Kano school

Kano school

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[[File:Kano_Eitoku_010.jpg|right|thumb|350px|Detail of ''The Four Accomplishments'', by [[Kanō Eitoku]]. One of six folding screens: ink on paper. Shows people playing [[go (game)|go]].]] The '''{{nihongo|Kanō school|狩野派|Kanō-ha}}''' is one of the most famous schools of [[Japanese painting]]. The Kanō school of painting was the dominant style of painting until the [[Meiji period]]. It was founded by [[Kanō Masanobu]] (1434–1530), a contemporary of [[Sesshū Tōyō|Sesshū]] and student of [[Qiufen|Shūbun]]. Some scholars write that though Masanobu mastered elements of [[Chinese painting]] and of Shubun's style, he was overall mediocre and lacked the originality and creativity of his teacher. Nevertheless, Masanobu became an official painter in the Shogun's court, and it was this lofty position which granted the Kanō school influence and fame. The artists who followed him improved upon his style and methods, and within a generation the school flourished. The school's works are the paragons of [[Azuchi–Momoyama period|Momoyama period]] art, and while most schools specialize in one style, medium, or form, the Kanō school excels at two. Kanō painters often worked on a large scale, painting nature scenes of birds, plants, water, or other animals on sliding doors or screens, covering the background with gold leaf. Some of the most famous examples of these can be found at the [[Nijō Castle]] in [[Kyoto]]. The school is equally renowned, however, for its monochrome ink-on-silk landscapes. Kanō ink painters composed very flat pictures but they balanced impeccably detailed realistic depictions of animals and other subjects in the foreground with abstract, often entirely blank, clouds and other background elements. The use of negative space to indicate distance, and to imply mist, clouds, sky or sea is drawn from traditional Chinese modes and is used beautifully by the Kanō artists. Bold brush strokes and thus bold images are obtained in what is often a very subtle and soft medium. These expertly painted monochrome ink paintings contrast with the almost gaudy but no less beautiful gold-on-paper forms these artists created for walls and screens. == Artists of the Kanō School == [[File:Namban-11.jpg|right|thumb|300px|Screen detail depicting arrival of a Western ship, attributed to [[Kanō Naizen]] (1570–1616).]] * [[Kanō Masanobu]] (1434–1530): the school's founder * [[Oguri Sōtan]] (1413–81) * [[Kanō Motonobu]] (1476–1559): son of Masanobu * [[Kanō Eitoku]] (1543–1590) * [[Kanō Hideyoru]] (d. 1557) * [[Kanō Domi]] (1568–1600) * [[Kanō Sanraku]] (1559–1635) * [[Kanō Sansetsu]] (1589–1651): the leader of the [[Kyōganō school]], an offshoot of the Kanō school, based in [[Kyoto]] * [[Kanō Eino]] (1631–1697) * [[Kanō Tan'yū]] (1602–1674) * [[Kano Yukinobu]] (1643-1682), niece of [[Kanō Tan'yū]] * [[Kanō Tanshin]] (1653-1718) * [[Kanō Hōgai]] (1828-1888) * [[Hashimoto Gahō]] (1835-1908) * [[Watanabe Shikō]] (1683-1755) == External links == *[http://www.aisf.or.jp/~jaanus/deta/k/kanouha.htm JANNUS / Kanouha] {{painting-stub}} {{art-org-stub}} {{coord missing}} {{DEFAULTSORT:Kano school}}