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Estimation theory

Estimation theory

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Encyclopedia
Estimation theory is a branch of statistics
Statistics
Statistics is the study of the collection, organization, analysis, and interpretation of data. It deals with all aspects of this, including the planning of data collection in terms of the design of surveys and experiments....

 and signal processing
Signal processing
Signal processing is an area of systems engineering, electrical engineering and applied mathematics that deals with operations on or analysis of signals, in either discrete or continuous time...

 that deals with estimating the values of parameters based on measured/empirical data that has a random component. The parameters describe an underlying physical setting in such a way that their value affects the distribution of the measured data. An estimator
Estimator
In statistics, an estimator is a rule for calculating an estimate of a given quantity based on observed data: thus the rule and its result are distinguished....

 attempts to approximate the unknown parameters using the measurements.

For example, it is desired to estimate the proportion of a population of voters who will vote for a particular candidate. That proportion is the unobservable parameter; the estimate is based on a small random sample of voters.

Or, for example, in radar
Radar
Radar is an object-detection system which uses radio waves to determine the range, altitude, direction, or speed of objects. It can be used to detect aircraft, ships, spacecraft, guided missiles, motor vehicles, weather formations, and terrain. The radar dish or antenna transmits pulses of radio...

 the goal is to estimate the range of objects (airplanes, boats, etc.) by analyzing the two-way transit timing of received echoes of transmitted pulses. Since the reflected pulses are unavoidably embedded in electrical noise, their measured values are randomly distributed, so that the transit time must be estimated.

In estimation theory, it is assumed the measured data is random with probability distribution dependent on the parameters of interest. For example, in electrical communication theory, the measurements which contain information regarding the parameters of interest are often associated with a noisy signal
Signal (electrical engineering)
In the fields of communications, signal processing, and in electrical engineering more generally, a signal is any time-varying or spatial-varying quantity....

. Without randomness, or noise, the problem would be deterministic
Determinism
Determinism is the general philosophical thesis that states that for everything that happens there are conditions such that, given them, nothing else could happen. There are many versions of this thesis. Each of them rests upon various alleged connections, and interdependencies of things and...

 and estimation would not be needed.

Estimation process


The entire purpose of estimation theory is to arrive at an estimator, and preferably an implementable one that could actually be used.
The estimator takes the measured data as input and produces an estimate of the parameters.

It is also preferable to derive an estimator that exhibits optimality
Optimization (mathematics)
In mathematics, computational science, or management science, mathematical optimization refers to the selection of a best element from some set of available alternatives....

. Estimator optimality usually refers to achieving minimum average error over some class of estimators, for example, a minimum variance unbiased estimator. In this case, the class is the set of unbiased estimators, and the average error measure is variance (average squared error between the value of the estimate and the parameter). However, optimal estimators do not always exist.

These are the general steps to arrive at an estimator:
  • In order to arrive at a desired estimator, it is first necessary to determine a probability distribution for the measured data, and the distribution's dependence on the unknown parameters of interest. Often, the probability distribution may be derived from physical models that explicitly show how the measured data depends on the parameters to be estimated, and how the data is corrupted by random errors or noise. In other cases, the probability distribution for the measured data is simply "assumed", for example, based on familiarity with the measured data and/or for analytical convenience.
  • After deciding upon a probabilistic model, it is helpful to find the limitations placed upon an estimator. This limitation, for example, can be found through the Cramér–Rao bound.
  • Next, an estimator needs to be developed or applied if an already known estimator is valid for the model. The estimator needs to be tested against the limitations to determine if it is an optimal estimator (if so, then no other estimator will perform better).
  • Finally, experiments or simulations can be run using the estimator to test its performance.


After arriving at an estimator, real data might show that the model used to derive the estimator is incorrect, which may require repeating these steps to find a new estimator.
A non-implementable or infeasible estimator may need to be scrapped and the process started anew.

In summary, the estimator estimates the parameters of a physical model based on measured data.

Basics


To build a model, several statistical "ingredients" need to be known.
These are needed to ensure the estimator has some mathematical tractability instead of being based on "good feel".

The first is a set of statistical samples taken from a random vector (RV) of size N. Put into a vector,


Secondly, we have the corresponding M parameters


which need to be established with their probability density function
Probability density function
In probability theory, a probability density function , or density of a continuous random variable is a function that describes the relative likelihood for this random variable to occur at a given point. The probability for the random variable to fall within a particular region is given by the...

 (pdf) or probability mass function
Probability mass function
In probability theory and statistics, a probability mass function is a function that gives the probability that a discrete random variable is exactly equal to some value...

 (pmf)


It is also possible for the parameters themselves to have a probability distribution (e.g., Bayesian statistics
Bayesian statistics
Bayesian statistics is that subset of the entire field of statistics in which the evidence about the true state of the world is expressed in terms of degrees of belief or, more specifically, Bayesian probabilities...

). It is then necessary to define the Bayesian probability
Bayesian probability
Bayesian probability is one of the different interpretations of the concept of probability and belongs to the category of evidential probabilities. The Bayesian interpretation of probability can be seen as an extension of logic that enables reasoning with propositions, whose truth or falsity is...




After the model is formed, the goal is to estimate the parameters, commonly denoted , where the "hat" indicates the estimate.

One common estimator is the minimum mean squared error estimator, which utilizes the error between the estimated parameters and the actual value of the parameters


as the basis for optimality. This error term is then squared and minimized for the MMSE estimator.

Estimators


Commonly-used estimators and estimation methods, and topics related to them:
  • Maximum likelihood
    Maximum likelihood
    In statistics, maximum-likelihood estimation is a method of estimating the parameters of a statistical model. When applied to a data set and given a statistical model, maximum-likelihood estimation provides estimates for the model's parameters....

     estimators
  • Bayes estimator
    Bayes estimator
    In estimation theory and decision theory, a Bayes estimator or a Bayes action is an estimator or decision rule that minimizes the posterior expected value of a loss function . Equivalently, it maximizes the posterior expectation of a utility function...

    s
  • Method of moments estimators
  • Cramér–Rao bound
  • Minimum mean squared error (MMSE), also known as Bayes least squared error (BLSE)
  • Maximum a posteriori
    Maximum a posteriori
    In Bayesian statistics, a maximum a posteriori probability estimate is a mode of the posterior distribution. The MAP can be used to obtain a point estimate of an unobserved quantity on the basis of empirical data...

     (MAP)
  • Minimum variance unbiased estimator (MVUE)
  • Best linear unbiased estimator (BLUE)
  • Unbiased estimators — see estimator bias.
  • Particle filter
    Particle filter
    In statistics, particle filters, also known as Sequential Monte Carlo methods , are sophisticated model estimation techniques based on simulation...

  • Markov chain Monte Carlo
    Markov chain Monte Carlo
    Markov chain Monte Carlo methods are a class of algorithms for sampling from probability distributions based on constructing a Markov chain that has the desired distribution as its equilibrium distribution. The state of the chain after a large number of steps is then used as a sample of the...

     (MCMC)
  • Kalman filter
    Kalman filter
    In statistics, the Kalman filter is a mathematical method named after Rudolf E. Kálmán. Its purpose is to use measurements observed over time, containing noise and other inaccuracies, and produce values that tend to be closer to the true values of the measurements and their associated calculated...

  • Ensemble Kalman filter
    Ensemble Kalman filter
    The ensemble Kalman filter is a recursive filter suitable for problems with a large number of variables, such as discretizations of partial differential equations in geophysical models...

     (EnKF)
  • Wiener filter
    Wiener filter
    In signal processing, the Wiener filter is a filter proposed by Norbert Wiener during the 1940s and published in 1949. Its purpose is to reduce the amount of noise present in a signal by comparison with an estimation of the desired noiseless signal. The discrete-time equivalent of Wiener's work was...


Unknown constant in additive white Gaussian noise


Consider a received discrete signal
Discrete signal
A discrete signal or discrete-time signal is a time series consisting of a sequence of qualities...

, , of independent
Statistical independence
In probability theory, to say that two events are independent intuitively means that the occurrence of one event makes it neither more nor less probable that the other occurs...

 samples that consists of an unknown constant with additive white Gaussian noise
Additive white Gaussian noise
Additive white Gaussian noise is a channel model in which the only impairment to communication is a linear addition of wideband or white noise with a constant spectral density and a Gaussian distribution of amplitude. The model does not account for fading, frequency selectivity, interference,...

 (AWGN) with known variance
Variance
In probability theory and statistics, the variance is a measure of how far a set of numbers is spread out. It is one of several descriptors of a probability distribution, describing how far the numbers lie from the mean . In particular, the variance is one of the moments of a distribution...

  (i.e., ).
Since the variance is known then the only unknown parameter is .

The model for the signal is then


Two possible (of many) estimators are:
  • which is the sample mean


Both of these estimators have a mean
Mean
In statistics, mean has two related meanings:* the arithmetic mean .* the expected value of a random variable, which is also called the population mean....

 of , which can be shown through taking the expected value
Expected value
In probability theory, the expected value of a random variable is the weighted average of all possible values that this random variable can take on...

 of each estimator

and

At this point, these two estimators would appear to perform the same.
However, the difference between them becomes apparent when comparing the variances.

and

It would seem that the sample mean is a better estimator since, it's variance is lower for every N>1.

Maximum likelihood



Continuing the example using the maximum likelihood
Maximum likelihood
In statistics, maximum-likelihood estimation is a method of estimating the parameters of a statistical model. When applied to a data set and given a statistical model, maximum-likelihood estimation provides estimates for the model's parameters....

 estimator, the probability density function
Probability density function
In probability theory, a probability density function , or density of a continuous random variable is a function that describes the relative likelihood for this random variable to occur at a given point. The probability for the random variable to fall within a particular region is given by the...

 (pdf) of the noise for one sample is


and the probability of becomes ( can be thought of a )


By independence, the probability of becomes


Taking the natural logarithm
Natural logarithm
The natural logarithm is the logarithm to the base e, where e is an irrational and transcendental constant approximately equal to 2.718281828...

 of the pdf


and the maximum likelihood estimator is


Taking the first derivative
Derivative
In calculus, a branch of mathematics, the derivative is a measure of how a function changes as its input changes. Loosely speaking, a derivative can be thought of as how much one quantity is changing in response to changes in some other quantity; for example, the derivative of the position of a...

 of the log-likelihood function


and setting it to zero


This results in the maximum likelihood estimator


which is simply the sample mean.
From this example, it was found that the sample mean is the maximum likelihood estimator for samples of a fixed, unknown parameter corrupted by AWGN.

Cramér–Rao lower bound


To find the Cramér–Rao lower bound (CRLB) of the sample mean estimator, it is first necessary to find the Fisher information
Fisher information
In mathematical statistics and information theory, the Fisher information is the variance of the score. In Bayesian statistics, the asymptotic distribution of the posterior mode depends on the Fisher information and not on the prior...

 number


and copying from above


Taking the second derivative

and finding the negative expected value is trivial since it is now a deterministic constant


Finally, putting the Fisher information into


results in


Comparing this to the variance of the sample mean (determined previously) shows that the sample mean is equal to the Cramér–Rao lower bound for all values of and .
In other words, the sample mean is the (necessarily unique) efficient estimator, and thus also the minimum variance unbiased estimator (MVUE), in addition to being the maximum likelihood
Maximum likelihood
In statistics, maximum-likelihood estimation is a method of estimating the parameters of a statistical model. When applied to a data set and given a statistical model, maximum-likelihood estimation provides estimates for the model's parameters....

 estimator.

Maximum of a uniform distribution



One of the simplest non-trivial examples of estimation is the estimation of the maximum of a uniform distribution. It is used as a hands-on classroom exercise and to illustrate basic principles of estimation theory. Further, in the case of estimation based on a single sample, it demonstrates philosophical issues and possible misunderstandings in the use of maximum likelihood
Maximum likelihood
In statistics, maximum-likelihood estimation is a method of estimating the parameters of a statistical model. When applied to a data set and given a statistical model, maximum-likelihood estimation provides estimates for the model's parameters....

 estimators and likelihood functions.

Given a discrete uniform distribution  with unknown maximum, the UMVU estimator for the maximum is given by
where m is the sample maximum and k is the sample size
Sample size
Sample size determination is the act of choosing the number of observations to include in a statistical sample. The sample size is an important feature of any empirical study in which the goal is to make inferences about a population from a sample...

, sampling without replacement. This problem is commonly known as the German tank problem
German tank problem
In the statistical theory of estimation, estimating the maximum of a uniform distribution is a common illustration of differences between estimation methods...

, due to application of maximum estimation to estimates of German tank production during World War II
World War II
World War II, or the Second World War , was a global conflict lasting from 1939 to 1945, involving most of the world's nations—including all of the great powers—eventually forming two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis...

.

The formula may be understood intuitively as:
"The sample maximum plus the average gap between observations in the sample",

the gap being added to compensate for the negative bias of the sample maximum as an estimator for the population maximum.The sample maximum is never more than the population maximum, but can be less, hence it is a biased estimator: it will tend to underestimate the population maximum.

This has a variance of
so a standard deviation of approximately , the (population) average size of a gap between samples; compare above. This can be seen as a very simple case of maximum spacing estimation
Maximum spacing estimation
In statistics, maximum spacing estimation , or maximum product of spacing estimation , is a method for estimating the parameters of a univariate statistical model...

.

The sample maximum is the maximum likelihood
Maximum likelihood
In statistics, maximum-likelihood estimation is a method of estimating the parameters of a statistical model. When applied to a data set and given a statistical model, maximum-likelihood estimation provides estimates for the model's parameters....

 estimator for the population maximum, but, as discussed above, it is biased.

Applications


Numerous fields require the use of estimation theory.
Some of these fields include (but are by no means limited to):
  • Interpretation of scientific experiment
    Experiment
    An experiment is a methodical procedure carried out with the goal of verifying, falsifying, or establishing the validity of a hypothesis. Experiments vary greatly in their goal and scale, but always rely on repeatable procedure and logical analysis of the results...

    s
  • Signal processing
    Signal processing
    Signal processing is an area of systems engineering, electrical engineering and applied mathematics that deals with operations on or analysis of signals, in either discrete or continuous time...

  • Clinical trial
    Clinical trial
    Clinical trials are a set of procedures in medical research and drug development that are conducted to allow safety and efficacy data to be collected for health interventions...

    s
  • Opinion poll
    Opinion poll
    An opinion poll, sometimes simply referred to as a poll is a survey of public opinion from a particular sample. Opinion polls are usually designed to represent the opinions of a population by conducting a series of questions and then extrapolating generalities in ratio or within confidence...

    s
  • Quality control
    Quality control
    Quality control, or QC for short, is a process by which entities review the quality of all factors involved in production. This approach places an emphasis on three aspects:...

  • Telecommunication
    Telecommunication
    Telecommunication is the transmission of information over significant distances to communicate. In earlier times, telecommunications involved the use of visual signals, such as beacons, smoke signals, semaphore telegraphs, signal flags, and optical heliographs, or audio messages via coded...

    s
  • Project management
    Project management
    Project management is the discipline of planning, organizing, securing, and managing resources to achieve specific goals. A project is a temporary endeavor with a defined beginning and end , undertaken to meet unique goals and objectives, typically to bring about beneficial change or added value...

  • Software engineering
    Software engineering
    Software Engineering is the application of a systematic, disciplined, quantifiable approach to the development, operation, and maintenance of software, and the study of these approaches; that is, the application of engineering to software...

  • Control theory
    Control theory
    Control theory is an interdisciplinary branch of engineering and mathematics that deals with the behavior of dynamical systems. The desired output of a system is called the reference...

     (in particular Adaptive control
    Adaptive control
    Adaptive control is the control method used by a controller which must adapt to a controlled system with parameters which vary, or are initially uncertain. For example, as an aircraft flies, its mass will slowly decrease as a result of fuel consumption; a control law is needed that adapts itself...

    )
  • Network intrusion detection system
    Network intrusion detection system
    A Network Intrusion Detection System is an intrusion detection system that tries to detect malicious activity such as denial of service attacks, port scans or even attempts to crack into computers by Network Security Monitoring of network traffic.A NIDS reads all the incoming packets and tries to...

  • Orbit determination
    Orbit determination
    Orbit determination is a branch of astronomy specialised in calculating, and hence predicting, the orbits of objects such as moons, planets, and spacecraft . These orbits could be orbiting the Earth, or other bodies...



Measured data are likely to be subject to noise or uncertainty and it is through statistical probability
Probability
Probability is ordinarily used to describe an attitude of mind towards some proposition of whose truth we arenot certain. The proposition of interest is usually of the form "Will a specific event occur?" The attitude of mind is of the form "How certain are we that the event will occur?" The...

 that optimal
Optimization (mathematics)
In mathematics, computational science, or management science, mathematical optimization refers to the selection of a best element from some set of available alternatives....

 solutions are sought to extract as much information
Fisher information
In mathematical statistics and information theory, the Fisher information is the variance of the score. In Bayesian statistics, the asymptotic distribution of the posterior mode depends on the Fisher information and not on the prior...

 from the data as possible.

See also


:Category:Estimation theory
:Category:Estimation for specific distributions
  • Best linear unbiased estimator (BLUE)
  • Chebyshev center
    Chebyshev center
    In geometry, the Chebyshev center of a bounded set Q having non-empty interior is the center of the minimal-radius ball enclosing the entire set Q, or, alternatively, the center of largest inscribed ball of Q ....

  • Completeness (statistics)
    Completeness (statistics)
    In statistics, completeness is a property of a statistic in relation to a model for a set of observed data. In essence, it is a condition which ensures that the parameters of the probability distribution representing the model can all be estimated on the basis of the statistic: it ensures that the...

  • Cramér–Rao bound
  • Detection theory
    Detection theory
    Detection theory, or signal detection theory, is a means to quantify the ability to discern between information-bearing energy patterns and random energy patterns that distract from the information Detection theory, or signal detection theory, is a means to quantify the ability to discern between...

  • Efficiency (statistics)
    Efficiency (statistics)
    In statistics, an efficient estimator is an estimator that estimates the quantity of interest in some “best possible” manner. The notion of “best possible” relies upon the choice of a particular loss function — the function which quantifies the relative degree of undesirability of estimation errors...

  • Estimator
    Estimator
    In statistics, an estimator is a rule for calculating an estimate of a given quantity based on observed data: thus the rule and its result are distinguished....

    , Estimator bias
  • Expectation-maximization algorithm
    Expectation-maximization algorithm
    In statistics, an expectation–maximization algorithm is an iterative method for finding maximum likelihood or maximum a posteriori estimates of parameters in statistical models, where the model depends on unobserved latent variables...

     (EM algorithm)
  • Information theory
    Information theory
    Information theory is a branch of applied mathematics and electrical engineering involving the quantification of information. Information theory was developed by Claude E. Shannon to find fundamental limits on signal processing operations such as compressing data and on reliably storing and...

  • Kalman filter
    Kalman filter
    In statistics, the Kalman filter is a mathematical method named after Rudolf E. Kálmán. Its purpose is to use measurements observed over time, containing noise and other inaccuracies, and produce values that tend to be closer to the true values of the measurements and their associated calculated...

  • Least-squares spectral analysis
    Least-squares spectral analysis
    Least-squares spectral analysis is a method of estimating a frequency spectrum, based on a least squares fit of sinusoids to data samples, similar to Fourier analysis...

  • Markov chain Monte Carlo
    Markov chain Monte Carlo
    Markov chain Monte Carlo methods are a class of algorithms for sampling from probability distributions based on constructing a Markov chain that has the desired distribution as its equilibrium distribution. The state of the chain after a large number of steps is then used as a sample of the...

     (MCMC)
  • Matched filter
    Matched filter
    In telecommunications, a matched filter is obtained by correlating a known signal, or template, with an unknown signal to detect the presence of the template in the unknown signal. This is equivalent to convolving the unknown signal with a conjugated time-reversed version of the template...

  • Maximum a posteriori
    Maximum a posteriori
    In Bayesian statistics, a maximum a posteriori probability estimate is a mode of the posterior distribution. The MAP can be used to obtain a point estimate of an unobserved quantity on the basis of empirical data...

     (MAP)
  • Maximum likelihood
    Maximum likelihood
    In statistics, maximum-likelihood estimation is a method of estimating the parameters of a statistical model. When applied to a data set and given a statistical model, maximum-likelihood estimation provides estimates for the model's parameters....

  • Maximum entropy spectral estimation
    Maximum entropy spectral estimation
    The maximum entropy method applied to spectral density estimation. The overall idea is that the maximum entropy rate stochastic process that satisfies the given constant autocorrelation and variance constraints, is a linear Gauss-Markov process with i.i.d...

  • Method of moments, generalized method of moments
    Generalized method of moments
    In econometrics, generalized method of moments is a generic method for estimating parameters in statistical models. Usually it is applied in the context of semiparametric models, where the parameter of interest is finite-dimensional, whereas the full shape of the distribution function of the data...

  • Minimum mean squared error (MMSE)
  • Minimum variance unbiased estimator (MVUE)
  • Nuisance parameter
  • Parametric equation
    Parametric equation
    In mathematics, parametric equation is a method of defining a relation using parameters. A simple kinematic example is when one uses a time parameter to determine the position, velocity, and other information about a body in motion....

  • Particle filter
    Particle filter
    In statistics, particle filters, also known as Sequential Monte Carlo methods , are sophisticated model estimation techniques based on simulation...

  • Rao–Blackwell theorem
    Rao–Blackwell theorem
    In statistics, the Rao–Blackwell theorem, sometimes referred to as the Rao–Blackwell–Kolmogorov theorem, is a result which characterizes the transformation of an arbitrarily crude estimator into an estimator that is optimal by the mean-squared-error criterion or any of a variety of similar...

  • Spectral density
    Spectral density
    In statistical signal processing and physics, the spectral density, power spectral density , or energy spectral density , is a positive real function of a frequency variable associated with a stationary stochastic process, or a deterministic function of time, which has dimensions of power per hertz...

    , Spectral density estimation
    Spectral density estimation
    In statistical signal processing, the goal of spectral density estimation is to estimate the spectral density of a random signal from a sequence of time samples of the signal. Intuitively speaking, the spectral density characterizes the frequency content of the signal...

  • Statistical signal processing
    Statistical signal processing
    Statistical signal processing is an area of Applied Mathematics and Signal Processing that treats signals as stochastic processes, dealing with their statistical properties...

  • Sufficiency (statistics)
    Sufficiency (statistics)
    In statistics, a sufficient statistic is a statistic which has the property of sufficiency with respect to a statistical model and its associated unknown parameter, meaning that "no other statistic which can be calculated from the same sample provides any additional information as to the value of...

  • Wiener filter
    Wiener filter
    In signal processing, the Wiener filter is a filter proposed by Norbert Wiener during the 1940s and published in 1949. Its purpose is to reduce the amount of noise present in a signal by comparison with an estimation of the desired noiseless signal. The discrete-time equivalent of Wiener's work was...



Reference list

  • Theory of Point Estimation by E.L. Lehmann and G. Casella. (ISBN-10: 0387985026)
  • Systems Cost Engineering by Dale Shermon. (ISBN 978-0-566-08861-2)
  • Mathematical Statistics and Data Analysis by John Rice. (ISBN 0-534-209343)
  • Fundamentals of Statistical Signal Processing: Estimation Theory by Steven M. Kay (ISBN 0-13-345711-7)
  • An Introduction to Signal Detection and Estimation by H. Vincent Poor (ISBN 0-387-94173-8)
  • Detection, Estimation, and Modulation Theory, Part 1 by Harry L. Van Trees (ISBN 0-471-09517-6; website)
  • Optimal State Estimation: Kalman, H-infinity, and Nonlinear Approaches by Dan Simon website
  • Ali H. Sayed
    Ali H. Sayed
    Ali H. Sayed is Professor of Electrical Engineering at the University of California, Los Angeles , where he teaches and conducts research on Adaptation, Learning, Statistical Signal Processing, and Signal Processing for Communications. He is the Director of the UCLA Adaptive Systems Laboratory...

    , Adaptive Filters, Wiley, NJ, 2008, ISBN 978-0-470-25388-5.
  • Ali H. Sayed
    Ali H. Sayed
    Ali H. Sayed is Professor of Electrical Engineering at the University of California, Los Angeles , where he teaches and conducts research on Adaptation, Learning, Statistical Signal Processing, and Signal Processing for Communications. He is the Director of the UCLA Adaptive Systems Laboratory...

    , Fundamentals of Adaptive Filtering, Wiley, NJ, 2003, ISBN 0-471-46126-1.
  • Thomas Kailath
    Thomas Kailath
    Thomas Kailath is an Indian electrical engineer, information theorist, control engineer, entrepreneur and the Hitachi America Professor of Engineering, Emeritus, at Stanford University...

    , Ali H. Sayed
    Ali H. Sayed
    Ali H. Sayed is Professor of Electrical Engineering at the University of California, Los Angeles , where he teaches and conducts research on Adaptation, Learning, Statistical Signal Processing, and Signal Processing for Communications. He is the Director of the UCLA Adaptive Systems Laboratory...

    , and Babak Hassibi
    Babak Hassibi
    Babak Hassibi is an Iranian-American electrical engineer who is currently professor of Electrical Engineering and head of the Department of Electrical Engineering at the California Institute of Technology ....

    , Linear Estimation, Prentice-Hall, NJ, 2000, ISBN 978-0-13-022464-4.
  • Babak Hassibi
    Babak Hassibi
    Babak Hassibi is an Iranian-American electrical engineer who is currently professor of Electrical Engineering and head of the Department of Electrical Engineering at the California Institute of Technology ....

    , Ali H. Sayed
    Ali H. Sayed
    Ali H. Sayed is Professor of Electrical Engineering at the University of California, Los Angeles , where he teaches and conducts research on Adaptation, Learning, Statistical Signal Processing, and Signal Processing for Communications. He is the Director of the UCLA Adaptive Systems Laboratory...

    , and Thomas Kailath
    Thomas Kailath
    Thomas Kailath is an Indian electrical engineer, information theorist, control engineer, entrepreneur and the Hitachi America Professor of Engineering, Emeritus, at Stanford University...

    , Indefinite Quadratic Estimation and Control: A Unified Approach to H2 and Hoo Theories, Society for Industrial & Applied Mathematics (SIAM), PA, 1999, ISBN 978-0-89871-411-1.
  • V.G.Voinov, M.S.Nikulin, "Unbiased estimators and their applications. Vol.1: Univariate case", Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1993, ISBN 0-7923-2382-3.
  • V.G.Voinov, M.S.Nikulin, "Unbiased estimators and their applications. Vol.2: Multivariate case", Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1996, ISBN 0-7923-3939-8.