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George Gilbert Scott

George Gilbert Scott

Encyclopedia
Sir George Gilbert Scott (13 July 1811 – 27 March 1878) was an English architect
Architect
An architect is a person trained in the planning, design and oversight of the construction of buildings. To practice architecture means to offer or render services in connection with the design and construction of a building, or group of buildings and the space within the site surrounding the...

 of the Victorian Age, chiefly associated with the design, building and renovation of churches, cathedral
Cathedral
A cathedral is a Christian church that contains the seat of a bishop...

s and workhouse
Workhouse
In England and Wales a workhouse, colloquially known as a spike, was a place where those unable to support themselves were offered accommodation and employment...

s. He was one of the most prolific architects that Great Britain has produced, over 800 buildings being designed or altered by him.

Scott was the architect of many iconic buildings, including the Midland Grand Hotel at St Pancras Station, the Albert Memorial
Albert Memorial
The Albert Memorial is situated in Kensington Gardens, London, England, directly to the north of the Royal Albert Hall. It was commissioned by Queen Victoria in memory of her beloved husband, Prince Albert who died of typhoid in 1861. The memorial was designed by Sir George Gilbert Scott in the...

, and the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, all in London
London
London is the capital city of :England and the :United Kingdom, the largest metropolitan area in the United Kingdom, and the largest urban zone in the European Union by most measures. Located on the River Thames, London has been a major settlement for two millennia, its history going back to its...

, the main building of the University of Glasgow
University of Glasgow
The University of Glasgow is the fourth-oldest university in the English-speaking world and one of Scotland's four ancient universities. Located in Glasgow, the university was founded in 1451 and is presently one of seventeen British higher education institutions ranked amongst the top 100 of the...

, and St Mary's Cathedral
St Mary's Cathedral, Edinburgh (Episcopal)
St Mary's Cathedral or the Cathedral Church of Saint Mary the Virgin is a cathedral of the Scottish Episcopal Church in Edinburgh, Scotland. It was built in the late 19th century in the West End of Edinburgh's New Town. The cathedral is the see of the Bishop of Edinburgh, one of seven bishops...

 in Edinburgh.

Life and career


Born in Gawcott
Gawcott
Gawcott is a village about southwest of Buckingham in Aylesbury Vale district in Buckinghamshire, England. The village is in the civil parish of Gawcott with Lenborough.The toponym is derived from the Old English for "cottage for which rent is payable"...

, Buckingham
Buckingham
Buckingham is a town situated in north Buckinghamshire, England, close to the borders of Northamptonshire and Oxfordshire. The town has a population of 11,572 ,...

, Buckinghamshire
Buckinghamshire
Buckinghamshire is a ceremonial and non-metropolitan home county in South East England. The county town is Aylesbury, the largest town in the ceremonial county is Milton Keynes and largest town in the non-metropolitan county is High Wycombe....

, Scott was the son of a clergyman and grandson of the biblical commentator Thomas Scott
Thomas Scott (commentator)
The Rev. Thomas Scott was an influential preacher and author who is principally known for his best-selling work A Commentary On The Whole Bible and The Force of Truth, and as one of the founders of the Church Missionary Society.- Life :...

. He studied architecture as a pupil of James Edmeston
James Edmeston
James Edmeston was an English architect and surveyor; he was also known as a prolific writer of church hymns.He was born in Wapping, Middlesex, England...

 and, from 1832 to 1834, worked as an assistant to Henry Roberts
Henry Roberts (architect)
Henry Roberts was a British architect best known for Fishmongers' Hall in London and for his work on model dwellings for workers.-Biography:...

. He also worked as an assistant for his friend Sampson Kempthorne
Sampson Kempthorne
Sampson Kempthorne was a workhouse architect. He began practising in Carlton Chambers on Regent Street in London. His father was a friend of the Poor Law Commissioner Thomas Frankland Lewis, which may have helped him to get the commission to build workhouses.Kempthorne came up with two designs –...

.

In about 1835, Scott took on William Bonython Moffatt
William Bonython Moffatt
William Bonython Moffatt was an architect, who for many years was a partner with Sir George Gilbert Scott at Spring Gardens, London.Moffatt was the son of a small builder and pupil of James Edmeston...

 as his assistant and later (1838–1845) as partner. Over the next 10 years Scott and Moffatt designed over 40 workhouse
Workhouse
In England and Wales a workhouse, colloquially known as a spike, was a place where those unable to support themselves were offered accommodation and employment...

s. Scott also designed working-class housing for Akroydon, Halifax in 1859.

Meanwhile, he was inspired by Augustus Pugin
Augustus Pugin
Augustus Welby Northmore Pugin was an English architect, designer, and theorist of design, now best remembered for his work in the Gothic Revival style, particularly churches and the Palace of Westminster. Pugin was the father of E. W...

 to join the Gothic revival of the Victorian era
Victorian era
The Victorian era of British history was the period of Queen Victoria's reign from 20 June 1837 until her death on 22 January 1901. It was a long period of peace, prosperity, refined sensibilities and national self-confidence...

, his first notable works in this style being the Martyrs' Memorial
Martyrs' Memorial
The Martyrs' Memorial is a stone monument positioned at the intersection of St Giles', Magdalen Street and Beaumont Street in Oxford, England just outside Balliol College...

 on St Giles', Oxford
St Giles', Oxford
St Giles is a wide street leading north from the centre of Oxford, England. At its northern end, the road divides into Woodstock Road to the left and Banbury Road to the right, both major roads through North Oxford. At the southern end, the road continues as Magdalen Street at the junction with...

 (1841) and the new St Giles' Church, Camberwell
St Giles' Church, Camberwell
St Giles' Church, Camberwell, is the parish church of Camberwell, a district of London which forms part of the London Borough of Southwark. It is part of Camberwell Deanery within the Anglican Diocese of Southwark in the Church of England. The church is dedicated to Saint Giles, the patron saint of...

 with its fine octagonal spire (1844). The choir stalls at Lancing College
Lancing College
Lancing College is a co-educational English independent school in the British public school tradition, founded in 1848 by Nathaniel Woodard. Woodard's aim was to provide education "based on sound principle and sound knowledge, firmly grounded in the Christian faith." Lancing was the first of a...

 in Sussex
Sussex
Sussex , from the Old English Sūþsēaxe , is an historic county in South East England corresponding roughly in area to the ancient Kingdom of Sussex. It is bounded on the north by Surrey, east by Kent, south by the English Channel, and west by Hampshire, and is divided for local government into West...

, which Scott designed with Walter Tower, were among many examples of his work that incorporated green men
Green Man
A Green Man is a sculpture, drawing, or other representation of a face surrounded by or made from leaves. Branches or vines may sprout from the nose, mouth, nostrils or other parts of the face and these shoots may bear flowers or fruit...

. Later, Scott went beyond copying mediaeval English gothic for his Victorian Gothic or Gothic Revival buildings, and began to introduce features from other styles and European countries as evidenced in his Midland red-brick construction, the Midland Grand Hotel at London's St Pancras Station, from which approach Scott believed a new style might emerge.

Between 1864 and 1876, the Albert Memorial
Albert Memorial
The Albert Memorial is situated in Kensington Gardens, London, England, directly to the north of the Royal Albert Hall. It was commissioned by Queen Victoria in memory of her beloved husband, Prince Albert who died of typhoid in 1861. The memorial was designed by Sir George Gilbert Scott in the...

, designed by Scott, was constructed in Hyde Park
Hyde Park, London
Hyde Park is one of the largest parks in central London, United Kingdom, and one of the Royal Parks of London, famous for its Speakers' Corner.The park is divided in two by the Serpentine...

. It was a commission on behalf of Queen Victoria in memory of her husband, Prince Albert.

Scott was awarded the RIBA
Royal Institute of British Architects
The Royal Institute of British Architects is a professional body for architects primarily in the United Kingdom, but also internationally.-History:...

's Royal Gold Medal
Royal Gold Medal
The Royal Gold Medal for architecture is awarded annually by the Royal Institute of British Architects on behalf of the British monarch, in recognition of an individual's or group's substantial contribution to international architecture....

 in 1859. Knighted in 1872, he died in 1878 and was buried in Westminster Abbey
Westminster Abbey
The Collegiate Church of St Peter at Westminster, popularly known as Westminster Abbey, is a large, mainly Gothic church, in the City of Westminster, London, United Kingdom, located just to the west of the Palace of Westminster. It is the traditional place of coronation and burial site for English,...

.

He married Caroline Oldrid of Boston
Boston, Lincolnshire
Boston is a town and small port in Lincolnshire, on the east coast of England. It is the largest town of the wider Borough of Boston local government district and had a total population of 55,750 at the 2001 census...

 in 1838. Two of his sons George Gilbert Scott, Jr. and John Oldrid Scott
John Oldrid Scott
John Oldrid Scott was an English architect.He was the son of Sir George Gilbert Scott and Caroline née Oldrid. His brother George Gilbert Scott Junior and nephew Sir Giles Gilbert Scott, were also prominent architects. He married Mary Ann Stevens in 1868, eldest daughter of the Reverend Thomas...

, and his grandson Giles Gilbert Scott
Giles Gilbert Scott
Sir Giles Gilbert Scott, OM, FRIBA was an English architect known for his work on such buildings as Liverpool Cathedral and Battersea Power Station and designing the iconic red telephone box....

, were also prominent architects. He was also related to the architect Elisabeth Scott
Elisabeth Scott
Elisabeth Whitworth Scott was a British architect who designed the Shakespeare Memorial Theatre at Stratford-upon-Avon, England. This was the first important public building in Britain to be designed by a female architect....

. His youngest son was the botanist Dukinfield Henry Scott
Dukinfield Henry Scott
Dukinfield Henry Scott FRS was a British botanist.The architect Sir George Gilbert Scott was his father...

.

Pupils


Scott's success attracted a large number of pupils, many would go on to have successful careers of their own, not always as architects. In the following list, the year next to the pupil's name denotes their time in Scott's office, some of the more famous were:
Hubert Austin
Hubert Austin
Hubert James Austin was an English architect who practiced in Lancaster. With his partners he designed many churches and other buildings, mainly in the northwest of England.-Early life and career:...

 (1868), George Frederick Bodley
George Frederick Bodley
George Frederick Bodley was an English architect working in the Gothic revival style.-Personal life:Bodley was the youngest son of William Hulme Bodley, M.D. of Edinburgh, physician at Hull Royal Infirmary, Kingston upon Hull, who in 1838 retired to his wife's home town, Brighton, Sussex, England....

 (1845–56), Charles Buckeridge
Charles Buckeridge
Charles Buckeridge was a British Gothic Revival architect who trained as a pupil of Sir George Gilbert Scott. He practiced in Oxford 1856–68 and in London from 1869. He was made an Associate of the Royal Institute of British Architects in 1861.-Work:Much of Buckeridge's work was for parish...

 (1856–57), Somers Clarke
Somers Clarke
George Somers Clarke was an architect and English Egyptologist who worked at a number of sites throughout Egypt, notably in El Kab, where he built a house. He was born in Brighton and died in Egypt....

 (1865), William Henry Crossland
William Henry Crossland
William Henry Crossland was a nineteenth century architect and a pupil of George Gilbert Scott.-Principal works:Crossland's three most important commissions were:...

 (?), C. Hodgson Fowler
C. Hodgson Fowler
Charles Hodgson Fowler was a prolific English ecclesiastical architect who specialised in building and, especially, restoring churches.-Life:He was born in Nottinghamshire...

 (1856–60), Thomas Gardner (1856–61), Thomas Graham Jackson
Thomas Graham Jackson
Sir Thomas Graham Jackson, 1st Baronet RA was one of the most distinguished English architects of his generation...

 (1858–61), John T. Micklethwaite (1862–69), Benjamin Mountfort
Benjamin Mountfort
Benjamin Woolfield Mountfort was an English emigrant to New Zealand, where he became one of that country's most prominent 19th century architects. He was instrumental in shaping the city of Christchurch's unique architectural identity and culture, and was appointed the first official Provincial...

 (1841–46), John Norton
John Norton (architect)
John Norton was an English architect who designed country houses, churches and a number of commercial buildings. He was born and educated in Bristol...

 (1870–78), George Gilbert Scott, Jr. (1856–63), John Oldrid Scott
John Oldrid Scott
John Oldrid Scott was an English architect.He was the son of Sir George Gilbert Scott and Caroline née Oldrid. His brother George Gilbert Scott Junior and nephew Sir Giles Gilbert Scott, were also prominent architects. He married Mary Ann Stevens in 1868, eldest daughter of the Reverend Thomas...

 (1858–78), J. J. Stevenson (1858–60), George Henry Stokes (1843–47), George Edmund Street
George Edmund Street
George Edmund Street was an English architect, born at Woodford in Essex.- Life :Street was the third son of Thomas Street, solicitor, by his second wife, Mary Anne Millington. George went to school at Mitcham in about 1830, and later to the Camberwell collegiate school, which he left in 1839...

 (1844–49), William White
William White (architect)
William White, F.S.A. was an English architect, famous for his part in 19th century Gothic Revival architecture and church restorations...

 (1845–47).

Books


Additionally he wrote over forty pamphlets and reports. As well as publishing articles, letters, lectures and reports in The Builder
Building (magazine)
Building is one of the United Kingdom’s oldest business-to-business magazines, launched as The Builder in 1843 by Joseph Aloysius Hansom – architect of Birmingham Town Hall and designer of the Hansom Cab. The journal was renamed Building in 1966 as it is still known today. Building is the only UK...

, The Ecclesiologist, The Building News, The British Architect, The Civil Engineer's and Architect's Journal, The Illustrated London News, The Times
The Times
The Times is a British daily national newspaper, first published in London in 1785 under the title The Daily Universal Register . The Times and its sister paper The Sunday Times are published by Times Newspapers Limited, a subsidiary since 1981 of News International...

and Transactions of the Royal Institute of British Architects.

Architectural work



His projects include:

Public buildings

  • Workhouse in Winslow, Buckinghamshire
    Winslow, Buckinghamshire
    Winslow is a small market town and also a civil parish designated as a town council within Aylesbury Vale district in north Buckinghamshire. It has a population of about 4500....

     (1835)
  • Workhouses (1836) in: Amesbury
    Amesbury
    Amesbury is a town and civil parish in Wiltshire, England. It is most famous for the prehistoric monument of Stonehenge which is in its parish, and for the discovery of the Amesbury Archer—dubbed the King of Stonehenge in the press—in 2002...

    , Wiltshire; Buckingham
    Buckingham
    Buckingham is a town situated in north Buckinghamshire, England, close to the borders of Northamptonshire and Oxfordshire. The town has a population of 11,572 ,...

    , Buckinghamshire
    Buckinghamshire
    Buckinghamshire is a ceremonial and non-metropolitan home county in South East England. The county town is Aylesbury, the largest town in the ceremonial county is Milton Keynes and largest town in the non-metropolitan county is High Wycombe....

    ; Kettering
    Kettering
    Kettering is a market town in the Borough of Kettering, Northamptonshire, England. It is situated about from London. Kettering is mainly situated on the west side of the River Ise, a tributary of the River Nene which meets at Wellingborough...

    , Northamptonshire
    Northamptonshire
    Northamptonshire is a landlocked county in the English East Midlands, with a population of 629,676 as at the 2001 census. It has boundaries with the ceremonial counties of Warwickshire to the west, Leicestershire and Rutland to the north, Cambridgeshire to the east, Bedfordshire to the south-east,...

    ; Northampton
    Northampton
    Northampton is a large market town and local government district in the East Midlands region of England. Situated about north-west of London and around south-east of Birmingham, Northampton lies on the River Nene and is the county town of Northamptonshire. The demonym of Northampton is...

    , Northamptonshire; Oundle
    Oundle
    Oundle is an ancient market town on the River Nene in Northamptonshire, England, with a population of 5,345 or 5,674 . It lies some north of London and south-west of Peterborough...

    , Northamptonshire; Tiverton, Devon; Totnes
    Totnes
    Totnes is a market town and civil parish at the head of the estuary of the River Dart in Devon, England within the South Devon Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty...

    , Devon; Towcester
    Towcester
    Towcester , the Roman town of Lactodorum, is a small town in south Northamptonshire, England.-Etymology:Towcester comes from the Old English Tófe-ceaster. Tófe refers to the River Tove; Bosworth and Toller compare it to the "Scandinavian proper names" Tófi and Tófa...

    , Northamptonshire; Williton
    Williton
    Williton is a medium-sized village and civil parish in West Somerset, England. It has many of the facilities of a small town, being the administrative centre for the district. Williton is situated at the junction of the A39, A358 and B3191 roads...

    , Somerset
    Somerset
    The ceremonial and non-metropolitan county of Somerset in South West England borders Bristol and Gloucestershire to the north, Wiltshire to the east, Dorset to the south-east, and Devon to the south-west. It is partly bounded to the north and west by the Bristol Channel and the estuary of the...

    .
  • Workhouse in Guildford
    Guildford
    Guildford is the county town of Surrey. England, as well as the seat for the borough of Guildford and the administrative headquarters of the South East England region...

    , Surrey
    Surrey
    Surrey is a county in the South East of England and is one of the Home Counties. The county borders Greater London, Kent, East Sussex, West Sussex, Hampshire and Berkshire. The historic county town is Guildford. Surrey County Council sits at Kingston upon Thames, although this has been part of...

     (1836–38)
  • Workhouses (1837) in: Bideford
    Bideford
    Bideford is a small port town on the estuary of the River Torridge in north Devon, south-west England. It is also the main town of the Torridge local government district.-History:...

    , Devon; Boston, Lincolnshire
    Boston, Lincolnshire
    Boston is a town and small port in Lincolnshire, on the east coast of England. It is the largest town of the wider Borough of Boston local government district and had a total population of 55,750 at the 2001 census...

    ; Clutton, Somerset
    Clutton, Somerset
    Clutton is a village and civil parish within the Chew Valley in Somerset in the Bath and North East Somerset Council area on the A37 road. It is located 10 miles from Bristol and Bath, very near Temple Cloud. The nearest town is Midsomer Norton...

    ; Flax Bourton
    Flax Bourton
    Flax Bourton is a village and civil parish in Somerset, England. The parish, with a population of 659, is situated within the Unitary Authority of North Somerset, on the edge of Nailsea Moor on the A370 road south west of Bristol city centre....

    , Somerset; Gloucester
    Gloucester
    Gloucester is a city, district and county town of Gloucestershire in the South West region of England. Gloucester lies close to the Welsh border, and on the River Severn, approximately north-east of Bristol, and south-southwest of Birmingham....

    , Gloucestershire; Liskeard
    Liskeard
    Liskeard is an ancient stannary and market town and civil parish in south east Cornwall, England, United Kingdom.Liskeard is situated approximately 20 miles west of Plymouth, west of the River Tamar and the border with Devon, and 12 miles east of Bodmin...

    , Cornwall
    Cornwall
    Cornwall is a unitary authority and ceremonial county of England, within the United Kingdom. It is bordered to the north and west by the Celtic Sea, to the south by the English Channel, and to the east by the county of Devon, over the River Tamar. Cornwall has a population of , and covers an area of...

    ; Newton Abbot
    Newton Abbot
    Newton Abbot is a market town and civil parish in the Teignbridge District of Devon, England on the River Teign, with a population of 23,580....

    , Devon; Hundleby
    Spilsby
    Spilsby is a market town and civil parish in Lincolnshire. England. The town is situated adjacent to the main A16 Trunk Road at the southern edge of the Lincolnshire Wolds north of the Fenlands, east of the county town of Lincoln, north east of Boston and north west from Skegness.The town has...

    , Lincolnshire; Tavistock, Devon
  • The workhouse in Loughborough
    Loughborough
    Loughborough is a town within the Charnwood borough of Leicestershire, England. It is the seat of Charnwood Borough Council and is home to Loughborough University...

    , Leicestershire (1837–38)
  • Workhouses (1838) in: Amersham
    Amersham
    Amersham is a market town and civil parish within Chiltern district in Buckinghamshire, England, 27 miles north west of London, in the Chiltern Hills. It is part of the London commuter belt....

    , Buckinghamshire
    Buckinghamshire
    Buckinghamshire is a ceremonial and non-metropolitan home county in South East England. The county town is Aylesbury, the largest town in the ceremonial county is Milton Keynes and largest town in the non-metropolitan county is High Wycombe....

    ; Belper
    Belper
    Belper is a town and civil parish in the local government district of Amber Valley in Derbyshire, England.-Geography:Belper is situated eight miles north of Derby and is centred in the valley of the River Derwent...

    , Derbyshire
    Derbyshire
    Derbyshire is a county in the East Midlands of England. A substantial portion of the Peak District National Park lies within Derbyshire. The northern part of Derbyshire overlaps with the Pennines, a famous chain of hills and mountains. The county contains within its boundary of approx...

    ; Great Dunmow
    Great Dunmow
    Great Dunmow is an ancient market town in the Uttlesford district of Essex, England in which the great Shannon Gray, also known as Hazzah Potter, lives...

    , Essex; Lichfield
    Lichfield
    Lichfield is a cathedral city, civil parish and district in Staffordshire, England. One of eight civil parishes with city status in England, Lichfield is situated roughly north of Birmingham...

    , Staffordshire; Mere, Wiltshire
    Mere, Wiltshire
    Mere is a small town in Wiltshire, England. It lies at the extreme southwestern tip of Salisbury Plain close to the borders of Somerset and Dorset....

    ; Penzance
    Penzance
    Penzance is a town, civil parish, and port in Cornwall, England, in the United Kingdom. It is the most westerly major town in Cornwall and is approximately 75 miles west of Plymouth and 300 miles west-southwest of London...

    , Cornwall; Redruth
    Redruth
    Redruth is a town and civil parish traditionally in the Penwith Hundred in Cornwall, United Kingdom. It has a population of 12,352. Redruth lies approximately at the junction of the A393 and A3047 roads, on the route of the old London to Land's End trunk road , and is approximately west of...

    , Cornwall
    Cornwall
    Cornwall is a unitary authority and ceremonial county of England, within the United Kingdom. It is bordered to the north and west by the Celtic Sea, to the south by the English Channel, and to the east by the county of Devon, over the River Tamar. Cornwall has a population of , and covers an area of...

  • Workhouse (1838) Williton, Somerset and 'sister design Witham
    Witham
    Witham is a town in the county of Essex, in the south east of England with a population of 22,500. It is part of the District of Braintree and is twinned with the town of Waldbröl, Germany. Witham stands between the larger towns of Chelmsford and Colchester...

    , Essex
  • Workhouses (1839) in: Billericay
    Billericay
    Billericay is a town and civil parish in the Basildon borough of Essex, England. It lies within the London Basin, has a population of 40,000, and constitutes a commuter town east of central London. The town has three secondary schools and a variety of open spaces...

    , Essex
    Essex
    Essex is a ceremonial and non-metropolitan county in the East region of England, and one of the home counties. It is located to the northeast of Greater London. It borders with Cambridgeshire and Suffolk to the north, Hertfordshire to the west, Kent to the South and London to the south west...

    ; Bedworth
    Bedworth
    Bedworth is a market town in the Nuneaton and Bedworth district of Warwickshire, England. It lies northwest of London, east of Birmingham, and north northeast of the county town of Warwick. It is situated between Coventry, to the south, and Nuneaton, to the north.In the 2001 census the town...

    , Warwickshire; Edmonton, London
    Edmonton, London
    Edmonton is an area in the east of the London Borough of Enfield, England, north-north-east of Charing Cross. It has a long history as a settlement distinct from Enfield.-Location:...

    ; Louth, Lincolnshire
    Louth, Lincolnshire
    Louth is a market town and civil parish within the East Lindsey district of Lincolnshire, England.-Geography:Known as the "capital of the Lincolnshire Wolds", it is situated where the ancient trackway Barton Street crosses the River Lud, and has a total resident population of 15,930.The Greenwich...

    ; Newcastle-under-Lyme
    Newcastle-under-Lyme
    Newcastle-under-Lyme is a market town in Staffordshire, England, and is the principal town of the Borough of Newcastle-under-Lyme. It is part of The Potteries Urban Area and North Staffordshire. In the 2001 census the town had a population of 73,944...

    , Staffordshire; Old Windsor
    Old Windsor
    Old Windsor is a large village and civil parish in the Royal Borough of Windsor and Maidenhead in the English county of Berkshire.-Location:...

    , Berkshire; St Austell
    St Austell
    St Austell is a civil parish and a major town in Cornwall, England, United Kingdom. It is situated on the south coast approximately ten miles south of Bodmin and 30 miles west of the border with Devon at Saltash...

    , Cornwall; Uttoxeter
    Uttoxeter
    Uttoxeter is a historic market town in Staffordshire, in the West Midlands region of England. The current population is approximately 13,711, though new developments in the town will increase this figure. Uttoxeter lies close to the River Dove and is near the cities of Stoke-on-Trent, Derby and...

    , Staffordshire
  • Buckingham Gaol
    The Old Gaol Museum
    Buckingham Old Gaol Museum is a museum in Buckingham, the former county town of Buckinghamshire, England.The museum is located on Market Hill. It is a member of the Milton Keynes Heritage Association and the Association of Independent Museums.-History:...

     extension and alterations (1839) in: Buckingham
    Buckingham
    Buckingham is a town situated in north Buckinghamshire, England, close to the borders of Northamptonshire and Oxfordshire. The town has a population of 11,572 ,...

    , Buckinghamshire
    Buckinghamshire
    Buckinghamshire is a ceremonial and non-metropolitan home county in South East England. The county town is Aylesbury, the largest town in the ceremonial county is Milton Keynes and largest town in the non-metropolitan county is High Wycombe....

  • The workhouse in Lutterworth
    Lutterworth
    Lutterworth is a market town and civil parish in the Harborough district of Leicestershire, England. The town is located in southern Leicestershire, north of Rugby, in Warwickshire and south of Leicester. It had a population of 8,293 in the 2001 UK census....

    , Leicestershire (1839–40)
  • School and Master's House, Hartshill, Stoke on Trent (1840)
  • Infant Orphan Asylum, Wanstead
    Wanstead
    Wanstead is a suburban area in the London Borough of Redbridge, North-East London. The main road going through Wanstead is the A12. The name is from the Anglo-Saxon words wænn and stede, meaning "settlement on a small hill"....

    , Essex (1841–43)
  • Martyrs' Memorial
    Martyrs' Memorial
    The Martyrs' Memorial is a stone monument positioned at the intersection of St Giles', Magdalen Street and Beaumont Street in Oxford, England just outside Balliol College...

    , Oxford
    Oxford
    The city of Oxford is the county town of Oxfordshire, England. The city, made prominent by its medieval university, has a population of just under 165,000, with 153,900 living within the district boundary. It lies about 50 miles north-west of London. The rivers Cherwell and Thames run through...

     (1841–43)
  • Reading Gaol
    Reading (HM Prison)
    HM Prison Reading, formerly known as Reading Gaol, is a prison located in Reading, Berkshire, England. The prison is operated by Her Majesty's Prison Service.-History:...

    , Berkshire (1842–44)
  • Lunatic Asylum, Shelton, Shropshire
    Shelton, Shropshire
    Shelton is a suburb of Shrewsbury in Shropshire, England.It was once a village of its own, but the town of Shrewsbury has grown steadily in the area since the 1950s...

     (1843)
  • The workhouse, Macclesfield
    Macclesfield
    Macclesfield is a market town within the unitary authority of Cheshire East, the county palatine of Chester, also known as the ceremonial county of Cheshire, England. The population of the Macclesfield urban sub-area at the time of the 2001 census was 50,688...

    , Cheshire (1843)
  • Lunatic Asylum, Clifton, York (1845)
  • Lunatic Asylum, Wells
    Wells
    Wells is a cathedral city and civil parish in the Mendip district of Somerset, England, on the southern edge of the Mendip Hills. Although the population recorded in the 2001 census is 10,406, it has had city status since 1205...

    , Somerset (1845)
  • Astbury School and Masters House Congleton (1848)
  • Christ Church School, Alsager
    Alsager
    Alsager is a town and civil parish in the unitary authority of Cheshire East and the ceremonial county of Cheshire, England, to the north-west of the city of Stoke-on-Trent, and east of the railway town of Crewe...

    , Cheshire (1848)
  • Brighton College
    Brighton College
    Brighton College is an institution divided between a Senior School known simply as Brighton College, the Prep School and the Pre-Prep School. All of these schools are co-educational independent schools in Brighton, England, sited immediately next to each another. The Senior School caters for...

    , Sussex (1848–1866)
  • Grammar School, Sandbach
    Sandbach
    Sandbach is a market town and civil parish in the unitary authority of Cheshire East and the ceremonial county of Cheshire, England. The civil parish contains four settlements; Sandbach itself, Elworth, Ettiley Heath and Wheelock....

    , Cheshire (1849)
  • School, Trefnant
    Trefnant
    Trefnant is a village and community in Denbighshire, Wales. It is located on the A525 road in the Vale of Clwyd , about halfway between St Asaph to the north and Denbigh to the south...

    , Denbighshire (c. 1855)
  • School, Tysoe
    Tysoe
    Tysoe is a civil parish located in Warwickshire, England, north-west of Banbury. The three main settlements in the parish, Upper, Middle and Lower Tysoe are on a hill, hence the respective village names. Upper and Middle Tysoe have now merged, whereas Lower Tysoe is still separate, a little...

    , Warwickshire (1856)
  • Crimea War Memorial, Westminster School
    Westminster School
    The Royal College of St. Peter in Westminster, almost always known as Westminster School, is one of Britain's leading independent schools, with the highest Oxford and Cambridge acceptance rate of any secondary school or college in Britain...

    , Broad Sanctuary, Westminster
    Westminster
    Westminster is an area of central London, within the City of Westminster, England. It lies on the north bank of the River Thames, southwest of the City of London and southwest of Charing Cross...

     (1858)
  • School, Ashley
    Ashley
    Ashley is a place name, a surname as well as both a male and female given name. A place name and surname, it is derived from the Old Dutch words 'æsc' and 'lēah' ....

    , Northamptonshire (1858)
  • The Vaughan Library, Harrow School
    Harrow School
    Harrow School, commonly known simply as "Harrow", is an English independent school for boys situated in the town of Harrow, in north-west London.. The school is of worldwide renown. There is some evidence that there has been a school on the site since 1243 but the Harrow School we know today was...

    , Middlesex (1861–63)
  • Foreign and Commonwealth Office
    Foreign and Commonwealth Office
    The Foreign and Commonwealth Office, commonly called the Foreign Office or the FCO is a British government department responsible for promoting the interests of the United Kingdom overseas, created in 1968 by merging the Foreign Office and the Commonwealth Office.The head of the FCO is the...

    , Whitehall
    Whitehall
    Whitehall is a road in Westminster, in London, England. It is the main artery running north from Parliament Square, towards Charing Cross at the southern end of Trafalgar Square...

    , London (1861–1868)
  • Preston Town Hall, Lancashire (1862–67), destroyed by fire in 1947

  • Old Schools
    Old Schools
    The Old Schools are part of the University of Cambridge, in the centre of Cambridge, England. The Old Schools house the Cambridge University Offices, which form the main administration for the University....

    , Cambridge
    Cambridge
    The city of Cambridge is a university town and the administrative centre of the county of Cambridgeshire, England. It lies in East Anglia about north of London. Cambridge is at the heart of the high-technology centre known as Silicon Fen – a play on Silicon Valley and the fens surrounding the...

     (1864–67)
  • Leeds General Infirmary
    Leeds General Infirmary
    Leeds General Infirmary, also known as the LGI or, more correctly, The General Infirmary at Leeds, is a large teaching hospital based in the centre of Leeds, West Yorkshire, England and is part of the Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust....

     (1864–67)
  • the Albert Memorial
    Albert Memorial
    The Albert Memorial is situated in Kensington Gardens, London, England, directly to the north of the Royal Albert Hall. It was commissioned by Queen Victoria in memory of her beloved husband, Prince Albert who died of typhoid in 1861. The memorial was designed by Sir George Gilbert Scott in the...

    , London (1864–72); in the podium frieze, one of the images of architects, sculpted by John Birnie Philip
    John Birnie Philip
    .John Birnie Philip was a notable English sculptor of the 19th century.He studied at the Government School of Design at Somerset House in London under John Rogers Herbert, and then at Herbert's own newly opened school in Maddox Street. He worked in Pugin's wood carving workshop at the Palace of...

     shows Scott himself.
  • St Mary's Church, Shackleford
    Shackleford
    Shackleford is a village in Surrey, England lying to the west of the A3 between Guildford and Petersfield. Neighbouring villages include Puttenham, Peper Harrow and Eashing....

    , Surrey
    Surrey
    Surrey is a county in the South East of England and is one of the Home Counties. The county borders Greater London, Kent, East Sussex, West Sussex, Hampshire and Berkshire. The historic county town is Guildford. Surrey County Council sits at Kingston upon Thames, although this has been part of...

     (1865)
  • Midland Grand Hotel, St Pancras Station, London (1865)
  • McManus Galleries
    McManus Galleries
    McManus Galleries is a Gothic Revival-style building, located in the centre of Dundee, Scotland. The building houses a museum and art gallery with a collection of fine and decorative art as well as a natural history collection....

     - formerly the Albert Institute, Dundee
    Dundee
    Dundee is the fourth-largest city in Scotland and the 39th most populous settlement in the United Kingdom. It lies within the eastern central Lowlands on the north bank of the Firth of Tay, which feeds into the North Sea...

     (1865–69)
  • The School, Great Dunmow
    Great Dunmow
    Great Dunmow is an ancient market town in the Uttlesford district of Essex, England in which the great Shannon Gray, also known as Hazzah Potter, lives...

    , Essex (1866)
  • Brill Swimming Baths, Brighton
    Brighton
    Brighton is the major part of the city of Brighton and Hove in East Sussex, England on the south coast of Great Britain...

     (1866–69) demolished 1929
  • Clifton Hampden Bridge
    Clifton Hampden Bridge
    Clifton Hampden Bridge is a road bridge crossing the River Thames in Clifton Hampden, Oxfordshire, England, situated on the reach below Clifton Lock. Originally it joined Oxfordshire on the north bank with Berkshire on the south but in 1974 the area on the south bank was transferred from Berkshire...

    , Oxfordshire (1867)
  • Hall Cross School
    Hall Cross School
    Hall Cross School, founded in 1350, is a co-educational comprehensive school in Doncaster, South Yorkshire, England.-Admissions:The school is split over two sites, with the Upper School located in the centre of Doncaster and the Lower School in the north of Bessacarr, near the Dome. Hall Cross...

    's library in Doncaster
    Doncaster
    Doncaster is a town in South Yorkshire, England, and the principal settlement of the Metropolitan Borough of Doncaster. The town is about from Sheffield and is popularly referred to as "Donny"...

     (1868)
  • Market Cross, Helmsley
    Helmsley
    Helmsley is a market town and civil parish in the Ryedale district of North Yorkshire, England. The town is located at the point where the valleys of Bilsdale and Ryedale leave the higher moorland and join the flat Vale of Pickering. It is situated on the River Rye and lies on the A170 road, east...

    , Yorkshire (1869)
  • School Nocton
    Nocton
    Nocton is a village south of Lincoln in the North Kesteven district of Lincolnshire, England. To the east of the village is Nocton Fen, and a small area known locally as Wasps Nest....

    , Lincolnshire (1869)
  • Extension Radcliffe Infirmary
    Radcliffe Infirmary
    The Radcliffe Infirmary was a hospital in central Oxford, England, located at the southern end of Woodstock Road on the western side, backing onto Walton Street. The Radcliffe Infirmary, named after physician John Radcliffe, opened in 1770 and was Oxford's first hospital...

    , Oxford (1869–71)
  • Lincoln's Inn, London, Library extension (1870–72), New Chambers Block A (1873) and New Chambers Block B (1876–78)
  • the main building of the new campus of the University of Glasgow
    University of Glasgow
    The University of Glasgow is the fourth-oldest university in the English-speaking world and one of Scotland's four ancient universities. Located in Glasgow, the university was founded in 1451 and is presently one of seventeen British higher education institutions ranked amongst the top 100 of the...

     (1870), often called the "Gilbert Scott Building" in his honour.
  • Savernake Hospital, Wiltshire (1871–72)
  • The Great Hall, Bombay University
    University of Mumbai
    The University of Mumbai , is a state university located in Mumbai, Maharashtra, India. It was known as the University of Bombay until 1996 when the city of Bombay was renamed as Mumbai. The affiliated colleges of the university are spread throughout the city of Mumbai and four coastal districts in...

     (1875)
  • The Clarkson Memorial
    Clarkson Memorial
    The Clarkson Memorial in Wisbech, Cambridgeshire, England commemorates Thomas Clarkson , a central figure in the campaign against the slave trade in the British empire, and a former native of Wisbech....

     in Wisbech
    Wisbech
    Wisbech is a market town, inland port and civil parish with a population of 20,200 in the Fens of Cambridgeshire. The tidal River Nene runs through the centre of the town and is spanned by two bridges...

    . Scott first put forward designs in 1875, but work did not start until 1880. The eventual design was a slightly altered version of Scott's original design.

Domestic buildings

  • Vicarage, Wappenham
    Wappenham
    Wappenham is a linear village and civil parish in Northamptonshire, England. It is south-west of Towcester, north of Syresham and north-west of Silverstone and forms part of the district of South Northamptonshire...

    , Northamptonshire (1833)
  • 16 High Street, Chesham
    Chesham
    Chesham is a market town in the Chiltern Hills, Buckinghamshire, England. It is located 11 miles south-east of the county town of Aylesbury. Chesham is also a civil parish designated a town council within Chiltern district. It is situated in the Chess Valley and surrounded by farmland, as well as...

    , Buckinghamshire (1835)
  • Vicarage, Dinton
    Dinton, Buckinghamshire
    Dinton is a village in Buckinghamshire, England. It is in the very south of the Aylesbury Vale on the ancient turnpike leading from Aylesbury to Thame . Dinton with Ford and Upton is also a civil parish within Aylesbury Vale district.The village name is Anglo Saxon in origin, and means 'Dunna's...

    , Buckinghamshire (1836)
  • Rectory, Weston Turville
    Weston Turville
    Weston Turville is a village and also a civil parish within Aylesbury Vale district in Buckinghamshire, England. It is located about a mile and a half south east of Aylesbury and the parish is bisected across the top by Akeman Street....

    , Buckinghamshire (1838)
  • Parsonage, Blakesley
    Blakesley
    Blakesley is a village and civil parish in the South Northamptonshire district of Northamptonshire, England. It is about = west of Towcester. It is about above sea level according to Ordnance Survey...

    , Northamptonshire (1839)
  • Parsonage, Hartshill, Stoke on Trent (1840)
  • Seaman's Houses, Whitby
    Whitby
    Whitby is a seaside town, port and civil parish in the Scarborough borough of North Yorkshire, England. Situated on the east coast of Yorkshire at the mouth of the River Esk, Whitby has a combined maritime, mineral and tourist heritage, and is home to the ruins of Whitby Abbey where Caedmon, the...

    , Yorkshire (1842)
  • Rectory, Teffont Evias
    Teffont Evias
    Teffont Evias, also Teffont Ewyas, past alternative spellings including Tevont Evias, is a small village and former civil parish in the south of Wiltshire, England. The present buildings are mostly of local stone, and several are thatched...

    , Wiltshire (1842)
  • Workers Houses, Hartshill, Stoke on Trent (1842–48)
  • Parsonage, Clifton Hampden
    Clifton Hampden
    Clifton Hampden is a village and civil parish on the north bank of the River Thames, just over east of Abingdon in Oxfordshire. Since 1932 the civil parish has included the village of Burcot, east of Clifton Hampden.-Manor:...

    , Oxfordshire (1843–46)
  • Parsonage, Barnet, Hertford
    Hertford
    Hertford is the county town of Hertfordshire, England, and is also a civil parish in the East Hertfordshire district of the county. Forming a civil parish, the 2001 census put the population of Hertford at about 24,180. Recent estimates are that it is now around 28,000...

     (1845)
  • Parsonage, St. Mark's, Swindon
    Swindon
    Swindon is a large town within the borough of Swindon and ceremonial county of Wiltshire, in South West England. It is midway between Bristol, west and Reading, east. London is east...

     (c. 1846)
  • Parsonage, Wembley
    Wembley
    Wembley is an area of northwest London, England, and part of the London Borough of Brent. It is home to the famous Wembley Stadium and Wembley Arena...

    , Middlesex (1846)
  • Parsonage, Weeton, North Yorkshire (c. 1852)
  • Houses Broad Sanctuary, Westminster
    Westminster
    Westminster is an area of central London, within the City of Westminster, England. It lies on the north bank of the River Thames, southwest of the City of London and southwest of Charing Cross...

     (1852–54)
  • Parsonage, Trefnant
    Trefnant
    Trefnant is a village and community in Denbighshire, Wales. It is located on the A525 road in the Vale of Clwyd , about halfway between St Asaph to the north and Denbigh to the south...

    , Denbighshire (c. 1855)
  • Parsonage, St. Mary's, Stoke Newington
    Stoke Newington
    Stoke Newington is a district in the London Borough of Hackney. It is north-east of Charing Cross.-Boundaries:In modern terms, Stoke Newington can be roughly defined by the N16 postcode area . Its southern boundary with Dalston is quite ill-defined too...

    , London (c. 1855)
  • All Souls' Vicarage, Halifax
    Halifax, West Yorkshire
    Halifax is a minster town, within the Metropolitan Borough of Calderdale in West Yorkshire, England. It has an urban area population of 82,056 in the 2001 Census. It is well-known as a centre of England's woollen manufacture from the 15th century onward, originally dealing through the Halifax Piece...

    , Yorkshire (c. 1856)
  • Cottages, Ilam, Staffordshire
    Ilam, Staffordshire
    Ilam is a village in the Staffordshire Peak District, lying on the River Manifold. This article describes some of the main features of the village and surroundings.- Ilam village :...

     (c. 1857)
  • Almshouses, Hartshill, Stoke on Trent (1857)
  • Lanhydrock House
    Lanhydrock House
    Lanhydrock is a civil parish centred on a country estate and mansion in Cornwall, United Kingdom. The parish lies south of the town of Bodmin and is bounded to the north by Bodmin parish, to the south by Lanlivery parish and to the west by Lanivet parish. The population was 171 in the 2001 census...

    , near Bodmin
    Bodmin
    Bodmin is a civil parish and major town in Cornwall, England, United Kingdom. It is situated in the centre of the county southwest of Bodmin Moor.The extent of the civil parish corresponds fairly closely to that of the town so is mostly urban in character...

    , Cornwall (1857) an Elizabethan mansion rebuilt after a fire, formal gardens assisted by Richard Coad
    Richard Coad
    Richard Coad was a 19th century Cornish architect.Born in Liskeard, Cornwall, he was articled to Henry Rice of Liskeard and subsequently worked as assistant to Sir George Gilbert Scott from 1847 to 1864...

  • Parsonage, Kilkhampton
    Kilkhampton
    Kilkhampton is a village and civil parish in northeast Cornwall, United Kingdom. The village is situated on the A39 approximately four miles north-northeast of Bude.Kilkhampton was mentioned in the Domesday Book as "Chilchetone"...

    , Cornwall (c. 1858)
  • Walton Hall, Warwickshire
    Walton Hall, Warwickshire
    Walton Hall is a 19th century country mansion at Walton, near Wellesbourne, Warwickshire, once owned by the late entertainer Danny La Rue, now in use as an hotel. It is a Grade II* listed building....

     (1858)
  • Parsonage, Ashley
    Ashley, Northamptonshire
    Ashley is a village and civil parish in the Kettering district of Northamptonshire, England, about northeast of Market Harborough, Leicestershire and west of Corby. The village is near the River Welland, which forms the border with Leicestershire...

    , Northamptonshire (1858)
  • Parsonage, Bridge
    Bridge, Kent
    Bridge is a village and civil parish near Canterbury in Kent, South East England.Bridge village is situated in the Nailbourne valley in a rural setting on the old Roman road, Watling Street, formerly the main road between London and Dover...

    , Kent (c. 1859)
  • Vicarage, Ranmore Common
    Ranmore Common
    Ranmore Common is a village and an area of wooded common land on the North Downs, to the northwest of Dorking in the English county of Surrey. It is located within the civil parish of Wotton and is also within the Surrey Hills Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty...

    , Surrey (c. 1859)
  • Kelham Hall
    Kelham
    Kelham is a small village in Nottinghamshire variously estimated as "3.36 miles," "3 miles," or "2.92 miles"to the northwest of Newark on a bend in the A617 road near its crossing of the River Trent.-Historical:...

    , Nottinghamshire (1859–62)
  • Workers' housing at Akroydon, Halifax (1859)
  • Lee Priory, Littlebourne
    Littlebourne
    Littlebourne is a village and civil parish near Canterbury in Kent, South East England.The 13th-century church, St Vincent of Saragossa, is thought to have been founded by the monks of St Augustine's Abbey and contains an ancient wall painting depicting Saint Christopher, patron saint of travellers...

    , Kent, alterations and additions (1860–63) demolished
  • Rectory, Higham, Forest Heath
    Higham, Forest Heath
    Higham is a village and civil parish in the Forest Heath district of Suffolk in the east of England. Located midway between Bury St Edmunds and Newmarket, in 2005 its population was 140. Higham is split into three parts: Upper Green, Middle Green and Lower Green.Prior to the Beeching Axe, the...

    , Suffolk (c. 1861)
  • Kingston Grange, Kingston St Mary
    Kingston St Mary
    Kingston St Mary is a village and parish in Somerset, England, situated at the southern end of the Quantock Hills north of Taunton in the Taunton Deane district...

    , Somerset for Mr Perkins (c. 1861)
  • Parsonage, St. Andrew's, Leicester
    Leicester
    Leicester is a city and unitary authority in the East Midlands of England, and the county town of Leicestershire. The city lies on the River Soar and at the edge of the National Forest...

     (c. 1861)
  • Hartland Abbey (c. 1861) supervised by Richard Coad, built by Pulsman of Barnstaple
    Barnstaple
    Barnstaple is a town and civil parish in the local government district of North Devon in the county of Devon, England, UK. It lies west southwest of Bristol, north of Plymouth and northwest of the county town of Exeter. The old spelling Barnstable is now obsolete.It is the main town of the...

  • Hafodunos
    Hafodunos
    Hafodunos Hall is a Gothic revival house located near the village of Llangernyw in Wales. Designed by Sir George Gilbert Scott, it was built between 1861 and 1866 for Henry Robertson Sandbach, replacing a house that had been built in 1674....

    , Llangernyw
    Llangernyw
    Llangernyw is a rural, mostly Welsh-speaking, village in Conwy County Borough, north Wales. The population was 960 in 2001, 67% Welsh-speaking...

    , North Wales (1861–1866)
  • Nos 1,3 & 3a Dean's Yard
    Dean's Yard
    Dean's Yard, Westminster, comprises most of the remaining precincts of the former monastery of Westminster, not occupied by the Abbey buildings. It is known to members of Westminster School as Green, and referred to without an article...

    , Westminster (1862)
  • Parsonage, Leith
    Leith
    -South Leith v. North Leith:Up until the late 16th century Leith , comprised two separate towns on either side of the river....

    , Midlothian (1862)
  • Two lodge houses at Great Barr Hall
    Great Barr Hall
    Great Barr Hall is an 18th century mansion situated at Pheasey, Walsall, on the border with Great Barr, Birmingham, West Midlands, England. It is a Grade II* listed building. It is, however, in a very poor state of repair and is on the Buildings at Risk Register.-The Scotts:In the mid-17th...

    , near Birmingham
    Birmingham
    Birmingham is a city and metropolitan borough in the West Midlands of England. It is the most populous British city outside the capital London, with a population of 1,036,900 , and lies at the heart of the West Midlands conurbation, the second most populous urban area in the United Kingdom with a...

     (pre-1863)
  • The Master's House, St John's College, Cambridge
    St John's College, Cambridge
    St John's College is a constituent college of the University of Cambridge. The college's alumni include nine Nobel Prize winners, six Prime Ministers, three archbishops, at least two princes, and three Saints....

     (1863)
  • Parsonage, Christ Church, Ottershaw
    Ottershaw
    Ottershaw is a village in the Runnymede district of Surrey, England about 20 miles to the south-west of London. It is part of the Foxhills ward in the census....

    , Surrey (c. 1864)
  • Parsonage, St. Luke's, Weaste
    Weaste
    Weaste is an inner city area of Salford, in Greater Manchester, England. It is an industrial area, with many industrial estates. The A57 road passes through Weaste, which lies close to the M602 motorway...

    , Lancashire (c. 1865)
  • Schools Master's House, Ashley, Northamptonshire (1865)
  • Almshouses, Winchcombe
    Winchcombe
    Winchcombe is a Cotswold town in the local authority district of Tewkesbury, in Gloucestershire, England. Its population according to the 2001 census was 4,379.-Early history:...

    , Gloucestershire (1865)
  • Rectory, Tydd St Giles, Cambridgeshire (1868)
  • Parsonage, Mirfield
    Mirfield
    Mirfield is a small town and civil parish within the Metropolitan Borough of Kirklees, in West Yorkshire, England. It is located on the A644 road between Brighouse and Dewsbury...

    , Yorkshire (1869)
  • Brownsover Hall
    Brownsover Hall
    Brownsover Hall is a 19th century mansion house in the old village of Brownsover, Rugby, Warwickshire which has been converted for use as a hotel. It is a Grade II listed building.-Early History :...

    , Warwickshire, date uncertain (c. 1870)
  • Polwhele House, Truro
    Truro
    Truro is a city and civil parish in Cornwall, England, United Kingdom. The city is the centre for administration, leisure and retail in Cornwall, with a population recorded in the 2001 census of 17,431. Truro urban statistical area, which includes parts of surrounding parishes, has a 2001 census...

    , Cornwall, additions (c. 1870)
  • Vicarage, Hillesden
    Hillesden
    Hillesden is a village and is also a civil parish within Aylesbury Vale district in Buckinghamshire, England. It is in the very north of the county, about four miles south of Buckingham.The village name is Anglo Saxon in origin, and means 'Hild's hill'...

    , Buckinghamshire (1871)
  • St Mary's Homes, Godstone
    Godstone
    Godstone is a village in the county of Surrey, England. It is located approximately six miles east of Reigate at the junction of the A22 and A25 major roads, and near the M25 motorway.-History:...

     (1872)
  • Scott's Building, King's College, Cambridge
    King's College, Cambridge
    King's College is a constituent college of the University of Cambridge, England. The college's full name is "The King's College of our Lady and Saint Nicholas in Cambridge", but it is usually referred to simply as "King's" within the University....

     (1873)
  • Parsonage, St. Michael's, New Southgate
    New Southgate
    New Southgate is a residential suburb in the south-east corner of the London Borough of Barnet and the south-west corner of the London Borough of Enfield in North London, England....

    , Middlesex (c. 1874)
  • Parsonage, St. Saviour's, Leicester
    Leicester
    Leicester is a city and unitary authority in the East Midlands of England, and the county town of Leicestershire. The city lies on the River Soar and at the edge of the National Forest...

     (1875)
  • Parsonage, Fulney, Lincolnshire (1877–80)
  • New Court, Pembroke College, Cambridge
    Pembroke College, Cambridge
    Pembroke College is a constituent college of the University of Cambridge, England.The college has over seven hundred students and fellows, and is the third oldest college of the university. Physically, it is one of the university's larger colleges, with buildings from almost every century since its...

     (1881)

Church buildings

  • St Giles' Church, Camberwell
    Camberwell
    Camberwell is a district of south London, England, and forms part of the London Borough of Southwark. It is a built-up inner city district located southeast of Charing Cross. To the west it has a boundary with the London Borough of Lambeth.-Toponymy:...

    , London (1841–44)
  • St Mary's Church, Hanwell
    Hanwell
    Hanwell is a town situated in the London Borough of Ealing in west London, between Ealing and Southall. The motto of Hanwell Urban District Council was Nec Aspera Terrent...

    , Middlesex (1841)
  • Holy Trinity Church, Hartshill, Stoke on Trent (1842)
  • St. John the Baptist Church, Beeston
    St. John the Baptist Church, Beeston
    St. John the Baptist Church is an Anglican church in Beeston, Nottinghamshire, England.The church is Grade II listed by the Department for Culture, Media & Sport as it is a building of special architectural or historic interest.-History:...

    , Nottinghamshire
    Nottinghamshire
    Nottinghamshire is a county in the East Midlands of England, bordering South Yorkshire to the north-west, Lincolnshire to the east, Leicestershire to the south, and Derbyshire to the west...

     (1842)
  • St. John the Baptist's Church, Leenside, Nottingham
    St. John the Baptist's Church, Leenside, Nottingham
    The church of St. John the Baptist, Leenside, Nottingham was opened in 1844 as a parish church in the Church of England. It was destroyed in 1941.-History:...

     (1843–44)
  • Holy Trinity Church, Halstead
    Holy Trinity Church, Halstead
    Holy Trinity Church, Halstead, is a redundant Anglican church in the town of Halstead, Essex, England. It has been designated by English Heritage as a Grade II* listed building, and is under the care of the Churches Conservation Trust...

    , Essex (1843–44)
  • St John the Evangelist, West Meon, Hampshire (1843-46), squared knapped flint work
  • St Mark's Church, Worsley
    St Mark's Church, Worsley
    St Mark’s Church, Worsley, is an Anglican parish church in Salford, Greater Manchester, England. It is built on a prominent site formerly known as Cross Field and is a significant local landmark; it is now also a point of reference to the many who pass it on the M60 motorway, which bisects the...

    , Greater Manchester (1844-6)
  • St Mark's Church, Swindon, (1845)
  • St Nikolai, Hamburg
    St. Nikolai, Hamburg
    The Gothic Revival Church of St. Nicholas was formerly one of the five Lutheran Hauptkirchen in the city of Hamburg. It is now in ruins, serving as a memorial and an important architectural landmark. When Hamburg residents mention the Nikolaikirche, it is generally to this church that they are...

     (1845–80), the tallest building in the world from 1874 to 1876.
  • The Cathedral of St John the Baptist
    Cathedral of St. John the Baptist (St. John's)
    The Cathedral of St. John the Baptist is located in the city of St. John's, Newfoundland. This parish in the Diocese of Eastern Newfoundland and Labrador was founded in 1699 in response to a petition drafted by the Anglican townsfolk of St. John's and sent to the Bishop of London, the Rt. Rev....

     in St John's, Newfoundland (1847, construction overseen by his assistant William Hay
    William Hay (architect)
    William Hay was a Scottish architect who was actively working internationally from 1842 to 1887. A specialist in gothic architecture, he is primarily known for his work on several churches and cathedrals. His most famous structure is the Bermuda Cathedral in Hamilton, Bermuda which he designed in...

    )
  • St Gregory's Church, Canterbury (1848)
  • St Paul's Church, Canterbury (1848)
  • Emmanuel Church, Forest Gate, London (1852)
  • St John's Church, Eastnor, Herefordshire
    Eastnor, Herefordshire
    Eastnor is a village in Herefordshire, England, east of Ledbury. Eastnor Castle is nearby, and named after the village.St John's Church was designed by Sir George Gilbert Scott in 1852.-External links:...

     Church (1852) and Monument (1855)
  • All Saints Church, Watford, Hertfordshire (1853)
  • All Saints Church, Sherbourne, Warwick (1854)
  • Holy Trinity Church, Coventry
    Holy Trinity Church, Coventry
    Holy Trinity Church, Coventry is a parish church in the Church of England located in Coventry City Centre, West Midlands, England.Above the chancel arch is probably the most impressive Doom wall-painting now remaining in an English church.-History:...

     (1854)
  • St. John's Church, Bilton, Harrogate (1855)
  • St Mary, Hayes
    Hayes, Bromley
    Hayes is a place in the London Borough of Bromley, south-east London, England. It has two main areas of activity: the ancient village and suburban Hayes.-The ancient village of Nimrods :...

    , Kent (alterations) (1856-62)
  • St Peter, Bushley
    Bushley
    Bushley is a village and civil parish in the Malvern Hills District in Worcestershire, England. The church is dedicated to Saint Peter. William Dowdeswell the Worcestershire MP from 1761 until his death was brought up at Pull Court in Bushley....

    , Worcestershire. Roof (1856)
  • St Mary, Tedstone Delamere
    Tedstone Delamere
    Tedstone Delamere is a village in Herefordshire, England, north east of Bromyard.St James' Church chancel was added by Sir George Gilbert Scott in 1856-57. The Buildings of England: Herefordshire, Nikolaus Pevsner, 1963 p106 ISBN 0-14-071025-6...

    , Herefordshire
    Herefordshire
    Herefordshire is a historic and ceremonial county in the West Midlands region of England. For Eurostat purposes it is a NUTS 3 region and is one of three counties that comprise the "Herefordshire, Worcestershire and Gloucestershire" NUTS 2 region. It also forms a unitary district known as the...

     Chancel (1856-7)
  • St George's Minster, Doncaster (1858)
  • St Matthias Church, Richmond
    St Matthias Church, Richmond
    St Matthias Church is an Anglican church in Richmond, London. Built in 1858, the tall spire is a familiar landmark as the church is on the top of Richmond Hill. The church has been designated a Grade II listed building by English Heritage....

    , London (1858)
  • All Souls Church, Halifax
    All Souls Church, Halifax
    All Souls Church, Halifax, is a redundant Anglican church in Haley Hill, Halifax, West Yorkshire, England. It has been designated by English Heritage as a Grade I listed building, and is under the care of the Churches Conservation Trust.-Early history:...

     (1859)
  • St. Thomas's Church, Huddersfield
    St. Thomas's Church, Huddersfield
    St Thomas’s Church is a Church of England church in the Diocese of Wakefield. It is situated in Huddersfield, West Yorkshire, England and is a Grade II* listed building....

     (1859)
  • St Michael and All Angels Church, Leafield
    Leafield
    Leafield is a village and civil parish about northwest of Witney in West Oxfordshire. The parish includes the hamlet of Langley, west of Leafield village....

    , Oxfordshire (1859-60)
  • St Matthew's Church, Stretton
    St Matthew's Church, Stretton
    St Matthew's Church, Stretton is in the village of Stretton, Cheshire, England. The church has been designated by English Heritage as a Grade II listed building. It is an active Anglican parish church in the diocese of Chester, the archdeaconry of Chester and the deanery of Great Budworth...

    , Cheshire (1859 and 1867)
  • St Matthew's Church. Yiewsley
    Yiewsley
    Yiewsley is a place in the London Borough of Hillingdon. Its name derives from the Anglo-Saxon Wifeleslēah: "Wifel's woodland clearing".The nearest places to Yiewsley are Hayes, Harlington, Cowley, Harmondsworth, Sipson, and West Drayton....

    , Hillingdon
    Hillingdon
    Hillingdon is a suburban area within the London Borough of Hillingdon, situated 14.2 miles west of Charing Cross.Much of Hillingdon is represented as the Hillingdon East ward within the local authority, Hillingdon Council...

     (1859)
  • St Mary, Edvin Loach
    Edvin Loach
    Edvin Loach, also Edwin Loach, is a village in eastern Herefordshire, England, about four miles north of the town of Bromyard, and near the village of Edwin Ralph...

    , Herefordshire
    Herefordshire
    Herefordshire is a historic and ceremonial county in the West Midlands region of England. For Eurostat purposes it is a NUTS 3 region and is one of three counties that comprise the "Herefordshire, Worcestershire and Gloucestershire" NUTS 2 region. It also forms a unitary district known as the...

     (?1860)
  • St Stephen's Church, Higham Green, Suffolk (1861)
  • The Hereford Screen
    Hereford Screen
    The Hereford Screen is a great choir screen designed by Sir George Gilbert Scott and made by Coventry metalworking firm Skidmore & Co. for Hereford Cathedral, England in 1862. It was one of the Gothic Revival works in iron of the nineteenth century...

    , (1862), choir screen from Hereford Cathedral, now restored and in the Victoria and Albert Museum
    Victoria and Albert Museum
    The Victoria and Albert Museum , set in the Brompton district of The Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea, London, England, is the world's largest museum of decorative arts and design, housing a permanent collection of over 4.5 million objects...

    , London
  • St Mary's Church, Shackleford
    Shackleford
    Shackleford is a village in Surrey, England lying to the west of the A3 between Guildford and Petersfield. Neighbouring villages include Puttenham, Peper Harrow and Eashing....

    , Surrey
    Surrey
    Surrey is a county in the South East of England and is one of the Home Counties. The county borders Greater London, Kent, East Sussex, West Sussex, Hampshire and Berkshire. The historic county town is Guildford. Surrey County Council sits at Kingston upon Thames, although this has been part of...

     (1865)
  • St Denys Church, Southampton (1868)
  • St James' Church, Cradley, Herefordshire
    Cradley, Herefordshire
    Cradley is the largest village in Herefordshire, England . The nearest towns are Ledbury, 14 km to the south, and Bromyard, 15 km to the north west, in Herefordshire and Malvern, Worcestershire, 7 km to the south east on the other side of the Malvern Hills.Cradley has a village shop/...

     Chancel (1868)
  • All Saints church, Ryde
    Ryde
    Ryde is a British seaside town, civil parish and the most populous town and urban area on the Isle of Wight, with a population of approximately 30,000. It is situated on the north-east coast. The town grew in size as a seaside resort following the joining of the villages of Upper Ryde and Lower...

    , Isle of Wight
    Isle of Wight
    The Isle of Wight is a county and the largest island of England, located in the English Channel, on average about 2–4 miles off the south coast of the county of Hampshire, separated from the mainland by a strait called the Solent...

     (1872)
  • St. Thomas of Canterbury Church, Chester
    St. Thomas of Canterbury Church, Chester
    The Church of St. Thomas of Canterbury is situated in the City of Chester, in an area of the city informally known as "The Garden Quarter". This is a densely-populated area, close to the University. While the church was built in 1872, the parish of St. Oswald which it serves, is much older, dating...

     (1872)
  • St Peter and St Paul, Priory Church Leominster
    Leominster
    Leominster is a market town in Herefordshire, England, located approximately north of the city of Hereford and south of Ludlow, at...

    , Herefordshire
    Herefordshire
    Herefordshire is a historic and ceremonial county in the West Midlands region of England. For Eurostat purposes it is a NUTS 3 region and is one of three counties that comprise the "Herefordshire, Worcestershire and Gloucestershire" NUTS 2 region. It also forms a unitary district known as the...

     Quatrefoil piers (1872-9).
  • The Cathedral Church of St Mary the Virgin, Glasgow
    St. Mary's Cathedral, Glasgow
    The Cathedral Church of St Mary the Virgin is a cathedral of the Scottish Episcopal Church. It is located on the Great Western Road, in the west end of Glasgow, Scotland. The current building was opened on 9 November 1871 as St Mary's Episcopal Church and was completed in 1893 when the spire was...

     (1873)
  • Christ Church, Bradford-on-Avon
    Christ Church, Bradford-on-Avon
    The Anglican Christ Church is located in the northern Hillside Terraces neighborhood Conservation District of Bradford-on-Avon, Wiltshire. It is in the Bradford Deanery of the Diocese of Salisbury....

     (additions) (1875)
  • All Souls, Blackman Lane
    All Souls, Blackman Lane
    All Souls' Church, Blackman Lane, in Leeds, West Yorkshire, England is a large Victorian Church of England parish church.-History:All Souls Church was built by public subscription in one of the poorest districts of Leeds, the Leylands, as a memorial to Dr W. F. Hook, Vicar of Leeds for some 22...

    , Leeds
    Leeds
    Leeds is a city and metropolitan borough in West Yorkshire, England. In 2001 Leeds' main urban subdivision had a population of 443,247, while the entire city has a population of 798,800 , making it the 30th-most populous city in the European Union.Leeds is the cultural, financial and commercial...

     (1879) - his last work, a large lancet-style church
  • St Mary The Virgin, Speldhurst
    Speldhurst
    Speldhurst is a village and civil parish in the borough of Tunbridge Wells in Kent, England. The parish is to the west of Tunbridge Wells: the village is west of the town.-Parish Church:...

     Kent
    Kent
    Kent is a county in southeast England, and is one of the home counties. It borders East Sussex, Surrey and Greater London and has a defined boundary with Essex in the middle of the Thames Estuary. The ceremonial county boundaries of Kent include the shire county of Kent and the unitary borough of...

     (1879)
  • St. Michael and St. George Cathedral
    St. Michael and St. George Cathedral
    The Cathedral of St. Michael and St. George is the home of the Anglican Diocese of Grahamstown in Grahamstown, South Africa in the Eastern Cape Province. It is the episcopal seat of the Bishop of Grahamstown. The cathedral is located on Church Square. It has the tallest spire in South Africa...

    , Grahamstown
    Grahamstown
    Grahamstown is a city in the Eastern Cape Province of the Republic of South Africa and is the seat of the Makana municipality. The population of greater Grahamstown, as of 2003, was 124,758. The population of the surrounding areas, including the actual city was 41,799 of which 77.4% were black,...

     (tower and spire completed in 1879)
  • St Paul's Church, Low Fulney
    Low Fulney
    Low Fulney is a hamlet lying directly east of the town of Spalding, Lincolnshire England.Thornholme Grange dates from the 15th century, extended and partially rebuilt in the 16th century. Altered 19th century and 1936 when acquired by Land Settlement Association. Built of brick on the supposed site...

    , Spalding, Lincolnshire
    Spalding, Lincolnshire
    Spalding is a market town with a population of 30,000 on the River Welland in the South Holland district of Lincolnshire, England. Little London is a hamlet directly south of Spalding on the B1172 road....

     (completed 1880)
  • Christ Church
    Christ Church (cathedral), New Zealand
    The Anglican cathedral of ChristChurch in the city of Christchurch, New Zealand, was built in the second half of the 19th century. It is located in the centre of the city, surrounded by Cathedral Square...

     Cathedral, Christchurch, New Zealand
  • Exeter College
    Exeter College, Oxford
    Exeter College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in England and the fourth oldest college of the University. The main entrance is on the east side of Turl Street...

     Chapel, Oxford

  • St John The Baptist Church, Busbridge, Godalming
    Godalming
    Godalming is a town and civil parish in the Waverley district of the county of Surrey, England, south of Guildford. It is built on the banks of the River Wey and is a prosperous part of the London commuter belt. Godalming shares a three-way twinning arrangement with the towns of Joigny in France...

    , Surrey
  • St Mary's Cathedral, Edinburgh (Episcopal)
    St Mary's Cathedral, Edinburgh (Episcopal)
    St Mary's Cathedral or the Cathedral Church of Saint Mary the Virgin is a cathedral of the Scottish Episcopal Church in Edinburgh, Scotland. It was built in the late 19th century in the West End of Edinburgh's New Town. The cathedral is the see of the Bishop of Edinburgh, one of seven bishops...

  • St Mary's Church, Mirfield
    Mirfield
    Mirfield is a small town and civil parish within the Metropolitan Borough of Kirklees, in West Yorkshire, England. It is located on the A644 road between Brighouse and Dewsbury...

    , West Yorkshire
  • St Mary, Timsbury, Somerset
    Timsbury, Somerset
    Timsbury is a village and civil parish in the Bath and North East Somerset unitary authority of the county of Somerset, south-west of Bath England...

  • St Michael, Stourport-on-Severn
    Stourport-on-Severn
    Stourport-on-Severn, often shortened to Stourport, is a town and civil parish in the Wyre Forest District of North Worcestershire, England, a few miles to the south of Kidderminster and down stream on the River Severn from Bewdley...

    , Worcestershire
    Worcestershire
    Worcestershire is a non-metropolitan county, established in antiquity, located in the West Midlands region of England. For Eurostat purposes it is a NUTS 3 region and is one of three counties that comprise the "Herefordshire, Worcestershire and Warwickshire" NUTS 2 region...

     designed (1875) started (1881) by son John Oldrid Scott
    John Oldrid Scott
    John Oldrid Scott was an English architect.He was the son of Sir George Gilbert Scott and Caroline née Oldrid. His brother George Gilbert Scott Junior and nephew Sir Giles Gilbert Scott, were also prominent architects. He married Mary Ann Stevens in 1868, eldest daughter of the Reverend Thomas...

    , never finished and partly demolished.
  • St Nicholas's, Newport, Lincoln, Lincolnshire
    Lincoln, Lincolnshire
    Lincoln is a cathedral city and county town of Lincolnshire, England.The non-metropolitan district of Lincoln has a population of 85,595; the 2001 census gave the entire area of Lincoln a population of 120,779....

    .
  • St Peter's Church, Elworth
    Elworth
    Elworth is a village and a suburb of Sandbach, Cheshire, England approximately one mile to the east. Elworth has a church, several pubs and a few shops. It also has the railway station serving Sandbach and is on the railway line between Crewe and Manchester. There is a canal running to the...

    , Cheshire.
  • Sandbach School
    Sandbach School
    Founded in 1677, Sandbach School has been located on Crewe Road in Sandbach, Cheshire for almost 150 years.It is an all-boys school offering admission from the age of 11. In years 10 and 11 a range of GCSE's and Vocational subjects are offered. The school has its own Sixth Form and so offers...

    , Sandbach, Cheshire.
  • Christ The Saviour, Ealing
    Ealing
    Ealing is a suburban area of west London, England and the administrative centre of the London Borough of Ealing. It is located west of Charing Cross and around from the City of London. It is one of the major metropolitan centres identified in the London Plan. It was historically a rural village...

    , London
  • Christ Church, Ramsgate
    Ramsgate
    Ramsgate is a seaside town in the district of Thanet in east Kent, England. It was one of the great English seaside towns of the 19th century and is a member of the ancient confederation of Cinque Ports. It has a population of around 40,000. Ramsgate's main attraction is its coastline and its main...

    , Kent
  • Christ Church, Swindon
    Swindon
    Swindon is a large town within the borough of Swindon and ceremonial county of Wiltshire, in South West England. It is midway between Bristol, west and Reading, east. London is east...

    , Wiltshire

Churches


Scott was involved in major restorations
Victorian restoration
Victorian restoration is the term commonly used to refer to the widespread and extensive refurbishment and rebuilding of Church of England churches and cathedrals that took place in England and Wales during the 19th-century reign of Queen Victoria...

 of medieval church architecture.
  • Chantry Chapel of St Mary the Virgin, Wakefield
    Chantry Chapel of St Mary the Virgin, Wakefield
    The Chantry Chapel of St Mary the Virgin, Wakefield is a chantry chapel in Wakefield, West Yorkshire, England and is designated a Grade I Listed building by English Heritage. It is located south of the city centre on the medieval bridge over the River Calder. It is the only survivor of four...

     (1842)
  • St. Mary's Church, Temple Balsall (1849)
  • St Mary's Church, Nottingham
    St. Mary's Church, Nottingham
    The Church of St Mary the Virgin is the oldest religious foundation in the City of Nottingham, England, the largest church after the Roman Catholic Cathedral and the largest mediæval building in Nottingham....

     (1850s)
  • Church of St Editha, Tamworth
    Church of St Editha, Tamworth
    The Church of St Editha is an Anglican parish church and Grade I listed building in Tamworth, Staffordshire, England.-History:The church of St. Editha is the largest medieval parish church in Staffordshire...

    , Staffordshire (1850s)
  • Church of St. Mary Magdalene, Newark-on-Trent
    Church of St. Mary Magdalene, Newark-on-Trent
    The Church of St. Mary Magadalene, Newark-on-Trent is a parish church in the Church of England in Newark-on-Trent in Nottinghamshire.The church is Grade I listed by the Department for Culture, Media & Sport as a building of outstanding architectural or historic interest.-Building:It is notable for...

    , Nottinghamshire (1850s)
  • All Saints' Church, Oakham
    All Saints' Church, Oakham
    All Saints' Church, Oakham is a parish church in the Church of England in Oakham, Rutland.-History:The spire of Oakham parish church dominates distant views of the town for several miles in all directions...

     (1857–1858)
  • St John the Baptist Church, Aconbury
    Aconbury
    Aconbury is a village in the English county of Herefordshire, situated on a road leading from Hereford to Ross-on-Wye.St John the Baptist Church was originally the church of a nunnery founded before 1237. The style of the current building is late 13th-century. Some restoration work was carried out...

    , Herefordshire (1863)
  • St John the Baptist Church, Bromsgrove
    Bromsgrove
    Bromsgrove is a town in Worcestershire, England. The town is about north east of Worcester and south west of Birmingham city centre. It had a population of 29,237 in 2001 with a small ethnic minority and is in Bromsgrove District.- History :Bromsgrove is first documented in the early 9th century...

    , Worcestershire (1858)
  • St Many Magdelene, Duns Tew
    Duns Tew
    Duns Tew is a village and civil parish about south of Banbury in Oxfordshire. With nearby Great Tew and Little Tew, Duns Tew is one of the three villages known locally as "The Tews".-Origin of the name:...

    , Oxfordshire (1861-62)
  • St Peter and St Paul, Buckingham
    St Peter and St Paul, Buckingham
    St Peter & St Paul is the Anglican parish church in Buckingham, Buckinghamshire, England. The current rector is Revd Will Pearson-Gee and leads a range of services traditional and modern style, most which are on Sunday...

     Church Buckingham
    Buckingham
    Buckingham is a town situated in north Buckinghamshire, England, close to the borders of Northamptonshire and Oxfordshire. The town has a population of 11,572 ,...

    , (1862–1878) Additions to the original 1780 church including chancel
    Chancel
    In church architecture, the chancel is the space around the altar in the sanctuary at the liturgical east end of a traditional Christian church building...

    , buttresses, porch, roof and nave
    Nave
    In Romanesque and Gothic Christian abbey, cathedral basilica and church architecture, the nave is the central approach to the high altar, the main body of the church. "Nave" was probably suggested by the keel shape of its vaulting...

     alterations. Work continued over the years by his second son John Oldrid Scott
    John Oldrid Scott
    John Oldrid Scott was an English architect.He was the son of Sir George Gilbert Scott and Caroline née Oldrid. His brother George Gilbert Scott Junior and nephew Sir Giles Gilbert Scott, were also prominent architects. He married Mary Ann Stevens in 1868, eldest daughter of the Reverend Thomas...

     and grandson Charles Marriott Oldrid Scott
    Charles Marriott Oldrid Scott
    Charles Marriott Oldrid Scott was an English architect who is often best remembered for being the son of John Oldrid Scott and grandson of Sir George Gilbert Scott, both of whom were architects, as was his uncle George Gilbert Scott, Jr. and his cousins Sir Giles Gilbert Scott and Adrian Gilbert...

    .
  • St John the Baptist Church, Upton Bishop
    Upton Bishop
    Upton Bishop is a small village in Herefordshire, England.Upton Bishop was featured on TV when Phil and Alison Clarke chose their home on the Channel 4 programme Location, location, location with Phil Spencer and Kirsty Allsop advising them...

    , Herefordshire
    Herefordshire
    Herefordshire is a historic and ceremonial county in the West Midlands region of England. For Eurostat purposes it is a NUTS 3 region and is one of three counties that comprise the "Herefordshire, Worcestershire and Gloucestershire" NUTS 2 region. It also forms a unitary district known as the...

     Restoration (1862)
  • St Leonard, Yarpole
    Yarpole
    Yarpole is a small village in rural north Herefordshire, England located between Leominster and Ludlow, Shropshire.St Leonard's church chancel was restored by Sir George Gilbert Scott in 1864....

    , Herefordshire
    Herefordshire
    Herefordshire is a historic and ceremonial county in the West Midlands region of England. For Eurostat purposes it is a NUTS 3 region and is one of three counties that comprise the "Herefordshire, Worcestershire and Gloucestershire" NUTS 2 region. It also forms a unitary district known as the...

     Restoration of chancel
    Chancel
    In church architecture, the chancel is the space around the altar in the sanctuary at the liturgical east end of a traditional Christian church building...

    (1864)
  • St. Margaret's, Westminster
    St. Margaret's, Westminster
    The Anglican church of St. Margaret, Westminster Abbey is situated in the grounds of Westminster Abbey on Parliament Square, and is the parish church of the House of Commons of the United Kingdom in London...

     (1877–78)
  • St Mary's Island church on the Orchardleigh Estate
    Orchardleigh Estate
    Orchardleigh is a country estate in Somerset, approximately two miles north of Frome, and on the southern edge of the village of Lullington. It comprises a Victorian stately home, an island church, and an 18-hole golf course...

    , Somerset (1878)
  • St Peter's Church, Prestbury, Cheshire (1879–1881)
  • St Andrews Parish Church, Spratton
    Spratton
    Spratton is a village and civil parish in the English county of Northamptonshire. The local government authority is Daventry District Council. At the time of the 2001 census, the parish's population was 1,099 people. Spratton is 7.1 miles north of Northampton, 6.5 miles from Long Buckby and 11.4...

    , Northamptonshire
    Northamptonshire
    Northamptonshire is a landlocked county in the English East Midlands, with a population of 629,676 as at the 2001 census. It has boundaries with the ceremonial counties of Warwickshire to the west, Leicestershire and Rutland to the north, Cambridgeshire to the east, Bedfordshire to the south-east,...

  • Church of St Mary the Less, Cambridge
    Church of St Mary the Less, Cambridge
    The Church of St Mary the Less is a Church of England church situated on Trumpington Street at the corner of Little St Mary's Lane, in central Cambridge, England, next to Peterhouse...




Cathedrals

  • Ely Cathedral
    Ely Cathedral
    Ely Cathedral is the principal church of the Diocese of Ely, in Cambridgeshire, England, and is the seat of the Bishop of Ely and a suffragan bishop, the Bishop of Huntingdon...

     (1847–78)
  • Gloucester Cathedral
    Gloucester Cathedral
    Gloucester Cathedral, or the Cathedral Church of St Peter and the Holy and Indivisible Trinity, in Gloucester, England, stands in the north of the city near the river. It originated in 678 or 679 with the foundation of an abbey dedicated to Saint Peter .-Foundations:The foundations of the present...

     (1854–76)
  • Peterborough Cathedral
    Peterborough Cathedral
    Peterborough Cathedral, properly the Cathedral Church of St Peter, St Paul and St Andrew – also known as Saint Peter's Cathedral in the United Kingdom – is the seat of the Bishop of Peterborough, dedicated to Saint Peter, Saint Paul and Saint Andrew, whose statues look down from the...

     (1855–60)
  • Coventry Cathedral
    Coventry Cathedral
    Coventry Cathedral, also known as St Michael's Cathedral, is the seat of the Bishop of Coventry and the Diocese of Coventry, in Coventry, West Midlands, England. The current bishop is the Right Revd Christopher Cocksworth....

     (1855–57)
  • Hereford Cathedral
    Hereford Cathedral
    The current Hereford Cathedral, located at Hereford in England, dates from 1079. Its most famous treasure is Mappa Mundi, a mediæval map of the world dating from the 13th century. The cathedral is a Grade I listed building.-Origins:...

     east side (1855–63)
  • Lichfield Cathedral
    Lichfield Cathedral
    Lichfield Cathedral is situated in Lichfield, Staffordshire, England. It is the only medieval English cathedral with three spires. The Diocese of Lichfield covers all of Staffordshire, much of Shropshire and part of the Black Country and West Midlands...

     (1855–61) & (1877–81)
  • Wakefield Cathedral
    Wakefield Cathedral
    Wakefield Cathedral, formally the Cathedral Church of All Saints Wakefield is the cathedral for the Church of England's Diocese of Wakefield and is the seat of the Bishop of Wakefield. The cathedral has Anglo Saxon origins and the tallest cathedral spire in Yorkshire...

    (1858–60) (1865–69), & (1872-4)
  • Durham Cathedral
    Durham Cathedral
    The Cathedral Church of Christ, Blessed Mary the Virgin and St Cuthbert of Durham is a cathedral in the city of Durham, England, the seat of the Anglican Bishop of Durham. The Bishopric dates from 995, with the present cathedral being founded in AD 1093...

     (1859) & (1874–76)
  • Brecon Cathedral
    Brecon Cathedral
    Brecon Cathedral, in the town of Brecon, is the Cathedral of the Diocese of Swansea and Brecon in the Church in Wales, and seat of the Bishop of Swansea and Brecon...

     (1860–62) & (1872–75)
  • Canterbury Cathedral
    Canterbury Cathedral
    Canterbury Cathedral in Canterbury, Kent, is one of the oldest and most famous Christian structures in England and forms part of a World Heritage Site....

     (1860) & (1877–80)
  • Chichester Cathedral
    Chichester Cathedral
    The Cathedral Church of the Holy Trinity, otherwise called Chichester Cathedral, is the seat of the Anglican Bishop of Chichester. It is located in Chichester, in Sussex, England...

     (1861–67) & (1872)
  • Ripon Cathedral
    Ripon Cathedral
    Ripon Cathedral is the seat of the Bishop of Ripon and Leeds and the mother church of the Diocese of Ripon and Leeds, situated in the small North Yorkshire city of Ripon, England.-Background:...

     (1862–72)
  • St Edmundsbury Cathedral (1863–64) & (1867–69)
  • Worcester Cathedral
    Worcester Cathedral
    Worcester Cathedral is an Anglican cathedral in Worcester, England; situated on a bank overlooking the River Severn. It is the seat of the Anglican Bishop of Worcester. Its official name is The Cathedral Church of Christ and the Blessed Mary the Virgin of Worcester...

     (1863–64) (1868) & (1874)
  • St David's Cathedral
    St David's Cathedral
    St David's Cathedral is situated in St David's in the county of Pembrokeshire, on the most westerly point of Wales.-Early history:The monastic community was founded by Saint David, Abbot of Menevia, who died in AD589...

    , St Davids, Wales (1864–76)
  • Salisbury Cathedral
    Salisbury Cathedral
    Salisbury Cathedral, formally known as the Cathedral Church of the Blessed Virgin Mary, is an Anglican cathedral in Salisbury, England, considered one of the leading examples of Early English architecture....

     (1865–71)
  • St Asaph Cathedral
    St Asaph Cathedral
    St Asaph Cathedral is the Anglican cathedral in St Asaph, Denbighshire, north Wales. It is sometimes claimed to be the smallest Anglican cathedral in Britain.- History :...

     (1866–69) & (1871)
  • Newcastle Cathedral
    Newcastle Cathedral
    St Nicholas's Cathedral is a Church of England cathedral in Newcastle upon Tyne, England. Its full title is The Cathedral Church of St Nicholas Newcastle upon Tyne...

     (1867–71) & (1872–76)
  • Chester Cathedral
    Chester Cathedral
    Chester Cathedral is the mother church of the Church of England Diocese of Chester, and is located in the city of Chester, Cheshire, England. The cathedral, formerly St Werburgh's abbey church of a Benedictine monastery, is dedicated to Christ and the Blessed Virgin Mary...

     (1868–75)
  • Exeter Cathedral
    Exeter Cathedral
    Exeter Cathedral, the Cathedral Church of Saint Peter at Exeter, is an Anglican cathedral, and the seat of the Bishop of Exeter, in the city of Exeter, Devon in South West England....

     (1869–70)
  • Christ Church, Oxford
    Christ Church, Oxford
    Christ Church or house of Christ, and thus sometimes known as The House), is one of the largest constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in England...

     east wall of choir (1870–72) & (1874–76)
  • Rochester Cathedral
    Rochester Cathedral
    Rochester Cathedral, or the Cathedral Church of Christ and the Blessed Virgin Mary, is a Norman church in Rochester, Kent. The bishopric is second oldest in England after Canterbury...

     (1871–74)
  • St Albans Cathedral
    St Albans Cathedral
    St Albans Cathedral is a Church of England cathedral church at St Albans, England. At , its nave is the longest of any cathedral in England...

     (1871–80)
  • Manchester Cathedral
    Manchester Cathedral
    Manchester Cathedral is a medieval church on Victoria Street in central Manchester and is the seat of the Bishop of Manchester. The cathedral's official name is The Cathedral and Collegiate Church of St Mary, St Denys and St George in Manchester...

     (c. 1872)
  • Winchester Cathedral
    Winchester Cathedral
    Winchester Cathedral at Winchester in Hampshire is one of the largest cathedrals in England, with the longest nave and overall length of any Gothic cathedral in Europe...

     (1875)

Additionally Scott designed the Mason and Dixon monument in York Minster
York Minster
York Minster is a Gothic cathedral in York, England and is one of the largest of its kind in Northern Europe alongside Cologne Cathedral. The minster is the seat of the Archbishop of York, the second-highest office of the Church of England, and is the cathedral for the Diocese of York; it is run by...

 (1860), prepared plans for the restoration of Bristol Cathedral
Bristol Cathedral
The Cathedral Church of the Holy and Undivided Trinity is the Church of England cathedral in the city of Bristol, England, and is commonly known as Bristol Cathedral...

 in 1859 and Norwich Cathedral
Norwich Cathedral
Norwich Cathedral is a cathedral located in Norwich, Norfolk, dedicated to the Holy and Undivided Trinity. Formerly a Catholic church, it has belonged to the Church of England since the English Reformation....

 in 1860 neither of which resulted in a commission, and designed a pulpit for Lincoln Cathedral
Lincoln Cathedral
Lincoln Cathedral is a historic Anglican cathedral in Lincoln in England and seat of the Bishop of Lincoln in the Church of England. It was reputedly the tallest building in the world for 249 years . The central spire collapsed in 1549 and was not rebuilt...

 in 1863.

Abbeys, Priories and Collegiate Churches

  • St. Mary's, Stafford
    Stafford
    Stafford is the county town of Staffordshire, in the West Midlands region of England. It lies approximately north of Wolverhampton and south of Stoke-on-Trent, adjacent to the M6 motorway Junction 13 to Junction 14...

     (1842–45)
  • Beverley Minster
    Beverley Minster
    Beverley Minster, in Beverley, East Riding of Yorkshire is a parish church in the Church of England. It is said to be the largest parish church in the UK....

     (1844) (1866–68) & (1877)
  • Westminster Abbey
    Westminster Abbey
    The Collegiate Church of St Peter at Westminster, popularly known as Westminster Abbey, is a large, mainly Gothic church, in the City of Westminster, London, United Kingdom, located just to the west of the Palace of Westminster. It is the traditional place of coronation and burial site for English,...

     (1848–78)
  • Dorchester Abbey
    Dorchester Abbey
    Dorchester Abbey is a Church of England parish church in Dorchester on Thames, Oxfordshire, about southeast of Oxford. It was formerly a Norman abbey church and was built on the site of a Saxon cathedral.-History:...

     (1858), (1862) & (1874)
  • King's College, Cambridge
    King's College, Cambridge
    King's College is a constituent college of the University of Cambridge, England. The college's full name is "The King's College of our Lady and Saint Nicholas in Cambridge", but it is usually referred to simply as "King's" within the University....

     (1859–63) & (1875)
  • Bath Abbey
    Bath Abbey
    The Abbey Church of Saint Peter and Saint Paul, Bath, commonly known as Bath Abbey, is an Anglican parish church and a former Benedictine monastery in Bath, Somerset, England...

     (1860–77)
  • Pershore Abbey
    Pershore Abbey
    Pershore Abbey, at Pershore in Worcestershire, was an Anglo-Saxon abbey and is now an Anglican parish church.-Foundation:The foundation of the minster at Pershore is alluded to in a spurious charter of King Æthelred of Mercia...

     (1861–64) & (1867)
  • St. George's Chapel, Windsor Castle
    St. George's Chapel, Windsor Castle
    St George's Chapel is the place of worship at Windsor Castle in England, United Kingdom. It is both a royal peculiar and the chapel of the Order of the Garter...

     (1863)
  • Great Malvern Priory
    Great Malvern Priory
    Great Malvern Priory in Malvern, Worcestershire, England, was a Benedictine monastery c.1075-1540 and is now an Anglican parish church.-History:...

     (c.1864)
  • Boxgrove Priory
    Boxgrove Priory
    Boxgrove Priory, in the village of Boxgrove in Sussex, was founded in about 1066 by Robert de Haye, who in 1105 bestowed the church of St. Mary of Boxgrove upon the Benedictine Abbey of Lessay. In about 1126 upon the marriage of Robert's daughter Cecily, to Roger St...

     (1864–67)
  • Priory Church, Leominster
    Priory Church, Leominster
    -External links:* *...

     (1864–66) & (1876–78)
  • Monkwearmouth-Jarrow Abbey
    Monkwearmouth-Jarrow Abbey
    Wearmouth-Jarrow is a twin-foundation English monastery, located on the River Wear in Sunderland and the River Tyne at Jarrow respectively, in the Kingdom of Northumbria . Its formal name is The Abbey Church of Saint Peter and Saint Paul, Wearmouth-Jarrow...

    , County Durham (1865–66)
  • Selby Abbey
    Selby Abbey
    Selby Abbey is an Anglican parish church in the town of Selby, North Yorkshire.-Background:It is one of the relatively few surviving abbey churches of the medieval period, and, although not a cathedral, is one of the biggest...

     (1872–74)
  • Tewkesbury Abbey
    Tewkesbury Abbey
    The Abbey of the Blessed Virgin Mary at Tewkesbury in the English county of Gloucestershire is the second largest parish church in the country and a former Benedictine monastery.-History:...

     (1874–79)
  • Bridlington Priory
    Bridlington Priory
    Priory Church of St. Mary, Bridlington, , commonly known as Bridlington Priory Church is a parish church in Bridlington, East Riding of Yorkshire, England, in the Diocese of York...

     (1875–80)

Other Restoration work


Scott restored the Inner Gateway (also known as the Abbey Gateway) of Reading Abbey
Reading Abbey
Reading Abbey is a large, ruined abbey in the centre of the town of Reading, in the English county of Berkshire. It was founded by Henry I in 1121 "for the salvation of my soul, and the souls of King William, my father, and of King William, my brother, and Queen Maud, my wife, and all my ancestors...

 in 1860 - 1861 after its partial collapse. St Mary's of Charity in Faversham
Faversham
Faversham is a market town and civil parish in the Swale borough of Kent, England. The parish of Faversham grew up around an ancient sea port on Faversham Creek and was the birthplace of the explosives industry in England.-History:...

, which was restored
Victorian restoration
Victorian restoration is the term commonly used to refer to the widespread and extensive refurbishment and rebuilding of Church of England churches and cathedrals that took place in England and Wales during the 19th-century reign of Queen Victoria...

 (and transformed, with an unusual spire and unexpected interior) by Scott in 1874, and Dundee Parish Church (St Mary's)
Dundee Parish Church (St Mary's)
Dundee Parish Church is located in the east section of Dundee's "City Churches", the other being occupied by the Steeple Church. Both are congregations in the Church of Scotland, although with differing styles of worship....

, and designed the chapels of Exeter College, Oxford
Exeter College, Oxford
Exeter College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in England and the fourth oldest college of the University. The main entrance is on the east side of Turl Street...

, St John's College, Cambridge
St John's College, Cambridge
St John's College is a constituent college of the University of Cambridge. The college's alumni include nine Nobel Prize winners, six Prime Ministers, three archbishops, at least two princes, and three Saints....

 and King's College London
King's College London
King's College London is a public research university located in London, United Kingdom and a constituent college of the federal University of London. King's has a claim to being the third oldest university in England, having been founded by King George IV and the Duke of Wellington in 1829, and...

. He also designed St Paul's Cathedral, Dundee
St Paul's Cathedral, Dundee
St Paul's Cathedral is an Anglican cathedral in the city of Dundee, Scotland. It is the Cathedral and administrative centre of the Diocese of Brechin in the Scottish Episcopal Church.-Castle:...

.
Lichfield Cathedral
Lichfield Cathedral
Lichfield Cathedral is situated in Lichfield, Staffordshire, England. It is the only medieval English cathedral with three spires. The Diocese of Lichfield covers all of Staffordshire, much of Shropshire and part of the Black Country and West Midlands...

's ornate West Front was extensively renovated by Scott from 1855 - 1878. He restored the Cathedral
Cathedral
A cathedral is a Christian church that contains the seat of a bishop...

 to the form he believed it took in the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
The Middle Ages is a periodization of European history from the 5th century to the 15th century. The Middle Ages follows the fall of the Western Roman Empire in 476 and precedes the Early Modern Era. It is the middle period of a three-period division of Western history: Classic, Medieval and Modern...

, working with original materials where possible and creating imitations when the originals were not available. It is recognised as some of his finest work.

External links