Kingston, New York

Kingston, New York

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Encyclopedia
Kingston is a city in and the county seat
County seat
A county seat is an administrative center, or seat of government, for a county or civil parish. The term is primarily used in the United States....

 of Ulster County
Ulster County, New York
Ulster County is a county located in the state of New York, USA. It sits in the state's Mid-Hudson Region of the Hudson Valley. As of the 2010 census, the population was 182,493. Recent population estimates completed by the United States Census Bureau for the 12-month period ending July 1 are at...

, New York
New York
New York is a state in the Northeastern region of the United States. It is the nation's third most populous state. New York is bordered by New Jersey and Pennsylvania to the south, and by Connecticut, Massachusetts and Vermont to the east...

, USA. It is 91 miles (146 km) north of New York City
New York City
New York is the most populous city in the United States and the center of the New York Metropolitan Area, one of the most populous metropolitan areas in the world. New York exerts a significant impact upon global commerce, finance, media, art, fashion, research, technology, education, and...

 and 59 miles (95 km) south of Albany
Albany, New York
Albany is the capital city of the U.S. state of New York, the seat of Albany County, and the central city of New York's Capital District. Roughly north of New York City, Albany sits on the west bank of the Hudson River, about south of its confluence with the Mohawk River...

. It became New York's first capital in 1777, and was burned by the British Oct. 16, 1777, after the Battles of Saratoga. In the 19th century, the city became an important transport hub after the discovery of natural cement
Rosendale cement
Rosendale cement refers to a type of natural cement produced in and around Rosendale, New York from argilaceous limestone. The fast-setting Rosendale natural cement mortars proved to be more efficient than the traditional mortars based on lime and sand...

 in the region, and had both railroad and canal connections. Passenger rail service has since ceased, and many of the older buildings are part of three historic districts, such as the Stockade District
Kingston Stockade District
The Kingston Stockade District is an eight-block area in the western section of Kingston, New York, United States, commonly referred to as Uptown Kingston...

 uptown, the Midtown Neighborhood Broadway Corridor, and the Rondout-West Strand Historic District
Rondout-West Strand Historic District
SEE ALSO Rondout, New YorkThe Rondout–West Strand Historic District is a historic district located on the shore of Rondout Creek along the southern boundary of the city of Kingston, New York, USA...

 downtown.

History


The city of Kingston was first called Esopus after a local Esopus tribe
Esopus tribe
The Esopus tribe was a tribe of Lenape Native Americans who were native to Upstate New York.The tribe fought a series of conflicts against settlers from the New Netherland Colony from September 1659 to September 1663, known as the Esopus Wars...

, then Wiltwijck (sometimes anglicized to Wiltwyck). Settled in 1651, it was one of the three large Hudson River
Hudson River
The Hudson is a river that flows from north to south through eastern New York. The highest official source is at Lake Tear of the Clouds, on the slopes of Mount Marcy in the Adirondack Mountains. The river itself officially begins in Henderson Lake in Newcomb, New York...

 settlements in New Netherland
New Netherland
New Netherland, or Nieuw-Nederland in Dutch, was the 17th-century colonial province of the Republic of the Seven United Netherlands on the East Coast of North America. The claimed territories were the lands from the Delmarva Peninsula to extreme southwestern Cape Cod...

, the other two being Beverwyck
Beverwyck
Beverwijck was a fur-trading community north of Fort Orange on the Hudson River in New Netherland that was to become Albany, New York, when the English took control of the colony in 1664....

, now Albany
Albany, New York
Albany is the capital city of the U.S. state of New York, the seat of Albany County, and the central city of New York's Capital District. Roughly north of New York City, Albany sits on the west bank of the Hudson River, about south of its confluence with the Mohawk River...

, and New Amsterdam
New Amsterdam
New Amsterdam was a 17th-century Dutch colonial settlement that served as the capital of New Netherland. It later became New York City....

, now New York City. In 1777, Kingston became the first capital of New York
New York
New York is a state in the Northeastern region of the United States. It is the nation's third most populous state. New York is bordered by New Jersey and Pennsylvania to the south, and by Connecticut, Massachusetts and Vermont to the east...

. During the summer of 1777, when the New York State constitution was written, New York City was occupied by British troops and Albany (then the second largest settlement in New York and capital of the newly independent State of New York) was under threat of attack by the British. To escape attack, the seat of government was moved downstream to Kingston, which was deemed safer. Ironically, the British never reached Albany, being stopped at Saratoga, but they did reach Kingston. On Oct. 16, 1777, shortly after the Battle of Saratoga
Battle of Saratoga
The Battles of Saratoga conclusively decided the fate of British General John Burgoyne's army in the American War of Independence and are generally regarded as a turning point in the war. The battles were fought eighteen days apart on the same ground, south of Saratoga, New York...

, the city was burned by British troops moving up the Hudson River from New York City
New York City
New York is the most populous city in the United States and the center of the New York Metropolitan Area, one of the most populous metropolitan areas in the world. New York exerts a significant impact upon global commerce, finance, media, art, fashion, research, technology, education, and...

, disembarking at the mouth of the Rondout Creek on the formation the Dutch had named Ponck Hockie. Contrary to popular belief there wasn't a large conflict between the townsfolk and the British invaders. This is because the denizens of Kingston knew of the oncoming fleet. The city had been evacuated by the time the British arrived, residents and the government having removed to Hurley, New York
Hurley (CDP), New York
Hurley is a hamlet in the Town of Hurley, Ulster County, New York, USA. The population was 3,458 at the 2010 census....

, which the British did not attack. Kingston celebrates and re-enacts the 1777 burning of the city by the British every other year (2013 is the next "burning of Kingston), that is an all city theatrical staging of the event that begins at the Rondout.

The area was a major granary for the colonies at the time, so the British burned large amounts of wheat and all but one or two of the buildings. There is some debate over exactly how much of a fight was put up against the British; one third of the local militia regiment was still to the north at Saratoga, and one third was to the south manning several forts (which were captured days before by the British). This would have left approximately 150 militiamen to defend the city against approximately 2,000 British regulars. The Dutch cultural influence in Kingston remained strong through the end of the Nineteenth Century.

Bluestone and cement



The town of Rondout, New York
Rondout, New York
Rondout was a village located on the north side of Rondout Creek near its mouth on the Hudson River in Ulster County and includes the Rondout-West Strand Historic District....

, now a part of the city of Kingston, became an important freight hub for the transportation of coal from Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
The Commonwealth of Pennsylvania is a U.S. state that is located in the Northeastern and Mid-Atlantic regions of the United States. The state borders Delaware and Maryland to the south, West Virginia to the southwest, Ohio to the west, New York and Ontario, Canada, to the north, and New Jersey to...

 to New York City
New York City
New York is the most populous city in the United States and the center of the New York Metropolitan Area, one of the most populous metropolitan areas in the world. New York exerts a significant impact upon global commerce, finance, media, art, fashion, research, technology, education, and...

 through the D & H canal. This hub was later used to transport other goods, including bluestone
Bluestone
Bluestone is a cultural or commercial name for a number of dimension or building stone varieties, including:*a feldspathic sandstone in the U.S. and Canada;*limestone in the Shenandoah Valley in the U.S...

. Kingston shaped and shipped most of the bluestone made to create the sidewalks of New York City. Natural cement
Rosendale cement
Rosendale cement refers to a type of natural cement produced in and around Rosendale, New York from argilaceous limestone. The fast-setting Rosendale natural cement mortars proved to be more efficient than the traditional mortars based on lime and sand...

 deposits were found throughout the valley, and in 1844 quarrying began in the "Ponchockie" section of Rondout
Rondout, New York
Rondout was a village located on the north side of Rondout Creek near its mouth on the Hudson River in Ulster County and includes the Rondout-West Strand Historic District....

. The Newark Lime and Cement Company shipped cement throughout the United States, a thriving business until the invention of the cheaper, quicker drying Portland Cement
Portland cement
Portland cement is the most common type of cement in general use around the world because it is a basic ingredient of concrete, mortar, stucco and most non-specialty grout...

. Large warehouses of ice sat beside the Hudson river from which the ice was cut during the winter and preserved all year to be used in early refrigeration. Large brick making factories were also located close to this shipping hub. Rondout’s central location as a shipping hub ended with the advent of railroads which ran through Rondout and Kingston but could transport their loads through the city without stopping.

Geography


Kingston has three recognized area neighborhoods. The Uptown area, the Stockade District
Kingston Stockade District
The Kingston Stockade District is an eight-block area in the western section of Kingston, New York, United States, commonly referred to as Uptown Kingston...

, was the first capital of New York State. The Midtown area, known for its early 20th Century industries, Ulster Performing Arts Center and the historic City Hall building. The downtown area, once the village of [Rondout, New York|Rondout]], now the Rondout-West Strand Historic District
Rondout-West Strand Historic District
SEE ALSO Rondout, New YorkThe Rondout–West Strand Historic District is a historic district located on the shore of Rondout Creek along the southern boundary of the city of Kingston, New York, USA...

, borders the Rondout Creek
Rondout Creek
Rondout Creek is a tributary of the Hudson River in Ulster and Sullivan counties, New York, USA. It rises on Rocky Mountain in the eastern Catskills, flows south into Rondout Reservoir, part of New York City's water supply network, then into the valley between the Catskills and the Shawangunk...

. The creek empties into the Hudson through a large, protected tidal area which was the terminus of the Delaware and Hudson Canal
Delaware and Hudson Canal
The Delaware and Hudson Canal was the first venture of the Delaware and Hudson Canal Company, which later developed the Delaware and Hudson Railway...

, built to haul coal from Pennsylvania to New York City.

Downtown, called "the Rondout" because it was formerly Rondout, New York
Rondout, New York
Rondout was a village located on the north side of Rondout Creek near its mouth on the Hudson River in Ulster County and includes the Rondout-West Strand Historic District....

, is an artist community labeled by Business Week online as one of "America's best places for artists." It is home to a large number of art galleries. Kingston holds many festivals in the Rondout neighborhood, including the Kingston Jazz Festival and the Artists Soapbox Derby, and Drum Boogie.

Midtown is the largest of Kingston's neighborhoods and home to Kingston/Benedictine Hospital.

While the Uptown area is noted for its "antique" feeling, the overhangs attached to buildings along Wall and North Front streets were added to historic buildings in the late 1970s and are not authentically part of the 19th century Victorian architecture. The historic covered storefront walks, known as the Pike Plan, were recently reinforced and modernized with skylights. More notably in Uptown is the Stockade district, where many 17th century stone buildings remain. Most notable of these is the Senate House
Senate House State Historic Site
The Senate House State Historic Site is located on Fair Street in Kingston, New York, United States. New York state was established there in 1777, during the Revolutionary War....

, which was built in the 1670s and was used as the state capital during the revolution. Many of these old buildings were burned by the British Oct. 17, 1777, and restored later. A controversial restoration of 1970s-era canopies was marred by the sudden appearance of painted red goats
Red goats of Kingston
The red goats of Kingston is a controversial public art display which appeared in the stockade district of Kingston, New York in October, 2011. The artists responsible for the goats, which were stenciled on newly-installed planters in front of area businesses, were apprehended and charged with...

 on planters just prior to the neighborhood's rededication. This part of the city is also the location of the Ulster County Office Building.

According to the United States Census Bureau
United States Census Bureau
The United States Census Bureau is the government agency that is responsible for the United States Census. It also gathers other national demographic and economic data...

, the city has a total area of 8.6 square miles (22.4 km2), of which 7.3 square miles (19.0 km2) is land and 1.3 square miles (3.4 km2), or 15.03%, is water.

The city is on the west bank of the Hudson River
Hudson River
The Hudson is a river that flows from north to south through eastern New York. The highest official source is at Lake Tear of the Clouds, on the slopes of Mount Marcy in the Adirondack Mountains. The river itself officially begins in Henderson Lake in Newcomb, New York...

. Neighboring towns include Hurley
Hurley (town), New York
Hurley is a town in Ulster County, New York, USA. The population was 6,314 at the 2010 census.The Town of Hurley is in the northeast part of the county, west of the City of Kingston...

, Saugerties
Saugerties (town), New York
Saugerties is a town in Ulster County, New York, USA. The population was 19,482 at the 2000 census. The Town of Saugerties contains the Village of Saugerties. The town is in the northeast corner of Ulster County....

, Rhinebeck
Rhinebeck (town), New York
Rhinebeck is a town in Dutchess County, New York, United States. The population was 7,548 at the 2010 census.The Town of Rhinebeck in the northwest part of Dutchess County in the Hudson Valley. Rhinebeck is also the name of a village in the town. US Route 9 passes through the town...

, and Red Hook
Red Hook, New York
Red Hook is a town in Dutchess County, New York, United States. The population was reported to be 11,319 during the 2010 census. The name is supposedly derived from the red foliage on trees on a small strip of land on the Hudson River. The town contains two villages; the village of Red Hook and the...

.

Demographics


As of the census
Census
A census is the procedure of systematically acquiring and recording information about the members of a given population. It is a regularly occurring and official count of a particular population. The term is used mostly in connection with national population and housing censuses; other common...

of 2000, there were 23,456 people, 9,871 households, and 5,498 families residing in the city. The population density
Population density
Population density is a measurement of population per unit area or unit volume. It is frequently applied to living organisms, and particularly to humans...

 was 3,189.5 persons per square mile (1,232.2/km2). There were 10,637 housing units at an average density of 1,446.4 houses per square mile (558.8/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 80.38% White, 12.77% Black or African American
Race (United States Census)
Race and ethnicity in the United States Census, as defined by the Federal Office of Management and Budget and the United States Census Bureau, are self-identification data items in which residents choose the race or races with which they most closely identify, and indicate whether or not they are...

, 0.30% Native American, 1.53% Asian, 1.90% from other races
Race (United States Census)
Race and ethnicity in the United States Census, as defined by the Federal Office of Management and Budget and the United States Census Bureau, are self-identification data items in which residents choose the race or races with which they most closely identify, and indicate whether or not they are...

, and 3.12% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 6.46% of the population.

There were 9,871 households out of which 27.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 35.2% were married couples
Marriage
Marriage is a social union or legal contract between people that creates kinship. It is an institution in which interpersonal relationships, usually intimate and sexual, are acknowledged in a variety of ways, depending on the culture or subculture in which it is found...

 living together, 15.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 44.3% were non-families. 36.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 14.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.28 and the average family size was 3.02.

In the city the population was spread out with 23.9% under the age of 18, 8.1% from 18 to 24, 28.9% from 25 to 44, 21.9% from 45 to 64, and 17.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 89.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 84.1 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $31,594, and the median income for a family was $41,806. Males had a median income of $31,634 versus $25,364 for females. The per capita income
Per capita income
Per capita income or income per person is a measure of mean income within an economic aggregate, such as a country or city. It is calculated by taking a measure of all sources of income in the aggregate and dividing it by the total population...

 for the city was $18,662, with 12.4% of families and 15.8% of the population below the poverty line, including 23.5% of those under age 18 and 10.3% of those age 65 or over.

Government


The government of Kingston consists of a mayor and city council known as the Common Council. The Common Council consists of 10 members, nine of which are elected from wards while one is elected at large. The mayor is elected in a citywide vote every four years.

Shayne Gallo was elected to the mayoral post in 2011.

Transportation


Commuter service is available by bus to New York City
New York City
New York is the most populous city in the United States and the center of the New York Metropolitan Area, one of the most populous metropolitan areas in the world. New York exerts a significant impact upon global commerce, finance, media, art, fashion, research, technology, education, and...

 daily. Passenger railroad service to Kingston itself has been discontinued for several decades. However, about 10 miles (16.1 km) away is the Rhinecliff-Kingston
Rhinecliff-Kingston (Amtrak station)
The Rhinecliff–Kingston Amtrak station, commonly and formerly known as simply Rhinecliff, is located in Rhinebeck, New York and serves northern Dutchess County and the nearby Kingston area across the Hudson River. The station has one low-level island platform that serves two tracks...

 Amtrak
Amtrak
The National Railroad Passenger Corporation, doing business as Amtrak , is a government-owned corporation that was organized on May 1, 1971, to provide intercity passenger train service in the United States. "Amtrak" is a portmanteau of the words "America" and "track". It is headquartered at Union...

 station. CSX Transportation
CSX Transportation
CSX Transportation operates a Class I railroad in the United States known as the CSX Railroad. It is the main subsidiary of the CSX Corporation. The company is headquartered in Jacksonville, Florida, and owns approximately 21,000 route miles...

 operates freight rail service through Kingston on the River Line Subdivision. There is also a small rail yard of about 7 tracks in Kingston.

New York State Route 199
New York State Route 199
New York State Route 199 is a state highway located in the Hudson Valley of New York in the United States. It extends for from an interchange with U.S. Route 9W and US 209 north of Kingston to an intersection with US 44 and NY 22 southwest of Millerton...

 has the nearest bridge traversing the Hudson River
Hudson River
The Hudson is a river that flows from north to south through eastern New York. The highest official source is at Lake Tear of the Clouds, on the slopes of Mount Marcy in the Adirondack Mountains. The river itself officially begins in Henderson Lake in Newcomb, New York...

, 5.48 miles (8.82 km) to the north. U.S. Highway 9W runs north-south through the city. The New York State Thruway
New York State Thruway
The New York State Thruway is a system of limited-access highways located within the state of New York in the United States. The system, known officially as the Governor Thomas E. Dewey Thruway for former New York Governor Thomas E. Dewey, is operated by the New York State Thruway Authority and...

, also known at this section as Interstate 87
Interstate 87
Interstate 87 is a Interstate Highway located entirely within New York State in the United States of America. I-87 is the longest intrastate Interstate highway in the Interstate Highway System. Its southern end is at the Bronx approaches of the Robert F. Kennedy Bridge in New York City...

, runs through the western part of the city.

The area is served by Kingston-Ulster airport (2ON), located at the western base of the Kingston-Rhinecliff bridge. The nearest major airports to Kingston are Stewart International Airport about 38 miles (40 km) south in Newburgh, and Albany International Airport approximately 65 miles (121 km) north. The three major metropolitan airports for New York City - John F. Kennedy International approximately 109 miles (142 km) south, Newark Liberty International approximately 104 miles (169 km) south, and LaGuardia Airport approximately 98 miles (129 km) south.

City bus service is provided by the city-owned CitiBus system, while service to points elsewhere in Ulster County is provided by Ulster County Area Transit
Ulster County Area Transit
Ulster County Area Transit is the county-owned operator of bus transportation in Ulster County, New York, providing fixed-route, deviated-fixed route, and commuter transit, except within the city of Kingston, where the local Kingston Citibus provides public transit.-Service area:UCAT provides...

 (UCAT).

On the first Saturday of every month an “art bus” is available for a fare of $1. The bus, usually a CitiBus tourist trolley
Tourist trolley
A tourist trolley, also called a road trolley, is a rubber-tired bus , which is made to resemble an old-style streetcar or tram....

, takes passengers on a guided tour of the art galleries of Kingston. Kingston's art galleries all have openings on the first Saturday of the month.

Weekend water taxi service between Kingston and Rhinecliff, New York is available May through October for $10 round-trip. Some trips stop at the Rondout Light
Rondout Light
Rondout Light is a lighthouse on the west side of the Hudson River at Kingston, New York.-Nomenclature:*The official name in the Coast Guard Light List is Rondout Creek Leading Light....

; a tour is available for an additional $5.

Kingston historically was an important transportation center for the region. The Hudson River, Rondout Creek and Delaware and Hudson Canal
Delaware and Hudson Canal
The Delaware and Hudson Canal was the first venture of the Delaware and Hudson Canal Company, which later developed the Delaware and Hudson Railway...

 were important commercial waterways. At one time, Kingston was served by four railroad companies and two trolley lines. Kingston was designated as a New York State Heritage Area with a transportation theme and the Hudson River Maritime Museum
Hudson River Maritime Museum
The Hudson River Maritime Museum is a maritime museum dedicated to the Hudson River.It is located at 50 Rondout Landing at the foot of Broadway in Kingston, New York, USA, along Rondout Creek in the city's old waterfront, just east of the John T...

 and Trolley Museum of New York are located on the waterfront.

Historic Churches


Kingston is home to many historic churches. The oldest church still standing is the First Reformed Protestant Dutch Church of Kingston which was organized in 1659. Referred to as The Old Dutch Church, it is located in Uptown Kingston.
Many of the city's historic churches populate Wurts street (6 in one block) among them Celebration Chapel is a recently restored church built in 1867 and now a chapel hosting weddings. Another church in the Rondout is Trinity Evangelical Lutheran Church located on Spring Street. Trinity Evangelical Lutheran Church was founded in 1849. The original church building at the corner of Hunter Street and Ravine Street burned to the ground in the late 1850's. The current church on Spring Street was built in 1874.

Education

  • Kingston High School (Kingston, New York)
    Kingston High School (Kingston, New York)
    Kingston High School is a comprehensive four-year school with an enrollment of approximately 2,500 students and staff located on Broadway in Kingston, New York.-Campus layout:...

     is the city's public high school
  • Most students at John A. Coleman Catholic High School
    John A. Coleman Catholic High School
    John A. Coleman Catholic High School is a private, Roman Catholic high school in Hurley, New York. It is located within the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New York. The school contains grades 9 - 12.-Background:...

     reside within the Kingston city school district.

Media

  • Newspapers
    • Kingston-based: Daily Freeman
      Daily Freeman
      The Daily Freeman is a seven-day-a-week morning newspaper in Kingston, New York, the Ulster County seat. Serving all of Ulster County and parts of three other counties in the Mid-Hudson Valley, the broadsheet publication has a weekday circulation of approximately 22,000.In addition to its Uptown...

      , Kingston Times
      Kingston Times
      The Kingston Times is a weekly newspaper published in Kingston, New York by Ulster Publishing. The Kingston Times is distributed in the city and town of Kingston, New York and the Town of Ulster, New York....

    • Outside Kingston:* ART TIMES, Poughkeepsie Journal
      Poughkeepsie Journal
      The Poughkeepsie Journal is a newspaper based in Poughkeepsie, New York owned by the Gannett Company, who bought the paper in 1977. Founded in 1785 , the Journal is the oldest paper in New York state, and is the third-oldest in the nation...

      , Times-Herald Record (Middletown)
    • See also: List of newspapers in New York in the 18th-century: Kingston
  • Television: Time Warner Cable
    Time Warner Cable
    Time Warner Cable is an American cable television company that operates in 28 states and has 31 operating divisions...

     Kingston Area Public-access television
    Public-access television
    Public-access television is a form of non-commercial mass media where ordinary people can create content television programming which is cablecast through cable TV specialty channels...

     cable TV channel 23
  • Radio
    • Kingston-based: WGHQ
      WGHQ
      WGHQ is a United States radio station licensed to Kingston, New York and serving the Hudson Valley as well as a part of the Capital District market...

       (920 AM), WKNY
      WKNY
      WKNY is a radio station serving the Kingston, New York, area with an adult contemporary format. It broadcasts at a power of 1 KW from a single tower located off of Albany Avenue...

       (1490 AM), WKXP
      WKXP
      WKXP is a country music station licensed to Kingston, New York and serving the Hudson Valley of New York state. The station is owned by Cumulus Media and broadcasts at 6 kilowatts ERP from a tower in Kingston....

       (94.3 FM)
    • Outside Kingston: WFGB
      Sound of Life Radio
      The Sound of Life Radio Network is a regional Inspirational radio network headquartered in Lake Katrine, New York and serves eastern New York State, northern New Jersey, northeast Pennsylvania, and western New England. Programming on the network is primarily music based . Programs are practical,...

       (89.7 FM), WBPM
      WBPM
      WBPM is a Classic Hits music formatted radio station licensed to Saugerties, New York, serving the Mid-Hudson Valley and Catskills...

       (92.9 FM, Saugerties), WKZE-FM
      WKZE-FM
      WKZE-FM is a radio station licensed to Salisbury, Connecticut. The station broadcasts to the upper Hudson Valley Region, northern Harlem Valley and north western Connecticut. It is independently owned by Willpower Radio, LLC and airs an Album Adult Alternative music format...

       (98.1, Salisbury CT/Rhinebeck), WDST
      WDST
      WDST is a radio station licensed to Woodstock, New York. The station is owned by CHET-5 Broadcasting and broadcasts with 3 kW ERP from a tower in the Town of Kingston.WDST also broadcasts one translator:...

       (100.1 FM, Woodstock).
  • Magazines: Chronogram

Actors, musicians and others in the entertainment industry

  • Peter Bogdanovich
    Peter Bogdanovich
    Peter Bogdanovich is an American film historian, director, writer, actor, producer, and critic. He was part of the wave of "New Hollywood" directors, which included William Friedkin, Brian De Palma, George Lucas, Martin Scorsese, Michael Cimino, and Francis Ford Coppola...

     (b. 1939) a film director, writer and actor, was born in town.
  • Paul Austin Kelly
    Paul Austin Kelly
    Paul Austin Kelly is an American opera tenor and former rock musician who also writes, records and performs music for children.He was born in Kingston, New York.-Musical beginnings:...

     (b. 1960) Opera tenor
    Tenor
    The tenor is a type of male singing voice and is the highest male voice within the modal register. The typical tenor voice lies between C3, the C one octave below middle C, to the A above middle C in choral music, and up to high C in solo work. The low extreme for tenors is roughly B2...

    , jazz
    Jazz
    Jazz is a musical style that originated at the beginning of the 20th century in African American communities in the Southern United States. It was born out of a mix of African and European music traditions. From its early development until the present, jazz has incorporated music from 19th and 20th...

     singer, children's music
    Children's music
    Children's music is used here to refer to music composed and performed for children by adults. In European influenced contexts this means music, usually songs, written specifically for a juvenile audience. The composers are usually adults. Children's music has historically held both entertainment...

     performer and impresario
    Impresario
    An impresario is a person who organizes and often finances concerts, plays or operas; analogous to a film producer in filmmaking, television production and an angel investor in business...

  • Paul Kreppel
    Paul Kreppel
    Paul Kreppel is an actor, producer, director. On television, he was best known as the pianist, Sonny Mann in the show, It's a Living. In his work as theater director- producer-creator, he received the 2007 Tony Award for Jay Johnson: The Two and Only.-Early Theater Career:Kreppel was born in...

     (b. 1947) Television and Broadway theatre
    Broadway theatre
    Broadway theatre, commonly called simply Broadway, refers to theatrical performances presented in one of the 40 professional theatres with 500 or more seats located in the Theatre District centered along Broadway, and in Lincoln Center, in Manhattan in New York City...

     director and actor born in the city.
  • Joseph Kesselring
    Joseph Kesselring
    Joseph Otto Kesselring was an American writer and playwright known best for his play Arsenic and Old Lace, written in 1939 and originally entitled "Bodies in Our Cellar." He was born in New York City to Henry and Frances Kesselring. His father's parents were immigrants from Germany. His mother was...

     (1902–1967), a writer and playwright best known for his play Arsenic and Old Lace
    Arsenic and Old Lace (play)
    Arsenic and Old Lace is a play by American playwright Joseph Kesselring, written in 1939. It has become best known through the film adaptation starring Cary Grant and directed by Frank Capra. The play was directed by Bretaigne Windust, and opened on January 10, 1941. On September 25, 1943, the...

    , died in the city.
  • Elissa Landi
    Elissa Landi
    Elissa Landi was an Italian born actress who was popular in Hollywood films of the 1920s and 1930s. Rumoured to be a descendant of Emperor Franz Joseph of Austria, she was noted for her aristocratic bearing....

     (1904–1948), an Italian born actress was popular in Hollywood films of the 1920s and 1930s, died of cancer in the city.
  • Rebecca Martin
    Rebecca Martin
    ((Rebecca Martin (born April 24, 1969, Portland, Maine) is an American singer and songwriter from Rumford, Maine. She and Jesse Harris formed Once Blue in the early 1990s and released a self-titled debut. In 1998, she released the solo album Thoroughfare....

     (b. 1969), Singer-songwriter and community activist. Started home gardening and sustainable living
    Sustainable living
    Sustainable living is a lifestyle that attempts to reduce an individual's or society's use of the Earth's natural resources and his/her own resources. Practitioners of sustainable living often attempt to reduce their carbon footprint by altering methods of transportation, energy consumption and diet...

     movement in the city of Kingston in 2007. Originally from the state of Maine
    Maine
    Maine is a state in the New England region of the northeastern United States, bordered by the Atlantic Ocean to the east and south, New Hampshire to the west, and the Canadian provinces of Quebec to the northwest and New Brunswick to the northeast. Maine is both the northernmost and easternmost...

    , and resident of Kingston since 2002.
  • Pauline OliverosComposer, performer and humanitarian is an important pioneer in American Music. Acclaimed internationally, for four decades she has explored sound -- forging new ground for herself and others.(from website)

Politics, political activism, government service


  • George Clinton
    George Clinton (vice president)
    George Clinton was an American soldier and politician, considered one of the Founding Fathers of the United States. He was the first Governor of New York, and then the fourth Vice President of the United States , serving under Presidents Thomas Jefferson and James Madison. He and John C...

     (1739–1812), fourth vice president of the United States
    United States
    The United States of America is a federal constitutional republic comprising fifty states and a federal district...

     and first elected governor of New York State, is buried in the city at the Old Dutch Church
    First Reformed Protestant Dutch Church of Kingston
    The Old Dutch Church, officially known as the First Reformed Protestant Dutch Church of Kingston, is located on Wall Street in Kingston, New York, United States. Formally organized in 1659, it is one of the oldest continuously existing congregations in the country...

    .
  • Charles DeWitt
    Charles DeWitt
    Charles DeWitt was an American miller and statesman from Kingston, New York. He served as a delegate to the Continental Congress....

     (1727–1789), a miller and statesman from Kingston, served as a delegate to the Continental Congress
    Continental Congress
    The Continental Congress was a convention of delegates called together from the Thirteen Colonies that became the governing body of the United States during the American Revolution....

    .
  • Abraham Bruyn Hasbrouck
    Abraham Bruyn Hasbrouck
    Abraham Bruyn Hasbrouck was a United States Congressman from New York and the sixth President of Rutgers College serving from 1840 to 1850...

     (1791–1879), a U.S. Congressman and the sixth President of Rutgers College (now Rutgers University
    Rutgers University
    Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey , is the largest institution for higher education in New Jersey, United States. It was originally chartered as Queen's College in 1766. It is the eighth-oldest college in the United States and one of the nine Colonial colleges founded before the American...

    ), was born and died in the city.
  • Alton B. Parker
    Alton B. Parker
    Alton Brooks Parker was an American lawyer, judge and the Democratic nominee for U.S. president in the 1904 elections.-Life:...

     (1852–1926), Democratic presidential nominee in 1904, practiced law in the city and was the first president of the Ulster County Bar Association. He not only lost the election, he didn't even carry Ulster County.
  • John Van Buren
    John Van Buren (US representative)
    John Van Buren was a United States Representative from New York.He graduated from Union College in 1818, studied law, was admitted to the bar and commenced practice in Kingston...

     (1799–1855), US Congressman

Others

  • Joe Ausanio
    Joe Ausanio
    Joseph John Ausanio is a former Major League baseball relief pitcher who appeared in 41 games for the New York Yankees in and ....

    , (b. 1965), pitcher for the New York Yankees
    New York Yankees
    The New York Yankees are a professional baseball team based in the The Bronx, New York. They compete in Major League Baseball in the American League's East Division...

     during the 1990s was born and grew up in Kingston. Half brother of major leaguer Paul Runge
    Paul Runge (infielder)
    Paul William Runge is a former professional baseball player. He played all or part of eight seasons in Major League Baseball for the Atlanta Braves from until...

    .
  • Heywood Hale Broun
    Heywood Hale Broun
    Heywood Hale Broun was an American an author, sportswriter, commentator and actor. He was born and raised in New York City, the son of writer and activist Ruth Hale and columnist Heywood Broun. He was educated at private schools and Swarthmore College....

     (1918–2001) a sportswriter and commentator, died in the city.
  • Robert H. Dietz
    Robert H. Dietz
    Robert H. Dietz was a United States Army soldier and a recipient of the United States military's highest decoration—the Medal of Honor—for his actions in World War II.-Biography:...

     (1921–1945), United States Army
    United States Army
    The United States Army is the main branch of the United States Armed Forces responsible for land-based military operations. It is the largest and oldest established branch of the U.S. military, and is one of seven U.S. uniformed services...

     soldier and Medal of Honor
    Medal of Honor
    The Medal of Honor is the highest military decoration awarded by the United States government. It is bestowed by the President, in the name of Congress, upon members of the United States Armed Forces who distinguish themselves through "conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his or her...

     recipient in World War II
    World War II
    World War II, or the Second World War , was a global conflict lasting from 1939 to 1945, involving most of the world's nations—including all of the great powers—eventually forming two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis...

  • Mike Ferraro
    Mike Ferraro
    Michael Dennis Ferraro is an American former Major League Baseball third baseman. He played for the New York Yankees , Seattle Pilots , and the Milwaukee Brewers...

     (b. 1944), a third baseman for the New York Yankees
    New York Yankees
    The New York Yankees are a professional baseball team based in the The Bronx, New York. They compete in Major League Baseball in the American League's East Division...

     and Milwaukee Brewers
    Milwaukee Brewers
    The Milwaukee Brewers are a professional baseball team based in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, currently playing in the Central Division of Major League Baseball's National League...

    , and later coach for the Kansas City Royals
    Kansas City Royals
    The Kansas City Royals are a Major League Baseball team based in Kansas City, Missouri. The Royals are a member of the Central Division of Major League Baseball's American League. From 1973 to the present, the Royals have played in Kauffman Stadium...

    , was born in the city.
  • Ezra Fitch
    Ezra Fitch
    Ezra Hasbrouck Fitch was the co-founder of the modern lifestyle brand Abercrombie & Fitch and is attributed with the historical introduction of Mahjong to the United States....

     (1866–1930), the "Fitch" in "Abercrombie & Fitch
    Abercrombie & Fitch
    Abercrombie & Fitch is an American retailer that focuses on casual wear for consumers aged 18 to 22. It has over 300 locations in the United States, and is expanding internationally....

    , practiced law in Kingston before leaving to join Abercrombie in his wilderness outfitting store in New York City in 1900. He bought out Abercrombie in 1907.
  • Charles Freer (1854–1919), who donated his art collection to the Smithsonian Institution, was born in Kingston. The Freer Gallery of Art
    Freer Gallery of Art
    The Freer Gallery of Art joins the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery to form the Smithsonian Institution's national museums of Asian art. The Freer contains art from East Asia, South Asia, Southeast Asia, the Islamic world, the ancient Near East, and ancient Egypt, as well as a significant collection of...

    , part of the Smithsonian, was named after him.
  • Walter B. Gibson
    Walter B. Gibson
    Walter Brown Gibson was an American author and professional magician, best known for his work on the pulp fiction character The Shadow...

      (1897-1985), American author and professional magician, most famous for his pulp fiction character, The Shadow
    The Shadow
    The Shadow is a collection of serialized dramas, originally in pulp magazines, then on 1930s radio and then in a wide variety of media, that follow the exploits of the title character, a crime-fighting vigilante in the pulps, which carried over to the airwaves as a "wealthy, young man about town"...

    .
  • Brian Kenny
    Brian Kenny (sportscaster)
    Brian Kenny is a sportscaster for the MLB Network. He previously worked for ESPN, where he most recently anchored the 6 p.m. edition of SportsCenter for ESPN, served as the host of ESPN2's Friday Night Fights...

     (b. 1963), a journalist who anchors Friday Night Fights and ESPNEWS' The Hot List, previously worked for WTZA in the city.
  • Edgar F. Luckenbach
    Edgar F. Luckenbach
    Edgar Frederick Luckenbach, Sr. was an American shipping magnate who inherited his father's steamship company, which he incorporated in 1913 under the name the Luckenbach Steamship Company, Inc. .-Personal life:Commodore Luckenbach was born in Kingston, New York...

     (1868-1943), Shipping magnate, Luckenbach Steamship Company.
  • Jervis McEntee
    Jervis McEntee
    Jervis McEntee was an American painter of the Hudson River School. He is a somewhat lesser-known figure of the 19th century American art world, but was the close friend and traveling companion of several of the important Hudson River School artists...

     (1828–1891), a painter of the Hudson River School
    Hudson River school
    The Hudson River School was a mid-19th century American art movement embodied by a group of landscape painters whose aesthetic vision was influenced by romanticism...

    , is buried in Montrepose Cemetery in the city.
  • Evaline Ness
    Evaline Ness
    Evaline Ness was an American commercial artist and illustrator for award winning children's books.She was born Evaline Michelow in Union City, Ohio and grew up in Pontiac, Michigan. Ness studied at Ball State Teachers College...

     (1911–1986) an illustrator and author who won a Caldecott Medal
    Caldecott Medal
    The Caldecott Medal is awarded annually by the Association for Library Service to Children , a division of the American Library Association, to the artist of the most distinguished American picture book for children published that year. The award was named in honor of nineteenth-century English...

     in 1967 for Sam, Bangs, and Moonshine
    Sam, Bangs, and Moonshine
    Sam, Bangs and Moonshine is a popular 1966 book by Evaline Ness. For its illustrations, it won the 1967 Caldecott Medal.-Plot:Samantha is a motherless child of a fisherman. To keep herself busy, she pretends that her mother is a mermaid and that Bangs, her cat, can talk to her. Sam also claims to...

    , and who was married to Untouchable Eliot Ness
    Eliot Ness
    Eliot Ness was an American Prohibition agent, famous for his efforts to enforce Prohibition in Chicago, Illinois, and the leader of a legendary team of law enforcement agents nicknamed The Untouchables.- Early life :...

     from 1938–1946, died in the city.
  • Maud Petersham (1890–1971), who won the Caldecott Medal
    Caldecott Medal
    The Caldecott Medal is awarded annually by the Association for Library Service to Children , a division of the American Library Association, to the artist of the most distinguished American picture book for children published that year. The award was named in honor of nineteenth-century English...

     with her husband and coauthor, Miska Petrezselyem Mikaly, in 1946 for "The Rooster Crows
    The Rooster Crows
    The Rooster Crows: A Book of American Rhymes and Jingles is a book by Maud and Miska Petersham. Released by Macmillan, it was the recipient of the Caldecott Medal for illustration in 1946....

    ", was born in Kingston.

  • Andrée Ruellan
    Andrée Ruellan
    Andrée Ruellan was an American painter, known for her depictions of everyday scenes in New York and the American South....

     (1905–2006), a painter whose works are in the permanent collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art
    Metropolitan Museum of Art
    The Metropolitan Museum of Art is a renowned art museum in New York City. Its permanent collection contains more than two million works, divided into nineteen curatorial departments. The main building, located on the eastern edge of Central Park along Manhattan's Museum Mile, is one of the...

     and the Whitney Museum, died in the city.
  • Paul Runge Jr.
    Paul Runge (infielder)
    Paul William Runge is a former professional baseball player. He played all or part of eight seasons in Major League Baseball for the Atlanta Braves from until...

    , (b. 1958), infielder for the Atlanta Braves
    Atlanta Braves
    The Atlanta Braves are a professional baseball club based in Atlanta, Georgia. The Braves are a member of the Eastern Division of Major League Baseball's National League. The Braves have played in Turner Field since 1997....

     during the 1980s and manager of several minor league teams was born and grew up in Kingston. Half brother of major leaguer Joe Ausanio
    Joe Ausanio
    Joseph John Ausanio is a former Major League baseball relief pitcher who appeared in 41 games for the New York Yankees in and ....

    .
  • Ron Suskind
    Ron Suskind
    Ron Suskind is a Pulitzer Prize winning American journalist and best-selling author. He was the senior national affairs writer for The Wall Street Journal from 1993 to 2000 and has published the books A Hope in the Unseen, The Price of Loyalty, The One Percent Doctrine, The Way of the World and...

    , journalist and writer (b. 1959)
  • Anne Sweeney
    Anne Sweeney
    Anne Marie Sweeney is the Co-Chair of Disney Media Networks and President of Disney-ABC Television Group.-Life and career:...

     (b. 1957), Co-Chair of Disney Media Networks and President of the Disney-ABC Television Group
    Disney-ABC Television Group
    Disney-ABC Television Group manages all of The Walt Disney Company's worldwide entertainment and news television properties...

    , who has been named the "Most Powerful Woman in Entertainment" by The Hollywood Reporter, and one of the "50 Most Powerful Women in Business" by Fortune magazine and one of "The World's 100 Most Powerful Women" by Forbes
    Forbes
    Forbes is an American publishing and media company. Its flagship publication, the Forbes magazine, is published biweekly. Its primary competitors in the national business magazine category are Fortune, which is also published biweekly, and Business Week...

    , spent her childhood in Kingston and is a graduate of Kingston's Coleman High School.
  • John Vanderlyn
    John Vanderlyn
    John Vanderlyn was an American neoclassicist painter.-Biography:Vanderlyn was born at Kingston, New York. He was employed by a print-seller in New York, and was first instructed in art by Archibald Robinson , a Scotsman who was afterwards one of the directors of the American Academy of the Fine Arts...

     (1776–1852), a neoclassicist painter, was born in the city.
  • Calvert Vaux
    Calvert Vaux
    Calvert Vaux , was an architect and landscape designer. He is best remembered as the co-designer , of New York's Central Park....

     (1824–1895), a noted architect and landscape designer; co-designer of Central Park
    Central Park
    Central Park is a public park in the center of Manhattan in New York City, United States. The park initially opened in 1857, on of city-owned land. In 1858, Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux won a design competition to improve and expand the park with a plan they entitled the Greensward Plan...

    , NYC; buried in Kingston's Montrepose Cemetery
    Montrepose Cemetery
    -Burials:*Jervis McEntee , American painter*Thomas Cornell , American politician and businessman*Arthur Sherwood Flemming , United States Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare...

    .
  • Kate Youngman
    Kate Youngman
    Kate M. Youngman was an American missionary who established the Ihaien leprosy hospital in Tokyo, Japan, in 1894. It was active from 1894 until 1942.-History:...

    (1841-1910), a Christian missionary to Japan who established the Ihaien leprosy hospital in Tokyo, Japan.

External links