Green-Wood Cemetery

Green-Wood Cemetery

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Green-Wood Cemetery was founded in 1838 as a rural cemetery
Rural cemetery
The rural cemetery or garden cemetery is a style of burial ground that uses landscaping in a park-like setting.As early as 1711 the architect Sir Christopher Wren had advocated the creation of burial grounds on the outskirts of town, "inclosed with a strong Brick Wall, and having a walk round, and...

 in Brooklyn
Brooklyn
Brooklyn is the most populous of New York City's five boroughs, with nearly 2.6 million residents, and the second-largest in area. Since 1896, Brooklyn has had the same boundaries as Kings County, which is now the most populous county in New York State and the second-most densely populated...

, Kings County
Kings County
-Canada:*Kings County, New Brunswick*Kings County, Nova Scotia*Kings County, Prince Edward Island and the related King's County -United States of America:*Kings County, California...

 , New York. It was granted National Historic Landmark
National Historic Landmark
A National Historic Landmark is a building, site, structure, object, or district, that is officially recognized by the United States government for its historical significance...

 status in 2006 by the U.S. Department of the Interior.

History


Located in Greenwood Heights, Brooklyn
Greenwood Heights, Brooklyn
Greenwood Heights is a neighborhood in the New York City borough of Brooklyn that takes part of its name from the neighborhood proximity to the Green-Wood Cemetery...

, it lies several blocks southwest of Prospect Park
Prospect Park (Brooklyn)
Prospect Park is a 585-acre public park in the New York City borough of Brooklyn located between Park Slope, Prospect-Lefferts Gardens, Kensington, Windsor Terrace and Flatbush Avenue, Grand Army Plaza and the Brooklyn Botanic Garden...

, between Park Slope
Park Slope, Brooklyn
Park Slope is a neighborhood in western Brooklyn, New York City's most populous borough. Park Slope is roughly bounded by Prospect Park West to the east, Fourth Avenue to the west, Flatbush Avenue to the north, and 15th Street to the south, though other definitions are sometimes offered. Generally...

, Windsor Terrace
Windsor Terrace, Brooklyn
Windsor Terrace is a neighborhood in the New York City borough of Brooklyn. It is bounded by Prospect Park to the northeast and Green-Wood Cemetery, a National Historic Landmark, to the southwest. Its southeastern boundary is Caton Avenue, while to the northwest it is bordered by Prospect Park West...

, Kensington
Kensington, Brooklyn
Kensington is a neighborhood in the center of the New York City borough of Brooklyn. It is the area south of Prospect Park and the Green-Wood Cemetery. It is bordered by Coney Island Avenue to the east, Fort Hamilton Parkway and Caton Avenue to the north, McDonald Avenue and 37th Street to the...

, and Sunset Park
Sunset Park, Brooklyn
Sunset Park is a neighborhood in the western section of the New York City borough of Brooklyn, USA. It is bounded by Greenwood Heights to the north, Borough Park to the east, Bay Ridge to the south, and Upper New York Bay to the west...

. Paul Goldberger
Paul Goldberger
Paul Goldberger is the Architecture Critic for The New Yorker, where since 1997 he has written the magazine's celebrated "Sky Line" column. He also holds the Joseph Urban Chair in Design and Architecture at The New School in New York City...

 in The New York Times
The New York Times
The New York Times is an American daily newspaper founded and continuously published in New York City since 1851. The New York Times has won 106 Pulitzer Prizes, the most of any news organization...

, wrote that it was said "it is the ambition of the New Yorker to live upon the Fifth Avenue, to take his airings in the Park, and to sleep with his fathers in Green-Wood". Inspired by Mount Auburn Cemetery
Mount Auburn Cemetery
Mount Auburn Cemetery was founded in 1831 as "America's first garden cemetery", or the first "rural cemetery", with classical monuments set in a rolling landscaped terrain...

 in Cambridge, Massachusetts
Cambridge, Massachusetts
Cambridge is a city in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, United States, in the Greater Boston area. It was named in honor of the University of Cambridge in England, an important center of the Puritan theology embraced by the town's founders. Cambridge is home to two of the world's most prominent...

, where a cemetery in a naturalistic park-like landscape in the English manner was first established, Green-Wood was able to take advantage of the varied topography provided by glacial moraine
Moraine
A moraine is any glacially formed accumulation of unconsolidated glacial debris which can occur in currently glaciated and formerly glaciated regions, such as those areas acted upon by a past glacial maximum. This debris may have been plucked off a valley floor as a glacier advanced or it may have...

s. Battle Hill, the highest point in Brooklyn, is on cemetery grounds, rising approximately 200 feet above sea level.

The cemetery was the idea of Henry Evelyn Pierrepont, a Brooklyn social leader. It was a popular tourist attraction in the 1850s and was the place most famous New Yorkers who died during the second half of the nineteenth century were buried. It is still an operating cemetery with approximately 600,000 graves spread out over 478 acres (1.9 km²). The rolling hills and dales, several ponds and an on-site chapel provide an environment that still draws visitors. There are several famous monuments located there, including a statue of DeWitt Clinton
DeWitt Clinton
DeWitt Clinton was an early American politician and naturalist who served as United States Senator and the sixth Governor of New York. In this last capacity he was largely responsible for the construction of the Erie Canal...

 and a Civil War Memorial. During the Civil War, Green-Wood Cemetery created the "Soldiers' Lot" for free veterans' burials.

The gates were designed by Richard Upjohn
Richard Upjohn
Richard Upjohn was an English-born architect who emigrated to the United States and became most famous for his Gothic Revival churches. He was partially responsible for launching the movement to such popularity in the United States. Upjohn also did extensive work in and helped to popularize the...

 in Gothic Revival style. The main entrance to the cemetery was built in 1861 of Belleville brownstone. The sculptured groups depicting biblical scenes over the gateways are the work of John M. Moffitt. A Designated Landmarks of New York plaque was erected on it in 1958 by the New York Community Trust.

Several wooden shelters were also built, including one in a Gothic Revival style, one resembling an Italian villa, and another resembling a Swiss chalet. A descendent colony of monk parakeet
Monk Parakeet
The Monk Parakeet, also known as the Quaker Parrot, is a species of parrot, in most treatments the only member of the genus Myiopsitta. It originates from the temperate to subtropical areas of Argentina and the surrounding countries in South America...

s that are believed to have escaped their containers while in transit now nests in the spires of the gate, as well as other areas in Brooklyn.

On December 5, 1876, the Brooklyn Theater Fire
Brooklyn Theater Fire
The Brooklyn Theater Fire was a catastrophic theater fire that broke out on the evening of December 5, 1876 in the city of Brooklyn, New York, United States. The conflagration claimed the lives of at least 278 individuals, with some accounts reporting over 300 dead. 103 unidentified victims were...

 claimed the lives of at least 278 individuals, with some accounts reporting over 300 dead. Out of that total, 103 unidentified victims were interred in a common grave at Green-Wood Cemetery. An obelisk near the main entrance at Fifth Avenue and 25th Street marks the burial site. More than two dozen identified victims were interred individually in separate sections at the Cemetery of the Evergreens in Brooklyn.

The cemetery was declared a National Historic Landmark
National Historic Landmark
A National Historic Landmark is a building, site, structure, object, or district, that is officially recognized by the United States government for its historical significance...

 in 2006.

In 1999, The Green-Wood Historic Fund, a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit institution, was created to continue preservation, beautification
Beautification
Beautification is the process of making visual improvements to a person, place or thing. With regard to a town, city or to an urban area, this most often involves planting trees, shrubbery, and other greenery, but frequently also includes adding decorative or historic-style street lights and other...

, educational programs and community outreach as the current "working cemetery
Cemetery
A cemetery is a place in which dead bodies and cremated remains are buried. The term "cemetery" implies that the land is specifically designated as a burying ground. Cemeteries in the Western world are where the final ceremonies of death are observed...

" evolves into a Brooklyn
Brooklyn
Brooklyn is the most populous of New York City's five boroughs, with nearly 2.6 million residents, and the second-largest in area. Since 1896, Brooklyn has had the same boundaries as Kings County, which is now the most populous county in New York State and the second-most densely populated...

 cultural institution.

Chapel


The chapel was completed in 1911. It was designed by the architectural firm of Warren and Wetmore
Warren and Wetmore
Warren and Wetmore was an architecture firm in New York City. It was a partnership between Whitney Warren and Charles Wetmore , that had one of the most extensive practices of its time and was known for the designing of large hotels.Whitney Warren was a cousin of the Vanderbilts and spent ten...

, who also designed Grand Central Terminal
Grand Central Terminal
Grand Central Terminal —often incorrectly called Grand Central Station, or shortened to simply Grand Central—is a terminal station at 42nd Street and Park Avenue in Midtown Manhattan in New York City, United States...

, the Commodore Hotel
Grand Hyatt New York
The Grand Hyatt New York is a hotel located directly east of Grand Central Terminal in Midtown Manhattan, New York City. It was originally built and opened on January 28, 1919 as The Commodore Hotel, but was completely rebuilt and modernized in 1980....

, the Yale Club
Yale Club
The Yale Club may be:*The Yale Club of New York City*The Yale Club of Philadelphia*The Yale Glee Club*The Yale Corinthian Yacht Club...

 and many other buildings. The architecture of the chapel is a reduced version of Christopher Wren
Christopher Wren
Sir Christopher Wren FRS is one of the most highly acclaimed English architects in history.He used to be accorded responsibility for rebuilding 51 churches in the City of London after the Great Fire in 1666, including his masterpiece, St. Paul's Cathedral, on Ludgate Hill, completed in 1710...

's Thomas Tower at Christ Church College in Oxford
Oxford
The city of Oxford is the county town of Oxfordshire, England. The city, made prominent by its medieval university, has a population of just under 165,000, with 153,900 living within the district boundary. It lies about 50 miles north-west of London. The rivers Cherwell and Thames run through...

. The chapel was restored in 2001.

Notable burials





  • Samuel Akerly (1785–1845), founder of the New York Institute for the Blind
    New York Institute for the Blind
    The New York Institute for the Blind was founded in 1831 as a school for blind children by Samuel Wood, a Quaker philanthropist, Samuel Akerly, a physician, and John Dennison Russ, a philanthropist and physician....

  • Harvey A. Allen
    Harvey A. Allen
    Harvey A. Allen was an officer in the United States Army who served as the fourth commander of the Department of Alaska, from September 20, 1871 to January 3, 1873....

     (1818?–1882), United States Army
    United States Army
    The United States Army is the main branch of the United States Armed Forces responsible for land-based military operations. It is the largest and oldest established branch of the U.S. military, and is one of seven U.S. uniformed services...

     officer, was Commander of the Department of Alaska 1871–1873.
  • Albert Anastasia
    Albert Anastasia
    Albert Anastasia was boss of what is now called the Gambino crime family, one of New York City's Five Families, from 1951-1957. He also ran a gang of contract killers called Murder Inc. which enforced the decisions of the Commission, the ruling council of the American Mafia...

     (1903–1957), mobster and contract killer for Murder Inc.
  • Othniel Boaz Askew (1972–2003), politician and assassin of New York City Council member
    New York City Council
    The New York City Council is the lawmaking body of the City of New York. It has 51 members from 51 council districts throughout the five boroughs. The Council serves as a check against the mayor in a "strong" mayor-council government model. The council monitors performance of city agencies and...

    , James E. Davis (cremated), who was relocated to another cemetery
  • James Bard
    James Bard
    James Bard was a marine artist of the 19th century. He is known for his paintings of watercraft, particularly of steamboats. His works are sometimes characterized as naïve art. Although Bard died poor and almost forgotten, his works have since become valuable...

     (1815–1897), marine artist, buried in unmarked grave
  • Peter Townsend Barlow
    Peter Townsend Barlow
    Peter Townsend Barlow was an American jurist who served as a New York City Magistrate for nearly two decades.-Early Life and Career:...

     (1857–1921), New York City Magistrate
  • Jean-Michel Basquiat
    Jean-Michel Basquiat
    Jean-Michel Basquiat was an American artist. His career in art began as a graffiti artist in New York City in the late 1970s, and in the 1980s produced Neo-expressionist painting.-Early life:...

     (1960–1988), artist
  • William Holbrook Beard
    William Holbrook Beard
    William Holbrook Beard was an American painter.Beard was born in Painesville, Ohio. He studied abroad, and in 1861 moved to New York City, where, in 1862, he became a member of the National Academy of Design. Beard was a prolific artist...

     (1824–1900), painter of Bulls and Bears representing the market cycle; a bear statue sits on top of his headstone
  • Henry Ward Beecher
    Henry Ward Beecher
    Henry Ward Beecher was a prominent Congregationalist clergyman, social reformer, abolitionist, and speaker in the mid to late 19th century...

     (1813–1887), abolitionist
  • James Gordon Bennett, Sr.
    James Gordon Bennett, Sr.
    James Gordon Bennett, Sr. was the founder, editor and publisher of the New York Herald and a major figure in the history of American newspapers.-Biography:...

     (1795–1872), founder/publisher of the New York Herald
    New York Herald
    The New York Herald was a large distribution newspaper based in New York City that existed between May 6, 1835, and 1924.-History:The first issue of the paper was published by James Gordon Bennett, Sr., on May 6, 1835. By 1845 it was the most popular and profitable daily newspaper in the UnitedStates...

  • Henry Bergh
    Henry Bergh
    Henry Bergh founded the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals in April, 1866, three days after the first effective legislation against animal cruelty in the United States was passed into law by the New York State Legislature...

     (1818–1888), founder of the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals
    American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals
    The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals is a non-profit organization dedicated to preventing cruelty towards animals...

  • Leonard Bernstein
    Leonard Bernstein
    Leonard Bernstein August 25, 1918 – October 14, 1990) was an American conductor, composer, author, music lecturer and pianist. He was among the first conductors born and educated in the United States of America to receive worldwide acclaim...

     (1918–1990), composer, conductor
  • Jane Augusta Blankman
    Fanny White
    Fanny White, a.k.a. Jane Augusta Blankman was one of the most successful courtesans of ante-bellum New York City. Known for her beauty, wit, and business acumen, Fanny White accumulated a significant fortune over the course of her career, married a middle-class lawyer in her thirties, and died...

     (1823-1860), courtesan
  • Samuel Blatchford
    Samuel Blatchford
    Samuel Blatchford was an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States from April 3, 1882 until his death.-Early life:...

     (1820–1893), U.S. Supreme Court
    Supreme Court of the United States
    The Supreme Court of the United States is the highest court in the United States. It has ultimate appellate jurisdiction over all state and federal courts, and original jurisdiction over a small range of cases...

     Justice
  • Alice Cary
    Alice Cary
    Alice Cary was an American poet, and the sister of fellow poet Phoebe Cary .-Biography:Alice Cary was born on April 26, 1820, in Mount Healthy, Ohio near Cincinnati. Her parents lived on a farm bought by Robert Cary in 1813 in what is now North College Hill, Ohio. He called the Clovernook Farm...

     (1820–1871), poet, author
  • Phoebe Cary
    Phoebe Cary
    Phoebe Cary was an American poet, and the younger sister of poet Alice Cary . The sisters co-published poems in 1849, and then each went on to publish volumes of her own...

     (1824–1871), poet, author
  • Henry Chadwick (1824–1908), Baseball Hall of Fame member (memorial)
  • Kate Claxton
    Kate Claxton
    Kate Claxton was an American actress, born Kate Elizabeth Cone at Somerville, New Jersey to Spencer Wallace Cone and Josephine Martinez. She made her first appearance on the stage in Chicago with Lotta Crabtree in 1870, and in the same year joined Augustin Daly's Fifth Avenue Theatre in New York....

     (1850–1924) American theatre actress noted for her role of Louise in the play The Two Orphans.
  • DeWitt Clinton
    DeWitt Clinton
    DeWitt Clinton was an early American politician and naturalist who served as United States Senator and the sixth Governor of New York. In this last capacity he was largely responsible for the construction of the Erie Canal...

     (1769–1828), unsuccessful U.S. presidential candidate 1812; U.S. Senator from New York; seventh and ninth Governor of New York
    Governor of New York
    The Governor of the State of New York is the chief executive of the State of New York. The governor is the head of the executive branch of New York's state government and the commander-in-chief of the state's military and naval forces. The officeholder is afforded the courtesy title of His/Her...

  • William J. Coombs
    William J. Coombs
    William Jerome Coombs was a Bourbon Democrat member of the United States House of Representatives from New York....

     (1833–1922), U.S. Congressman from Brooklyn
  • Peter Cooper
    Peter Cooper
    Peter Cooper was an American industrialist, inventor, philanthropist, and candidate for President of the United States...

     (1791–1883), inventor, manufacturer, abolitionist, founder of Cooper Union
    Cooper Union
    The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art, commonly referred to simply as Cooper Union, is a privately funded college in the East Village neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City, United States, located at Cooper Square and Astor Place...

  • James Creighton, Jr. (1841–1862), baseball player
  • Edwin Pearce Christy
    Edwin Pearce Christy
    Edwin Pearce Christy was an American composer, singer, actor and stage producer. He is more commonly known as E. P. Christy, and was the founder of the blackface minstrel group Christy's Minstrels.-Background:...

     (1815–1862) Minstrel, known for the song "Swanee River".
  • Nathaniel Currier
    Nathaniel Currier
    Nathaniel Currier was an American lithographer, who headed the company Currier & Ives with James Ives.-Early years:...

     (1813–1888), artist ("Currier and Ives
    Currier and Ives
    Currier and Ives was a successful American printmaking firm headed by Nathaniel Currier and James Merritt Ives . Based in New York City from 1834–1907, the prolific firm produced prints from paintings by fine artists as black and white lithographs that were hand colored...

    ")
  • Bronson M. Cutting
    Bronson M. Cutting
    Bronson Murray Cutting was a United States Senator from New Mexico, publisher, and military attaché.-Biography:Bronson Cutting was born in Great River, Long Island, New York, on June 23, 1888 at his family's country seat of Westbrook. He was the third of four children born to William Bayard...

     (1888–1935), United States Senator from New Mexico
    New Mexico
    New Mexico is a state located in the southwest and western regions of the United States. New Mexico is also usually considered one of the Mountain States. With a population density of 16 per square mile, New Mexico is the sixth-most sparsely inhabited U.S...

     (1927–1928; 1929–1935)
  • James E. Davis (1962–2003), assassinated City Councilman, was buried here for a few days. Upon learning his killer's ashes were also in Green-Wood, his family had his body exhumed and reinterred in the Cemetery of the Evergreens.
  • Richard Delafield
    Richard Delafield
    Richard Delafield served as superintendent of the United States Military Academy, was Chief of Engineers, and was a major general in the Union Army during the American Civil War.-Biography:...

     (1798–1873), Chief of Engineers
    Chief of Engineers
    The Chief of Engineers commands the US Army Corps of Engineers. As a staff officer at The Pentagon, the Chief advises the Army on engineering matters and serves as the Army's topographer and the proponent for real estate and other related engineering programs....

     and Superintendent of West Point
    United States Military Academy
    The United States Military Academy at West Point is a four-year coeducational federal service academy located at West Point, New York. The academy sits on scenic high ground overlooking the Hudson River, north of New York City...

  • Francis E. Dorn
    Francis E. Dorn
    Francis Edwin Dorn was a member of the United States House of Representatives from New York.He was born in Brooklyn. He attended St. Augustine and Bishop Loughlin Memorial High Schools. Dorn graduated from Fordham University in 1932 and Fordham University School of Law in 1935. He also studied at...

     (1911–1987), US Naval Commander, attorney and 12th District New York congressman for Brooklyn, Kings County.
  • Mabel Smith Douglass
    Mabel Smith Douglass
    Mabel Smith Douglass was the first dean, in 1918 of the New Jersey College for Women. In September 1932 she retired due to ill health. On September 21, 1933, she went rowing on Lake Placid and never returned. She was last seen rowing alone across the lake by servants at a camp she owned...

     (1874–1933), founder and first dean of the New Jersey College for Women
  • Thomas Clark Durant (1820–1885), key figure in building the First Transcontinental Railroad
    First Transcontinental Railroad
    The First Transcontinental Railroad was a railroad line built in the United States of America between 1863 and 1869 by the Central Pacific Railroad of California and the Union Pacific Railroad that connected its statutory Eastern terminus at Council Bluffs, Iowa/Omaha, Nebraska The First...

  • James Durno (1795–1873), husband of labor activist Sarah Bagley
    Sarah Bagley
    Sarah George Bagley Sarah George Bagley was an advocate for women's rights and one of the most important labor leaders in New England during the 1840s. An advocate of shorter workdays for factory operatives and mechanics, she campaigned to make ten hours of labor per day the maximum in Massachusetts...

     (1806-188?)
  • Fred Ebb
    Fred Ebb
    Fred Ebb was an American musical theatre lyricist who had many successful collaborations with composer John Kander. The Kander and Ebb team frequently wrote for such performers as Liza Minnelli and Chita Rivera....

     (1928–2004), lyricist
  • Charles Ebbets
    Charles Ebbets
    Charles Hercules Ebbets, Sr. was an American sports executive who owned the Brooklyn Dodgers from 1902 to 1925.-Biography:...

     (1859–1925), baseball team (Brooklyn Dodgers
    Los Angeles Dodgers
    The Los Angeles Dodgers are a professional baseball team based in Los Angeles, California. The Dodgers are members of Major League Baseball's National League West Division. Established in 1883, the team originated in Brooklyn, New York, where it was known by a number of nicknames before becoming...

    ) owner; built Ebbets Field
    Ebbets Field
    Ebbets Field was a Major League Baseball park located in the Flatbush section of Brooklyn, New York, USA, on a city block which is now considered to be part of the Crown Heights neighborhood. It was the home of the Brooklyn Dodgers of the National League. It was also a venue for professional football...

  • Elizabeth F. Ellet
    Elizabeth F. Ellet
    Elizabeth Fries Lummis Ellet was an American writer, historian and poet. She was the first writer to record the lives of women who contributed to the American Revolutionary War....

     (1818–1877), American writer and poet
  • Charles Feltman
    Hot dog
    A hot dog is a sausage served in a sliced bun. It is very often garnished with mustard, ketchup, onions, mayonnaise, relish and/or sauerkraut.-History:...

     (1841–1910), claimed to be the first person to put a hot dog on a bun
  • Edward Ferrero
    Edward Ferrero
    Edward Ferrero was one of the leading dance instructors, choreographers, and ballroom operators in the United States. He also served as a Union Army general in the American Civil War, best remembered for his role in the Battle of the Crater in 1864.-Early life and career:Ferrero was born in...

     (1831–1899), American Civil War General at the Battle of the Crater
    Battle of the Crater
    The Battle of the Crater was a battle of the American Civil War, part of the Siege of Petersburg. It took place on July 30, 1864, between the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia, commanded by General Robert E. Lee and the Union Army of the Potomac, commanded by Major General George G. Meade The...

     and in the Appomattox Campaign
    Appomattox Campaign
    The Appomattox Campaign was a series of battles fought March 29 – April 9, 1865, in Virginia that culminated in the surrender of Confederate General Robert E...

  • Edwin Forbes
    Edwin Forbes
    Edwin Austin Forbes was an American landscape painter and etcher who first gained fame during the American Civil War for his detailed and dramatic sketches of military subjects, including battlefield combat scenes.-Biography:...

     (1839–1895), American Civil War and postbellum artist, illustrator, and etcher.
  • Isaac Kaufmann Funk
    Isaac Kaufmann Funk
    Isaac Kaufmann Funk was an American Lutheran minister, editor, lexicographer, publisher, and spelling reformer. He was the co-founder of Funk & Wagnalls Company, the father of author Wilfred J. Funk, and the grandfather of author Peter Funk...

     (1839–1912), American editor, lexicographer, publisher, and spelling reformer
  • Joey Gallo (1929–1972), mobster
  • Asa Bird Gardiner
    Asa Bird Gardiner
    Asa Bird Gardiner was a controversial American soldier, attorney, and prosecutor. He received the Medal of Honor for his service in the American Civil War in 1872, it was rescinded when the supporting documentation was not found...

     (1839–1919), controversial soldier, attorney, and prosecutor
  • Robert Selden Garnett
    Robert S. Garnett
    Robert Selden Garnett was a career military officer, serving in the United States Army until the American Civil War, when he became a Confederate States Army brigadier general. He was the first general officer killed in the Civil War.-Early life and career:Garnett was born at the family plantation...

     (1819–1861), brigadier general of the Confederate States Army
    Confederate States Army
    The Confederate States Army was the army of the Confederate States of America while the Confederacy existed during the American Civil War. On February 8, 1861, delegates from the seven Deep South states which had already declared their secession from the United States of America adopted the...

     and the first general killed in the American Civil War
  • Henry George, Jr.
    Henry George, Jr.
    Henry George, Jr. was a United States Representative from New York and son of American political economist Henry George .-Biography:...

     (1862–1916), United States Representative from New York
  • Louis Moreau Gottschalk
    Louis Moreau Gottschalk
    Louis Moreau Gottschalk was an American composer and pianist, best known as a virtuoso performer of his own romantic piano works...

     (1829–1869), composer
  • John Franklin Gray
    John Franklin Gray
    John Franklin Gray was an American educator and physician a pioneer in the field of and the first practitioner of homoeopathy in the United States...

     (1804–1882), the first practitioner of Homeopathy
    Homeopathy
    Homeopathy is a form of alternative medicine in which practitioners claim to treat patients using highly diluted preparations that are believed to cause healthy people to exhibit symptoms that are similar to those exhibited by the patient...

     in the United States.
  • Horace Greeley
    Horace Greeley
    Horace Greeley was an American newspaper editor, a founder of the Liberal Republican Party, a reformer, a politician, and an outspoken opponent of slavery...

     (1811–1872), unsuccessful U.S. presidential candidate 1872; founder of the New York Tribune
    New York Tribune
    The New York Tribune was an American newspaper, first established by Horace Greeley in 1841, which was long considered one of the leading newspapers in the United States...

  • Robert Stockton Green
    Robert Stockton Green
    Robert Stockton Green was an American Democratic Party politician, who served as the 27th Governor of New Jersey from 1887–1890.-Biography:...

     (1831–1895), Governor of New Jersey
    Governor of New Jersey
    The Office of the Governor of New Jersey is the executive branch for the U.S. state of New Jersey. The office of Governor is an elected position, for which elected officials serve four year terms. While individual politicians may serve as many terms as they can be elected to, Governors cannot be...

  • Rufus Wilmot Griswold
    Rufus Wilmot Griswold
    Rufus Wilmot Griswold was an American anthologist, editor, poet, and critic. Born in Vermont, Griswold left home when he was 15 years old. He worked as a journalist, editor, and critic in Philadelphia, New York City, and elsewhere. He built up a strong literary reputation, in part due to his 1842...

     (1815–1857), literary critic
  • Paul Hall
    Paul Hall (labor leader)
    Paul Hall was an American labor leader from Inglenook in Jefferson County, Alabama. He was a founding member and president of the Seafarers International Union from 1957 to 1980...

     (1914–1980), labor leader
  • Henry Wager Halleck
    Henry Wager Halleck
    Henry Wager Halleck was a United States Army officer, scholar, and lawyer. A noted expert in military studies, he was known by a nickname that became derogatory, "Old Brains." He was an important participant in the admission of California as a state and became a successful lawyer and land developer...

     (1815–1872),Chief of Staff during the latter part of the American Civil War
    American Civil War
    The American Civil War was a civil war fought in the United States of America. In response to the election of Abraham Lincoln as President of the United States, 11 southern slave states declared their secession from the United States and formed the Confederate States of America ; the other 25...

  • William Stewart Halsted
    William Stewart Halsted
    William Stewart Halsted was an American surgeon who emphasized strict aseptic technique during surgical procedures, was an early champion of newly discovered anesthetics, and introduced several new operations, including the radical mastectomy for breast cancer...

     (1852–1922), pioneer in American medicine and surgery, often credited as the "Father of Modern American Surgery"
  • John Hardy
    John Hardy (US politician)
    John Hardy was a United States Representative from New York.Hardy was born in Scotland on September 19, 1835, he immigrated to the United States in 1839 with his parents, who settled in New York City...

     (1835–1913), member of the U.S. House of Representatives from New York
    New York
    New York is a state in the Northeastern region of the United States. It is the nation's third most populous state. New York is bordered by New Jersey and Pennsylvania to the south, and by Connecticut, Massachusetts and Vermont to the east...

  • Townsend Harris
    Townsend Harris
    Townsend Harris was a successful New York City merchant and minor politician, and the first United States Consul General to Japan...

     (1804–1878), first U.S. Consul General to Japan
  • William S. Hart
    William S. Hart
    William Surrey Hart was an American silent film actor, screenwriter, director and producer. He is remembered for having "imbued all of his characters with honor and integrity."-Biography:...

     (1864–1946), star of silent "Western" movies
  • Thomas Hastings
    Thomas Hastings (composer)
    Thomas Hastings was an American composer, primarily an author of hymn tunes of which the best known is Toplady for the hymn Rock of Ages. He was born to Dr. Seth and Eunice Hastings in Washington, Connecticut...

     (1784–1872) - wrote the music to the hymn "Rock of Ages"
  • Joseph Henderson
    Joseph Henderson (Pilot)
    Joseph Henderson was an early American harbor pilot. He was well known for being one of the oldest and wealthiest pilots in the New York Sandy Hook service. -Early life:...

     (1826–1890), notable harbor pilot
  • Philip A. Herfort
    Philip A. Herfort
    Philip Adolph Herfort was a German violinist and orchestra leader.He was born in Berlin, Germany to Jewish parents, Adolph Herfort and Clara Herfort née Maass...

     (1851–1921), violinist and orchestra leader
  • Abram S. Hewitt (1822–1903), Teacher, lawyer, iron manufacturer, U.S. Congressman, and a mayor of New York. Son-in-law of Peter Cooper
    Peter Cooper
    Peter Cooper was an American industrialist, inventor, philanthropist, and candidate for President of the United States...

    .
  • Henry B. Hidden
    Henry B. Hidden
    Henry B. Hidden was a First Lieutenant in the Union Army during the American Civil War. Hidden is believed to be the first cavalry officer killed in action in the Army of the Potomac and the first officer of Union volunteer cavalry killed in the Civil War.-Biography:Henry B...

     (c. 1839–1862), American Civil War cavalry officer
  • DeWolf Hopper
    DeWolf Hopper
    William DeWolf Hopper was an American actor, singer, comedian, and theatrical producer. Although a star of the musical stage, he was best-known for performing the popular baseball poem Casey at the Bat. -Biography:...

     (1858–1935), actor
  • Elias Howe
    Elias Howe
    Elias Howe, Jr. was an American inventor and sewing machine pioneer.-Early life & family:Howe was born on July 9, 1819 to Dr. Elias Howe, Sr. and Polly Howe in Spencer, Massachusetts. Howe spent his childhood and early adult years in Massachusetts where he apprenticed in a textile factory in...

     (1819–1867), invented the sewing machine
    Sewing machine
    A sewing machine is a textile machine used to stitch fabric, cards and other material together with thread. Sewing machines were invented during the first Industrial Revolution to decrease the amount of manual sewing work performed in clothing companies...

     (see Walter Hunt
    Walter Hunt
    Walter Hunt was an American mechanic. He lived and worked in New York state. Through the course of his work he became renowned for being a prolific inventor, notably of the lockstitch sewing machine , safety pin , a forerunner of the Winchester repeating rifle, a successful flax spinner, knife...

    )
  • Walter Hunt
    Walter Hunt
    Walter Hunt was an American mechanic. He lived and worked in New York state. Through the course of his work he became renowned for being a prolific inventor, notably of the lockstitch sewing machine , safety pin , a forerunner of the Winchester repeating rifle, a successful flax spinner, knife...

     (1785–1869), invented the safety pin
    Safety pin
    A safety pin is a simple fastening device, a variation of the regular pin which includes a simple spring mechanism and a clasp. The clasp serves two purposes: to form a closed loop thereby properly fastening the pin to whatever it is applied to, and to cover the end of the pin to protect the user...

  • James Merritt Ives
    James Merritt Ives
    James Merritt Ives was a American lithographer, bookkeeper, and businessman. He oversaw the business and financial side of the firm, Currier and Ives, which he co-managed with his business partner, Nathaniel Currier....

     (1824–1895), artist ("Currier and Ives
    Currier and Ives
    Currier and Ives was a successful American printmaking firm headed by Nathaniel Currier and James Merritt Ives . Based in New York City from 1834–1907, the prolific firm produced prints from paintings by fine artists as black and white lithographs that were hand colored...

    ")
  • Paul Jabara
    Paul Jabara
    Paul Jabara was an American actor, singer, and songwriter of Lebanese ancestry. He wrote Donna Summer's "Last Dance" from Thank God It's Friday and Barbra Streisand's song "The Main Event/Fight" from The Main Event...

     (1948–1992), actor, singer and songwriter
  • Leonard Jerome
    Leonard Jerome
    Leonard Walter Jerome was a Brooklyn, New York, financier and grandfather of Winston Churchill.- Early life :...

     (1817–1891), entrepreneur, grandfather of Winston Churchill
    Winston Churchill
    Sir Winston Leonard Spencer-Churchill, was a predominantly Conservative British politician and statesman known for his leadership of the United Kingdom during the Second World War. He is widely regarded as one of the greatest wartime leaders of the century and served as Prime Minister twice...

  • Laura Keene
    Laura Keene
    Laura Keene was a British-born American stage actress and manager. In her twenty-year career, she became known as the first powerful female manager in New York.-Early life:...

     (1826–1873), actress (on stage when Lincoln
    Abraham Lincoln
    Abraham Lincoln was the 16th President of the United States, serving from March 1861 until his assassination in April 1865. He successfully led his country through a great constitutional, military and moral crisis – the American Civil War – preserving the Union, while ending slavery, and...

     was shot)
  • Florence La Badie
    Florence La Badie
    Florence La Badie was an American actress in the early days of the silent film era. Though little known today, she was a major star between 1911 and 1917, her career was at its height and climbing when she died unexpectedly due to injuries sustained during an automobile accident.-Early life:While...

    , (1888–1917), actress
  • John La Farge (1835–1910), artist
  • Laura Jean Libbey
    Laura Jean Libbey
    Laura Jean Libbey , was an American writer.The highly popular author of fiction, her works were what became known as dime novels. Today they would be categorised as formulaic romance novels....

     (1862–1924), popular "dime-store" novelist
  • Brockholst Livingston, U.S. Supreme Court Justice
  • William Livingston
    William Livingston
    William Livingston served as the Governor of New Jersey during the American Revolutionary War and was a signer of the United States Constitution.-Early life:...

     (1723–1790), signer of the U.S. Constitution; first Governor of New Jersey
    Governor of New Jersey
    The Office of the Governor of New Jersey is the executive branch for the U.S. state of New Jersey. The office of Governor is an elected position, for which elected officials serve four year terms. While individual politicians may serve as many terms as they can be elected to, Governors cannot be...

  • William Lewis Lockwood
    William Lewis Lockwood
    William Lewis Lockwood was one of the founders of Sigma Chi fraternity. He was born in New York City and was admitted to Miami University in Oxford, Ohio at the age of eighteen.-Sigma Chi Involvement:...

     (1836–1867), one of the founders of the Sigma Chi
    Sigma Chi
    Sigma Chi is the largest and one of the oldest college Greek-letter secret and social fraternities in North America with 244 active chapters and more than . Sigma Chi was founded on June 28, 1855 at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio when members split from Delta Kappa Epsilon...

     Fraternity
  • Pierre Lorillard IV
    Pierre Lorillard IV
    Pierre Lorillard IV was an American tobacco manufacturer and thoroughbred race horse owner.-Biography:...

     (1833–1901), tobacco tycoon, introduced the tuxedo to the U.S.
  • Susan McKinney Steward (1847–1918) one of the first black women to earn a medical degree, and the first in the state of New York
    New York
    New York is a state in the Northeastern region of the United States. It is the nation's third most populous state. New York is bordered by New Jersey and Pennsylvania to the south, and by Connecticut, Massachusetts and Vermont to the east...

  • Ormsby M. Mitchel
    Ormsby M. Mitchel
    Ormsby MacKnight Mitchel was an American astronomer and major general in the American Civil War....

     (1805-–1862) American astronomer and major general in the American Civil War
  • Henry James Montague
    Henry James Montague
    Henry James Montague was the stage name of Henry James Mann, , and American actor born in England.-Biography:He was born in 1844.He appeared in...

     (1840–1878), stage actor
  • Lola Montez
    Lola Montez
    Eliza Rosanna Gilbert, Countess of Landsfeld , better known by the stage name Lola Montez, was an Irish dancer and actress who became famous as a "Spanish dancer", courtesan and mistress of King Ludwig I of Bavaria, who made her Countess of Landsfeld. She used her influence to institute liberal...

     (1821–1861), actress and mistress of many notable men among them King Ludwig I of Bavaria
    Ludwig I of Bavaria
    Ludwig I was a German king of Bavaria from 1825 until the 1848 revolutions in the German states.-Crown prince:...

  • Samuel F.B. Morse (1791–1872), invented Morse code
    Morse code
    Morse code is a method of transmitting textual information as a series of on-off tones, lights, or clicks that can be directly understood by a skilled listener or observer without special equipment...

    , language of the telegraph
  • Violet Oakley
    Violet Oakley
    Violet Oakley was an American artist known for her murals and her work in stained glass. She was a student and later a faculty member at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts.-Life:...

     (1874–1961), artist.
  • James Kirke Paulding
    James Kirke Paulding
    James Kirke Paulding was an American writer and, for a time, the United States Secretary of the Navy.-Biography:...

     (1779–1860), U.S. Secretary of the Navy under Martin Van Buren
    Martin Van Buren
    Martin Van Buren was the eighth President of the United States . Before his presidency, he was the eighth Vice President and the tenth Secretary of State, under Andrew Jackson ....

    ; thought to be "author" of "Peter picked a peck of pickled peppers".
  • James "Steve" Phelan, (1942–2011) Chief Engineer and Marine Superintendent, Circle Line Statue of Liberty Ferry Inc.
  • Anson Greene Phelps
    Anson Greene Phelps
    Anson Greene Phelps was a co-founder of mining company Phelps Dodge, which he founded in 1833 along with his son-in-law William E. Dodge.-Early life:...

    , (1781–1853) founder of Phelps, Dodge mining and copper company
  • William "Bill The Butcher" Poole
    William Poole
    William Poole , also known as Bill the Butcher, was a member of the New York City gang the Bowery Boys, a bare-knuckle boxer, and a leader of the Know Nothing political movement.-Early life:...

     (1821–1855), a member of the Bowery Boys
    Bowery Boys
    The Bowery Boys were a nativist, anti-Catholic, and anti-Irish gang based north of the Five Points district of New York City in the mid-19th century. They were primarily stationed in the Bowery section of New York, which was, at the time, extended north of the Five Points...

     gang and the Know Nothing
    Know Nothing
    The Know Nothing was a movement by the nativist American political faction of the 1840s and 1850s. It was empowered by popular fears that the country was being overwhelmed by German and Irish Catholic immigrants, who were often regarded as hostile to Anglo-Saxon Protestant values and controlled by...

     political party; also a bare-knuckle
    Bare-knuckle boxing
    Bare-knuckle boxing is the original form of boxing, closely related to ancient combat sports...

     boxer
  • Henry Jarvis Raymond
    Henry Jarvis Raymond
    Henry Jarvis Raymond was an American journalist and politician and founder of The New York Times.-Early life and ancestors:...

    , (1820–1869) American journalist and politician and founder of The New York Times
    The New York Times
    The New York Times is an American daily newspaper founded and continuously published in New York City since 1851. The New York Times has won 106 Pulitzer Prizes, the most of any news organization...

  • Samuel C. Reid (1783–1861), suggested the design upon which all U.S. flags since 1818 have been based
  • Alice Roosevelt
    Alice Hathaway Lee Roosevelt
    Alice Hathaway Lee Roosevelt was the first wife of Theodore Roosevelt. They had one child, Alice Lee Roosevelt.- Early Life and Courtship by Theodore Roosevelt :...

     (1861–1884), first wife of U.S. President Theodore Roosevelt
    Theodore Roosevelt
    Theodore "Teddy" Roosevelt was the 26th President of the United States . He is noted for his exuberant personality, range of interests and achievements, and his leadership of the Progressive Movement, as well as his "cowboy" persona and robust masculinity...

  • Martha Bulloch Roosevelt (1834–1884), mother of U.S. President Theodore Roosevelt
  • Robert Roosevelt
    Robert Roosevelt
    Robert Barnwell Roosevelt, also known as Robert Barnhill Roosevelt , was a sportsman, author and United States Congressman from New York .-Biography:...

     (1829–1906), uncle of U.S. President Theodore Roosevelt
  • Theodore Roosevelt, Sr.
    Theodore Roosevelt, Sr.
    Theodore Roosevelt, Sr. was the father of U.S. President Theodore Roosevelt and the paternal grandfather of American first lady Eleanor Roosevelt. He was the son of Cornelius Van Schaak Roosevelt and Margaret Barnhill...

     (1831–1878), father of U.S. President Theodore Roosevelt
  • Henry Rutgers
    Henry Rutgers
    Henry Rutgers was a United States Revolutionary War hero and philanthropist from New York City, New York.-Biography:...

     (1745-1830) Revolutionary War hero, philanthropist, namesake of Rutgers University
  • Ira Sankey (1840–1908), hymn
    Hymn
    A hymn is a type of song, usually religious, specifically written for the purpose of praise, adoration or prayer, and typically addressed to a deity or deities, or to a prominent figure or personification...

     composer
  • Frederick August Otto Schwarz
    Frederick August Otto Schwarz
    Frederick August Otto Schwarz was a toy retailer who started FAO Schwarz. -Biography:He was born in 1836 at Herford, Westphalia, Germany, and immigrated in 1856 with his three brothers: Henry, Richard, and Gustav. He worked for a Baltimore stationery importer...

     (1836–1911), founder of specialty toy retailer FAO Schwarz
  • Elizabeth Cochrane Seaman
    Nellie Bly
    Nellie Bly was the pen name of American pioneer female journalist Elizabeth Jane Cochran. She remains notable for two feats: a record-breaking trip around the world in emulation of Jules Verne's character Phileas Fogg, and an exposé in which she faked insanity to study a mental institution from...

     ("Nellie Bly") (1864–1922), American pioneer female journalist.
  • Eli Siegel
    Eli Siegel
    Eli Siegel was the poet and critic who founded the philosophy Aesthetic Realism in 1941. He wrote the award-winning poem, "Hot Afternoons Have Been in Montana", two highly acclaimed volumes of poetry, a critical consideration of Henry James's The Turn of the Screw titled James and the Children,...

     (1902–1978), poet, educator, founder of the philosophy Aesthetic Realism
    Aesthetic Realism
    Aesthetic Realism is the philosophy founded by Eli Siegel in 1941. It is based on three core principles. First, according to Siegel, the deepest desire of every person is to like the world on an honest or accurate basis...

    .
  • Henry Warner Slocum
    Henry Warner Slocum
    Henry Warner Slocum , was a Union general during the American Civil War and later served in the United States House of Representatives from New York. During the war, he was one of the youngest major generals in the Army and fought numerous major battles in the Eastern Theater and in Georgia and the...

     (1827–1894), Union General of the American Civil War
    American Civil War
    The American Civil War was a civil war fought in the United States of America. In response to the election of Abraham Lincoln as President of the United States, 11 southern slave states declared their secession from the United States and formed the Confederate States of America ; the other 25...

    , U.S. House Representative from N.Y.
  • Ole Singstad
    Ole Singstad
    Ole Knutsen Singstad was a Norwegian-American civil engineer who innovated the ventilation system for the Holland Tunnel and advanced the use of the "Sunk-tube" method of underwater vehicular tunnel building, a system of constructing the tunnels with prefabricated sections.By 1950...

     (1882–1969) Norwegian-American civil engineer
    Civil engineer
    A civil engineer is a person who practices civil engineering; the application of planning, designing, constructing, maintaining, and operating infrastructures while protecting the public and environmental health, as well as improving existing infrastructures that have been neglected.Originally, a...

    , designed Lincoln Tunnel
    Lincoln Tunnel
    The Lincoln Tunnel is a long tunnel under the Hudson River, connecting Weehawken, New Jersey and the borough of Manhattan in New York City.-History:...

     and others.
  • Francis Barretto Spinola
    Francis Barretto Spinola
    Francis Barretto Spinola was the first Portuguese American to be elected to the United States House of Representatives, serving as a representative from New York from 1887 to 1891...

     (1821–1891), first Italian-American elected to the U.S. House of Representatives
    United States House of Representatives
    The United States House of Representatives is one of the two Houses of the United States Congress, the bicameral legislature which also includes the Senate.The composition and powers of the House are established in Article One of the Constitution...

  • Henry Steinway (1797–1871), founder of Steinway & Sons
    Steinway & Sons
    Steinway & Sons, also known as Steinway , is an American and German manufacturer of handmade pianos, founded 1853 in Manhattan in New York City by German immigrant Heinrich Engelhard Steinweg...

    , piano
    Piano
    The piano is a musical instrument played by means of a keyboard. It is one of the most popular instruments in the world. Widely used in classical and jazz music for solo performances, ensemble use, chamber music and accompaniment, the piano is also very popular as an aid to composing and rehearsal...

     manufacturers
  • William Steinway
    William Steinway
    William Steinway, also Wilhelm Steinway, born Wilhelm Steinweg , son of Steinway & Sons founder Henry E. Steinway, was a businessman and civic leader who was influential in the development of Astoria, New York....

     (1836–1896), son of Henry Steinway, and founder of Steinway, New York
  • John Austin Stevens Jr.
    John Austin Stevens
    John Austin Stevens Jr. was a leader of business, an adviser of government and a student of the American Revolution. While he was born to a prominent banking family with political connections, it was his interest of U.S...

     (1827–1910), founder of Sons of the Revolution
  • James S. T. Stranahan
    James S. T. Stranahan
    James Samuel Thomas Stranahan was a United States Representative from New York.-Early years:Born in Peterboro, Madison County, New York to Samuel Stranahan and Marrianne Fitch. He attended the common schools and Cazenovia Seminary. He founded the town of Florence in Oneida County in 1832 and...

     (1808–1898), "Father of Prospect Park
    Prospect Park (Brooklyn)
    Prospect Park is a 585-acre public park in the New York City borough of Brooklyn located between Park Slope, Prospect-Lefferts Gardens, Kensington, Windsor Terrace and Flatbush Avenue, Grand Army Plaza and the Brooklyn Botanic Garden...

    ", instrumental promoter of the park, the Brooklyn Bridge
    Brooklyn Bridge
    The Brooklyn Bridge is one of the oldest suspension bridges in the United States. Completed in 1883, it connects the New York City boroughs of Manhattan and Brooklyn by spanning the East River...

    , and the consolidation of Brooklyn into Greater New York
  • Francis Scott Street
    Francis Scott Street
    Francis Scott Street , with partner Francis Shubael Smith were the owners of Street & Smith publishing company in New York City.-New York Dispatch:...

     (1831–1883), co-owner of Street & Smith
    Street & Smith
    Street & Smith or Street & Smith Publications, Inc. was a New York City publisher specializing in inexpensive paperbacks and magazines referred to as pulp fiction and dime novels. They also published comic books and sporting yearbooks...

     publishers
  • George Crockett Strong
    George Crockett Strong
    George Crockett Strong was a Union brigadier general in the American Civil War.-Biography:Strong was born in Stockbridge, Vermont, and attended Williston Seminary but left after 1851. He attended Union College, but left for the U.S. Military Academy, from which he graduated in 1857...

     (1832–1863), Union
    Union (American Civil War)
    During the American Civil War, the Union was a name used to refer to the federal government of the United States, which was supported by the twenty free states and five border slave states. It was opposed by 11 southern slave states that had declared a secession to join together to form the...

     brigadier general
    Brigadier General
    Brigadier general is a senior rank in the armed forces. It is the lowest ranking general officer in some countries, usually sitting between the ranks of colonel and major general. When appointed to a field command, a brigadier general is typically in command of a brigade consisting of around 4,000...

     in the American Civil War
    American Civil War
    The American Civil War was a civil war fought in the United States of America. In response to the election of Abraham Lincoln as President of the United States, 11 southern slave states declared their secession from the United States and formed the Confederate States of America ; the other 25...

    .
  • Thomas William "Fightin' Tom" Sweeny
    Thomas William Sweeny
    Thomas William Sweeny was an Irish soldier who served in the Mexican-American War and then was a general in the Union Army during the American Civil War.-Birth and early years:...

     (1820–1892) Irish immigrant and American Civil War general
  • John Thomas
    John Thomas (Christadelphian)
    Dr. John Thomas was the founder of the Christadelphian movement, a Restorationist religion with doctrines similar in part to some 16th century Antitrinitarian Rationalist Socinians and the 16th century Swiss-German pacifist Anabaptists.-Early life:John Thomas M.D., born in Hoxton Square, Hackney,...

     (1805–1871), founding father of The Christadelphians
    Christadelphians
    Christadelphians is a Christian group that developed in the United Kingdom and North America in the 19th century...

  • Louis Comfort Tiffany
    Louis Comfort Tiffany
    Louis Comfort Tiffany was an American artist and designer who worked in the decorative arts and is best known for his work in stained glass. He is the American artist most associated with the Art Nouveau  and Aesthetic movements...

     (1848–1933), artist
  • Matilda (or Mathilda) Tone, widow of Irish rebel Wolfe Tone
  • George Francis Train
    George Francis Train
    George Francis Train was an entrepreneurial businessman who organized the clipper ship line that sailed around Cape Horn to San Francisco; he organized the Union Pacific Railroad and the Credit Mobilier in the United States, and a horse tramway company in England while there during the American...

     (1829–1904), railroad promoter
  • Juan Trippe
    Juan Trippe
    Juan Terry Trippe was an American airline entrepreneur and pioneer, and the founder of Pan American World Airways, one of the world's most prominent airlines of the twentieth century.-Early years:...

     (1899–1981), airline pioneer, headed Pan Am
    Pan American World Airways
    Pan American World Airways, commonly known as Pan Am, was the principal and largest international air carrier in the United States from 1927 until its collapse on December 4, 1991...

     from 1927 to 1968
  • Robert Troup
    Robert Troup
    Robert Troup was an American soldier, lawyer and jurist.Born in Elizabethtown, New Jersey, Troup attended King's College...

     (1756–1832), Revolutionary War hero, New York State assemblyman and Judge. Body moved to Green-Wood in 1872.
  • William Magear "Boss" Tweed (1823–1878), notorious New York political boss, member of the U.S. House of Representatives and New York State Senate
    New York State Senate
    The New York State Senate is one of two houses in the New York State Legislature and has members each elected to two-year terms. There are no limits on the number of terms one may serve...

  • Camilla Urso
    Camilla Urso
    Camilla Urso , was a French violinist.Born at Nantes, France, Urso was the daughter of an Italian flutist and a French singer . When she was six years old, despite general skepticism about her ability to master a “masculine” instrument, she began taking violin lessons...

     (Camille Urso), (1842–1902), French violinist.
  • Steven C. Vincent (1955–2005), American journalist and author kidnapped and murdered in Iraq August 2005
  • Leopold von Gilsa
    Leopold von Gilsa
    Leopold von Gilsa was a career soldier who served as an officer in the armies of Prussia and later the United States. He is best known for his role in the misfortunes of the XI Corps in the Army of the Potomac during the American Civil War, particularly at the battles of Chancellorsville and...

     (d. 1870), American Civil War colonel and brigade commander
  • Charles S. Wainwright
    Charles S. Wainwright
    Charles Shiels Wainwright was a produce farmer in the state of New York and an artillery officer in the Union Army during the American Civil War. He played an important role in the defense of Cemetery Hill during the July 1863 Battle of Gettysburg, where his artillery helped repel a Confederate...

    , (1826–1907), American Civil War colonel and artillery officer
  • Henry John Whitehouse
    Henry John Whitehouse
    Henry John Whitehouse was the second Episcopal bishop of Illinois.-Early life:Whitehouse was born in New York City, the son of John Whitehouse and Eliza Norman. He graduated from Columbia University in 1821, and from the General Theological Seminary in 1824. Whitehouse was ordained deacon in...

     (1803–1874), Episcopal Bishop
  • Thomas R. Whitney
    Thomas R. Whitney
    Thomas Richard Whitney was a nineteenth century politician from New York.Born in New York City, New York, Whitney pursued classical studies and engaged in newspaper work...

     (1807–1858), member of the U.S. House of Representatives from New York
    New York
    New York is a state in the Northeastern region of the United States. It is the nation's third most populous state. New York is bordered by New Jersey and Pennsylvania to the south, and by Connecticut, Massachusetts and Vermont to the east...

  • Beekman Winthrop
    Beekman Winthrop
    Beekman Winthrop was a New York lawyer and Governor of Puerto Rico from 1904 to 1907. He was later an Assistant Secretary of the Treasury....

     (1874–1940), Governor of Puerto Rico from 1904 to 1907, and later an Assistant Secretary of the Treasury.
  • Frank Morgan Wupperman
    Frank Morgan
    Frank Morgan was an American actor. He was best known for his portrayal of the title character in the film The Wizard of Oz.-Early life:...

     (1890–1949), played the character of the Wizard in The Wizard of Oz
    The Wizard of Oz (1939 film)
    The Wizard of Oz is a 1939 American musical fantasy film produced by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. It was directed primarily by Victor Fleming. Noel Langley, Florence Ryerson and Edgar Allan Woolf received credit for the screenplay, but there were uncredited contributions by others. The lyrics for the songs...

    .

Further reading

  • Jehemiah Cleveland, Green-Wood Cemetery: A History from 1838 to 1864 Anderson and Archer (1866)
  • The Ones Who Prepare the Ground for the Last Farewell, New York Times, Corey Killgannon, January 30, 2006
  • The Encyclopedia Of New York City (1995), ed. Kenneth T. Jackson; Green-Wood Cemetery, Edward F. Bergman, pp. 509–510
  • Jeffrey I. Richman, "Brooklyn's Green-wood Cemetery: New York's Buried Treasure" (1998)
  • Jeffrey I. Richman, "Final Camping Ground:Civil War Veterans at Brooklyn's Green-Wood Cemetery, In Their Own Words"
  • Alexandra Kathryn Mosca, "Green-Wood Cemetery (Images of America: New York)" (2008)

Archive


The Pierrepont papers deposited at the Brooklyn Historical Society
Brooklyn Historical Society
Founded in 1863, the Brooklyn Historical Society is a museum, library, and educational center preserving and encouraging the study of Brooklyn's rich 400-year past. The Brooklyn Historical Society houses materials relating to the history of Brooklyn and its people. These holdings supply...

contain material about the organizing of Green-Wood Cemetery.

External links