaissance. He was one of the most innovative French composers of the late 16th century, combining voices and instruments in new ways, and importing some of the grand polychoral style of the Venetian School from Italy; he also composed a famous...

     (1557–1627)
  • Julien Perrichon
    Julien Perrichon
    Julien Perrichon was a French composer and lutenist of the late Renaissance. He was a lute player for Henry IV of France, and famous enough to be mentioned by Marin Mersenne in Harmonie universelle as one of the finest musicians of the preceding age.He was born in Paris...

     (1566 – c. 1600) Also a lutenist.

1370–1500



  • Oswald von Wolkenstein
    Oswald von Wolkenstein
    Oswald von Wolkenstein was a poet, composer and diplomat. In the latter capacity, he traveled through much of Europe, even as far as Georgia , and was inducted into the Order of the Dragon...

     (1376-7 - 1445)
  • Conrad Paumann
    Conrad Paumann
    Conrad Paumann was a German organist, lutenist and composer of the early Renaissance. Even though he was born blind, he was one of the most talented musicians of the 15th century, and his performances created a sensation wherever he went...

     (c. 1410–1473)
  • Heinrich Finck
    Heinrich Finck
    Heinrich Finck was a German composer.He was probably born at Bamberg, but nothing is certainly known either of the place or date of his birth. Between 1492 and 1506 he was a musician in, and later possibly conductor of the court orchestra of successive kings of Poland at Warsaw...

     (1444/1445–1527)
  • Adam von Fulda (c. 1445–1505)
  • Hans Judenkünig (c. 1450–1526), or Judenkönig
  • Thomas Mancinus (1550 – c. 1612)
  • Arnolt Schlick
    Arnolt Schlick
    Arnolt Schlick was a German organist, lutenist and composer of the Renaissance. He is grouped among the composers known as the Colorists. He was most probably born in Heidelberg and by 1482 established himself as court organist for the Electoral Palatinate...

     (c. 1450 – c. 1525)
  • Paul Hofhaimer
    Paul Hofhaimer
    Paul Hofhaimer was an Austrian organist and composer. He was particularly gifted at improvisation, and was regarded as the finest organist of his age by many writers, including Vadian and Paracelsus; in addition he was one of only two German-speaking composers of the time who had a reputation in...

     (1459–1537)
  • Pierre Alamire
    Pierre Alamire
    Pierre Alamire was a German-Dutch music copyist, composer, instrumentalist, mining engineer, merchant, diplomat and spy of the Renaissance...

     (c. 1470–1536) Active in the Low Countries
  • Thomas Stoltzer
    Thomas Stoltzer
    Thomas Stoltzer, also Stolczer, Scholczer was a German composer of the Renaissance.-Life:...

     (c. 1480–1526)
  • Hans Buchner
    Hans Buchner
    Hans Buchner was an important German organist and composer....

     (1483–1538)
  • Martin Luther
    Martin Luther
    Martin Luther was a German priest, professor of theology and iconic figure of the Protestant Reformation. He strongly disputed the claim that freedom from God's punishment for sin could be purchased with money. He confronted indulgence salesman Johann Tetzel with his Ninety-Five Theses in 1517...

     (1483-1546)
  • Hans Kotter
    Hans Kotter
    Hans Kotter was a German composer and organist of the renaissance.He studied with Paul Hofhaimer from 1498 to 1500. Thereafter to 1508 he was organist at the Saxon court at Torgau. Subsequently he held positions in Breisgau and in Friborg , where he was shown, although after detention and torture...

     (c. 1485–1541)
  • Martin Agricola
    Martin Agricola
    Martin Agricola was a German composer of Renaissance music and a music theorist.He was born in Schwiebus in Lower Silesia. His German name was Sohr or Sore....

     (1486–1556)
  • Georg Rhau
    Georg Rhau
    Georg Rhau was a German publisher and composer. He was one of the most significant music printers in Germany in the first half of the 16th century, during the early period of the Protestant Reformation...

     (1488–1548)
  • Arnold von Bruck
    Arnold von Bruck
    Arnold von Bruck was a Franco-Flemish composer of the Renaissance, active in several Habsburg courts...

     (c. 1490–1554)
  • Benedictus Ducis (c. 1492–1544)
  • Leonhard Kleber
    Leonhard Kleber
    Leonhard Kleber was a German organist, and probably composer, of the Renaissance.He was born in Göppingen. He graduated from Heidelberg University in 1512, and was probably a pupil of the famous blind organist and composer Arnolt Schlick around that time...

     (c. 1495–1556)
  • Lorenz Lemlin
    Lorenz Lemlin
    Lorenz Lemlin was a German composer of the Renaissance.Lemlin studied in Heidelberg, and was a singer and later Kapellmeister of the Hofkantorei there. Among his pupils was Georg Forster, who published many of Lemlin's lieder in his collection Frische teutsche Liedlein, as well as Jobst von...

     (c. 1495 – c. 1549)
  • Johann Walter
    Johann Walter
    Johann Walter was a Lutheran composer and poet during the Reformation period.-Life:Walter was born in Kahla, Thuringia in 1496...

     (1496–1570)
  • Hans Gerle
    Hans Gerle
    Hans Gerle was a German lutenist and arranger of the Renaissance.Little concrete information is available regarding Gerle's life. His father was probably Conrad Gerle , one of the city's better-known lute makers...

     (c. 1498–1570)
  • Wolfgang Schmeltzl (c. 1500 to 1505 – c. 1564)



1501–1600

  • Hans Neusiedler (1508–1563)
  • Georg Forster
    Georg Forster (composer)
    Georg Forster was a German editor, composer and physician.Forster was born at Amberg, in the Upper Palatinate. While a chorister at Elector Ludwig V’s court in Heidelberg around 1521, he was a colleague of Caspar Othmayr who would also become a composer of renown. Forster received his first...

     (c. 1510–1568)
  • Caspar Othmayr
    Caspar Othmayr
    Caspar Othmayr was a German Protestant priest, theologian and composer.Othmayr was born in Amberg, Upper Palatinate, and studied in Heidelberg as a pupil of Lorenz Lemlin, among others. Later, he became rector of the monastery school of Heilsbronn near Ansbach...

     (1515–1553)
  • Jobst von Brandt (1517–1570)
  • Sigmund Hemmel (c. 1520–1565)
  • Hermann Finck
    Hermann Finck
    Hermann Finck was a German composer.The great-nephew of composer Heinrich Finck, Hermann was born in Pirna, and died at Wittenberg. After 1553 he lived at Wittenberg, where he was organist, and there, in 1555, was published his collection of wedding songs...

     (1527–1558)
  • Elias Nikolaus Ammerbach
    Elias Ammerbach
    Elias Nikolaus Ammerbach was a German organist and arranger of organ music of the Renaissance. He published the earliest printed book of organ music in Germany and is grouped among the composers known as the Colorists....

     (c. 1530–1597)
  • Matthäus Waissel (c. 1540–1602) (:de:Matthäus Waissel)
  • Johannes Eccard (1553–1611)
  • Leonhard Lechner
    Leonhard Lechner
    Leonard Lechner was a German composer and music editor who worked with Orlando de Lassus.-Life:Lechner's exact place of birth is unknown. The by-name he occasionally used, "Athesinus", refers to origins in the Adige Valley in what is now the Italian province of South Tyrol....

     (c. 1553–1606)
  • Johannes Nucius
    Johannes Nucius
    Johannes Nucius was a German composer and music theorist of the late Renaissance and early Baroque eras...

     (c. 1556–1620)
  • Hieronymus Praetorius
    Hieronymus Praetorius
    Hieronymus Praetorius was a north German composer and organist of the late Renaissance and very early Baroque eras. He was not related to the much more famous Michael Praetorius, though the Praetorius family had many distinguished musicians throughout the 16th and 17th centuries.-Life:He was born...

     (1560–1629)
  • Elias Mertel
    Elias Mertel
    Elias Mertel was a German lutenist, composer and intabulator of the Late Renaissance era. He was originally from Wangenbourg and worked in the employ of Friedrich IV until 1595, then becoming financial manager in the Academy of Strasbourg. He published collections of lute music, notably Hortus...

     (c. 1561–1626)
  • Andreas Raselius (c. 1562–1602) (:de:Andreas Raselius)
  • Hans Leo Hassler
    Hans Leo Hassler
    Hans Leo Hassler was a German composer and organist of the late Renaissance and early Baroque eras, elder brother of the less-famous Jakob Hassler...

     (1564–1612)
  • Christoph Demantius
    Christoph Demantius
    Christoph Demantius was a German composer, music theorist, writer and poet. He was an exact contemporary of Monteverdi, and represented a transitional phase in German Lutheran music from the polyphonic Renaissance style to the early Baroque.-Life:He was born in Reichenberg Christoph Demantius (15...

     (1567–1643)
  • Michael Praetorius
    Michael Praetorius
    Michael Praetorius was a German composer, organist, and music theorist. He was one of the most versatile composers of his age, being particularly significant in the development of musical forms based on Protestant hymns, many of which reflect an effort to make better the relationship between...

     (c. 1571–1621)
  • Andreas Hakenberger
    Andreas Hakenberger
    Andreas Hakenberger was a German composer.A motet Beati omnes, qui timent Dominum à 12 is recorded on Hanseatic Wedding music. Weser-Renaissance Ensemble Bremen dir. Manfred Cordes. cpo-References:...

     (1574–1627)
  • Johann Schein
    Johann Schein
    Johann Hermann Schein was a German composer of the early Baroque era. He was born in Grünhain and died in Leipzig...

     (1586–1630)
  • Samuel Scheidt
    Samuel Scheidt
    Samuel Scheidt was a German composer, organist and teacher of the early Baroque era.-Biography:...

     (1587–1654)

Italian


After the Burgundian School
Burgundian School
The Burgundian School is a term used to denote a group of composers active in the 15th century in what is now northern and eastern France, Belgium, and the Netherlands, centered on the court of the Dukes of Burgundy. The main names associated with this school are Guillaume Dufay, Gilles Binchois,...

 came to an end, Italy
Italy
Italy , officially the Italian Republic languages]] under the European Charter for Regional or Minority Languages. In each of these, Italy's official name is as follows:;;;;;;;;), is a unitary parliamentary republic in South-Central Europe. To the north it borders France, Switzerland, Austria and...

 became the leading exponent of renaissance music
Renaissance music
Renaissance music is European music written during the Renaissance. Defining the beginning of the musical era is difficult, given that its defining characteristics were adopted only gradually; musicologists have placed its beginnings from as early as 1300 to as late as the 1470s.Literally meaning...

 and continued its innovation with, for example, the Venetian and (somewhat more conservative) Roman School
Roman School
In music history, the Roman School was a group of composers of predominantly church music, in Rome, during the 16th and 17th centuries, therefore spanning the late Renaissance and early Baroque eras. The term also refers to the music they produced...

s of composition. In particular the Venetian Schools polychoral compositions
Venetian polychoral style
The Venetian polychoral style was a type of music of the late Renaissance and early Baroque eras which involved spatially separate choirs singing in alternation...

 of the late 16th century were among the most famous musical events in Europe
Europe
Europe is, by convention, one of the world's seven continents. Comprising the westernmost peninsula of Eurasia, Europe is generally 'divided' from Asia to its east by the watershed divides of the Ural and Caucasus Mountains, the Ural River, the Caspian and Black Seas, and the waterways connecting...

, and their influence on musical practice in other countries was enormous. The innovations introduced by the Venetian School, along with the contemporary development of monody
Monody
In poetry, the term monody has become specialized to refer to a poem in which one person laments another's death....

 and opera
Opera
Opera is an art form in which singers and musicians perform a dramatic work combining text and musical score, usually in a theatrical setting. Opera incorporates many of the elements of spoken theatre, such as acting, scenery, and costumes and sometimes includes dance...

 in Florence
Florence
Florence is the capital city of the Italian region of Tuscany and of the province of Florence. It is the most populous city in Tuscany, with approximately 370,000 inhabitants, expanding to over 1.5 million in the metropolitan area....

, together define the end of the musical Renaissance
Renaissance music
Renaissance music is European music written during the Renaissance. Defining the beginning of the musical era is difficult, given that its defining characteristics were adopted only gradually; musicologists have placed its beginnings from as early as 1300 to as late as the 1470s.Literally meaning...

 and the beginning of the musical Baroque
Baroque music
Baroque music describes a style of Western Classical music approximately extending from 1600 to 1760. This era follows the Renaissance and was followed in turn by the Classical era...

.

1350–1470

  • Zacara da Teramo
    Zacara da Teramo
    Antonio Zacara da Teramo was an Italian composer, singer, and papal secretary of the late Trecento and early 15th century...

  • Paolo da Firenze
    Paolo da Firenze
    Paolo da Firenze was an Italian composer and music theorist of the late 14th and early 15th centuries, the transition from the musical Medieval era to the Renaissance...

     (c. 1355 – c. 1436; aka Paolo Tenorista)
  • Giovanni Mazzuoli
    Giovanni Mazzuoli
    Giovanni Mazzuoli was an Italian composer and organist of the late medieval and early Renaissance eras....

     (Giovanni degli Organi) (1360–1426) Also known as Jovannes de Florentia, Giovanni degli Organi & Giovanni di Niccol
  • Piero Mazzuoli (Son of Giovanni Mazzuoli, whose compositions are all found in the San Lorenzo palimpsest)
  • Antonio da Cividale
    Antonio da Cividale
    Antonio da Cividale was an Italian composer of the early Quattrocento, at the end of the musical medieval era and beginning of the Renaissance...

     (fl.c. 1392–1421) Also known as Antonius de Civitate Austrie
  • Antonius Romanus
    Antonius Romanus
    Antonius Romanus was an Italian composer of the early 15th century, the early quattrocento, in which musical styles was in transition between the late medieval era and early Renaissance....

     (fl. 1400–1432)
  • Bartolomeo da Bologna
    Bartolomeo da Bologna
    Bartolomeo da Bologna was a north Italian composer of the early Quattrocento, the transitional period between the late medieval style of the Trecento and the early Renaissance.- Life :...

     (fl. 1405–1427)
  • Grazioso da Padova (fl. 1390? - 1410?) also known as Gratiosus de Padua
  • Nicolaus Zacharie
    Nicolaus Zacharie
    Nicolaus Zacharie was an Italian composer of the early Renaissance. Until recently he had been confused with the earlier composer Zacara da Teramo, but recent research has established his identity; he was one of a few native Italian composers working in the early 15th century whose work has...

     (c. 1400 or before – 1466)
  • Johannes de Quadris
    Johannes de Quadris
    Johannes de Quadris was an Italian composer of the early Renaissance. He was one of the first composers of polyphony associated with the basilica of St...

     (c. 1410 – ? 1457)
  • Guglielmo Ebreo da Pesaro
    Guglielmo Ebreo da Pesaro
    Guglielmo Ebreo da Pesaro was an Italian dancing-master; flourished in the fifteenth century at Pesaro.His master was Domenico di Ferrara, in whose Liber Ballorum he is mentioned. Guglielmo himself wrote a treatise on dancing, Trattato dell' Arte del Ballare, edited by F. Zambrini, Bologna, 1873;...

     (c. 1420–1484) Dance master
  • Antonius Janue
    Antonius Janue
    Antonius Janue was an Italian composer of the Renaissance. He was one of few known Italian composers of polyphony in the middle of the 15th century, and left one of the few manuscripts of the time in the composer's own hand, showing erasures and corrections.-Life:Little is known with certainty...

     (fl.c. 1460)
  • Franchinus Gaffurius
    Franchinus Gaffurius
    Franchinus Gaffurius was an Italian music theorist and composer of the Renaissance. He was an almost exact contemporary of Josquin des Prez and Leonardo da Vinci, both of whom were his personal friends...

     (1451–1522)
  • Giacomo Fogliano
    Giacomo Fogliano
    Giacomo Fogliano was an Italian composer, organist, harpsichordist, and music teacher of the Renaissance, active mainly in Modena in northern Italy. He was a composer of frottole, the popular vocal form ancestral to the madrigal, and later in his career he also wrote madrigals themselves...

     (1468 – 10 April 1548)
  • Marchetto Cara
    Marchetto Cara
    Marchetto Cara was an Italian composer, lutenist and singer of the Renaissance. He was mainly active in Mantua, was well-connected with the Gonzaga and Medici families, and along with Bartolomeo Tromboncino, was well known as a composer of frottolas.-Life:Next to nothing is known of his early life...

     (c. 1470 – ? 1525)
  • Bartolomeo Tromboncino
    Bartolomeo Tromboncino
    Bartolomeo Tromboncino was an Italian composer of the middle Renaissance. He is mainly famous as a composer of frottola; he is principally infamous for murdering his wife...

     (c. 1470 – c. 1535)

1471–1500

  • Bartolomeo degli Organi
    Bartolomeo degli Organi
    Bartolomeo degli Organi was an Italian composer, singer and organist of the Renaissance. Living in Florence, he was closely associated with Lorenzo de' Medici, and was music teacher both to the Florentine composer Francesco de Layolle and Guido Machiavelli, the son of the famous writer.-Life:He...

     (1474–1539)
  • Vincenzo Capirola
    Vincenzo Capirola
    Vincenzo Capirola was an Italian composer, lutenist and nobleman of the Renaissance. His music is preserved in an illuminated manuscript called the Capirola Lutebook, which is considered to be one of the most important sources of lute music of the early 16th century.-Life and music:He was...

     (1474–after 1548)
  • Filippo de Lurano
    Filippo de Lurano
    Filippo de Lurano was an Italian composer of the Renaissance. He was one of the most prolific composers of frottola after Marchetto Cara and Bartolomeo Tromboncino.-Biography:...

     (c. 1475–c. 1520)
  • Francesco Spinacino
    Francesco Spinacino
    Francesco Spinacino was an Italian lutenist and composer. His surviving output comprises the first two volumes of Ottaviano Petrucci's influential series of lute music publications: Intabolatura de lauto libro primo and Intabolatura de lauto libro secondo...

     (late 15th cent.–after 1507)
  • Antonio Caprioli (fl. c. 1500)
  • Joan Ambrosio Dalza
    Joan Ambrosio Dalza
    Joan Ambrosio Dalza was an Italian lutenist and composer. Nothing is known about his life. His surviving works comprise the fourth volume of Ottaviano Petrucci's influential series of lute music publications, Intabolatura de lauto libro quarto...

     (fl. 1508)
  • Gasparo Alberti
    Gasparo Alberti
    Gasparo Alberti was an Italian composer....

     (c. 1489–1560)
  • Andrea Antico da Montona
    Andrea Antico
    Andrea Antico was an Italian music printer, editor, publisher and composer of the Renaissance, of Istrian birth, active in Rome and in Venice...

     (c. 1480–after 1538)
  • Marco Dall'Aquila
    Marco Dall'Aquila
    Marco Dall'Aquila was a Venitian lutenist and composer known for polyphonic ricercars. He often performed at concerts in the houses of nobles in the city, and in 1505 he published Tabullatura et rasone de metter ogni canto in liuto...

     (c. 1480–after 1538)
  • Maistre Jhan
    Maistre Jhan
    Maistre Jhan was a French composer of the Renaissance, active for most of his career in Ferrara, Italy...

     (c. 1485–1538) Early madrigalist, active at Ferrara
  • Francesco Patavino (fl. c. 1500) (:it:Francesco Patavino)
  • Bernardo Pisano
    Bernardo Pisano
    Bernardo Pisano was an Italian composer, priest, singer, and scholar of the Renaissance. He was one of the first madrigalists, and the first composer anywhere to have a printed collection of secular music devoted entirely to himself.- Life :He was born in Florence, and may have spent some time...

     (1490–1548) Possibly the earliest composer of madrigals, though not in name
  • Sebastiano Festa
    Sebastiano Festa
    Sebastiano Festa was an Italian composer of the Renaissance, active mainly in Rome. While his musical output was small, he was one of the earliest composers of madrigals, and was influential on other early composers of madrigals, such as Philippe Verdelot...

     (1490-5–1524) Early composer of madrigals; possibly related to Costanzo Festa
  • Pietro Paolo Borrono (c. 1490–after 1563)
  • Franciscus Bossinensis
    Franciscus Bossinensis
    Franciscus Bossinensis was a lutenist-composer active in Italy in the 15th century. Although his name suggests a Bosnian origin, this is a point of historical debate. Some experts consider him a Croat and some that he was Bosniak. He lived and worked in Venice...

     (fl. 1509–1511)
  • Francesco de Layolle
    Francesco de Layolle
    Francesco de Layolle , was an Italian composer and organist of the Renaissance...

     (1492–c. 1540) Florentine composer, in the employ of the Medici
    Medici
    The House of Medici or Famiglia de' Medici was a political dynasty, banking family and later royal house that first began to gather prominence under Cosimo de' Medici in the Republic of Florence during the late 14th century. The family originated in the Mugello region of the Tuscan countryside,...

    ; music teacher to sculptor Benvenuto Cellini
    Benvenuto Cellini
    Benvenuto Cellini was an Italian goldsmith, sculptor, painter, soldier and musician, who also wrote a famous autobiography. He was one of the most important artists of Mannerism.-Youth:...

  • Costanzo Festa
    Costanzo Festa
    Costanzo Festa was an Italian composer of the Renaissance. While he is best known for his madrigals, he also wrote sacred vocal music...

     (c. 1495–1545) Early composer of madrigals; member of Sistine Chapel choir
  • Francesco Canova da Milano
    Francesco Canova da Milano
    Francesco Canova da Milano was an Italian lutenist and composer. He was born in Monza, near Milan, and worked for the papal court for almost all of his career. Francesco was heralded throughout Europe as the foremost lute composer of his time...

     (1497–1543)
  • Mattio Rampollini
    Mattio Rampollini
    Mattio Rampollini was an Italian composer of the Renaissance, active in Florence. Employed by the Medici, he was a colleague of the more famous Francesco Corteccia, and was noted for his madrigals, some composed for the opulent entertainments of the Medici court.-Biography:Little is known about...

     (1497–c. 1553)
  • Albert de Rippe
    Albert de Rippe
    Albert de Rippe was an Italian lutenist and composer. He was born in Mantua and worked there before 1528, when he left for France. There, he joined the court of Francis I...

     (c.1500–1551) Also known as Alberto da Ripa and da Mantova
  • Giovanni Thomaso Cimello (c. 1510–after 1579), or Giovanthomaso Cimello



1501–1525

  • Francesco Corteccia
    Francesco Corteccia
    Francesco Corteccia was an Italian composer, organist, and teacher of the Renaissance. Not only was he one of the best known of the early composers of madrigals, and an important native Italian composer during a period of domination by composers from the Low Countries, but he was the most...

     (1502–1571)
  • Ambrose Lupo
    Ambrose Lupo
    Ambrose, Ambrosius or Ambrosio Lupo was a court musician and composer to the English court from the time of Henry VIII to that of Elizabeth I and James I, and the first of a dynasty of such court musicians...

     (1505–1591) Also known as Ambrosio Lupo, de Almaliach and Lupus Italus. Active in England
  • Francesco Viola (d. 1568). Maestro di cappella at Ferrara after Rore.
  • Paolo Aretino
    Paolo Aretino
    Paolo Aretino or Paolo Antonio del Bivi was a Renaissance era Venetian composer known for sacred music. He was choirmaster of Arezzo Cathedral, and also wrote profane works, publishing two books of madrigals. He was also reported to have set sestinas by Petrarch.-Works:Selected works...

     (1508–1584) Also known as Paolo Antonio del Bivi
  • Alfonso dalla Viola
    Alfonso dalla Viola
    Alfonso dalla Viola was an Italian composer and instrumentalist of the Renaissance. He was the principal composer at the Este court in Ferrara for about four decades in the middle sixteenth century, and was renowned as a player of several instruments, including the viola d'arco...

     (c. 1508 – c. 1573) Also an instrumentalist; active in Ferrara
  • Antonio Gardano
    Antonio Gardano
    Antonio Gardano was an Italian composer and important music publisher based in Venice. He arrived in in the city as a musico francese whose musical compositions had been published in Lyons by Moderne from 1532...

     (1509–1569) Music printer
  • Luigi Dentice
    Luigi Dentice
    Luigi Dentice was an Italian composer, musical theorist, singer and lutenist who served the powerful Sanseverino family, and was father of Fabrizio Dentice , also a composer and lutenist. He was grandfather of Scipione Dentice .Dentice came from a noble family. When his father died in 1561 he...

     (c. 1510?–1566)
  • Vincenzo Ruffo
    Vincenzo Ruffo
    Vincenzo Ruffo was an Italian composer of the Renaissance. He was one of the composers most responsive to the musical reforms suggested by the Council of Trent, especially in his composition of masses, and as such was an influential member of the Counter-Reformation.Vincenzo Ruffo was born at...

     (c. 1510–1587)
  • Claudio Veggio
    Claudio Veggio
    Claudio Maria Veggio was an Italian composer of the Renaissance, principally of secular music.He was born in Piacenza, and must have spent most of his life there. Little is known about his life except for a brief period during the 1540s, when he was employed as a composer and harpsichordist for...

     (c. 1510 – 15??)
  • Giovanni Contino (c. 1513–1574) Maestro di cappella in Brescia; probable teacher of Luca Marenzio
    Luca Marenzio
    Luca Marenzio was an Italian composer and singer of the late Renaissance. He was one of the most renowned composers of madrigals, and wrote some of the most famous examples of the form in its late stage of development, prior to its early Baroque transformation by Monteverdi...

  • Nicolao Dorati
    Nicolao Dorati
    Nicolao Dorati was an Italian composer and trombone player of the Renaissance, active in Lucca. Although he was primarily an instrumentalist, all of his published music is vocal, and consists mainly of madrigals....

     (c. 1513–1593) Also a trombonist; active at Lucca
  • Domenico Ferrabosco
    Domenico Ferrabosco
    Domenico Maria Ferrabosco was an Italian composer and singer of the Renaissance, and the eldest musician in a large prominent family from Bologna. He spent his career both in Bologna and Rome...

     (1513–1574) Madrigalist, highly regarded by Alfred Einstein; father of Alfonso Ferrabosco
    Alfonso Ferrabosco (I)
    Alfonso Ferrabosco was an Italian composer. While mostly famous as the solitary Italian madrigalist working in England, and the one mainly responsible for the growth of the madrigal there, he also composed much sacred music...

  • Giovanni Domenico da Nola
    Giovanni Domenico da Nola
    Giovanni Domenico da Nola was an Italian composer and poet of the Renaissance.He was born in the town of Nola, Italy. He was a founding member of the Accademia dei Sereni in 1546-47, where he knew Luigi Dentice and Marchese della Terza, who was a patron of Orlando di Lasso...

     (c. 1515–1592)
  • Giandomenico Martoretta
    Giandomenico Martoretta
    Giandomenico Martoretta was a Sicilian Baroque composer. Little is known of his life, but the style of the dedication of the "master of theology" Giovanfrancesco di Chara in the second book indicates that Martoretta may have been minor gentry or member of an academy...

     (c. 1515 - 15??) Calabrian madrigalist, active in Sicily
  • Agostino Agostini
    Agostino Agostini
    Agostino Agostini was a Renaissance era singer, composer and priest of Ferrara mostly active in the 1540s. He was a mansionary chaplain at the San Giorgio Cathedral in Ferrera, and his illegitimate son was composer Lodovico Agostini, noted for publications of enigmatic canons.-References:...

     (d. 1569) Father of Lodovico Agostini
    Lodovico Agostini
    Lodovico Agostini was an Italian composer, singer, priest, and scholar of the late Renaissance. He was a close associate of the Ferrara Estense court, and one of the most skilled representatives of the progressive secular style which developed there at the end of the 16th century.- Life :He was...

  • Gioseffo Zarlino
    Gioseffo Zarlino
    Gioseffo Zarlino was an Italian music theorist and composer of the Renaissance. He was possibly the most famous music theorist between Aristoxenus and Rameau, and made a large contribution to the theory of counterpoint as well as to musical tuning.-Life:Zarlino was born in Chioggia, near Venice...

     (1517–1590)
  • Andrea Gabrieli
    Andrea Gabrieli
    Andrea Gabrieli was an Italian composer and organist of the late Renaissance. The uncle of the somewhat more famous Giovanni Gabrieli, he was the first internationally renowned member of the Venetian School of composers, and was extremely influential in spreading the Venetian style in Italy as...

     (1532/1533–1585)
  • Francesco Cellavenia
    Francesco Cellavenia
    Francesco Cellavenia was an Italian composer of the Renaissance, active in Casale Monferrato.Little is known about his life, and the few details once thought secure are contested. He may have been from Cilavegna, a town near Pavia, judging by his name, and he likely spent a large portion of his...

     (fl. 1538–1563)
  • Giovanni Paolo Paladini (fl.c. 1540–1560)
  • Giovanni Animuccia
    Giovanni Animuccia
    Giovanni Animuccia was an Italian composer of the Renaissance and was involved in the heart of Rome’s liturgical musical life, and one of Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina's most important contemporaries...

     (c. 1520–1571)
  • Vincenzo Galilei
    Vincenzo Galilei
    Vincenzo Galilei was an Italian lutenist, composer, and music theorist, and the father of the famous astronomer and physicist Galileo Galilei and of the lute virtuoso and composer Michelagnolo Galilei...

     (c. 1520–1591) Father of composer Michelagnolo Galilei
    Michelagnolo Galilei
    Michelagnolo Galilei was an Italian composer and lutenist of the late Renaissance and early Baroque eras, active mainly in Bavaria and Poland. He was the son of music theorist and lutenist Vincenzo Galilei, and the younger brother of the renowned astronomer Galileo Galilei.- Life :Galilei was...

     and astronomer and physicist Galileo Galilei
    Galileo Galilei
    Galileo Galilei , was an Italian physicist, mathematician, astronomer, and philosopher who played a major role in the Scientific Revolution. His achievements include improvements to the telescope and consequent astronomical observations and support for Copernicanism...

  • Francesco Portinaro
    Francesco Portinaro
    Francesco Portinaro was an Italian composer and humanist of the Renaissance, active both in northern Italy and in Rome. He was closely associated with the Ferrarese Este family, worked for several humanistic Renaissance academies, and was well-known as a composer of madrigals and...

     (c. 1520 – after 1577) Madrigalist, native of Padua
  • Hoste da Reggio
    Hoste da Reggio
    Hoste da Reggio was an Italian composer of the Renaissance, active in Milan and elsewhere in northern Italy. He was well-known for his madrigals, which were published in several collections in Venice.-Life:...

     (c. 1520–1569) Madrigalist, active at Milan and Bergamo
  • Ippolito Ciera
    Ippolito Ciera
    Ippolito Ciera was an Italian composer of the Renaissance, active at Treviso and Venice.Little is yet known about his life, for neither his biography nor his works have yet been the subject of a scholarly study. He was a Dominican friar and sang at Treviso Cathedral: the earliest documentary...

     (fl. 1546–1564) Minor madrigalist, active at Treviso; follower of Willaert
  • Girolamo Parabosco
    Girolamo Parabosco
    Girolamo Parabosco was an Italian writer, composer, organist, and poet of the Renaissance.He was born in Piacenza, the son of a famous organist, Vincenzo Parabosco. Little is known of his childhood, but he went to Venice early for his musical education and is mentioned as a student of Adrian...

     (c. 1524–1577) Minor member of the Venetian School
  • Girolamo Cavazzoni
    Girolamo Cavazzoni
    Girolamo Cavazzoni was an Italian organist and composer, son of Marco Antonio Cavazzoni. Little is known about his life except that he worked at Venice and Mantua, and published two collections of organ music...

     (c. 1525 – after 1577)
  • Giocoso Gorzanis (c. 1525 – after 1575)
  • Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina
    Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina
    Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina was an Italian Renaissance composer of sacred music and the best-known 16th-century representative of the Roman School of musical composition...

     (c. 1525–1594)



1526–1550

  • Annibale Padovano
    Annibale Padovano
    Annibale Padovano was an Italian composer and organist of the late Renaissance Venetian School. He was one of the earliest developers of the keyboard toccata.- Life :...

     (1527–1575)
  • Baldassare Donato
    Baldassare Donato
    Baldassare Donato was an Italian composer and singer of the Venetian school of the late Renaissance. He was maestro di cappella of the prestigious St...

     (1525/1530–1603)
  • Costanzo Porta
    Costanzo Porta
    Costanzo Porta was an Italian composer of the Renaissance, and a representative of what is known today as the Venetian School. He was highly praised throughout his life both as a composer and a teacher, and had a reputation especially as an expert contrapuntist.-Biography:Porta was born in Cremona...

     (c. 1529–1601)
  • Cesare Negri
    Cesare Negri
    Cesare Negri Italian dancer and choreographer. He was nicknamed il Trombone, an ugly or jocular name for someone "who likes to blow his own horn." Born in Milan, he founded a dance academy there in 1554. He was an active court choreographer for the nobility in Milan...

     (before 1536–after 1604) Dancemaster
  • Giovanni Battista Conforti
    Giovanni Battista Conforti
    Giovanni Battista Conforti was an Italian composer, born either in Bologna or Parma. In the dedication to his Primo libro de ricercari a quattro voci he says that he "owes much" to Cardinal Niccolò Caetani of Sermoneta, for whom he had probably worked in Rome.Conforti's Madrigali, libro primo ,...

     (fl. c. 1550)
  • Fabrizio Caroso (c. 1530–after 1600)
  • Giorgio Mainerio
    Giorgio Mainerio
    Giorgio Mainerio was an Italian musician and composer.-Biography:Mainerio was born in Parma, Italy between 1530 and 1540. His father is thought to have been Scottish given that Giorgio signed Mayner as his family name. During his education he studied music, but he did not immediately begin a...

     (c. 1530/1540–1582)
  • Giulio Fiesco
    Giulio Fiesco
    Giulio Fiesco was an Italian composer of the Renaissance, active in Ferrara, known for his madrigals. He was the first composer to set the poetry of Giovanni Batista Guarini, the most often-set poet by madrigalists of the late 16th century, and was an important court composer for the rich musical...

     (fl. 1550–1570) (madrigalist, active at Ferrara)
  • Gianmatteo Asola (c. 1532–1609)
  • Claudio Merulo
    Claudio Merulo
    Claudio Merulo was an Italian composer, publisher and organist of the late Renaissance period, most famous for his innovative keyboard music and his ensemble music composed in the Venetian polychoral style. He was born in Correggio and died in Parma...

     (1533–1604)
  • Francesco Soto de Langa (1534–1619)
  • Ippolito Chamaterò
    Ippolito Chamaterò
    Ippolito Chamaterò was an Italian composer of the late Renaissance, originally from Rome but active in northern Italy. He wrote both sacred and secular music, particularly madrigals; all of his surviving music is vocal...

     (1535/1540–after 1592) Active in several cities in northern Italy; composed both sacred and secular music
  • Marc'Antonio Ingegneri (1535/1536–1592) Madrigalist and teacher of Monteverdi; active at Cremona
  • Rocco Rodio
    Rocco Rodio
    Rocco Rodio was an Italian Renaissance composer and theorist, best known for his sacred works and keyboard ricercares.-Biography:...

     (c. 1535–after 1615)
  • Annibale Stabile
    Annibale Stabile
    Annibale Stabile was an Italian composer of the Renaissance. He was a member of the Roman School of composition, and probably was a pupil of Palestrina. He was active mainly at Rome but moved briefly to Kraków, Poland at the end of his life.-Life:Records of his early life are inexact, but he was...

     (c. 1535–1595)
  • Pietro Taglia
    Pietro Taglia
    Pietro Taglia was an Italian composer of the Renaissance, active in Milan, known for his madrigals. Stylistically he was a progressive, following the innovations of more famous composers such as Cipriano de Rore in Venice, and his music was well-known at the time.-Life:Next to nothing is known...

     (fl. c. 1555–1565) Madrigalist in Milan; follower of Cipriano de Rore
  • Antonio Valente
    Antonio Valente
    Antonio Valente was an Italian Renaissance organist and composer. He was blind from childhood and served as organist of Sant'Angelo a Nilo in Naples in 1565–80...

     (fl. 1565–1580)
  • Pietro Vinci
    Pietro Vinci
    Pietro Vinci was an Italian composer of late Renaissance music.Vinci was probably born in Nicosia, Sicily. He was active in Bergamo and then in various Sicilian cities as Maestro di cappella. He published several books of madrigals and church music from 1561 to 1584.-External links:...

     (c. 1535–1584) Madrigalist; founder of the Sicilian school
  • Annibale Zoilo
    Annibale Zoilo
    Annibale Zoilo was an Italian composer and singer of the late Renaissance Roman School. He was a contemporary of Palestrina, writing music in a closely related style, and was a prominent composer and choir director in Rome in the late 16th century.-Life:He was born in Rome, but little...

     (c. 1537–1592)
  • Stefano Felis
    Stefano Felis
    Stefano Felis, Latinized form of his last name 'Gatto', in English: 'cat' , was a Neapolitan Italian composer of the Renaissance, and the collaborator and probable teacher of composer Pomponio Nenna...

     (c. 1538?–1603)
  • Fabrizio Dentice
    Fabrizio Dentice
    Fabrizio Dentice was an Italian composer and virtuoso lute and viol player.Fabrizio was the son of Luigi Dentice who served the powerful Sanseverino family and had a great reputation as a singer and lutenist...

     (1539?–1581)
  • Giovanni Dragoni
    Giovanni Dragoni
    Giovanni Andrea Dragoni was an Italian composer of the Roman School of the late Renaissance, a student of Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina, and a prominent composer and maestro di cappella in Rome in the late 16th century...

     (c. 1540–1598)
  • Filippo Azzaiolo
    Filippo Azzaiolo
    Filippo Azzaiolo was a 16th century Italian composer. His surviving compositions were published in three collections issued between 1557 and 1569. The dedicatees each have links to Bologna, so it seems likely that Azzaiolo himself had connections to that city....

     (fl. 1557–1569)
  • Maddalena Casulana
    Maddalena Casulana
    Maddalena Casulana was an Italian composer, lutenist and singer of the late Renaissance. She is the first female composer to have music printed and published in the history of western music.-Life and work:...

     (c. 1540–c. 1590)
  • Giovanni Ferretti
    Giovanni Ferretti
    Giovanni Ferretti was an Italian composer of the Renaissance, best known for his secular music. He was important in the development of the lighter kind of madrigal current in the 1570s related to the villanella, and was influential as far away as England.-Life:His place of origin is uncertain,...

     (c. 1540–after 1609)
  • Gioseffo Guami
    Gioseffo Guami
    Gioseffo Guami was an Italian composer, organist, violinist and singer of the late Renaissance Venetian School...

     (1542–1611), also known as Gioseffo da Lucca
  • Giovanni Leonardo Primavera (1540–1585)
  • Alessandro Striggio
    Alessandro Striggio
    Alessandro Striggio was an Italian composer, instrumentalist and diplomat of the Renaissance. He composed numerous madrigals as well as dramatic music, and by combining the two, became the inventor of madrigal comedy...

     (c. 1540–1592) Musician to the Medici; composer of the colossal 60-voice Missa sopra Ecco sì beato giorno
    Missa sopra Ecco sì beato giorno
    The Missa sopra Ecco sì beato giorno is a musical setting of the Ordinary of the Mass, for 40 and 60 voices, by Florentine Renaissance composer Alessandro Striggio. It probably dates from 1565–6, during the reign of his employer Cosimo I de' Medici. Lost for more than 400 years, it was recently...

  • Tiburzio Massaino (before 1550–after 1608)
  • Vincenzo Bellavere
    Vincenzo Bellavere
    Vincenzo Bellavere was an Italian composer of the Venetian School...

     (c. 1540/1541–1587)
  • Francesco Rovigo
    Francesco Rovigo
    Francesco Rovigo was an Italian composer and organist of the late Renaissance, active in Mantua and Graz.-Life:Nothing is known of his life prior to 1570, when he went to Venice, already 29 or 30 years old, to receive a musical education with the renowned organist and composer Claudio Merulo of...

     (1540/1541–1597) Composed liturgical music and madrigals; active at Mantua and Graz
  • Alfonso Ferrabosco the elder
    Alfonso Ferrabosco (I)
    Alfonso Ferrabosco was an Italian composer. While mostly famous as the solitary Italian madrigalist working in England, and the one mainly responsible for the growth of the madrigal there, he also composed much sacred music...

     (1543–1588) Active in England
  • Giovanni Maria Nanino
    Giovanni Maria Nanino
    Giovanni Maria Nanino was an Italian composer and teacher of the late Renaissance. He was a member of the Roman School of composers, and was the most influential music teacher in Rome in the late 16th century...

     (1543/1544–1607) Also spelt Nanini. Brother of Giovanni Bernardino Nanino
    Giovanni Bernardino Nanino
    Giovanni Bernardino Nanino was an Italian composer, teacher and singing master of the late Renaissance and early Baroque eras, and a leading member of the Roman School of composers...

  • Francesco Guami (c. 1544–1602) Brother of Gioseffo Guami
    Gioseffo Guami
    Gioseffo Guami was an Italian composer, organist, violinist and singer of the late Renaissance Venetian School...

    ; active in Germany and Italy
  • Ascanio Trombetti
    Ascanio Trombetti
    Ascanio Trombetti was an Italian composer.He was born in Bologna as a son of Astore Cavallari. In his family, the surname Trombetti was used because of the great ability of its members in playing wind instruments.-External links:*...

     (1544–1590)
  • Gioseppe Caimo
    Gioseppe Caimo
    Gioseppe Caimo was an Italian composer and organist of the Renaissance, mainly active in Milan. He was a prolific composer of madrigals and other secular vocal music, and was one of the most prominent musicians in Milan in the 1570s and early 1580s.-Life:He was born in Milan...

     (c. 1545–1584) Active at Milan; madrigalist and organist
  • Luzzasco Luzzaschi
    Luzzasco Luzzaschi
    Luzzasco Luzzaschi was an Italian composer, organist, and teacher of the late Renaissance. He was born and died in Ferrara, and despite evidence of travels to Rome it is assumed that Luzzaschi spent the majority of his life in his native city.As a pupil of Cipriano de Rore, Luzzaschi developed...

     (c. 1545–1607) Late madrigalist at Ferrara
  • Francesco Soriano
    Francesco Soriano
    Francesco Soriano was an Italian composer of the Renaissance. He was one of the most skilled members of the Roman School in the first generation after Palestrina....

     (c. 1548–1621)
  • Girolamo Dalla Casa
    Girolamo Dalla Casa
    Girolamo Dalla Casa was an Italian composer, instrumentalist, and writer of the late Renaissance. He was a member of the Venetian School, and was perhaps more famous and influential as a performer than as a composer....

     (fl. from 1568; died 1601)
  • Emilio de' Cavalieri
    Emilio de' Cavalieri
    Emilio de' Cavalieri was an Italian composer, producer, organist, diplomat, choreographer and dancer at the end of the Renaissance era. His work, along with that of other composers active in Rome, Florence and Venice, was critical in defining the beginning of the musical Baroque era...

     (c. 1550–1602)
  • Cesario Gussago
    Cesario Gussago
    Cesario Gussago was an Italian musician and composer of the late Renaissance era. He studied philosophy and theology at the University of Pavia and served as church organist in Brescia at Santa Maria della Grazia...

     (c. 1550–1612)
  • Pomponio Nenna
    Pomponio Nenna
    Pomponio Nenna was a Neapolitan Italian composer of the Renaissance. He is mainly remembered for his madrigals, which were influenced by Gesualdo, and for his polychoral sacred motets, posthumously published as Sacrae Hebdomadae Responsoria in 1622.- Life :Pomponio Nenna was born in Bari, in the...

     (c. 1550–1613)
  • Riccardo Rognoni
    Riccardo Rognoni
    Riccardo Rognoni or Richardo Rogniono is the earliest known member of the Rognoni family which started one of the earliest of all violin schools, based in Milan. His treatise Passaggi per potersi esercitare nel diminuire , Venice 1592, is the first to mention the violino da brazzo, or violin...

     (c. 1550–c. 1620)
  • Ruggiero Trofeo (c. 1550–1614)
  • Orazio Vecchi
    Orazio Vecchi
    Orazio Vecchi was an Italian composer of the late Renaissance. He is most famous for his madrigal comedies, particularly L'Amfiparnaso.- Life :...

     (1550–1605)
  • Girolamo Conversi
    Girolamo Conversi
    Girolamo Conversi was an Italian composer of the late Renaissance. His music, which was popular from the 1570s through the 1590s, was noted for its combination of the light canzone alla napolitana with the literary and musical sophistication of the madrigal...

     (fl. c. 1572–1575)




1551–1586

  • Giulio Caccini
    Giulio Caccini
    Giulio Caccini , also known as Giulio Romano, was an Italian composer, teacher, singer, instrumentalist and writer of the very late Renaissance and early Baroque eras. He was one of the founders of the genre of opera, and one of the single most influential creators of the new Baroque style...

     (1551–1618) One of the founders of opera
  • Benedetto Pallavicino
    Benedetto Pallavicino
    Benedetto Pallavicino was an Italian composer and organist of the late Renaissance. A prolific composer of madrigals, he was resident at the Gonzaga court of Mantua in the 1590s, where he was a close associate of Giaches de Wert, and a competitor of his considerably more famous contemporary...

     (c. 1551–1601)
  • Girolamo Belli
    Girolamo Belli
    Girolamo Belli was an Italian composer and music teacher of the late Renaissance. He was closely associated with the Ferrara School in the 1580s, having previously studied with Luzzasco Luzzaschi, and was noted for his composition of both madrigals and sacred music.- Life :Belli was born in...

     (1552 – c. 1620)
  • Luca Marenzio
    Luca Marenzio
    Luca Marenzio was an Italian composer and singer of the late Renaissance. He was one of the most renowned composers of madrigals, and wrote some of the most famous examples of the form in its late stage of development, prior to its early Baroque transformation by Monteverdi...

     (c. 1553–1599)
  • Lodovico Agostini
    Lodovico Agostini
    Lodovico Agostini was an Italian composer, singer, priest, and scholar of the late Renaissance. He was a close associate of the Ferrara Estense court, and one of the most skilled representatives of the progressive secular style which developed there at the end of the 16th century.- Life :He was...

     (1534–1590) Illegitimate son of Agostino Agostini
    Agostino Agostini
    Agostino Agostini was a Renaissance era singer, composer and priest of Ferrara mostly active in the 1540s. He was a mansionary chaplain at the San Giorgio Cathedral in Ferrera, and his illegitimate son was composer Lodovico Agostini, noted for publications of enigmatic canons.-References:...

  • Paolo Bellasio
    Paolo Bellasio
    Paolo Bellasio was an Italian composer and organist of the late Renaissance. He is generally considered to be a member of the Roman School, though unusually for the group he seems to have written only madrigals....

     (1554–1594)
  • Cosimo Bottegari
    Cosimo Bottegari
    Cosimo Bottegari was an Italian lutenist and composer of the Late Renaissance era. He was born in Florence and in 1573 became a gentleman at the court of Duke Albert of Bavaria in Munich. He left a manuscript of compositions titled Il Libro di canto e liuto which is an important source for Italian...

     (1554–1620)
  • Girolamo Diruta
    Girolamo Diruta
    Girolamo Diruta was an Italian organist, music theorist, and composer. He was famous as a teacher, for his treatise on counterpoint, and for his part in the development of keyboard technique, particularly on the organ...

     (c. 1554 – after 1610)
  • Giovanni Giacomo Gastoldi
    Giovanni Giacomo Gastoldi
    Giovanni Giacomo Gastoldi , was an Italian composer of the late Renaissance and early Baroque periods. He is known for his 1591 publication of balletti for five voices.-Career:Gastoldi was born at Caravaggio, Lombardy...

     (c. 1554–1609)
  • Gabriele Villani (c. 1555–1625)
  • Giovanni Croce
    Giovanni Croce
    Giovanni Croce was an Italian composer of the late Renaissance, of the Venetian School...

     (c. 1557–1609)
  • Alfonso Fontanelli
    Alfonso Fontanelli
    Alfonso Fontanelli was an Italian composer, writer, diplomat, courtier, and nobleman of the late Renaissance...

     (1557–1622)
  • Giovanni Gabrieli
    Giovanni Gabrieli
    Giovanni Gabrieli was an Italian composer and organist. He was one of the most influential musicians of his time, and represents the culmination of the style of the Venetian School, at the time of the shift from Renaissance to Baroque idioms.-Biography:Gabrieli was born in Venice...

     (1557–1612)
  • Giovanni Bassano
    Giovanni Bassano
    Giovanni Bassano was an Italian Venetian School composer and cornettist of the late Renaissance and early Baroque eras. He was a key figure in the development of the instrumental ensemble at St. Mark's basilica, and left a detailed book on instrumental ornamentation, which is a rich resource for...

     (c. 1558–1617)
  • Scipione Stella
    Scipione Stella
    Scipione Stella was a Neapolitan composer. He is to be distinguished from another member of the circle of Carlo Gesualdo, Scipione Dentice....

     (1558/1559–1622)
  • Felice Anerio
    Felice Anerio
    Felice Anerio was an Italian composer of the late Renaissance and early Baroque eras, and a member of the Roman School of composers. He was the older brother of another important, and somewhat more progressive composer of the same period, Giovanni Francesco Anerio.-Life:Anerio was born in Rome and...

     (c. 1560–1614) Brother of Giovanni Francesco Anerio
    Giovanni Francesco Anerio
    Giovanni Francesco Anerio was an Italian composer of the Roman School, of the very late Renaissance and early Baroque eras. He was the younger brother of Felice Anerio...

  • Giulio Belli
    Giulio Belli
    Giulio Belli was an Italian composer of the late Renaissance and early Baroque eras. He was a prolific composer during the transitional time between the two musical eras, and worked in many cities in northern Italy.-Life:...

     (c. 1560 – c. 1621)
  • Dario Castello
    Dario Castello
    Dario Castello was an Italian composer and instrumentalist from the early Baroque period who worked and published in Venice. As regards his instrument, it is not clear whether he played the cornetto or the bassoon...

     (c. 1560 – c. 1640)
  • Scipione Dentice
    Scipione Dentice
    Scipione Dentice was a Neapolitan keyboard composer. He is to be distinguished from his colleague and exact contemporary Scipione Stella , a member of Carlo Gesualdo's circle...

     (1560–1635)
  • Carlo Gesualdo
    Carlo Gesualdo
    Carlo Gesualdo, known as Gesualdo di Venosa or Gesualdo da Venosa , Prince of Venosa and Count of Conza, was an Italian nobleman, lutenist, composer, and murderer....

     (1560–1613)
  • Ruggiero Giovannelli
    Ruggiero Giovannelli
    Ruggiero Giovannelli was an Italian composer of the late Renaissance and early Baroque eras. He was a member of the Roman School, and succeeded Palestrina at St. Peter's.- Life :He was born in Velletri, near Rome...

     (c. 1560–1625)
  • Antonio Il Verso
    Antonio il Verso
    Antonio Il Verso was an Italian composer.Il Verso was born at Piazza Armerina, and began his musical studies under the guidance of Pietro Vinci. He was active in Venice in the last years of the sixteenth century is given in Venice, then the seat of the Venetian school, where he refined his studies...

     (c. 1560–1621)
  • Stefano Rossetto
    Stefano Rossetto
    Stefano Rossetto was an Italian composer of the late Renaissance, born in Nice, who worked mainly in Florence for the powerful Medici family, and in Munich.-Life:His life has not yet been thoroughly studied...

     (fl. 1560–1580) Active in Italy and Germany
  • Leone Leoni
    Leone Leoni (composer)
    Leone Leoni was a North Italian polyphonic composer who served as maestro di cappella at Vicenza cathedral from 1588. He composed motets for antiphonal choirs, some in many parts, with instrumental accompaniment...

     (ca 1560 — 1627), maestro di cappella at Vicenza
  • Jacopo Peri
    Jacopo Peri
    Jacopo Peri was an Italian composer and singer of the transitional period between the Renaissance and Baroque styles, and is often called the inventor of opera...

     (1561–1633)
  • Francisco de Peraza (c. 1564 – c. 1600)
  • Erasmo Marotta
    Erasmo Marotta
    Erasmo Marotta was a Jesuit Sicilian composer of motets and madrigals.-Editions:* Mottetti concertati: a due, tre, quattro e cinque voci ed. Irene Calagna 2002 pp147-References:...

     (1565–1641) Sicilian composer
  • Paola Massarenghi
    Paola Massarenghi
    Paola Massarenghi was an Italian composer. Only one of her works survives, Quando spiega l'insegn'al sommo padre, a spiritual madrigal. It was printed in Arcangelo Gherardini's Primo libro de madrigali a cinque voci...

     (born 1565; fl. 1585)
  • Ascanio Mayone
    Ascanio Mayone
    Ascanio Mayone was an Neapolitan composer and harpist. He trained as a pupil of Giovanni de Macque in Naples, and worked at Santissima Annunziata there as organist from 1593 and maestro di cappella from 1621; he was also organist at the royal chapel from 1602...

     (1565–1627)
  • Giovanni Pietro Flaccomio (c. 1565 - 1617) Sicilian composer, chapel master at the court of Philip III of Spain
    Philip III of Spain
    Philip III , also known as Philip the Pious, was the King of Spain and King of Portugal and the Algarves, where he ruled as Philip II , from 1598 until his death...

     (:de:Giovanni Pietro Flaccomio)
  • Alessandro Piccinini
    Alessandro Piccinini
    Alessandro Piccinini , was an Italian lutenist and composer.Piccinini was born in Bologna into a musical family: his father Leonardo Maria Piccinini taught lute playing to Alessandro as well as his brothers Girolamo and Filippo...

     (1566–1638)
  • Lucia Quinciani
    Lucia Quinciani
    Lucia Quinciani was an Italian composer. She is the earliest known published female composer of monody. She is known only by one composition, a setting of "Udite lagrimosi spirti d’Averno, udite", from Giovanni Battista Guarini's Il pastor fido, found in Marcantonio Negri's Affetti amorosi , in...

     (c. 1566 – fl. 1611)
  • Lorenzo Allegri
    Lorenzo Allegri
    Lorenzo Allegri was an Italian composer, who worked at the Medici court, in Florence. He was mainly known as a lutenist, and for lute he wrote dances, sometimes with vocal parts.-External links:...

     (1567–1648)
  • Giovanni Francesco Anerio
    Giovanni Francesco Anerio
    Giovanni Francesco Anerio was an Italian composer of the Roman School, of the very late Renaissance and early Baroque eras. He was the younger brother of Felice Anerio...

     (c. 1567 – buried 1630) Brother of Felice Anerio
    Felice Anerio
    Felice Anerio was an Italian composer of the late Renaissance and early Baroque eras, and a member of the Roman School of composers. He was the older brother of another important, and somewhat more progressive composer of the same period, Giovanni Francesco Anerio.-Life:Anerio was born in Rome and...

  • Claudio Monteverdi
    Claudio Monteverdi
    Claudio Giovanni Antonio Monteverdi – 29 November 1643) was an Italian composer, gambist, and singer.Monteverdi's work, often regarded as revolutionary, marked the transition from the Renaissance style of music to that of the Baroque period. He developed two individual styles of composition – the...

     (1567–1643)
  • Massimo Troiano
    Massimo Troiano
    Massimo Troiano was an Italian Renaissance composer, poet, and a brief, but vivid chronicler of life at the court of Bavaria's ruler, Duke Albrecht V in the late 1560s, the only period in which Troiano is known to history.-Life:...

     (fl. 1567 to 1570 – after 1570)
  • Adriano Banchieri
    Adriano Banchieri
    Adriano Banchieri was an Italian composer, music theorist, organist and poet of the late Renaissance and early Baroque eras. He founded the Accademia dei Floridi in Bologna.-Biography:...

     (1568–1634)
  • Ottavio Vernizzi (1569–1649)
  • Diomedes Cato
    Diomedes Cato
    Diomedes Cato was an Italian-born composer and lute player, who lived and worked entirely in Poland. He is known mainly for his instrumental music...

     (c. 1570 – after 1615) Worked all his life in Poland
  • Giovanni Paolo Cima
    Giovanni Paolo Cima
    Giovanni Paolo Cima was an Italian composer and organist in the early Baroque era. He was a contemporary of Claudio Monteverdi and Girolamo Frescobaldi, though not as well known as either of those men....

     (1570–1622)
  • Simone Molinaro
    Simone Molinaro
    Simone Molinaro was a composer of the late Renaissance in Italy. He was especially renowned for his lute music.-Life and career:...

     (c. 1570–after 1633)
  • Salamone Rossi
    Salamone Rossi
    Salamone Rossi or Salomone Rossi was an Italian Jewish violinist and composer. He was a transitional figure between the late Italian Renaissance period and early Baroque.-Life:...

     (1570–1630)
  • Claudia Sessa
    Claudia Sessa
    Claudia Sessa was an Italian composer. A Milanese nun at the convent of S. Maria Annunciata, she composed two sacred works published in 1613...

     (c. 1570 – between 1613 and 1619) (:ca:Claudia Sessa)
  • Francesco Usper
    Francesco Usper
    Francesco Usper , Italian composer and organist born in Rovigno, Istria . He settled in Venice before 1586 and is associated with the contrafraternity St. Giovanni Evangelista, Venice. He spent most of his life there, serving as organist, chaplain, manager of the adjoining church Francesco Usper...

     (c. 1570–1641) Also known as Spongia
  • Salvatore Sacco (1572 – c. 1622)
  • Cesarina Ricci (c. 1573 – fl. 1597)
  • Giovanni Bernardino Nanino
    Giovanni Bernardino Nanino
    Giovanni Bernardino Nanino was an Italian composer, teacher and singing master of the late Renaissance and early Baroque eras, and a leading member of the Roman School of composers...

     (1560–1623) Brother of Giovanni Maria Nanino
    Giovanni Maria Nanino
    Giovanni Maria Nanino was an Italian composer and teacher of the late Renaissance. He was a member of the Roman School of composers, and was the most influential music teacher in Rome in the late 16th century...

  • Giulio Cesare Martinengo
    Giulio Cesare Martinengo
    Giulio Cesare Martinengo was an Italian composer and teacher of the late Renaissance and early Baroque Venetian School. He was the predecessor to Claudio Monteverdi at St. Mark's....

     (1564 or 1568–1613)
  • Michelagnolo Galilei
    Michelagnolo Galilei
    Michelagnolo Galilei was an Italian composer and lutenist of the late Renaissance and early Baroque eras, active mainly in Bavaria and Poland. He was the son of music theorist and lutenist Vincenzo Galilei, and the younger brother of the renowned astronomer Galileo Galilei.- Life :Galilei was...

     (1575–1631) Active in Bavaria and Poland. Son of composer Vincenzo Galilei
    Vincenzo Galilei
    Vincenzo Galilei was an Italian lutenist, composer, and music theorist, and the father of the famous astronomer and physicist Galileo Galilei and of the lute virtuoso and composer Michelagnolo Galilei...

    , brother of astronomer and physicist Galileo Galilei
    Galileo Galilei
    Galileo Galilei , was an Italian physicist, mathematician, astronomer, and philosopher who played a major role in the Scientific Revolution. His achievements include improvements to the telescope and consequent astronomical observations and support for Copernicanism...

  • Stefano Venturi del Nibbio
    Stefano Venturi del Nibbio
    Stefano Venturi del Nibbio was an Italian composer of the late Renaissance, active in Venice and Florence. In addition to composing madrigals in a relatively conservative style, works which were published as far away as England, he collaborated with Giulio Caccini on one of the earliest operas,...

     (fl. 1592–1600); active in Florence. Collaborated with Giulio Caccini
    Giulio Caccini
    Giulio Caccini , also known as Giulio Romano, was an Italian composer, teacher, singer, instrumentalist and writer of the very late Renaissance and early Baroque eras. He was one of the founders of the genre of opera, and one of the single most influential creators of the new Baroque style...

     on the early opera, Il rapimento di Cefalo
    Il rapimento di Cefalo
    Il rapimento di Cefalo was one of the first Italian operas. Most of the music was written by Giulio Caccini but Stefano Venturi del Nibbio, Luca Bati and Piero Strozzi also contributed...

  • Vittoria Aleotti
    Vittoria Aleotti
    Vittoria Aleotti , believed to be the same as Raffaella Aleotti was an Italian Augustinian nun, a composer and organist.-Personal Life and Musical Growth:...

     (c. 1575 – after 1620) Believed to be the same person as Raffaella Aleotti (c. 1570 – after 1646)
  • Caterina Assandra
    Caterina Assandra
    Caterina Assandra was an Italian composer and Benedictine nun. She was born in Pavia, Italy. She wrote a number of motets, as well as a number of organ pieces, written in German tablature. She studied counterpoint with the German Catholic exile Benedetto Re, or Reggio, one of the leading teachers...

     (1580–1632)
  • Adreana Basile (c. 1580 – c. 1640)
  • Gregorio Allegri
    Gregorio Allegri
    Gregorio Allegri was an Italian composer of the Roman School and brother of Domenico Allegri; he was also a priest and a singer. He lived mainly in Rome, where he would later die.-Life:...

     (1582–1652)
  • Sigismondo d'India
    Sigismondo d'India
    Sigismondo d'India was an Italian composer of the late Renaissance and early Baroque eras. He was one of the most accomplished contemporaries of Monteverdi, and wrote music in many of the same forms as the more famous composer.-Life:D'India was probably born in Palermo, Sicily in 1582, though...

     (c. 1582–1629)
  • Antonio Cifra
    Antonio Cifra
    Antonio Cifra was an Italian composer of the Roman School of the Renaissance and early Baroque eras. He was one of the significant transitional figures between the Renaissance and Baroque styles, and produced music in both idioms.-Life and works:Son of Costanzo and Claudia, Antonio Cifra was born...

     (1584–1629)
  • Francesco Rognoni (c. 1585 – before 1626)
  • Stefano Landi
    Stefano Landi
    Stefano Landi was an Italian composer and teacher of the early Baroque Roman School. He was an influential early composer of opera, and wrote the earliest opera on a historical subject: Sant'Alessio .-Biography:Landi was born in Rome, the capital of the Papal States.In 1595 he joined the Collegio...

     (1586-1643)

Polish


During a period of favourable economic and political conditions at the beginning of the 16th century, Poland
Poland
Poland , officially the Republic of Poland , is a country in Central Europe bordered by Germany to the west; the Czech Republic and Slovakia to the south; Ukraine, Belarus and Lithuania to the east; and the Baltic Sea and Kaliningrad Oblast, a Russian exclave, to the north...

 reached the height of its powers, when it was one of the richest and most powerful countries in Europe
Europe
Europe is, by convention, one of the world's seven continents. Comprising the westernmost peninsula of Eurasia, Europe is generally 'divided' from Asia to its east by the watershed divides of the Ural and Caucasus Mountains, the Ural River, the Caspian and Black Seas, and the waterways connecting...

. It encompassed an area which included present day Lithuania
Lithuania
Lithuania , officially the Republic of Lithuania is a country in Northern Europe, the biggest of the three Baltic states. It is situated along the southeastern shore of the Baltic Sea, whereby to the west lie Sweden and Denmark...

 and Latvia
Latvia
Latvia , officially the Republic of Latvia , is a country in the Baltic region of Northern Europe. It is bordered to the north by Estonia , to the south by Lithuania , to the east by the Russian Federation , to the southeast by Belarus and shares maritime borders to the west with Sweden...

 and portions of what is now Ukraine
Ukraine
Ukraine is a country in Eastern Europe. It has an area of 603,628 km², making it the second largest contiguous country on the European continent, after Russia...

, Belarus
Belarus
Belarus , officially the Republic of Belarus, is a landlocked country in Eastern Europe, bordered clockwise by Russia to the northeast, Ukraine to the south, Poland to the west, and Lithuania and Latvia to the northwest. Its capital is Minsk; other major cities include Brest, Grodno , Gomel ,...

, Czech Republic
Czech Republic
The Czech Republic is a landlocked country in Central Europe. The country is bordered by Poland to the northeast, Slovakia to the east, Austria to the south, and Germany to the west and northwest....

, Slovakia
Slovakia
The Slovak Republic is a landlocked state in Central Europe. It has a population of over five million and an area of about . Slovakia is bordered by the Czech Republic and Austria to the west, Poland to the north, Ukraine to the east and Hungary to the south...

, and Germany
Germany
Germany , officially the Federal Republic of Germany , is a federal parliamentary republic in Europe. The country consists of 16 states while the capital and largest city is Berlin. Germany covers an area of 357,021 km2 and has a largely temperate seasonal climate...

. As the middle class
Middle class
The middle class is any class of people in the middle of a societal hierarchy. In Weberian socio-economic terms, the middle class is the broad group of people in contemporary society who fall socio-economically between the working class and upper class....

 prospered, patronage for the arts in Poland increased, and also looked westward - particularly to Italy
Italy
Italy , officially the Italian Republic languages]] under the European Charter for Regional or Minority Languages. In each of these, Italy's official name is as follows:;;;;;;;;), is a unitary parliamentary republic in South-Central Europe. To the north it borders France, Switzerland, Austria and...

 - for influences.
  • Jerzy Liban z Legnicy (1464 – after 1546)
  • Mikołaj z Chrzanowa (1485–1555)
  • Sebastian z Felsztyna (c. 1490–1543)
  • Sebastian Herburt
    Sebastian Herburt
    Sebastian Herburt Sebastian Herburt Sebastian Herburt (also Sebastian z Felsztyna, Roxolanus z Felsztyna, Sebastianus de Felstin, Sebastianus Felstinensis, Sebastian Felstynski, (born in 1480–1490 in Felsztyn; died 1544–1549) was a Polish composer and music theorist of Ukrainian descent...

     (c. 1490–1543) Same as Sebastian z Felsztyna (c. 1490 – after 1543) ?
  • Jan z Lublina
    Jan z Lublina
    Jan z Lublina, or Joannis de Lublin, was a Polish composer and organist who lived in the first half of the 16th century. Not much is known about his life - he was a member of the Order of Canons Regular of the Lateran, circa 1540 he was possibly the organist at the convent in Kraśnik, near Lublin...

     (late 15th century – 1540)
  • Mikołaj z Krakowa (first half of 16th century)
  • Wacław z Szamotuł (c. 1520 – c. 1560)
  • Cyprian Bazylik
    Cyprian Bazylik
    Cyprian Bazylik was a Polish composer, usually designated as C.B. or C.S. . Besides writing music, he was also a writer, poet, and printer....

     (c. 1535–c. 1600)
  • Mikołaj Gomółka (c. 1535 – c. 1609)
  • Krzysztof Borek (? – 1573)
  • Marcin Leopolita
    Marcin Leopolita
    Marcin Leopolita - one of the most eminent Polish composers of 16th century. He studied in the Kraków University and at the age of 20 was already a member of royal music ensemble at the court of King Zygmunt August. There are only a few compositions of Leopolita that remained to our times: 5...

     (c. 1540 – c. 1584) Also known as Marcin ze Lwowa
  • Jakub Polak
    Jakub Polak
    Jakub Polak , also known as Jakub Reys and Jacques le Polonois, was a Polish lutenist and composer. He was notable for his service as court lutenist to Henry III of Poland and France. Initially Polak served as one of the court musicians at Kraków, and after Henry III fled Poland, Polak joined him...

     (c. 1545–1605) Also known as Jacob Polonais, Jakub Reys, Jacques le Polonois and Jacob de Reis. Active in France
  • Nicolaus Cracoviensis
    Nicolaus Cracoviensis
    Nicolaus Cracoviensis was a 16th-century Polish composer.Not much is known about his life. His name appears in the Kraków University archives as organist at the Kraków court. The biggest part of his compositions is contained in two great Polish organ tablatures: by Jan z Lublina and the Cracow...

     (16th cent.)
  • Tomasz Szadek (c. 1550 – after 1611) (:nl:Tomasz Szadek :pl:Tomasz Szadek)
  • Krzysztof Klabon
    Krzysztof Klabon
    Krzysztof Klabon was a Polish Renaissance composer, lutenist, and singer. He was one the most renowned instrumentalists of his time in Poland. His extant works are: a cycle of lute songs entitled Pieśni Kalliopy Slowienskiey...

     (c. 1550 – after 1616)
  • Marcin Wartecki (second half of 16th century)
  • Wojciech Długoraj (c. 1557 – after 1619)
  • Petrus de Drusina (c. 1560–1611)
  • Diomedes Cato
    Diomedes Cato
    Diomedes Cato was an Italian-born composer and lute player, who lived and worked entirely in Poland. He is known mainly for his instrumental music...

     (before 1570 – c. 1603)

Portuguese

  • Pedro de Escobar
    Pedro de Escobar
    Pedro de Escobar , a.k.a. Pedro do Porto, was a Portuguese composer of the Renaissance, mostly active in Spain. He was one of the earliest and most skilled composers of polyphony in the Iberian Peninsula, whose music has survived.-Life:He was born at Oporto, Portugal, but nothing is known of his...

     (c. 1465–after 1535)
  • Heliodoro de Paiva
    Heliodoro de Paiva
    Dom Heliodoro de Paiva was a Portuguese composer, philosopher, and theologian.- Life :Heliodoro de Paiva was born in Lisbon . He studied at the Monastery of Santa Cruz de Coimbra, where he took the holy orders as an Augustinian regular capitulary...

     (c. 1500–1552)
  • António Carreira
    António Carreira
    António Carreira was a Portuguese composer and organist of the Renaissance.He held the post of organist at the Royal Chapel in Lisbon. His compositions reveal his high contrapuntal craftsmanship...

     (c. 1515 to 1530 – c. 1590 to 1597)
  • Manuel da Fonseca (fl.c. 1540)
  • Vicente Lusitano
    Vicente Lusitano
    Vicente Lusitano was a Portuguese music composer and theorist of the late Renaissance.He was born in Olivença, but little else is known for certain of his life, including the dates of his birth and death...

     (fl. 1550–1561)
  • Manuel Mendes
    Manuel Mendes
    Manuel Mendes was a Portuguese composer and teacher of the Renaissance. While his music remains obscure, he was important as the teacher of several of the composers of the golden age of Portuguese polyphony, including Duarte Lobo and Manuel Cardoso.He was born in Lisbon, and studied music with...

     (c. 1547–1605)
  • Pedro de Cristo
    Pedro de Cristo
    Pedro de Cristo was a Portuguese composer of the Renaissance. He is one of the most important Portuguese polyphonists of the 16th and 17th centuries.-Life:...

     (c. 1550–1618)
  • Manuel Rodrigues Coelho
    Manuel Rodrigues Coelho
    Manuel Rodrigues Coelho was a Portuguese organist and composer. He is the first important Iberian keyboard composer since Cabezón....

     (c. 1555 – c. 1635)
  • Duarte Lobo
    Duarte Lobo
    Duarte Lobo was a Portuguese composer of the late Renaissance and early Baroque. He was one of the most famous Portuguese composers of the time, together with Filipe de Magalhães, Manuel Cardoso, composers who all began their academic studies as students of Manuel Mendes...

     (c. 1565–1647)
  • Gaspar Fernandes
    Gaspar Fernandes
    Gaspar Fernandes was a Portuguese composer and organist active in the cathedrals of Santiago de Guatemala and Puebla de los Ángeles, New Spain .-Life:Most scholars agree that the Gaspar Fernandes listed as a singer in the cathedral of Évora,...

     (1566–1629)
  • Manuel Cardoso
    Manuel Cardoso
    Manuel Cardoso was a Portuguese composer and organist. With Duarte Lobo and John IV of Portugal, he represented the "golden age" of Portuguese polyphony....

     (1566–1650)
  • Filipe de Magalhães
    Filipe de Magalhães
    Filipe de Magalhães was a Portuguese composer of sacred polyphony.-Life:Filipe de Magalhães was born in Azeitão, Portugal, in 1571. He studied music at the Cathedral of Évora with Manuel Mendes where he was a colleague of the equally renowned polyphonists Duarte Lobo and Manuel Cardoso...

     (1571–1652)
  • Estêvão de Brito
    Estêvão de Brito
    Estêvão de Brito was a Portuguese composer of polyphony.-Life:Estêvão de Brito was born in Serpa, Portugal. He studied music at the Cathedral of Évora with Filipe de Magalhães. On January 1597 he was already mestre de capela of the Cathedral of Badajoz , where he stayed until 1613...

     (1575–1641)
  • John IV of Portugal
    John IV of Portugal
    |-|John IV was the King of Portugal and the Algarves from 1640 to his death. He was the grandson of Catherine, Duchess of Braganza, who had in 1580 claimed the Portuguese crown and sparked the struggle for the throne of Portugal. John was nicknamed John the Restorer...

     (1603–1656)

1370–1450

  • Johannes Cornago (c. 1400–after 1475)
  • Juan de Urrede
    Juan de Urrede
    Juan de Urrede or Juan de Urreda was a Flemish singer and composer active in Spain in the service of the Duke of Alba and King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella. He was born Johannes de Wreede in Bruges....

     (c. 1430–after 1482), or Johannes de Wreede

1451–1510



  • Juan de Triana
    Juan de Triana
    Juan de Triana was a Spanish composer of the Renaissance period, active in the second half of fifteenth century during the reign of the Catholic Monarchs. Pope Sixtus IV issued a bull on 9 February 1478 that listed De Triana as Prebendary of the Cathedral of Sevilla for at least a year before...

     (fl. c. 1460–1500)
  • Francisco de la Torre (fl. 1483–1504)
  • Juan de Anchieta
    Juan de Anchieta
    Juan de Anchieta was a leading Spanish Basque composer of the Renaissance, at the Royal Court Chaplaincy in Granada of Queen Isabel I of Castile.-History:...

     (1462–1523)
  • Juan del Encina
    Juan del Encina
    Juan del Enzina – the spelling he used – or Juan del Encina – modern Spanish spelling – was a composer, poet and playwright, often called the founder of Spanish drama...

     (1468 – c. 1529)
  • Francisco de Peñalosa
    Francisco de Peñalosa
    Francisco de Peñalosa was a Spanish composer of the middle Renaissance.-Life:He was born in Talavera de la Reina in the province of Toledo. He spent most of his career in Seville, serving as the maestro di capilla, though he also spent time in Burgos, and three years in Rome at the papal chapel...

     (c. 1470–1528)
  • Andreas De Silva
    Andreas de Silva
    Andreas de Silva was a composer, possibly Portuguese, or likely Spanish, who is known mainly from inclusion of five motets in the Medici Codex.Now attributed to de Silva is a madrigal Che sentisti Madonna misattributed to Verdelot in 1537....

     (c. 1475/1480–after 1520)
  • Mateo Flecha the elder
    Mateo Flecha
    Mateo Flecha was a composer born in Catalonia, in the region of Prades. He is sometimes known as "El Viejo" to distinguish him from his nephew, Mateo Flecha "El Joven" , also a composer of madrigals...

     (1481?–1553?), or Mateu Fletxa el Vell
  • Juan Pérez de Gijón
    Juan Pérez de Gijón
    Juan Pérez de Gijón was a Spanish composer of the Renaissance.Nothing is known about his life, except for his approximate period of activity. He is one of the composers of secular songs who contributed to the huge Cancionero Musical de Palacio, the largest and most diverse manuscript collection of...

     (fl. c. 1460–1500)
  • Alonso de Mondéjar (fl. 1502–1516), or Mondexar
  • Pedro de Pastrana (c. 1490–after 1558)
  • Luis de Milán
    Luis de Milán
    Luis de Milán was a Spanish Renaissance composer, vihuelist , and writer on music...

     (c. 1500–after 1560)
  • Cristóbal de Morales
    Cristóbal de Morales
    Cristóbal de Morales was a Spanish composer of the Renaissance. He is generally considered to be the most influential Spanish composer before Victoria.- Life :...

     (c. 1500–1553)
  • Luis de Narváez
    Luis de Narváez
    Luis de Narváez was a Spanish composer and vihuelist. Highly regarded during his lifetime, Narváez is known today for Los seys libros del delphín, a collection of polyphonic music for the vihuela which includes the earliest known variation sets...

     (c. 1500 – between 1550 and 1560)
  • Bartolomé de Escobedo
    Bartolomé de Escobedo
    Bartolomé de Escobedo was a Spanish composer of the Renaissance. He was born in Zamora, studied at Salamanca where he was a singer, and in 1536 joined the papal choir in Rome as only the second Spaniard to be admitted after Cristóbal de Morales. He remained in Rome until 1554, interrupted by a...

     (c. 1505–1563)
  • Juan Bermudo
    Juan Bermudo
    Fray Juan Bermudo was a Spanish composer, music theorist and mathematician.In his Perfecting the perfect instrument 1555, a treatise on playing the vihuela, Bermudo lists the maestro de capilla of the Royal Chapel of Granada, Bernardino de Figueroa, and Cristóbal de Morales as having checked and...

     (c. 1510 – c. 1565)
  • Juan Vásquez
    Juan Vásquez (composer)
    Juan Vásquez was a Spanish priest and composer of the renaissance. He can be considered part of the School of Andalusia group of composers along with Francisco Guerrero, Cristóbal de Morales, Juan Navarro Hispalensis and others.-Biography:Even relative to the standards of early music composers,...

     (c. 1500–c. 1560)
  • Antonio de Cabezón
    Antonio de Cabezón
    Antonio de Cabezón was a Spanish Renaissance composer and organist. Blind from childhood, he quickly rose to prominence as performer and was eventually employed by the royal family...

     (c. 1510–1566)
  • Alonso Mudarra
    Alonso Mudarra
    Alonso Mudarra was a Spanish composer and vihuelist of the Renaissance. He was an innovative composer of instrumental music as well as songs, and was the composer of the earliest surviving music for the guitar....

     (c. 1510–1580)
  • Diego Ortiz
    Diego Ortiz
    Diego Ortiz was a Spanish composer and musicologist, in service to the Spanish viceroy in Naples and later to Philip II of Spain. Ortiz published influential treatises on both instrumental and vocal performance....

     (c. 1510–c. 1570)
  • Luis Venegas de Henestrosa (c. 1510–1570)

1511–1570



  • Tomás de Santa María
    Tomás de Santa María
    Fr. Tomás de Santa María O.P. was a Spanish music theorist, organist and composer of the Renaissance. He was born in Madrid but the date is highly uncertain; he died in Ribadavia...

     (c. 1515–1570)
  • Joan Brudieu
    Joan Brudieu
    Joan Brudieu was an Catalan Spanish composer. Brudieu was born around 1520 in the diocese of Limoges and died in la Seu d'Urgell in 1591, but can generally be considered as a Spanish, since the few biographical details found him locate him in Catalonia.From 1539 was cantor at the Cathedral of...

     (c. 1520–1591)
  • Rodrigo de Ceballos
    Rodrigo de Ceballos
    Rodrigo de Ceballos was a Spanish composer.He was born in Aracena , and was ordained a priest in Seville in 1556. He was named maestro di capella in Malaga in 1554, in the cathedral of Córdoba in 1556, and in Royal Chapel of Granada in 1561.He is among the composers of the Andalusian school,...

     (c. 1525/1530–1581)
  • Enríquez de Valderrábano
    Enríquez de Valderrábano
    Enríquez de Valderrábano was a Spanish vihuelist and composer. There is little biographical data on this composer of early music, but there is some from the prologue to his book of music, Libro de música de vihuela intitulado Silva de Sirenas, published in Valladolid, Spain in 1547...

     (fl. 1547)
  • Francisco Guerrero (1528–1599)
  • Leonardo Meldart Fiamengo (fl. c. 1550–1600)
  • Juan Navarro (c. 1530–1580)
  • Miguel de Fuenllana
    Miguel de Fuenllana
    Miguel de Fuenllana was a Spanish vihuelist and composer of the Renaissance.-Biography:Little is known of his life. It is assumed from his name that his roots lie in the municipality of Fuenllana, in the province of Ciudad Real, although he was born in Navalcarnero, Madrid...

     (fl. 1553–1578)
  • Vicente Espinel
    Vicente Espinel
    Vicente Gómez Martínez-Espinel , was a Spanish writer and musician of the Siglo de Oro.He is credited with the addition of the 5th string to the guitar and the creation of the modern poetic form of the décima, composed of ten octameters, named espinella in Spanish after him.Espinel was born in Ronda...

     (1550–1624)
  • Juan Navarro (c. 1550–c. 1610), active in Mexico
  • Mateo Flecha the younger (c. 1530–1604), or Mateu Fletxa el Jove
  • Hernando Franco
    Hernando Franco
    Hernando Franco was a Spanish composer of the Renaissance, who was mainly active in Guatemala and Mexico.- Life :Franco was born in Galizuela in Extremadura, a source region for many people who came to the New World in the 16th century...

     (1532–1585), active in Guatemala and Mexico
  • Hernando de Cabezón
    Hernando de Cabezón
    Hernando de Cabezón, was a Spanish composer and organist, son of Antonio de Cabezón. Only a few of his works are extant today, and he is chiefly remembered for publishing the bulk of his father's work....

     (1541–1602)
  • Ginés de Boluda
    Ginés de Boluda
    Ginés de Boluda . Maestro de capilla at the Cathedral of Cádiz, then at Cuenca Cathedral and the Cathedral of Sigüenza and Cathedral of Toledo.-Compositions:Recovered in the lost mass book of Toledo, Codex 25, by Michael Noone:...

     (c. 1545–c. 1606)
  • Ginés Pérez de la Parra
    Ginés Pérez de la Parra
    Ginés Pérez de la Parra , also known as Juan Ginés Pérez, was a Spanish Valencian composer during the Renaissance. He was born in Orihuela, a city in what is now the province of Alicante...

     (c. 1548–1600)
  • Tomás Luis de Victoria
    Tomás Luis de Victoria
    Tomás Luis de Victoria, sometimes Italianised as da Vittoria , was the most famous composer of the 16th century in Spain, and one of the most important composers of the Counter-Reformation, along with Giovanni da Palestrina and Orlando di Lasso. Victoria was not only a composer, but also an...

     (1548–1611)
  • Bernardo Clavijo del Castillo (c. 1549–1626), active in Palermo
    Palermo
    Palermo is a city in Southern Italy, the capital of both the autonomous region of Sicily and the Province of Palermo. The city is noted for its history, culture, architecture and gastronomy, playing an important role throughout much of its existence; it is over 2,700 years old...

    , Sicily
    Sicily
    Sicily is a region of Italy, and is the largest island in the Mediterranean Sea. Along with the surrounding minor islands, it constitutes an autonomous region of Italy, the Regione Autonoma Siciliana Sicily has a rich and unique culture, especially with regard to the arts, music, literature,...

     and later in Salamanca
    Salamanca
    Salamanca is a city in western Spain, in the community of Castile and León. Because it is known for its beautiful buildings and urban environment, the Old City was declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1988. It is the most important university city in Spain and is known for its contributions to...

    . Published motets in 1588
  • Ambrosio Cotes
    Ambrosio Cotes
    Ambrosio Cotes was a Spanish renaissance composer.Cotes was born in Villena, Alicante around 1550 of noble birth. He studied theology with the Theatines of Yecla. In 1573 he was maestro de capilla at the church of St. James Church in his hometown...

     (c. 1550–1603)
  • Sebastián Raval
    Sebastian Raval
    Sebastián Raval was a Spanish composer of vocal and instrumental music. Born in Cartagena, he served as a soldier of the Army of Flanders in Flanders and Sicily. He joined the order of St...

     (c. 1550–1604)
  • Alonso Lobo
    Alonso Lobo
    Alonso Lobo was a Spanish composer of the late Renaissance. Although not as famous as Tomás Luís de Victoria, he was highly regarded at the time, and Victoria himself considered him to be his equal....

     (c. 1555–1617)
  • Sebastián Aguilera de Heredia
    Sebastian Aguilera de Heredia
    Sebastian Aguilera de Heredia was a Spanish monk, musician and composer.He was first the organist at the cathedral in Huesca from 1585 to 1603, and then moved to a more prestigious position as maestro de música at La Seo Cathedral in Saragossa. He published a collection of works in 1618, and...

     (1561–1627)
  • Juan Esquivel Barahona (c. 1563–after 1624?)
  • Joan Pau Pujol
    Joan Pau Pujol
    Joan Pau Pujol was a Catalan and Spanish composer and organist of the late Renaissance and early Baroque. While best known for his sacred music, he also wrote popular secular music.-Life:Pujol was born in Mataró...

     (1570–1626)

Czech



  • Kryštof Harant z Polžic a Bezdružic
    Kryštof Harant
    Kryštof Harant z Polžic a Bezdružic was a Czech nobleman, traveller, humanist, soldier, writer and composer.As a composer he represented the school of Franco-Flemish polyphony in Bohemia...

     (1564–1621)
  • Jan Trojan Turnovský
    Jan Trojan Turnovský
    Jan Trojan Turnovský was a Czech Renaissance composer. He became known in the second half of the 1570s. His compositions are included in the most important sources of the Utraquist polyphony music.- Biography :...

     (c. 1550 - 1606)
  • Simon Bar Jona Madelka
    Simon Bar Jona Madelka
    Simon Bar Jona Madelka was a Czech composer. In addition to being a composer, he was also a respectable member of the butcher's guild in the city of Plzeň...

     (c. 1530-1550 - c. 1598)
  • Jiří Rychnovský
    Jiří Rychnovský
    Jiří Rychnovský was a Czech composer of the Renaissance and early Baroque era. He was the mayor of Chrudim. His musical work consists of Czech and Latin sacred music with advanced vocal polyphony, reveals a knowledge of European designs, but also the efforts of self expression...

     (before 1550 - 1616)
  • Jan Simonides Montanus
    Jan Simonides Montanus
    Jan Simonides Montanus was a Czech composer of Renaissance era . He was an Utraquist and belonged to favourite authors of the times. His works represent late 16th century Utraquist polyphony....

     (? - 1587) - active in Kutná Hora
    Kutná Hora
    Kutná Hora is a city in Bohemia, now the Czech Republic in the Central Bohemian Region.-History:The town began in 1142 with the settlement of the first Cistercian Monastery in Bohemia, Kloster Sedlitz, brought from the Imperial immediate Cistercian Waldsassen Abbey...

  • Pavel Spongopaeus Jistebnický
    Pavel Spongopaeus Jistebnický
    Pavel Spongopaeus Jistebnický was a Czech composer of Renaissance and early Baroque era. He worked as a teacher all his life...

     (c. 1550 - 1619)
  • Ondřej Chrysoponus Jevíčský
    Ondřej Chrysoponus Jevíčský
    Ondřej Chrysoponus Jevíčský was a Czech composer who was active in Prachatice in southern Bohemia from 1576–1582. He composed works mainly for Czech schools and literary associations...

     (?)

Other

  • Robert Johnson (c. 1470 – after 1554) Scottish. Active in England and Scotland
  • John Lloyd (c. 1480–1523) Welsh. Also spelt Lloidd, Floyd. Active in England. Works include the complex Mass
    Mass (liturgy)
    "Mass" is one of the names by which the sacrament of the Eucharist is called in the Roman Catholic Church: others are "Eucharist", the "Lord's Supper", the "Breaking of Bread", the "Eucharistic assembly ", the "memorial of the Lord's Passion and Resurrection", the "Holy Sacrifice", the "Holy and...

     on O quam suavis
  • Robert Carver
    Robert Carver (composer)
    Robert Carver was a Scottish Renaissance monk and composer of Christian sacred music.He spent much of his life at Scone Abbey in Perthshire and is regarded as Scotland's greatest sixteenth-century composer. He is best known for his sacred choral music, of which there are five surviving masses and...

     (c. 1484/1487–c. 1570) Scottish. Wrote a mass on L'Homme armé (the only known by a British composer) and a nineteen part O bone jesu
  • Ludwig Senfl
    Ludwig Senfl
    Ludwig Senfl was a Swiss composer of the Renaissance, active in Germany. He was the most famous pupil of Heinrich Isaac, was music director to the court of Maximilian I, Holy Roman Emperor, and was an influential figure in the development of the Franco-Flemish polyphonic style in...

     (c. 1486–1543) Swiss. Active in Germany
  • Fridolin Sicher
    Fridolin Sicher
    Fridolin Sicher was a Swiss composer and organist of the Renaissance era. He was born in Bischofszell and began his study of the organ at the age of 13 with Martin Vogelmaier, the organist of Konstanz Cathedral. He then studied theology and in 1510 became a prebend and organist at St Agnes Church...

     (1490–1546) Swiss
  • Bálint Bakfark
    Bálint Bakfark
    Bálint Bakfark ; 1507 – August 15 or August 22, 1576) was a Hungarian composer and lutenist of the Renaissance...

     (1507–1576) Hungarian
  • Sebestyén Tinódi
    Sebestyén Tinódi Lantos
    Sebestyén "Lantos" Tinódi was a 16th century Hungarian lyricist, epic poet, political historian, and minstrel.- Biography :...

    , "Lantos" (c. 1505/1510–1556) Hungarian
  • John Angus (c. 1515–1596) Scottish
  • Robert Douglas (early 16th cent.) Scottish. Works ascribed to him in the Christchurch partbooks, are in fact by Orlande de Lassus
    Orlande de Lassus
    Orlande de Lassus was a Franco-Flemish composer of the late Renaissance...

  • David Peebles
    David Peebles
    -Biography:Little is known of his life but the majority of his work dates to between 1530 and 1576. He is known to have been a canon at the Augustinian Priory of St Andrews until the Scottish Reformation . After leaving the priory at the Reformation he seems to have married and had two children...

     (fl. c. 1530–1579) Scottish
  • Philip ap Rhys (fl. 1545–1560) Probably Welsh. Also spelt Ryce
  • Jacobus Gallus
    Jacobus Gallus
    Jacobus Gallus Carniolus was a late Renaissance composer of Slovenian ethnicity...

     (1550–1591) Slovenian. Also known as Jacob Handl. Active in Moravia and Bohemia
  • Mogens Pedersøn
    Mogens Pedersøn
    Mogens Pedersøn was a Danish instrumentalist and composer. He is considered the most important Danish-born composer before Buxtehude.-Life:Early in his career he entered the service of the Danish monarch, Christian IV...

     (c. 1583–1623) Danish
  • Ivan Lukačić
    Ivan Lukacic
    Marko Ivan Lukačić was a Croatian-born musician and composer of the Renaissance and early Baroque.-Biography:...

     (1584?–1648) Croatian
  • William Kinloch (16th – 17th cent.) Scottish. Five keyboard pieces (and possibly others) in the National Library of Scotland
    National Library of Scotland
    The National Library of Scotland is the legal deposit library of Scotland and is one of the country's National Collections. It is based in a collection of buildings in Edinburgh city centre. The headquarters is on George IV Bridge, between the Old Town and the university quarter...

    , Edinburgh
    Edinburgh
    Edinburgh is the capital city of Scotland, the second largest city in Scotland, and the eighth most populous in the United Kingdom. The City of Edinburgh Council governs one of Scotland's 32 local government council areas. The council area includes urban Edinburgh and a rural area...

    ; there is also a Pavan and Galliard by 'Kinloughe' in a British Museum
    British Museum
    The British Museum is a museum of human history and culture in London. Its collections, which number more than seven million objects, are amongst the largest and most comprehensive in the world and originate from all continents, illustrating and documenting the story of human culture from its...

     MS

Unknown nationality

  • Lupus (c. 1495 – after 1530) Possibly a Franco-Flemish composer, whose music has survived in the Medici Codex: stylistically distinct from Lupus Hellinck
    Lupus Hellinck
    Lupus Hellinck was a Flemish composer of the Renaissance. He was a prominent composer of masses, as well as German chorales and motets...

     who otherwise would be identified as this composer
  • Teodora Ginés (c. 1530 – after 1598) Not to be confused with the later Cuba
    Cuba
    The Republic of Cuba is an island nation in the Caribbean. The nation of Cuba consists of the main island of Cuba, the Isla de la Juventud, and several archipelagos. Havana is the largest city in Cuba and the country's capital. Santiago de Cuba is the second largest city...

    n singer and former slave of the same name
  • Jean Courtois (fl. 1530–1545) Flemish or French, active at Cambrai
    Cambrai
    Cambrai is a commune in the Nord department in northern France. It is a sub-prefecture of the department.Cambrai is the seat of an archdiocese whose jurisdiction was immense during the Middle Ages. The territory of the Bishopric of Cambrai, roughly coinciding with the shire of Brabant, included...


See also


There is considerable overlap near the beginning and end of this era. See lists of composers for the previous and following eras.