Great Cypress Swamp

Great Cypress Swamp

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The '''Great Cypress Swamp''' (also known as ''Great Pocomoke Swamp'', ''Cypress Swamp'', or ''Big Cypress Swamp''), is a forested freshwater [[swamp]] located on the [[Delmarva Peninsula]] in south [[Delaware]] and southeastern [[Maryland]]. As of 2000, it is the largest contiguous forest on the Delmarva Peninsula. Located at {{coord|38|29|N|75|18|W |type:waterbody_region:US_source:enwiki-plaintext-parser |display=inline,title}}, it is the northernmost of the southern swamps and one of many along the coast of the [[Atlantic Ocean]]. It covers about {{convert|50|mi2}}, mostly in southern [[Sussex County, Delaware]]. It is the source of the [[Pocomoke River]], which flows south, and [[Pepper Creek (Delaware)|Pepper Creek]], which flows northeast. ==History== This swamp once yielded much cypress timber. Due to [[over harvesting]] and a disastrous peat fire in 1930 much of its vegetation was destroyed. One of the fires burned for eight months, leading it to be called the "Burnt Swamp" by local residents. In 1980, [[Joe Biden]], at the request of environmentalists, proposed that the swamp be made into a [[National Park]]; this plan was met with resistance from local residents concerned of being overwhelmed with large numbers of visitors. When representative [[Tom Carper]] revisited the idea of creating a national park in Delaware in 2004, the Cypress Swamp was not being considered due to these concerns. The non-profit organization [[Delaware Wild Lands]] manages the swamp and has undertaken efforts to replant [[bald cypress]] trees there. ===Birds=== The swamp is home to 73 breeding species of birds. The most abundant species in the swamp are the [[Worm-eating warbler]] and [[Brown-headed Cowbird]]. The swamp also contains two regionally rare species, [[Swainson's Warbler]] and [[Black-throated Green Warbler]]. [[eBird]] has records of at least 94 species observed in the swamp, including some found during migration which do not breed there.