Bard College

Bard College

Encyclopedia
Bard College, founded in 1860 as "St. Stephen's College", is a small four-year liberal arts college
Liberal arts colleges in the United States
Liberal arts colleges in the United States are certain undergraduate institutions of higher education in the United States. The Encyclopædia Britannica Concise offers a definition of the liberal arts as a "college or university curriculum aimed at imparting general knowledge and developing general...

 located in Annandale-on-Hudson
Annandale-on-Hudson, New York
Annandale-on-Hudson is a hamlet in Dutchess County, New York, USA, in the Hudson Valley in the town of Red Hook, across the Hudson River from Kingston....

, New York
New York
New York is a state in the Northeastern region of the United States. It is the nation's third most populous state. New York is bordered by New Jersey and Pennsylvania to the south, and by Connecticut, Massachusetts and Vermont to the east...

.

Location


Bard has a 600-acre (2.4-km²) campus in Annandale-on-Hudson, near the town of Red Hook
Red Hook, New York
Red Hook is a town in Dutchess County, New York, United States. The population was reported to be 11,319 during the 2010 census. The name is supposedly derived from the red foliage on trees on a small strip of land on the Hudson River. The town contains two villages; the village of Red Hook and the...

, overlooking the Hudson River
Hudson River
The Hudson is a river that flows from north to south through eastern New York. The highest official source is at Lake Tear of the Clouds, on the slopes of Mount Marcy in the Adirondack Mountains. The river itself officially begins in Henderson Lake in Newcomb, New York...

 and Catskill Mountains
Catskill Mountains
The Catskill Mountains, an area in New York State northwest of New York City and southwest of Albany, are a mature dissected plateau, an uplifted region that was subsequently eroded into sharp relief. They are an eastward continuation, and the highest representation, of the Allegheny Plateau...

, within the Hudson River Historic District
Hudson River Historic District
The Hudson River Historic District, also known as Hudson River Heritage Historic District, is the largest such district on the mainland of the contiguous United States...

, a National Historic Landmark
National Historic Landmark
A National Historic Landmark is a building, site, structure, object, or district, that is officially recognized by the United States government for its historical significance...

. The hamlet of Annandale-on-Hudson has no downtown center and consists of the college and nine other non-associated houses. The village is neighbored by the villages of Red Hook
Red Hook, New York
Red Hook is a town in Dutchess County, New York, United States. The population was reported to be 11,319 during the 2010 census. The name is supposedly derived from the red foliage on trees on a small strip of land on the Hudson River. The town contains two villages; the village of Red Hook and the...

 and Tivoli
Tivoli, New York
Tivoli is a village in Dutchess County, New York, United States. The population was 1,118 at the 2010 census. The village, which was incorporated in 1872 from parts of Upper Red Hook Landing and Madalin, is the northernmost settlement in the county, located in the northwest part of the Town of Red...

, and is across the Hudson River
Hudson River
The Hudson is a river that flows from north to south through eastern New York. The highest official source is at Lake Tear of the Clouds, on the slopes of Mount Marcy in the Adirondack Mountains. The river itself officially begins in Henderson Lake in Newcomb, New York...

 from the small cities of Kingston
Kingston, New York
Kingston is a city in and the county seat of Ulster County, New York, USA. It is north of New York City and south of Albany. It became New York's first capital in 1777, and was burned by the British Oct. 16, 1777, after the Battles of Saratoga...

 and Saugerties
Saugerties (village), New York
Saugerties is a village in Ulster County, New York, USA. The population was 4,955 at the 2000 census.The Village of Saugerties is a Town in the eastern part of the Town of Saugerties. U.S. Route 9W passes through the village...

. Shuttles run between the college and the two villages.

History



The college was originally founded under the name St. Stephen's, in association with the Episcopal church of New York City
New York City
New York is the most populous city in the United States and the center of the New York Metropolitan Area, one of the most populous metropolitan areas in the world. New York exerts a significant impact upon global commerce, finance, media, art, fashion, research, technology, education, and...

, and changed its name to Bard in 1934 in honor of its founder, John Bard. While the college remains affiliated with the church, it pursues a far more secular mission today. Between 1928 and 1944, Bard/St. Stephen's operated as an undergraduate school of Columbia University
Columbia University
Columbia University in the City of New York is a private, Ivy League university in Manhattan, New York City. Columbia is the oldest institution of higher learning in the state of New York, the fifth oldest in the United States, and one of the country's nine Colonial Colleges founded before the...

. Bard/St. Stephen's ties with Columbia were severed when Bard became a fully coeducational college.

By the 1930s, Bard had become atypical among US colleges in that it had begun to place a heavy academic emphasis on the performing and fine arts. During that time, a substantive examination period was introduced for students in their second year, as well as what the dean at the time called the "final demonstration". These two periods would come to be known as Moderation and Senior Project, respectively (see below).

During the 1940s, Bard provided a haven for intellectual refugees fleeing Europe. These included Hannah Arendt
Hannah Arendt
Hannah Arendt was a German American political theorist. She has often been described as a philosopher, although she refused that label on the grounds that philosophy is concerned with "man in the singular." She described herself instead as a political theorist because her work centers on the fact...

, the political theorist, Stefan Hirsch, the precisionist
Precisionism
Precisionism, also known as Cubist Realism, was an artistic movement that emerged in the United States after World War I and was at its height during the inter-War period...

 painter; Felix Hirsch, the political editor of the Berliner Tageblatt
Berliner Tageblatt
The Berliner Tageblatt or BT was a German language newspaper published in Berlin from 1872-1939. Along with the Frankfurter Zeitung, it became one of the most important liberal German newspapers of its time.-History:...

; the violinist Emil Hauser; the linguist Hans Marchand
Hans Marchand
Hans Marchand was a German Linguist. He studied Romance Languages, English and Latin and was due to his fleeing from Germany during the Third Reich a lecturer of linguistics at Istandbul, Yale University, Bard College. From 1957 to 1973 he was a professor at the university of Tübingen...

; the noted psychologist Werner Wolff; and the philosopher Heinrich Blücher
Heinrich Blücher
Heinrich Blücher was a German poet and philosopher. He was the second husband of Hannah Arendt.Blücher was born in Berlin. He was a member of the Communist Party of Germany until 1928, but soon rejected Stalinism and left the party in protest of its Stalinist policies...

.

In 1975, after serving as the youngest college president in history at Franconia College
Franconia College
Franconia College was a small experimental liberal arts college in Franconia, New Hampshire, United States. It opened in 1963 on the site of The Forest Hills Hotel on Agassiz Road, and closed in 1978, after years of declining enrollment and increasing financial difficulties.A small, eclectic...

, Leon Botstein
Leon Botstein
Leon Botstein is an American conductor and the President of Bard College . Botstein is the music director and principal conductor of the American Symphony Orchestra and conductor laureate of the Jerusalem Symphony Orchestra, where he served as music director and principal conductor from 2003-2010...

 was elected president of Bard. He is generally credited with reviving the academic and cultural prestige of the College, having overseen the acquisition of Bard College at Simon's Rock, the construction of the Frank Gehry
Frank Gehry
Frank Owen Gehry, is a Canadian American Pritzker Prize-winning architect based in Los Angeles, California.His buildings, including his private residence, have become tourist attractions...

-designed Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts, and the creation of a large number of other associated academic institutions. In June, 2011, Bard officially acquired the Longy School of Music
Longy School of Music
The Longy School of Music of Bard College is a conservatory located near Harvard Square in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Founded in 1915, it was one of the four independent degree-granting music schools in the Boston region along with the New England Conservatory, Berklee College of Music, and Boston...

.


Admissions


For the class of 2015, 28% of applicants were accepted, while the average SAT and ACT scores (only 50% and 23%, respectively, reported scores because Bard is an SAT/ACT optional school) for matriculating students were 1330 (math plus verbal) and 30, respectively. The mid 50% range for the SAT was: critical reading 640-740; math 590-690 and the mid 50% range for the ACT was 29-31. Sixty percent of matriculating students ranked in the top 10% of their high school class out of 33% of students who reported their ranking. The Princeton Review rated Bard a 96 out of 99 in its selectivity rating, and US News & World Report categorized Bard as "most selective." The class of 2015 represent 39 states and 40 different countries.

Programs and associated institutes


Bard has developed several innovative graduate programs and research institutes, including the Milton Avery Graduate School of the Arts
Milton Avery Graduate School of the Arts
Milton Avery Graduate School of the Arts is a graduate program associated with Bard College that grants Master of Fine Arts degrees.Founded in 1981, Milton Avery Graduate School of the Arts is a nontraditional school for interdisciplinary study in the visual and creative arts...

, the Levy Economics Institute
Levy Economics Institute
The Levy Economics Institute of Bard College is located on the campus of Bard College, in Annandale-on-Hudson, New York. The Institute is housed in Blithewood, a mansion originally designed by an alumnus of the architectural firm of McKim, Mead and White for Andrew Zabriskie in 1899...

, the Center for Curatorial Studies and Art in Contemporary Culture
Center for Curatorial Studies and Art in Contemporary Culture
The Center for Curatorial Studies and Art in Contemporary Culture is an exhibition and research center dedicated to the study of art and exhibition practices from the 1960s to the present day. Co-founded in 1990 by Marieluise Hessel and Richard Black, the Center initiated its graduate program in...

, the Bard Center for Environmental Policy, the Bard College Conservatory of Music
Bard College Conservatory of Music
The Bard College Conservatory of Music is a program of Bard College in Annandale-on-Hudson, New York. Founded in 2005, the program is unique among music conservatories in the United States in that all undergraduate students are required to participate in a five-year dual-degree program, in which...

, the ICP-Bard Program in Advanced Photographic Studies in Manhattan, the Master of Arts in Teaching Program (MAT), the Bard College Clemente Program, and the Bard Graduate Center
Bard Graduate Center
The Bard Graduate Center: Decorative Arts, Design History, Material Culture is a graduate institute affiliated with Bard College, located in Annandale-on-Hudson, New York....

 in Manhattan
Manhattan
Manhattan is the oldest and the most densely populated of the five boroughs of New York City. Located primarily on the island of Manhattan at the mouth of the Hudson River, the boundaries of the borough are identical to those of New York County, an original county of the state of New York...

. The college's Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts
Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts
The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College is a performance hall located in New York's Hudson Valley. The center provides audiences with performances and programs in orchestral, chamber, and jazz music and theater, dance, and opera by American and international artists...

 was designed by acclaimed architect Frank Gehry
Frank Gehry
Frank Owen Gehry, is a Canadian American Pritzker Prize-winning architect based in Los Angeles, California.His buildings, including his private residence, have become tourist attractions...

, and was completed in the spring of 2003.

The Bard Prison Initiative
Bard Prison Initiative
The Bard Prison Initiative is a program sponsored by Bard College to provide a liberal arts degree to incarcerated individuals in five different prisons in the U.S. State of New York. It currently enrolls over 200 students full time in liberal arts programs that end in associate and bachelor's...

 provides a liberal arts degree to incarcerated individuals (Prison education
Prison education
Prison education, by Daryl Kuissi also known as Inmate Education and Correctional Education, is a very broad term that encompasses any number of educational activities occurring inside a prison. These educational activities include both vocational training and academic education...

) in five different prisons in New York State, and currently enrolls nearly 200 students. Since federal funding for prison education programs was eliminated in 1994, the BPI is one of only a small number of programs in the country of its kind.

Bard College is also affiliated with Bard College at Simon's Rock, the nation's oldest and most prestigious early college entrance program
Early college entrance program
Early college entrance programs, sometimes called early admission or early enrollment programs are educational programs that allow high school students to be accelerated into college, together with other such students, one or more years before the traditional age of college entrance, and without...

, Bard High School Early College
Bard High School Early College
Bard High School Early College , is an alternative public secondary school in New York City that allows highly motivated and scholastically strong students to begin their college studies two years early. Upon entering, these students embark on a writing intensive journey and engage in far more...

 in New York City, as well as Bard Center for Environmental Policy. Bard also helped construct a curriculum for Smolny College
Smolny College
Smolny College of Liberal Arts and Sciences is a liberal arts college located in St. Petersburg, Russia. It is the product of a collaboration between Bard College and Saint Petersburg State University. It has the distinction of being the first liberal arts college in Russia.Smolny opened in...

, Russia's first liberal arts college, with St. Petersburg State University. Additionally, the college hosts the Bard Globalization and International Affairs (BGIA) Program in New York City, which is focused on the specialized study of human rights law, international relations ethics, civil society, humanitarian action, and global political economy. Students attend seminar classes in the evenings and work at a substantive international affairs internship during the day. BGIA publishes BardPolitik, a semiannual international affairs journal featuring contributions for students and academics.

In February 2009, Bard announced the first dual degree program between a Palestinian
Palestinian people
The Palestinian people, also referred to as Palestinians or Palestinian Arabs , are an Arabic-speaking people with origins in Palestine. Despite various wars and exoduses, roughly one third of the world's Palestinian population continues to reside in the area encompassing the West Bank, the Gaza...

 university and an American institution of higher education. The College entered into a collaboration with Al-Quds University
Al-Quds University
Al-Quds University is a Palestinian university with campuses in Jerusalem, Abu Dis, and al-Bireh. It was founded in 1984, but its official constitution was written in 1993 when Mohammed Nusseibeh, its first Chancellor and Chancellor of the College of Science and Technology, announced its...

 involving an honors college, a masters program in teaching and a model high school.

Recently, Bard College acquired, on permanent loan, art collector Marieluise Hessel's substantial collection of important contemporary artwork. Hessel also contributed $8 million (USD) for the construction of a new wing at Bard's Center for Curatorial Studies building, in which the collection is exhibited.

In March 2010, Bard established an official partnership with American University of Central Asia
American University of Central Asia
The , formerly the Kyrgyz-American University, is a liberal arts University located in Bishkek, the capital of the former Soviet republic of Kyrgyzstan....

 located in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan. The partnership will allow students of American Studies, Anthropology, Economics, European Studies, International and Comparative Politics, Journalism and Mass Communications, Psychology, Sociology and Software Engineering programs to receive liberal arts degrees fully accredited in the US.

Student life


Over 80 student clubs are financed through Bard's Convocation Fund, which is distributed once a semester by an elected student body and ratified during a rowdy public forum.

Bard students have one print newspaper, the Bard Free Press, which won Best Campus Publication in SPIN Magazines first annual Campus Awards in 2003. Literary magazines include the semiannual Lux, the annual Bard Papers, The Moderator, and Sui Generis, a journal of translations and of original poetry in languages other than English. The Bard Journal of the Social Sciences, which publishes undergraduate work, is also produced by students on campus.

Other prominent student groups include the International Students Organization and other cultural organizations, KLOUDS (Kids Laying Out Under Daytime Skies), High Tea, the Bard Film Committee, the Bard Queer-Straight Alliance, the Bard Democrats, Surrealist Training Circus, Student-run Bike Co-op and college radio station WXBC.

Bard is also home to the Root Cellar, a completely student-run, multipurpose space that serves as an Infoshop, vegan café, and venue for small-scale shows. It houses an extensive zine
Zine
A zine is most commonly a small circulation publication of original or appropriated texts and images. More broadly, the term encompasses any self-published work of minority interest usually reproduced via photocopier....

 library, which once was touted as "the largest zine library on the East Coast." While technically defined as a club by the Office of Student Activities, the "club heads" of the Root Cellar hold no more power than any other students involved, and decisions are made by consensus
Consensus decision-making
Consensus decision-making is a group decision making process that seeks the consent, not necessarily the agreement, of participants and the resolution of objections. Consensus is defined by Merriam-Webster as, first, general agreement, and second, group solidarity of belief or sentiment. It has its...

 at weekly meetings. The space is a haven for radical political action and education, and an outlook much like that of ABC No Rio
ABC No Rio
ABC No Rio is a social center located at 156 Rivington Street on New York City's Lower East Side that was founded in 1980. It features a gallery space, a zine library, a darkroom, a silkscreening studio, and public computer lab...

 or Bluestockings bookstore in New York City.

The Bard Athletics department offers varsity sports in basketball, cross country, soccer, tennis, volleyball, lacrosse and squash (men), and joined the Skyline Conference, effective 2007-2008. Bard has announced that it will join the Liberty League
Liberty League
The Liberty League is an intercollegiate athletic conference affiliated with the NCAA’s Division III. Originally founded in 1995 as the Upstate Collegiate Athletic Association, was renamed during the summer of 2004 to the current name...

 starting with the 2011-2012 academic year. One of the more popular sports on campus is rugby. In the spring of 2006, Bard Women's Rugby joined the men's side, Bard Rugby Football Club, as an official team. In 2011, the Bard Women's and Men's Football teams joined the Liberty League tournament.

Bard has a strong, independent music scene considering its isolation and size. The college's Old Gym was once a popular location for concerts and parties in the 80s, 90s, and early 00s. In 2004, the Old Gym was shut down and in spring 2006 transformed into a student-run theater. Many activities that once took place there now occur in the smaller SMOG building, an autonomous student space. Student-run theater is also popular: dozens of student directed and written productions are put on each semester and a 24 Hour Theater Festival is held at least once a year.

Academics


All first-year students must attend the Language and Thinking (L&T) program, an intensive, writing-centered introduction to the liberal arts, for the three weeks preceding their first semester. Orientation also takes place during this time. All first-year students must also participate in the Citizen Science program, a three-week program that begins in January 2011. The Citizen Science program will introduce students to science and the ideas of the scientific method. The program is designed to promote science literacy and will utilize the theme of infectious diseases, the importance of infectious disease in a community, and the impact that infectious disease outbreaks and subsequent management can have on our global society. The curriculum will range from conducting a laboratory experiment and analyzing a scientific problem to modeling potential solutions to that problem. The program will merge three distinct, yet thematically interwoven, rotations, each designed to address the large question: How can we reduce the global burden of infectious disease?

All first-year student take the "First-Year Seminar," an intensive, year-long, reading and writing core curricular course. "FYSem," as it is commonly known among students and faculty, begins in the fall semester of the freshman year. The first semester spans thinkers from Confucius
Confucius
Confucius , literally "Master Kong", was a Chinese thinker and social philosopher of the Spring and Autumn Period....

 to Galileo. The second semester spans John Locke
John Locke
John Locke FRS , widely known as the Father of Liberalism, was an English philosopher and physician regarded as one of the most influential of Enlightenment thinkers. Considered one of the first of the British empiricists, following the tradition of Francis Bacon, he is equally important to social...

 to Virginia Woolf
Virginia Woolf
Adeline Virginia Woolf was an English author, essayist, publisher, and writer of short stories, regarded as one of the foremost modernist literary figures of the twentieth century....

. There are nearly thirty sections of the course each semester, taught by a wide variety of professors, including President Botstein and other members of the administration. The course covers works by Plato
Plato
Plato , was a Classical Greek philosopher, mathematician, student of Socrates, writer of philosophical dialogues, and founder of the Academy in Athens, the first institution of higher learning in the Western world. Along with his mentor, Socrates, and his student, Aristotle, Plato helped to lay the...

, Virgil
Virgil
Publius Vergilius Maro, usually called Virgil or Vergil in English , was an ancient Roman poet of the Augustan period. He is known for three major works of Latin literature, the Eclogues , the Georgics, and the epic Aeneid...

, Saint Augustine, Dante
DANTE
Delivery of Advanced Network Technology to Europe is a not-for-profit organisation that plans, builds and operates the international networks that interconnect the various national research and education networks in Europe and surrounding regions...

, William Shakespeare
William Shakespeare
William Shakespeare was an English poet and playwright, widely regarded as the greatest writer in the English language and the world's pre-eminent dramatist. He is often called England's national poet and the "Bard of Avon"...

, Galileo Galilei
Galileo Galilei
Galileo Galilei , was an Italian physicist, mathematician, astronomer, and philosopher who played a major role in the Scientific Revolution. His achievements include improvements to the telescope and consequent astronomical observations and support for Copernicanism...

, Jean Jacques Rousseau, Mary Shelley
Mary Shelley
Mary Shelley was a British novelist, short story writer, dramatist, essayist, biographer, and travel writer, best known for her Gothic novel Frankenstein: or, The Modern Prometheus . She also edited and promoted the works of her husband, the Romantic poet and philosopher Percy Bysshe Shelley...

, Karl Marx
Karl Marx
Karl Heinrich Marx was a German philosopher, economist, sociologist, historian, journalist, and revolutionary socialist. His ideas played a significant role in the development of social science and the socialist political movement...

, Charles Darwin
Charles Darwin
Charles Robert Darwin FRS was an English naturalist. He established that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestry, and proposed the scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection.He published his theory...

, Friedrich Nietzsche
Friedrich Nietzsche
Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche was a 19th-century German philosopher, poet, composer and classical philologist...

, W. E. B. DuBois, Sigmund Freud
Sigmund Freud
Sigmund Freud , born Sigismund Schlomo Freud , was an Austrian neurologist who founded the discipline of psychoanalysis...

, Virginia Woolf
Virginia Woolf
Adeline Virginia Woolf was an English author, essayist, publisher, and writer of short stories, regarded as one of the foremost modernist literary figures of the twentieth century....

, Chinua Achebe
Chinua Achebe
Albert Chinụalụmọgụ Achebe popularly known as Chinua Achebe is a Nigerian novelist, poet, professor, and critic...

, and Primo Levi
Primo Levi
Primo Michele Levi was an Italian Jewish chemist and writer. He was the author of two novels and several collections of short stories, essays, and poems, but is best known for If This Is a Man, his account of the year he spent as a prisoner in the Auschwitz concentration camp in Nazi-occupied Poland...

.

Another mandatory process of the university is "moderation". Moderation typically takes place in the fourth or fifth semester, as a way of choosing a major. Conditions vary from department to department: all require the preparation of two short papers, one on the moderand's past work in the major subject and one on their plans for the future; most require the completion of a certain set or a certain number of courses; some have additional requirements, such as a concert or recital, the submission of a seminar paper, or the production of a film. To moderate, the student presents whatever work is required to a moderation board of three professors, and is subsequently interviewed, examined, and critiqued.

The "capstone" of the Bard undergraduate experience is the Senior Project. As with moderation, this project takes different forms in different departments. Most students in the divisions of Languages and Literature and of Social Sciences write a paper of around eighty pages, which is then, as with work for moderation, critiqued by a board of three professors. Arts students must organize a series of concerts, recitals, or shows, or produce substantial creative work; math and science students, as well as some social science students, undertake research projects.

The college also offers graduate degrees at the Bard Center for Environmental Policy, the Bard Graduate Center in Manhattan, the Center for Curatorial Studies, the Conductor's Institute, the International Center of Photography
International Center of Photography
The International Center of Photography is a photography museum, school, and research center in Midtown Manhattan in New York City, United States...

 (also in Manhattan), the Milton Avery Graduate School of the Arts, and in the Master of Arts in Teaching Program.

Politics


In 2005, the Princeton Review ranked it as the second-most liberal college in the United States, declaring that Bard "puts the 'liberal' in 'liberal arts.'"

In 2003, Bard Professor Joel Kovel
Joel Kovel
Joel Kovel is an American politician, academic, writer, and eco-socialist. A practicing psychiatrist and psychoanalyst until the mid-1980s, he has lectured in psychiatry, anthropology, political science and communication studies. He has published many books on his work in psychiatry,...

 drew criticism from controversial conservative columnist Ann Coulter
Ann Coulter
Ann Hart Coulter is an American lawyer, conservative social and political commentator, author, and syndicated columnist. She frequently appears on television, radio, and as a speaker at public events and private events...

 for his book, Red Hunting in the Promised Land: Anticommunism and the Making of America, in which he compared anti-communism to a psychiatric disorder. Coulter, who has described Senator Joseph McCarthy
Joseph McCarthy
Joseph Raymond "Joe" McCarthy was an American politician who served as a Republican U.S. Senator from the state of Wisconsin from 1947 until his death in 1957...

 as the deceased person she admires the most, accused Kovel of holding a "lunatic psychological theory" and counted Bard among the colleges and universities that "have become a Safe Streets program for traitors and lunatics."http://www.jewishworldreview.com/cols/coulter071003.asp

Notable faculty


Former faculty


Notable alumni


{{about|the college in New York state|the "early college" in Massachusetts|Bard College at Simon's Rock}}

Bard College, founded in 1860 as "St. Stephen's College", is a small four-year liberal arts college
Liberal arts colleges in the United States
Liberal arts colleges in the United States are certain undergraduate institutions of higher education in the United States. The Encyclopædia Britannica Concise offers a definition of the liberal arts as a "college or university curriculum aimed at imparting general knowledge and developing general...

 located in Annandale-on-Hudson
Annandale-on-Hudson, New York
Annandale-on-Hudson is a hamlet in Dutchess County, New York, USA, in the Hudson Valley in the town of Red Hook, across the Hudson River from Kingston....

, New York
New York
New York is a state in the Northeastern region of the United States. It is the nation's third most populous state. New York is bordered by New Jersey and Pennsylvania to the south, and by Connecticut, Massachusetts and Vermont to the east...

.

Location


Bard has a 600-acre (2.4-km²) campus in Annandale-on-Hudson, near the town of Red Hook
Red Hook, New York
Red Hook is a town in Dutchess County, New York, United States. The population was reported to be 11,319 during the 2010 census. The name is supposedly derived from the red foliage on trees on a small strip of land on the Hudson River. The town contains two villages; the village of Red Hook and the...

, overlooking the Hudson River
Hudson River
The Hudson is a river that flows from north to south through eastern New York. The highest official source is at Lake Tear of the Clouds, on the slopes of Mount Marcy in the Adirondack Mountains. The river itself officially begins in Henderson Lake in Newcomb, New York...

 and Catskill Mountains
Catskill Mountains
The Catskill Mountains, an area in New York State northwest of New York City and southwest of Albany, are a mature dissected plateau, an uplifted region that was subsequently eroded into sharp relief. They are an eastward continuation, and the highest representation, of the Allegheny Plateau...

, within the Hudson River Historic District
Hudson River Historic District
The Hudson River Historic District, also known as Hudson River Heritage Historic District, is the largest such district on the mainland of the contiguous United States...

, a National Historic Landmark
National Historic Landmark
A National Historic Landmark is a building, site, structure, object, or district, that is officially recognized by the United States government for its historical significance...

. The hamlet of Annandale-on-Hudson has no downtown center and consists of the college and nine other non-associated houses. The village is neighbored by the villages of Red Hook
Red Hook, New York
Red Hook is a town in Dutchess County, New York, United States. The population was reported to be 11,319 during the 2010 census. The name is supposedly derived from the red foliage on trees on a small strip of land on the Hudson River. The town contains two villages; the village of Red Hook and the...

 and Tivoli
Tivoli, New York
Tivoli is a village in Dutchess County, New York, United States. The population was 1,118 at the 2010 census. The village, which was incorporated in 1872 from parts of Upper Red Hook Landing and Madalin, is the northernmost settlement in the county, located in the northwest part of the Town of Red...

, and is across the Hudson River
Hudson River
The Hudson is a river that flows from north to south through eastern New York. The highest official source is at Lake Tear of the Clouds, on the slopes of Mount Marcy in the Adirondack Mountains. The river itself officially begins in Henderson Lake in Newcomb, New York...

 from the small cities of Kingston
Kingston, New York
Kingston is a city in and the county seat of Ulster County, New York, USA. It is north of New York City and south of Albany. It became New York's first capital in 1777, and was burned by the British Oct. 16, 1777, after the Battles of Saratoga...

 and Saugerties
Saugerties (village), New York
Saugerties is a village in Ulster County, New York, USA. The population was 4,955 at the 2000 census.The Village of Saugerties is a Town in the eastern part of the Town of Saugerties. U.S. Route 9W passes through the village...

. Shuttles run between the college and the two villages.

History



The college was originally founded under the name St. Stephen's, in association with the Episcopal church of New York City
New York City
New York is the most populous city in the United States and the center of the New York Metropolitan Area, one of the most populous metropolitan areas in the world. New York exerts a significant impact upon global commerce, finance, media, art, fashion, research, technology, education, and...

, and changed its name to Bard in 1934 in honor of its founder, John Bard. While the college remains affiliated with the church, it pursues a far more secular mission today. Between 1928 and 1944, Bard/St. Stephen's operated as an undergraduate school of Columbia University
Columbia University
Columbia University in the City of New York is a private, Ivy League university in Manhattan, New York City. Columbia is the oldest institution of higher learning in the state of New York, the fifth oldest in the United States, and one of the country's nine Colonial Colleges founded before the...

. Bard/St. Stephen's ties with Columbia were severed when Bard became a fully coeducational college.

By the 1930s, Bard had become atypical among US colleges in that it had begun to place a heavy academic emphasis on the performing and fine arts. During that time, a substantive examination period was introduced for students in their second year, as well as what the dean at the time called the "final demonstration". These two periods would come to be known as Moderation and Senior Project, respectively (see below).

During the 1940s, Bard provided a haven for intellectual refugees fleeing Europe. These included Hannah Arendt
Hannah Arendt
Hannah Arendt was a German American political theorist. She has often been described as a philosopher, although she refused that label on the grounds that philosophy is concerned with "man in the singular." She described herself instead as a political theorist because her work centers on the fact...

, the political theorist, Stefan Hirsch, the precisionist
Precisionism
Precisionism, also known as Cubist Realism, was an artistic movement that emerged in the United States after World War I and was at its height during the inter-War period...

 painter; Felix Hirsch, the political editor of the Berliner Tageblatt
Berliner Tageblatt
The Berliner Tageblatt or BT was a German language newspaper published in Berlin from 1872-1939. Along with the Frankfurter Zeitung, it became one of the most important liberal German newspapers of its time.-History:...

; the violinist Emil Hauser; the linguist Hans Marchand
Hans Marchand
Hans Marchand was a German Linguist. He studied Romance Languages, English and Latin and was due to his fleeing from Germany during the Third Reich a lecturer of linguistics at Istandbul, Yale University, Bard College. From 1957 to 1973 he was a professor at the university of Tübingen...

; the noted psychologist Werner Wolff; and the philosopher Heinrich Blücher
Heinrich Blücher
Heinrich Blücher was a German poet and philosopher. He was the second husband of Hannah Arendt.Blücher was born in Berlin. He was a member of the Communist Party of Germany until 1928, but soon rejected Stalinism and left the party in protest of its Stalinist policies...

.

In 1975, after serving as the youngest college president in history at Franconia College
Franconia College
Franconia College was a small experimental liberal arts college in Franconia, New Hampshire, United States. It opened in 1963 on the site of The Forest Hills Hotel on Agassiz Road, and closed in 1978, after years of declining enrollment and increasing financial difficulties.A small, eclectic...

, Leon Botstein
Leon Botstein
Leon Botstein is an American conductor and the President of Bard College . Botstein is the music director and principal conductor of the American Symphony Orchestra and conductor laureate of the Jerusalem Symphony Orchestra, where he served as music director and principal conductor from 2003-2010...

 was elected president of Bard. He is generally credited with reviving the academic and cultural prestige of the College, having overseen the acquisition of Bard College at Simon's Rock, the construction of the Frank Gehry
Frank Gehry
Frank Owen Gehry, is a Canadian American Pritzker Prize-winning architect based in Los Angeles, California.His buildings, including his private residence, have become tourist attractions...

-designed Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts, and the creation of a large number of other associated academic institutions. In June, 2011, Bard officially acquired the Longy School of Music
Longy School of Music
The Longy School of Music of Bard College is a conservatory located near Harvard Square in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Founded in 1915, it was one of the four independent degree-granting music schools in the Boston region along with the New England Conservatory, Berklee College of Music, and Boston...

.


Admissions


For the class of 2015, 28% of applicants were accepted, while the average SAT and ACT scores (only 50% and 23%, respectively, reported scores because Bard is an SAT/ACT optional school) for matriculating students were 1330 (math plus verbal) and 30, respectively. The mid 50% range for the SAT was: critical reading 640-740; math 590-690 and the mid 50% range for the ACT was 29-31. Sixty percent of matriculating students ranked in the top 10% of their high school class out of 33% of students who reported their ranking. The Princeton Review rated Bard a 96 out of 99 in its selectivity rating, and US News & World Report categorized Bard as "most selective." The class of 2015 represent 39 states and 40 different countries.

Programs and associated institutes


Bard has developed several innovative graduate programs and research institutes, including the Milton Avery Graduate School of the Arts
Milton Avery Graduate School of the Arts
Milton Avery Graduate School of the Arts is a graduate program associated with Bard College that grants Master of Fine Arts degrees.Founded in 1981, Milton Avery Graduate School of the Arts is a nontraditional school for interdisciplinary study in the visual and creative arts...

, the Levy Economics Institute
Levy Economics Institute
The Levy Economics Institute of Bard College is located on the campus of Bard College, in Annandale-on-Hudson, New York. The Institute is housed in Blithewood, a mansion originally designed by an alumnus of the architectural firm of McKim, Mead and White for Andrew Zabriskie in 1899...

, the Center for Curatorial Studies and Art in Contemporary Culture
Center for Curatorial Studies and Art in Contemporary Culture
The Center for Curatorial Studies and Art in Contemporary Culture is an exhibition and research center dedicated to the study of art and exhibition practices from the 1960s to the present day. Co-founded in 1990 by Marieluise Hessel and Richard Black, the Center initiated its graduate program in...

, the Bard Center for Environmental Policy, the Bard College Conservatory of Music
Bard College Conservatory of Music
The Bard College Conservatory of Music is a program of Bard College in Annandale-on-Hudson, New York. Founded in 2005, the program is unique among music conservatories in the United States in that all undergraduate students are required to participate in a five-year dual-degree program, in which...

, the ICP-Bard Program in Advanced Photographic Studies in Manhattan, the Master of Arts in Teaching Program (MAT), the Bard College Clemente Program, and the Bard Graduate Center
Bard Graduate Center
The Bard Graduate Center: Decorative Arts, Design History, Material Culture is a graduate institute affiliated with Bard College, located in Annandale-on-Hudson, New York....

 in Manhattan
Manhattan
Manhattan is the oldest and the most densely populated of the five boroughs of New York City. Located primarily on the island of Manhattan at the mouth of the Hudson River, the boundaries of the borough are identical to those of New York County, an original county of the state of New York...

. The college's Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts
Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts
The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College is a performance hall located in New York's Hudson Valley. The center provides audiences with performances and programs in orchestral, chamber, and jazz music and theater, dance, and opera by American and international artists...

 was designed by acclaimed architect Frank Gehry
Frank Gehry
Frank Owen Gehry, is a Canadian American Pritzker Prize-winning architect based in Los Angeles, California.His buildings, including his private residence, have become tourist attractions...

, and was completed in the spring of 2003.

The Bard Prison Initiative
Bard Prison Initiative
The Bard Prison Initiative is a program sponsored by Bard College to provide a liberal arts degree to incarcerated individuals in five different prisons in the U.S. State of New York. It currently enrolls over 200 students full time in liberal arts programs that end in associate and bachelor's...

 provides a liberal arts degree to incarcerated individuals (Prison education
Prison education
Prison education, by Daryl Kuissi also known as Inmate Education and Correctional Education, is a very broad term that encompasses any number of educational activities occurring inside a prison. These educational activities include both vocational training and academic education...

) in five different prisons in New York State, and currently enrolls nearly 200 students. Since federal funding for prison education programs was eliminated in 1994, the BPI is one of only a small number of programs in the country of its kind.

Bard College is also affiliated with Bard College at Simon's Rock, the nation's oldest and most prestigious early college entrance program
Early college entrance program
Early college entrance programs, sometimes called early admission or early enrollment programs are educational programs that allow high school students to be accelerated into college, together with other such students, one or more years before the traditional age of college entrance, and without...

, Bard High School Early College
Bard High School Early College
Bard High School Early College , is an alternative public secondary school in New York City that allows highly motivated and scholastically strong students to begin their college studies two years early. Upon entering, these students embark on a writing intensive journey and engage in far more...

 in New York City, as well as Bard Center for Environmental Policy. Bard also helped construct a curriculum for Smolny College
Smolny College
Smolny College of Liberal Arts and Sciences is a liberal arts college located in St. Petersburg, Russia. It is the product of a collaboration between Bard College and Saint Petersburg State University. It has the distinction of being the first liberal arts college in Russia.Smolny opened in...

, Russia's first liberal arts college, with St. Petersburg State University. Additionally, the college hosts the Bard Globalization and International Affairs (BGIA) Program in New York City, which is focused on the specialized study of human rights law, international relations ethics, civil society, humanitarian action, and global political economy. Students attend seminar classes in the evenings and work at a substantive international affairs internship during the day. BGIA publishes BardPolitik, a semiannual international affairs journal featuring contributions for students and academics.

In February 2009, Bard announced the first dual degree program between a Palestinian
Palestinian people
The Palestinian people, also referred to as Palestinians or Palestinian Arabs , are an Arabic-speaking people with origins in Palestine. Despite various wars and exoduses, roughly one third of the world's Palestinian population continues to reside in the area encompassing the West Bank, the Gaza...

 university and an American institution of higher education. The College entered into a collaboration with Al-Quds University
Al-Quds University
Al-Quds University is a Palestinian university with campuses in Jerusalem, Abu Dis, and al-Bireh. It was founded in 1984, but its official constitution was written in 1993 when Mohammed Nusseibeh, its first Chancellor and Chancellor of the College of Science and Technology, announced its...

 involving an honors college, a masters program in teaching and a model high school.

Recently, Bard College acquired, on permanent loan, art collector Marieluise Hessel's substantial collection of important contemporary artwork. Hessel also contributed $8 million (USD) for the construction of a new wing at Bard's Center for Curatorial Studies building, in which the collection is exhibited.

In March 2010, Bard established an official partnership with American University of Central Asia
American University of Central Asia
The , formerly the Kyrgyz-American University, is a liberal arts University located in Bishkek, the capital of the former Soviet republic of Kyrgyzstan....

 located in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan. The partnership will allow students of American Studies, Anthropology, Economics, European Studies, International and Comparative Politics, Journalism and Mass Communications, Psychology, Sociology and Software Engineering programs to receive liberal arts degrees fully accredited in the US.

Student life


Over 80 student clubs are financed through Bard's Convocation Fund, which is distributed once a semester by an elected student body and ratified during a rowdy public forum.

Bard students have one print newspaper, the Bard Free Press, which won Best Campus Publication in SPIN Magazines first annual Campus Awards in 2003. Literary magazines include the semiannual Lux, the annual Bard Papers, The Moderator, and Sui Generis, a journal of translations and of original poetry in languages other than English. The Bard Journal of the Social Sciences, which publishes undergraduate work, is also produced by students on campus.

Other prominent student groups include the International Students Organization and other cultural organizations, KLOUDS (Kids Laying Out Under Daytime Skies), High Tea, the Bard Film Committee, the Bard Queer-Straight Alliance, the Bard Democrats, Surrealist Training Circus, Student-run Bike Co-op and college radio station WXBC.

Bard is also home to the Root Cellar, a completely student-run, multipurpose space that serves as an Infoshop, vegan café, and venue for small-scale shows. It houses an extensive zine
Zine
A zine is most commonly a small circulation publication of original or appropriated texts and images. More broadly, the term encompasses any self-published work of minority interest usually reproduced via photocopier....

 library, which once was touted as "the largest zine library on the East Coast."{{Citation needed|date=April 2007}} While technically defined as a club by the Office of Student Activities, the "club heads" of the Root Cellar hold no more power than any other students involved, and decisions are made by consensus
Consensus decision-making
Consensus decision-making is a group decision making process that seeks the consent, not necessarily the agreement, of participants and the resolution of objections. Consensus is defined by Merriam-Webster as, first, general agreement, and second, group solidarity of belief or sentiment. It has its...

 at weekly meetings. The space is a haven for radical political action and education, and an outlook much like that of ABC No Rio
ABC No Rio
ABC No Rio is a social center located at 156 Rivington Street on New York City's Lower East Side that was founded in 1980. It features a gallery space, a zine library, a darkroom, a silkscreening studio, and public computer lab...

 or Bluestockings bookstore in New York City.

The Bard Athletics department offers varsity sports in basketball, cross country, soccer, tennis, volleyball, lacrosse and squash (men), and joined the Skyline Conference, effective 2007-2008. Bard has announced that it will join the Liberty League
Liberty League
The Liberty League is an intercollegiate athletic conference affiliated with the NCAA’s Division III. Originally founded in 1995 as the Upstate Collegiate Athletic Association, was renamed during the summer of 2004 to the current name...

 starting with the 2011-2012 academic year. One of the more popular sports on campus is rugby. In the spring of 2006, Bard Women's Rugby joined the men's side, Bard Rugby Football Club, as an official team. In 2011, the Bard Women's and Men's Football teams joined the Liberty League tournament.

Bard has a strong, independent music scene considering its isolation and size. The college's Old Gym was once a popular location for concerts and parties in the 80s, 90s, and early 00s. In 2004, the Old Gym was shut down and in spring 2006 transformed into a student-run theater. Many activities that once took place there now occur in the smaller SMOG building, an autonomous student space. Student-run theater is also popular: dozens of student directed and written productions are put on each semester and a 24 Hour Theater Festival is held at least once a year.

Academics


All first-year students must attend the Language and Thinking (L&T) program, an intensive, writing-centered introduction to the liberal arts, for the three weeks preceding their first semester. Orientation also takes place during this time. All first-year students must also participate in the Citizen Science program, a three-week program that begins in January 2011. The Citizen Science program will introduce students to science and the ideas of the scientific method. The program is designed to promote science literacy and will utilize the theme of infectious diseases, the importance of infectious disease in a community, and the impact that infectious disease outbreaks and subsequent management can have on our global society. The curriculum will range from conducting a laboratory experiment and analyzing a scientific problem to modeling potential solutions to that problem. The program will merge three distinct, yet thematically interwoven, rotations, each designed to address the large question: How can we reduce the global burden of infectious disease?

All first-year student take the "First-Year Seminar," an intensive, year-long, reading and writing core curricular course. "FYSem," as it is commonly known among students and faculty, begins in the fall semester of the freshman year. The first semester spans thinkers from Confucius
Confucius
Confucius , literally "Master Kong", was a Chinese thinker and social philosopher of the Spring and Autumn Period....

 to Galileo. The second semester spans John Locke
John Locke
John Locke FRS , widely known as the Father of Liberalism, was an English philosopher and physician regarded as one of the most influential of Enlightenment thinkers. Considered one of the first of the British empiricists, following the tradition of Francis Bacon, he is equally important to social...

 to Virginia Woolf
Virginia Woolf
Adeline Virginia Woolf was an English author, essayist, publisher, and writer of short stories, regarded as one of the foremost modernist literary figures of the twentieth century....

. There are nearly thirty sections of the course each semester, taught by a wide variety of professors, including President Botstein and other members of the administration. The course covers works by Plato
Plato
Plato , was a Classical Greek philosopher, mathematician, student of Socrates, writer of philosophical dialogues, and founder of the Academy in Athens, the first institution of higher learning in the Western world. Along with his mentor, Socrates, and his student, Aristotle, Plato helped to lay the...

, Virgil
Virgil
Publius Vergilius Maro, usually called Virgil or Vergil in English , was an ancient Roman poet of the Augustan period. He is known for three major works of Latin literature, the Eclogues , the Georgics, and the epic Aeneid...

, Saint Augustine, Dante
DANTE
Delivery of Advanced Network Technology to Europe is a not-for-profit organisation that plans, builds and operates the international networks that interconnect the various national research and education networks in Europe and surrounding regions...

, William Shakespeare
William Shakespeare
William Shakespeare was an English poet and playwright, widely regarded as the greatest writer in the English language and the world's pre-eminent dramatist. He is often called England's national poet and the "Bard of Avon"...

, Galileo Galilei
Galileo Galilei
Galileo Galilei , was an Italian physicist, mathematician, astronomer, and philosopher who played a major role in the Scientific Revolution. His achievements include improvements to the telescope and consequent astronomical observations and support for Copernicanism...

, Jean Jacques Rousseau, Mary Shelley
Mary Shelley
Mary Shelley was a British novelist, short story writer, dramatist, essayist, biographer, and travel writer, best known for her Gothic novel Frankenstein: or, The Modern Prometheus . She also edited and promoted the works of her husband, the Romantic poet and philosopher Percy Bysshe Shelley...

, Karl Marx
Karl Marx
Karl Heinrich Marx was a German philosopher, economist, sociologist, historian, journalist, and revolutionary socialist. His ideas played a significant role in the development of social science and the socialist political movement...

, Charles Darwin
Charles Darwin
Charles Robert Darwin FRS was an English naturalist. He established that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestry, and proposed the scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection.He published his theory...

, Friedrich Nietzsche
Friedrich Nietzsche
Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche was a 19th-century German philosopher, poet, composer and classical philologist...

, W. E. B. DuBois, Sigmund Freud
Sigmund Freud
Sigmund Freud , born Sigismund Schlomo Freud , was an Austrian neurologist who founded the discipline of psychoanalysis...

, Virginia Woolf
Virginia Woolf
Adeline Virginia Woolf was an English author, essayist, publisher, and writer of short stories, regarded as one of the foremost modernist literary figures of the twentieth century....

, Chinua Achebe
Chinua Achebe
Albert Chinụalụmọgụ Achebe popularly known as Chinua Achebe is a Nigerian novelist, poet, professor, and critic...

, and Primo Levi
Primo Levi
Primo Michele Levi was an Italian Jewish chemist and writer. He was the author of two novels and several collections of short stories, essays, and poems, but is best known for If This Is a Man, his account of the year he spent as a prisoner in the Auschwitz concentration camp in Nazi-occupied Poland...

.

Another mandatory process of the university is "moderation". Moderation typically takes place in the fourth or fifth semester, as a way of choosing a major. Conditions vary from department to department: all require the preparation of two short papers, one on the moderand's past work in the major subject and one on their plans for the future; most require the completion of a certain set or a certain number of courses; some have additional requirements, such as a concert or recital, the submission of a seminar paper, or the production of a film. To moderate, the student presents whatever work is required to a moderation board of three professors, and is subsequently interviewed, examined, and critiqued.

The "capstone" of the Bard undergraduate experience is the Senior Project. As with moderation, this project takes different forms in different departments. Most students in the divisions of Languages and Literature and of Social Sciences write a paper of around eighty pages, which is then, as with work for moderation, critiqued by a board of three professors. Arts students must organize a series of concerts, recitals, or shows, or produce substantial creative work; math and science students, as well as some social science students, undertake research projects.

The college also offers graduate degrees at the Bard Center for Environmental Policy, the Bard Graduate Center in Manhattan, the Center for Curatorial Studies, the Conductor's Institute, the International Center of Photography
International Center of Photography
The International Center of Photography is a photography museum, school, and research center in Midtown Manhattan in New York City, United States...

 (also in Manhattan), the Milton Avery Graduate School of the Arts, and in the Master of Arts in Teaching Program.

Politics


In 2005, the Princeton Review ranked it as the second-most liberal college in the United States, declaring that Bard "puts the 'liberal' in 'liberal arts.'"

In 2003, Bard Professor Joel Kovel
Joel Kovel
Joel Kovel is an American politician, academic, writer, and eco-socialist. A practicing psychiatrist and psychoanalyst until the mid-1980s, he has lectured in psychiatry, anthropology, political science and communication studies. He has published many books on his work in psychiatry,...

 drew criticism from controversial conservative columnist Ann Coulter
Ann Coulter
Ann Hart Coulter is an American lawyer, conservative social and political commentator, author, and syndicated columnist. She frequently appears on television, radio, and as a speaker at public events and private events...

 for his book, Red Hunting in the Promised Land: Anticommunism and the Making of America, in which he compared anti-communism to a psychiatric disorder. Coulter, who has described Senator Joseph McCarthy
Joseph McCarthy
Joseph Raymond "Joe" McCarthy was an American politician who served as a Republican U.S. Senator from the state of Wisconsin from 1947 until his death in 1957...

 as the deceased person she admires the most, accused Kovel of holding a "lunatic psychological theory" and counted Bard among the colleges and universities that "have become a Safe Streets program for traitors and lunatics."http://www.jewishworldreview.com/cols/coulter071003.asp

Notable faculty


{{refimprove|section|date=April 2008}}
{{columns-list|4|
  • JoAnne Akalaitis
    JoAnne Akalaitis
    JoAnne Akalaitis is an American theatre director and a writer and the winner of five Obie Awards for direction and founder of the critically acclaimed Mabou Mines in New York, from which she resigned after twenty years in June 1990.Akalaitis was pre-med and studied philosophy in college...

  • Peggy Ahwesh
    Peggy Ahwesh
    Peggy Ahwesh is an American avant-garde filmmaker and experimental video artist. She received her B.F.A. from Antioch College. Ahwesh's work has been shown at the Solomon R...

  • John Ashbery
    John Ashbery
    John Lawrence Ashbery is an American poet. He has published more than twenty volumes of poetry and won nearly every major American award for poetry, including a Pulitzer Prize in 1976 for his collection Self-Portrait in a Convex Mirror. But Ashbery's work still proves controversial...

  • Emily Barton
    Emily Barton
    Emily Barton is an American novelist, critic, and academic. She is the author of two novels: The Testament of Yves Gundron and Brookland .-Background and education:...

  • Jonathan Brent
  • Franklin Bruno
    Franklin Bruno
    Franklin Bruno is an American singer-songwriter, academic, writer, and blogger originally from Upland, California. He has been a member of Nothing Painted Blue since its inception in 1986....

  • Ian Buruma
    Ian Buruma
    Buruma is a nephew of the English film director John Schlesinger, a series of interviews with whom he published in book form.-Works:*The Japanese Tattoo with Donald Richie ISBN 978-0-8348-0228-5...

  • Mary Caponegro
    Mary Caponegro
    Mary Caponegro is an American experimental fiction writer whose collections include Tales from the Next Village, The Star Cafe, Five Doubts, The Complexities of Intimacy, and All Fall Down. Her stories appear regularly in Conjunctions and in other periodicals...

  • Caleb Carr
    Caleb Carr
    Caleb Carr is an American novelist and military historian.-Biography:A son of Lucien Carr, a former UPI editor and a key Beat generation figure, he was born in Manhattan and lived for much of his life on the Lower East Side. He attended Kenyon College and New York University, earning a B.A. in...

  • Bruce Chilton
    Bruce Chilton
    Bruce Chilton is a scholar of early Christianity and Judaism, now Bernard Iddings Bell Professor of Religion at Bard College, and formerly Lillian Claus Professor of New Testament at Yale University. He holds a degree in New Testament from Cambridge University...

  • Mark Danner
    Mark Danner
    Mark David Danner is a prominent American writer, journalist, and educator. He is a former staff writer for The New Yorker and frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books. Danner specializes in U.S. foreign affairs, war and politics, and has written extensively on Haiti, Central America,...

  • Tim Davis
    Tim Davis (artist and poet)
    Tim Davis is an American visual artist and poet. His photographic work delves into formal aspects of photography as well as socially engaged documentary...

  • John Esposito
    John Esposito (pianist)
    John Esposito is an American jazz pianist of advanced bebop tendencies. Known as a composer for his own groups and a versatile sideman capable of all styles from stride piano to free improvisation, he is a pianist highly influenced by modernism , and capable of playing off of several rhythmic and...

  • Kyle Gann
    Kyle Gann
    Kyle Eugene Gann is an American professor of music, critic and composer born in Dallas, Texas. As a critic for The Village Voice and other publications he has been a supporter of progressive music including such Downtown movements as postminimalism and totalism.- As composer :As a composer his...

  • Jackie Goss
    Jackie Goss
    Jackie Goss is an American media artist, utilising videos and web-based projects, often featuring Flash animation techniques.. Goss graduated from Brown University and received an M.F.A from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute...

  • Apo Hsu
    Apo Hsu
    Apo Hsu is a conductor born in Taiwan and resident of both Taiwan and the United States. Hsu served as music director of the National Taiwan Normal University Symphony Orchestra and the Springfield Symphony Orchestra in Springfield, Missouri...

  • Peter Hutton
    Peter Hutton
    Peter Hutton is an experimental filmmaker, known primarily for his silent cinematic portraits of cities and landscapes around the world. He has also worked as a professional cinematographer, most notably for his former student Ken Burns. Hutton studied painting, sculpture and film at the San...

  • Robert Kelly
    Robert Kelly (poet)
    Robert Kelly is an American poet associated with the deep image group.-Early life and education:Kelly was born in Brooklyn, New York, to Samuel Jason and Margaret Rose Kelly née Kane, in 1935. He did his undergraduate studies at the City College of the City University of New York, graduating in 1955...

  • Verlyn Klinkenborg
    Verlyn Klinkenborg
    Verlyn Klinkenborg is an American non-fiction author. Since 1997, he has been a member of the editorial board of The New York Times. His books include The Rural Life, Making Hay, The Last Fine Time, and Timothy; or, Notes of an Abject Reptile...

  • Ann Lauterbach
    Ann Lauterbach
    Ann Lauterbach is an American poet, essayist, and professor. Her most recent poetry collection is Or to Begin Again , a 2009 National Book Award finalist. Her other honors include fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the Ingram Merrill Foundation, the John D. and Catherine C. MacArthur...

  • Erica Lindsay
    Erica Lindsay
    Erica Lindsay is an American saxophone player and composer. Erica Lindsay is an American jazz - saxophonist and composer....

  • Ken Lum
    Ken Lum
    Ken Lum is a Canadian artist of Chinese heritage who lives and works in Vancouver, British Columbia. Working in a number of media including painting, sculpture and photography, his art is conceptually oriented, and generally concerned with issues of identity in relation to the categories of...

  • Norman Manea
    Norman Manea
    Norman Manea is a Jewish Romanian writer and author of short fiction, novels, and essays about the Holocaust, daily life in a communist state, and exile. He is a Francis Flournoy Professor of European Culture and writer in residence at Bard College...

  • Walter Russell Mead
    Walter Russell Mead
    Walter Russell Mead is James Clarke Chace Professor of Foreign Affairs and Humanities at Bard College and Editor-at-Large of The American Interest magazine, and is recognized as one of the country's leading students of American foreign policy . Until 2010, Mead was the Henry A. Kissinger Senior...

  • Edie Meidav
    Edie Meidav
    -Life:She graduated with a B.A., Yale University, and M.F.A., Mills College.Her fiction, poetry, and criticism have appeared in Writing on Air , On Globalization , Now Write! Fiction Writing Exercises from Today's Best Teachers and Writers , and other anthologies, and in Village Voice,...

  • Daniel Mendelsohn
    Daniel Mendelsohn
    -Life and career:Mendelsohn was born on Long Island. He graduated with a B. A. in Classics from the University of Virginia, which he attended from 1978 to 1982 as an Echols Scholar, and received his M. A. and Ph. D. in Classics from Princeton University, where he was a Mellon Fellow in the...

  • Bradford Morrow
    Bradford Morrow
    Bradford Morrow is an American novelist, editor, essayist, poet, and children's book writer. Professor of literature and Bard Center Fellow at Bard College, he is the founding editor of Conjunctions literary magazine.-Life:...

  • Salahuddin Mustafa Muhammad
    Salahuddin Mustafa Muhammad
    Salahuddin Mustafa Muhammad is an American imam. He is the imam of the Masjid al-Ikhlas mosque in Newburgh, New York. He is also the Muslim chaplain of Bard College and has been a chaplain by the New York State Department of Corrections since 1985....

    , Chaplain
  • An-My Lê
  • Jacob Neusner
    Jacob Neusner
    Jacob Neusner is an American academic scholar of Judaism who lives in Rhinebeck, New York.-Biography:Born in Hartford, Connecticut, Neusner was educated at Harvard University, the Jewish Theological Seminary of America , the University of Oxford, and Columbia University.Neusner is often celebrated...

  • Orhan Pamuk
    Orhan Pamuk
    Ferit Orhan Pamuk , generally known simply as Orhan Pamuk, is a Turkish novelist. He is also the Robert Yik-Fong Tam Professor in the Humanities at Columbia University, where he teaches comparative literature and writing....

  • Zeena Parkins
    Zeena Parkins
    Zeena Parkins is a harpist active in rock music, free improvisation and jazz. Parkins plays standard harps, as well as several custom-made one-of-a kind electric harps; she also plays piano and accordion...

  • Judy Pfaff
    Judy Pfaff
    Judy Pfaff, born 1946 in London, England, is an American artist, known mainly for Installation art. Pfaff has received numerous awards for her work, including a John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Award and fellowships from the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation and the National...

  • Francine Prose
    Francine Prose
    Francine Prose is an American writer. Since March 2007 she has been the president of PEN American Center. She graduated from Radcliffe College in 1968 and received a Guggenheim fellowship in 1991....

  • Kelly Reichardt
    Kelly Reichardt
    Kelly Reichardt is a screenwriter and film director working within American indie cinema. Her debut film River of Grass was released in 1994. It was nominated for three Independent Spirit Awards, as well as the Grand Jury Prize at the Sundance Film Festival. In 1999, she completed her sophomore...

  • Jennifer Ringo
  • Luc Sante
    Luc Sante
    -Early life:Born in Verviers, Belgium, Sante emigrated to the United States in the early 1960s. He attended school in New York City, first at Regis High School in Manhattan and then at Columbia University.-Writing:...

  • Stephen Shore
    Stephen Shore
    Stephen Shore is an American photographer known for his deadpan images of banal scenes and objects in the United States, and for his pioneering use of color in art photography.- Life and work :...

  • Amy Sillman
    Amy Sillman
    Amy Sillman is an American painter living and working in New York.In a 2007 article in Artforum, Linda Norden wrote of Amy Sillman’s “fearless, tenacious pursuit of a painting that might accurately register the discomfort, incoherence, and absurdity that can characterize painterly experience—and...

  • Mona Simpson
  • Richard Teitelbaum
    Richard Teitelbaum
    Richard Teitelbaum is an American composer, keyboardist, and improvisor. Born in New York, he is a former student of Allen Forte, Mel Powell, and Luigi Nono. He is best known for his live electronic music and synthesizer performance. For example, he brought the first moog synthesizer to Europe...

  • William Terry
  • Michael Tibbetts
    Michael Tibbetts
    Michael Tibbetts is a Professor of Biology at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson, New York, 12504.-Degrees and Professional Interests:B.S., Southeastern Massachusetts University; Ph.D., Wesleyan University. Teaching assistant, Peterson Fellowship, Wesleyan University. Adjunct lecturer, postdoctoral...

  • Joan Tower
    Joan Tower
    Joan Tower is a Grammy-winning contemporary American composer, concert pianist and conductor. Lauded by the New Yorker as "one of the most successful woman composers of all time", her bold and energetic compositions have been performed in concert halls around the world...

  • George Tsontakis
    George Tsontakis
    George Tsontakis is an American composer and conductor.Tsontakis studied composition with Hugo Weisgall and Roger Sessions at the Juilliard School from 1974 to 1978, and later with Franco Donatoni at the Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia in Rome...

  • Dawn Upshaw
    Dawn Upshaw
    Dawn Upshaw is an American soprano described as "one of the most consequential performers of our time" by the Los Angeles Times. The recipient of several Grammy Awards and Edison Prize-winning discs, Upshaw is at home both in opera and art song, and in repertoire from Baroque to contemporary...

  • Lawrence Weschler
    Lawrence Weschler
    Lawrence Weschler is an author of works of creative nonfiction.A graduate of Cowell College of the University of California, Santa Cruz , Weschler was for over twenty years a staff writer at The New Yorker, where his work shuttled between political tragedies and cultural comedies...



}}

Former faculty


{{refimprove|section|date=April 2008}}
{{columns-list|4|
  • Chinua Achebe
    Chinua Achebe
    Albert Chinụalụmọgụ Achebe popularly known as Chinua Achebe is a Nigerian novelist, poet, professor, and critic...

     http://news.brown.edu/pressreleases/2009/09/achebe
  • Andre Aciman
    André Aciman
    -External links:***...

  • Artine Artinian
    Artine Artinian
    Artine Artinian was a French literature scholar of Armenian descent, notable for his manuscript collection, who was immortalized as a fictional character by Gore Vidal.-Background:...

  • Alfred Jules Ayer
  • Saul Bellow
    Saul Bellow
    Saul Bellow was a Canadian-born Jewish American writer. For his literary contributions, Bellow was awarded the Pulitzer Prize, the Nobel Prize for Literature, and the National Medal of Arts...

  • Heinrich Blücher
    Heinrich Blücher
    Heinrich Blücher was a German poet and philosopher. He was the second husband of Hannah Arendt.Blücher was born in Berlin. He was a member of the Communist Party of Germany until 1928, but soon rejected Stalinism and left the party in protest of its Stalinist policies...

     (buried in the Bard Cemetery with his wife, Hannah Arendt
    Hannah Arendt
    Hannah Arendt was a German American political theorist. She has often been described as a philosopher, although she refused that label on the grounds that philosophy is concerned with "man in the singular." She described herself instead as a political theorist because her work centers on the fact...

    )
  • Benjamin Boretz
    Benjamin Boretz
    Benjamin Boretz is an American composer and music theorist.-Life and work:Boretz was born in Brooklyn, New York and graduated with a degree in music from Brooklyn College...

  • James Chace
    James Chace
    James Clarke Chace was an eminent historian, writing on American diplomacy and statecraft. His 12 books include the critically acclaimed Acheson: The Secretary of State Who Created the American World , the definitive biography of former Secretary of State Dean Acheson. In a debate during the...

  • Paul de Man
    Paul de Man
    Paul de Man was a Belgian-born deconstructionist literary critic and theorist.He began teaching at Bard College. Later, he completed his Ph.D. at Harvard University in the late 1950s...

  • Jacob Druckman
    Jacob Druckman
    Jacob Druckman was an American composer born in Philadelphia. A graduate of the Juilliard School, Druckman studied with Vincent Persichetti, Peter Mennin, and Bernard Wagenaar. In 1949 and 1950 he studied with Aaron Copland at Tanglewood and later continued his studies at the École Normale de...

  • Ralph Ellison
    Ralph Ellison
    Ralph Waldo Ellison was an American novelist, literary critic, scholar and writer. He was born in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Ellison is best known for his novel Invisible Man, which won the National Book Award in 1953...

  • Harvey Fite
    Harvey Fite
    Harvey Fite was a pioneering American sculptor, painter and earth artist best known for his monumental land sculpture Opus 40. A teacher, innovator and Woodstock artist of many talents, he was primarily a sculptor of wood and stone...

  • Heinz Insu Fenkl
    Heinz Insu Fenkl
    - Academic work :Fenkl is an associate professor of English and Asian Studies at SUNY New Paltz. He previously served as coordinator of the school's Creative Writing Program and was director of the now-defunct ISIS: The Interstitial Studies Institute .Before his appointment to his current position...

  • Ryszard Frelek
  • William Gaddis
    William Gaddis
    William Thomas Gaddis, Jr. was an American novelist. He wrote five novels, two of which won National Book Awards and one of which, The Recognitions , was chosen as one of TIME magazine's 100 best novels from 1923 to 2005...

  • Leah Gilliam
    Leah Gilliam
    Leah Gilliam is an American filmmaker and media artist who deals with issues of race, gender, and sexual orientation in her art. Gilliam is the Director of Projects and Community Catalyst at gamelab's Institute of Play and a visiting faculty member at the Vermont College of Fine Arts.- Early life...

  • Daron Hagen
    Daron Hagen
    Daron Aric Hagen , is an American composer, conductor, pianist, educator, librettist, and stage director of contemporary classical music and opera.- Early life and education :...

  • Bob Holman
    Bob Holman
    Bob Holman is a poet and poetry activist in the United States.- Career :After graduating from Columbia University in 1970, Bob Holman founded, with Sara Miles and Susie Timmons, the NYC Poetry Calendar, a free monthly publication with all the readings and poets "on the same page"...

  • William Humphrey
    William Humphrey (writer)
    William Humphrey was an American novelist who wrote about small-town family life in rural Texas.-Biography:...

  • Mat Johnson
    Mat Johnson
    Mat Johnson is an American writer of literary fiction.-Biography:Born and raised in the Germantown and Mount Airy, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Johnson writes primarily about the lives of African-Americans, using fiction, nonfiction and graphic novels as mediums...

  • Joel Kovel
    Joel Kovel
    Joel Kovel is an American politician, academic, writer, and eco-socialist. A practicing psychiatrist and psychoanalyst until the mid-1980s, he has lectured in psychiatry, anthropology, political science and communication studies. He has published many books on his work in psychiatry,...

  • Harvey J. Levin
    Harvey J. Levin
    Harvey Joshua Levin was an American economist. He was University Research Professor in the Department of Economics at Hofstra University , Augustus B. Weller Professor of Economics at Hofstra , and Founder and Director of its Public Policy Workshop . He was also a Senior Research Associate at the...

  • Roy Lichtenstein
    Roy Lichtenstein
    Roy Lichtenstein was a prominent American pop artist. During the 1960s his paintings were exhibited at the Leo Castelli Gallery in New York City and along with Andy Warhol, Jasper Johns, James Rosenquist and others he became a leading figure in the new art movement...

  • Mary McCarthy
    Mary McCarthy (author)
    Mary Therese McCarthy was an American author, critic and political activist.- Early life :Born in Seattle, Washington, to Roy Winfield McCarthy and his wife, the former Therese Preston, McCarthy was orphaned at the age of six when both her parents died in the great flu epidemic of 1918...

  • Allan McCollum
    Allan McCollum
    Allan McCollum is a contemporary American artist who was born in Los Angeles, California in 1944, and now lives and works in New York City. He has spent over forty years exploring how objects achieve public and personal meaning in a world constituted in mass production, focusing most recently on...

  • Adolfas Mekas
    Adolfas Mekas
    Adolfas Mekas was a Lithuanian-born film director, and brother of Jonas Mekas. He is principally known for his work in the United States....

  • Toni Morrison
    Toni Morrison
    Toni Morrison is a Nobel Prize and Pulitzer Prize-winning American novelist, editor, and professor. Her novels are known for their epic themes, vivid dialogue, and richly detailed characters. Among her best known novels are The Bluest Eye, Song of Solomon and Beloved...

  • Vik Muniz
    Vik Muniz
    Vicente José de Oliveira Muniz, known as Vik Muniz , is a visual artist living in New York City.-Early career:Muniz began his career as a sculptor in the late 1980s after relocating from Brazil to Chicago and later to New York. His early work grew out of a post-Fluxus aesthetic and often involved...

  • Elizabeth Murray
    Elizabeth Murray (artist)
    Elizabeth Murray was an American painter, printmaker and draughtsman. Her works are in many major public collections, including those of the Solomon R...

  • Albert Jay Nock
    Albert Jay Nock
    Albert Jay Nock was an influential United States libertarian author, educational theorist, and social critic of the early and middle 20th century.- Life and work :...

  • Arthur Penn
    Arthur Penn
    Arthur Hiller Penn was an American film director and producer with a career as a theater director as well. Penn amassed a critically acclaimed body of work throughout the 1960s and 1970s.-Early years:...

  • Paul Ramirez Jonas
    Paul Ramirez Jonas
    Paul Ramirez Jonas is a contemporary artist whose work currently explores the potential between artist and audience, artwork and public. Many of Ramirez Jonas' projects use pre-existing texts, models, or materials to reenact or prompt actions and reinsert himself into his own audience...

  • David Rieff
    David Rieff
    David Rieff is an American polemicist and pundit. His books have focused on issues of immigration, international conflict, and humanitarianism...

  • Roswell Rudd
    Roswell Rudd
    Roswell Rudd is a Grammy Award-nominated American jazz trombonist and composer....

  • Mary Lee Settle
    Mary Lee Settle
    Mary Lee Settle was an American writer and winner of the National Book Award for her 1978 novel Blood Tie...

  • Isaac Bashevis Singer
    Isaac Bashevis Singer
    Isaac Bashevis Singer – July 24, 1991) was a Polish Jewish American author noted for his short stories. He was one of the leading figures in the Yiddish literary movement, and received the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1978...

  • Wadada Leo Smith
    Wadada Leo Smith
    Ishmael Wadada Leo Smith is a trumpeter and composer working primarily in the fields of avant-garde jazz and free improvisation.-Biography:...

  • Wilhelm Sollmann
    Wilhelm Sollmann
    Friedrich Wilhelm Sollmann was a German journalist, politician, and interior minister of the Weimar Republic. In 1919 he was a member of the German delegation to the Treaty of Versailles...

  • Joseph Somers
    Joseph Somers
    Joseph Somers is an American artist and painter most famous for his canvases, three-dimensional in both their structure and illusion.His work was featured at International Art Show Las Vegas. The artwork at this show moved and created another dimension of art...

  • William Weaver
    William Weaver
    William Fense Weaver is an English language translator of modern Italian literature.-Biography:William Weaver is perhaps best known for his translations of the work of Umberto Eco and Italo Calvino, and has translated many other Italian authors over the course of a career spanning more than fifty...

  • Ted Weiss
  • Werner Wolff

}}

Notable alumni


{{refimprove|section|date=April 2008}}

{{about|the college in New York state|the "early college" in Massachusetts|Bard College at Simon's Rock}}

Bard College, founded in 1860 as "St. Stephen's College", is a small four-year liberal arts college
Liberal arts colleges in the United States
Liberal arts colleges in the United States are certain undergraduate institutions of higher education in the United States. The Encyclopædia Britannica Concise offers a definition of the liberal arts as a "college or university curriculum aimed at imparting general knowledge and developing general...

 located in Annandale-on-Hudson
Annandale-on-Hudson, New York
Annandale-on-Hudson is a hamlet in Dutchess County, New York, USA, in the Hudson Valley in the town of Red Hook, across the Hudson River from Kingston....

, New York
New York
New York is a state in the Northeastern region of the United States. It is the nation's third most populous state. New York is bordered by New Jersey and Pennsylvania to the south, and by Connecticut, Massachusetts and Vermont to the east...

.

Location


Bard has a 600-acre (2.4-km²) campus in Annandale-on-Hudson, near the town of Red Hook
Red Hook, New York
Red Hook is a town in Dutchess County, New York, United States. The population was reported to be 11,319 during the 2010 census. The name is supposedly derived from the red foliage on trees on a small strip of land on the Hudson River. The town contains two villages; the village of Red Hook and the...

, overlooking the Hudson River
Hudson River
The Hudson is a river that flows from north to south through eastern New York. The highest official source is at Lake Tear of the Clouds, on the slopes of Mount Marcy in the Adirondack Mountains. The river itself officially begins in Henderson Lake in Newcomb, New York...

 and Catskill Mountains
Catskill Mountains
The Catskill Mountains, an area in New York State northwest of New York City and southwest of Albany, are a mature dissected plateau, an uplifted region that was subsequently eroded into sharp relief. They are an eastward continuation, and the highest representation, of the Allegheny Plateau...

, within the Hudson River Historic District
Hudson River Historic District
The Hudson River Historic District, also known as Hudson River Heritage Historic District, is the largest such district on the mainland of the contiguous United States...

, a National Historic Landmark
National Historic Landmark
A National Historic Landmark is a building, site, structure, object, or district, that is officially recognized by the United States government for its historical significance...

. The hamlet of Annandale-on-Hudson has no downtown center and consists of the college and nine other non-associated houses. The village is neighbored by the villages of Red Hook
Red Hook, New York
Red Hook is a town in Dutchess County, New York, United States. The population was reported to be 11,319 during the 2010 census. The name is supposedly derived from the red foliage on trees on a small strip of land on the Hudson River. The town contains two villages; the village of Red Hook and the...

 and Tivoli
Tivoli, New York
Tivoli is a village in Dutchess County, New York, United States. The population was 1,118 at the 2010 census. The village, which was incorporated in 1872 from parts of Upper Red Hook Landing and Madalin, is the northernmost settlement in the county, located in the northwest part of the Town of Red...

, and is across the Hudson River
Hudson River
The Hudson is a river that flows from north to south through eastern New York. The highest official source is at Lake Tear of the Clouds, on the slopes of Mount Marcy in the Adirondack Mountains. The river itself officially begins in Henderson Lake in Newcomb, New York...

 from the small cities of Kingston
Kingston, New York
Kingston is a city in and the county seat of Ulster County, New York, USA. It is north of New York City and south of Albany. It became New York's first capital in 1777, and was burned by the British Oct. 16, 1777, after the Battles of Saratoga...

 and Saugerties
Saugerties (village), New York
Saugerties is a village in Ulster County, New York, USA. The population was 4,955 at the 2000 census.The Village of Saugerties is a Town in the eastern part of the Town of Saugerties. U.S. Route 9W passes through the village...

. Shuttles run between the college and the two villages.

History



The college was originally founded under the name St. Stephen's, in association with the Episcopal church of New York City
New York City
New York is the most populous city in the United States and the center of the New York Metropolitan Area, one of the most populous metropolitan areas in the world. New York exerts a significant impact upon global commerce, finance, media, art, fashion, research, technology, education, and...

, and changed its name to Bard in 1934 in honor of its founder, John Bard. While the college remains affiliated with the church, it pursues a far more secular mission today. Between 1928 and 1944, Bard/St. Stephen's operated as an undergraduate school of Columbia University
Columbia University
Columbia University in the City of New York is a private, Ivy League university in Manhattan, New York City. Columbia is the oldest institution of higher learning in the state of New York, the fifth oldest in the United States, and one of the country's nine Colonial Colleges founded before the...

. Bard/St. Stephen's ties with Columbia were severed when Bard became a fully coeducational college.

By the 1930s, Bard had become atypical among US colleges in that it had begun to place a heavy academic emphasis on the performing and fine arts. During that time, a substantive examination period was introduced for students in their second year, as well as what the dean at the time called the "final demonstration". These two periods would come to be known as Moderation and Senior Project, respectively (see below).

During the 1940s, Bard provided a haven for intellectual refugees fleeing Europe. These included Hannah Arendt
Hannah Arendt
Hannah Arendt was a German American political theorist. She has often been described as a philosopher, although she refused that label on the grounds that philosophy is concerned with "man in the singular." She described herself instead as a political theorist because her work centers on the fact...

, the political theorist, Stefan Hirsch, the precisionist
Precisionism
Precisionism, also known as Cubist Realism, was an artistic movement that emerged in the United States after World War I and was at its height during the inter-War period...

 painter; Felix Hirsch, the political editor of the Berliner Tageblatt
Berliner Tageblatt
The Berliner Tageblatt or BT was a German language newspaper published in Berlin from 1872-1939. Along with the Frankfurter Zeitung, it became one of the most important liberal German newspapers of its time.-History:...

; the violinist Emil Hauser; the linguist Hans Marchand
Hans Marchand
Hans Marchand was a German Linguist. He studied Romance Languages, English and Latin and was due to his fleeing from Germany during the Third Reich a lecturer of linguistics at Istandbul, Yale University, Bard College. From 1957 to 1973 he was a professor at the university of Tübingen...

; the noted psychologist Werner Wolff; and the philosopher Heinrich Blücher
Heinrich Blücher
Heinrich Blücher was a German poet and philosopher. He was the second husband of Hannah Arendt.Blücher was born in Berlin. He was a member of the Communist Party of Germany until 1928, but soon rejected Stalinism and left the party in protest of its Stalinist policies...

.

In 1975, after serving as the youngest college president in history at Franconia College
Franconia College
Franconia College was a small experimental liberal arts college in Franconia, New Hampshire, United States. It opened in 1963 on the site of The Forest Hills Hotel on Agassiz Road, and closed in 1978, after years of declining enrollment and increasing financial difficulties.A small, eclectic...

, Leon Botstein
Leon Botstein
Leon Botstein is an American conductor and the President of Bard College . Botstein is the music director and principal conductor of the American Symphony Orchestra and conductor laureate of the Jerusalem Symphony Orchestra, where he served as music director and principal conductor from 2003-2010...

 was elected president of Bard. He is generally credited with reviving the academic and cultural prestige of the College, having overseen the acquisition of Bard College at Simon's Rock, the construction of the Frank Gehry
Frank Gehry
Frank Owen Gehry, is a Canadian American Pritzker Prize-winning architect based in Los Angeles, California.His buildings, including his private residence, have become tourist attractions...

-designed Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts, and the creation of a large number of other associated academic institutions. In June, 2011, Bard officially acquired the Longy School of Music
Longy School of Music
The Longy School of Music of Bard College is a conservatory located near Harvard Square in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Founded in 1915, it was one of the four independent degree-granting music schools in the Boston region along with the New England Conservatory, Berklee College of Music, and Boston...

.


Admissions


For the class of 2015, 28% of applicants were accepted, while the average SAT and ACT scores (only 50% and 23%, respectively, reported scores because Bard is an SAT/ACT optional school) for matriculating students were 1330 (math plus verbal) and 30, respectively. The mid 50% range for the SAT was: critical reading 640-740; math 590-690 and the mid 50% range for the ACT was 29-31. Sixty percent of matriculating students ranked in the top 10% of their high school class out of 33% of students who reported their ranking. The Princeton Review rated Bard a 96 out of 99 in its selectivity rating, and US News & World Report categorized Bard as "most selective." The class of 2015 represent 39 states and 40 different countries.

Programs and associated institutes


Bard has developed several innovative graduate programs and research institutes, including the Milton Avery Graduate School of the Arts
Milton Avery Graduate School of the Arts
Milton Avery Graduate School of the Arts is a graduate program associated with Bard College that grants Master of Fine Arts degrees.Founded in 1981, Milton Avery Graduate School of the Arts is a nontraditional school for interdisciplinary study in the visual and creative arts...

, the Levy Economics Institute
Levy Economics Institute
The Levy Economics Institute of Bard College is located on the campus of Bard College, in Annandale-on-Hudson, New York. The Institute is housed in Blithewood, a mansion originally designed by an alumnus of the architectural firm of McKim, Mead and White for Andrew Zabriskie in 1899...

, the Center for Curatorial Studies and Art in Contemporary Culture
Center for Curatorial Studies and Art in Contemporary Culture
The Center for Curatorial Studies and Art in Contemporary Culture is an exhibition and research center dedicated to the study of art and exhibition practices from the 1960s to the present day. Co-founded in 1990 by Marieluise Hessel and Richard Black, the Center initiated its graduate program in...

, the Bard Center for Environmental Policy, the Bard College Conservatory of Music
Bard College Conservatory of Music
The Bard College Conservatory of Music is a program of Bard College in Annandale-on-Hudson, New York. Founded in 2005, the program is unique among music conservatories in the United States in that all undergraduate students are required to participate in a five-year dual-degree program, in which...

, the ICP-Bard Program in Advanced Photographic Studies in Manhattan, the Master of Arts in Teaching Program (MAT), the Bard College Clemente Program, and the Bard Graduate Center
Bard Graduate Center
The Bard Graduate Center: Decorative Arts, Design History, Material Culture is a graduate institute affiliated with Bard College, located in Annandale-on-Hudson, New York....

 in Manhattan
Manhattan
Manhattan is the oldest and the most densely populated of the five boroughs of New York City. Located primarily on the island of Manhattan at the mouth of the Hudson River, the boundaries of the borough are identical to those of New York County, an original county of the state of New York...

. The college's Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts
Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts
The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College is a performance hall located in New York's Hudson Valley. The center provides audiences with performances and programs in orchestral, chamber, and jazz music and theater, dance, and opera by American and international artists...

 was designed by acclaimed architect Frank Gehry
Frank Gehry
Frank Owen Gehry, is a Canadian American Pritzker Prize-winning architect based in Los Angeles, California.His buildings, including his private residence, have become tourist attractions...

, and was completed in the spring of 2003.

The Bard Prison Initiative
Bard Prison Initiative
The Bard Prison Initiative is a program sponsored by Bard College to provide a liberal arts degree to incarcerated individuals in five different prisons in the U.S. State of New York. It currently enrolls over 200 students full time in liberal arts programs that end in associate and bachelor's...

 provides a liberal arts degree to incarcerated individuals (Prison education
Prison education
Prison education, by Daryl Kuissi also known as Inmate Education and Correctional Education, is a very broad term that encompasses any number of educational activities occurring inside a prison. These educational activities include both vocational training and academic education...

) in five different prisons in New York State, and currently enrolls nearly 200 students. Since federal funding for prison education programs was eliminated in 1994, the BPI is one of only a small number of programs in the country of its kind.

Bard College is also affiliated with Bard College at Simon's Rock, the nation's oldest and most prestigious early college entrance program
Early college entrance program
Early college entrance programs, sometimes called early admission or early enrollment programs are educational programs that allow high school students to be accelerated into college, together with other such students, one or more years before the traditional age of college entrance, and without...

, Bard High School Early College
Bard High School Early College
Bard High School Early College , is an alternative public secondary school in New York City that allows highly motivated and scholastically strong students to begin their college studies two years early. Upon entering, these students embark on a writing intensive journey and engage in far more...

 in New York City, as well as Bard Center for Environmental Policy. Bard also helped construct a curriculum for Smolny College
Smolny College
Smolny College of Liberal Arts and Sciences is a liberal arts college located in St. Petersburg, Russia. It is the product of a collaboration between Bard College and Saint Petersburg State University. It has the distinction of being the first liberal arts college in Russia.Smolny opened in...

, Russia's first liberal arts college, with St. Petersburg State University. Additionally, the college hosts the Bard Globalization and International Affairs (BGIA) Program in New York City, which is focused on the specialized study of human rights law, international relations ethics, civil society, humanitarian action, and global political economy. Students attend seminar classes in the evenings and work at a substantive international affairs internship during the day. BGIA publishes BardPolitik, a semiannual international affairs journal featuring contributions for students and academics.

In February 2009, Bard announced the first dual degree program between a Palestinian
Palestinian people
The Palestinian people, also referred to as Palestinians or Palestinian Arabs , are an Arabic-speaking people with origins in Palestine. Despite various wars and exoduses, roughly one third of the world's Palestinian population continues to reside in the area encompassing the West Bank, the Gaza...

 university and an American institution of higher education. The College entered into a collaboration with Al-Quds University
Al-Quds University
Al-Quds University is a Palestinian university with campuses in Jerusalem, Abu Dis, and al-Bireh. It was founded in 1984, but its official constitution was written in 1993 when Mohammed Nusseibeh, its first Chancellor and Chancellor of the College of Science and Technology, announced its...

 involving an honors college, a masters program in teaching and a model high school.

Recently, Bard College acquired, on permanent loan, art collector Marieluise Hessel's substantial collection of important contemporary artwork. Hessel also contributed $8 million (USD) for the construction of a new wing at Bard's Center for Curatorial Studies building, in which the collection is exhibited.

In March 2010, Bard established an official partnership with American University of Central Asia
American University of Central Asia
The , formerly the Kyrgyz-American University, is a liberal arts University located in Bishkek, the capital of the former Soviet republic of Kyrgyzstan....

 located in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan. The partnership will allow students of American Studies, Anthropology, Economics, European Studies, International and Comparative Politics, Journalism and Mass Communications, Psychology, Sociology and Software Engineering programs to receive liberal arts degrees fully accredited in the US.

Student life


Over 80 student clubs are financed through Bard's Convocation Fund, which is distributed once a semester by an elected student body and ratified during a rowdy public forum.

Bard students have one print newspaper, the Bard Free Press, which won Best Campus Publication in SPIN Magazines first annual Campus Awards in 2003. Literary magazines include the semiannual Lux, the annual Bard Papers, The Moderator, and Sui Generis, a journal of translations and of original poetry in languages other than English. The Bard Journal of the Social Sciences, which publishes undergraduate work, is also produced by students on campus.

Other prominent student groups include the International Students Organization and other cultural organizations, KLOUDS (Kids Laying Out Under Daytime Skies), High Tea, the Bard Film Committee, the Bard Queer-Straight Alliance, the Bard Democrats, Surrealist Training Circus, Student-run Bike Co-op and college radio station WXBC.

Bard is also home to the Root Cellar, a completely student-run, multipurpose space that serves as an Infoshop, vegan café, and venue for small-scale shows. It houses an extensive zine
Zine
A zine is most commonly a small circulation publication of original or appropriated texts and images. More broadly, the term encompasses any self-published work of minority interest usually reproduced via photocopier....

 library, which once was touted as "the largest zine library on the East Coast."{{Citation needed|date=April 2007}} While technically defined as a club by the Office of Student Activities, the "club heads" of the Root Cellar hold no more power than any other students involved, and decisions are made by consensus
Consensus decision-making
Consensus decision-making is a group decision making process that seeks the consent, not necessarily the agreement, of participants and the resolution of objections. Consensus is defined by Merriam-Webster as, first, general agreement, and second, group solidarity of belief or sentiment. It has its...

 at weekly meetings. The space is a haven for radical political action and education, and an outlook much like that of ABC No Rio
ABC No Rio
ABC No Rio is a social center located at 156 Rivington Street on New York City's Lower East Side that was founded in 1980. It features a gallery space, a zine library, a darkroom, a silkscreening studio, and public computer lab...

 or Bluestockings bookstore in New York City.

The Bard Athletics department offers varsity sports in basketball, cross country, soccer, tennis, volleyball, lacrosse and squash (men), and joined the Skyline Conference, effective 2007-2008. Bard has announced that it will join the Liberty League
Liberty League
The Liberty League is an intercollegiate athletic conference affiliated with the NCAA’s Division III. Originally founded in 1995 as the Upstate Collegiate Athletic Association, was renamed during the summer of 2004 to the current name...

 starting with the 2011-2012 academic year. One of the more popular sports on campus is rugby. In the spring of 2006, Bard Women's Rugby joined the men's side, Bard Rugby Football Club, as an official team. In 2011, the Bard Women's and Men's Football teams joined the Liberty League tournament.

Bard has a strong, independent music scene considering its isolation and size. The college's Old Gym was once a popular location for concerts and parties in the 80s, 90s, and early 00s. In 2004, the Old Gym was shut down and in spring 2006 transformed into a student-run theater. Many activities that once took place there now occur in the smaller SMOG building, an autonomous student space. Student-run theater is also popular: dozens of student directed and written productions are put on each semester and a 24 Hour Theater Festival is held at least once a year.

Academics


All first-year students must attend the Language and Thinking (L&T) program, an intensive, writing-centered introduction to the liberal arts, for the three weeks preceding their first semester. Orientation also takes place during this time. All first-year students must also participate in the Citizen Science program, a three-week program that begins in January 2011. The Citizen Science program will introduce students to science and the ideas of the scientific method. The program is designed to promote science literacy and will utilize the theme of infectious diseases, the importance of infectious disease in a community, and the impact that infectious disease outbreaks and subsequent management can have on our global society. The curriculum will range from conducting a laboratory experiment and analyzing a scientific problem to modeling potential solutions to that problem. The program will merge three distinct, yet thematically interwoven, rotations, each designed to address the large question: How can we reduce the global burden of infectious disease?

All first-year student take the "First-Year Seminar," an intensive, year-long, reading and writing core curricular course. "FYSem," as it is commonly known among students and faculty, begins in the fall semester of the freshman year. The first semester spans thinkers from Confucius
Confucius
Confucius , literally "Master Kong", was a Chinese thinker and social philosopher of the Spring and Autumn Period....

 to Galileo. The second semester spans John Locke
John Locke
John Locke FRS , widely known as the Father of Liberalism, was an English philosopher and physician regarded as one of the most influential of Enlightenment thinkers. Considered one of the first of the British empiricists, following the tradition of Francis Bacon, he is equally important to social...

 to Virginia Woolf
Virginia Woolf
Adeline Virginia Woolf was an English author, essayist, publisher, and writer of short stories, regarded as one of the foremost modernist literary figures of the twentieth century....

. There are nearly thirty sections of the course each semester, taught by a wide variety of professors, including President Botstein and other members of the administration. The course covers works by Plato
Plato
Plato , was a Classical Greek philosopher, mathematician, student of Socrates, writer of philosophical dialogues, and founder of the Academy in Athens, the first institution of higher learning in the Western world. Along with his mentor, Socrates, and his student, Aristotle, Plato helped to lay the...

, Virgil
Virgil
Publius Vergilius Maro, usually called Virgil or Vergil in English , was an ancient Roman poet of the Augustan period. He is known for three major works of Latin literature, the Eclogues , the Georgics, and the epic Aeneid...

, Saint Augustine, Dante
DANTE
Delivery of Advanced Network Technology to Europe is a not-for-profit organisation that plans, builds and operates the international networks that interconnect the various national research and education networks in Europe and surrounding regions...

, William Shakespeare
William Shakespeare
William Shakespeare was an English poet and playwright, widely regarded as the greatest writer in the English language and the world's pre-eminent dramatist. He is often called England's national poet and the "Bard of Avon"...

, Galileo Galilei
Galileo Galilei
Galileo Galilei , was an Italian physicist, mathematician, astronomer, and philosopher who played a major role in the Scientific Revolution. His achievements include improvements to the telescope and consequent astronomical observations and support for Copernicanism...

, Jean Jacques Rousseau, Mary Shelley
Mary Shelley
Mary Shelley was a British novelist, short story writer, dramatist, essayist, biographer, and travel writer, best known for her Gothic novel Frankenstein: or, The Modern Prometheus . She also edited and promoted the works of her husband, the Romantic poet and philosopher Percy Bysshe Shelley...

, Karl Marx
Karl Marx
Karl Heinrich Marx was a German philosopher, economist, sociologist, historian, journalist, and revolutionary socialist. His ideas played a significant role in the development of social science and the socialist political movement...

, Charles Darwin
Charles Darwin
Charles Robert Darwin FRS was an English naturalist. He established that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestry, and proposed the scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection.He published his theory...

, Friedrich Nietzsche
Friedrich Nietzsche
Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche was a 19th-century German philosopher, poet, composer and classical philologist...

, W. E. B. DuBois, Sigmund Freud
Sigmund Freud
Sigmund Freud , born Sigismund Schlomo Freud , was an Austrian neurologist who founded the discipline of psychoanalysis...

, Virginia Woolf
Virginia Woolf
Adeline Virginia Woolf was an English author, essayist, publisher, and writer of short stories, regarded as one of the foremost modernist literary figures of the twentieth century....

, Chinua Achebe
Chinua Achebe
Albert Chinụalụmọgụ Achebe popularly known as Chinua Achebe is a Nigerian novelist, poet, professor, and critic...

, and Primo Levi
Primo Levi
Primo Michele Levi was an Italian Jewish chemist and writer. He was the author of two novels and several collections of short stories, essays, and poems, but is best known for If This Is a Man, his account of the year he spent as a prisoner in the Auschwitz concentration camp in Nazi-occupied Poland...

.

Another mandatory process of the university is "moderation". Moderation typically takes place in the fourth or fifth semester, as a way of choosing a major. Conditions vary from department to department: all require the preparation of two short papers, one on the moderand's past work in the major subject and one on their plans for the future; most require the completion of a certain set or a certain number of courses; some have additional requirements, such as a concert or recital, the submission of a seminar paper, or the production of a film. To moderate, the student presents whatever work is required to a moderation board of three professors, and is subsequently interviewed, examined, and critiqued.

The "capstone" of the Bard undergraduate experience is the Senior Project. As with moderation, this project takes different forms in different departments. Most students in the divisions of Languages and Literature and of Social Sciences write a paper of around eighty pages, which is then, as with work for moderation, critiqued by a board of three professors. Arts students must organize a series of concerts, recitals, or shows, or produce substantial creative work; math and science students, as well as some social science students, undertake research projects.

The college also offers graduate degrees at the Bard Center for Environmental Policy, the Bard Graduate Center in Manhattan, the Center for Curatorial Studies, the Conductor's Institute, the International Center of Photography
International Center of Photography
The International Center of Photography is a photography museum, school, and research center in Midtown Manhattan in New York City, United States...

 (also in Manhattan), the Milton Avery Graduate School of the Arts, and in the Master of Arts in Teaching Program.

Politics


In 2005, the Princeton Review ranked it as the second-most liberal college in the United States, declaring that Bard "puts the 'liberal' in 'liberal arts.'"

In 2003, Bard Professor Joel Kovel
Joel Kovel
Joel Kovel is an American politician, academic, writer, and eco-socialist. A practicing psychiatrist and psychoanalyst until the mid-1980s, he has lectured in psychiatry, anthropology, political science and communication studies. He has published many books on his work in psychiatry,...

 drew criticism from controversial conservative columnist Ann Coulter
Ann Coulter
Ann Hart Coulter is an American lawyer, conservative social and political commentator, author, and syndicated columnist. She frequently appears on television, radio, and as a speaker at public events and private events...

 for his book, Red Hunting in the Promised Land: Anticommunism and the Making of America, in which he compared anti-communism to a psychiatric disorder. Coulter, who has described Senator Joseph McCarthy
Joseph McCarthy
Joseph Raymond "Joe" McCarthy was an American politician who served as a Republican U.S. Senator from the state of Wisconsin from 1947 until his death in 1957...

 as the deceased person she admires the most, accused Kovel of holding a "lunatic psychological theory" and counted Bard among the colleges and universities that "have become a Safe Streets program for traitors and lunatics."http://www.jewishworldreview.com/cols/coulter071003.asp

Notable faculty


{{refimprove|section|date=April 2008}}
{{columns-list|4|
  • JoAnne Akalaitis
    JoAnne Akalaitis
    JoAnne Akalaitis is an American theatre director and a writer and the winner of five Obie Awards for direction and founder of the critically acclaimed Mabou Mines in New York, from which she resigned after twenty years in June 1990.Akalaitis was pre-med and studied philosophy in college...

  • Peggy Ahwesh
    Peggy Ahwesh
    Peggy Ahwesh is an American avant-garde filmmaker and experimental video artist. She received her B.F.A. from Antioch College. Ahwesh's work has been shown at the Solomon R...

  • John Ashbery
    John Ashbery
    John Lawrence Ashbery is an American poet. He has published more than twenty volumes of poetry and won nearly every major American award for poetry, including a Pulitzer Prize in 1976 for his collection Self-Portrait in a Convex Mirror. But Ashbery's work still proves controversial...

  • Emily Barton
    Emily Barton
    Emily Barton is an American novelist, critic, and academic. She is the author of two novels: The Testament of Yves Gundron and Brookland .-Background and education:...

  • Jonathan Brent
  • Franklin Bruno
    Franklin Bruno
    Franklin Bruno is an American singer-songwriter, academic, writer, and blogger originally from Upland, California. He has been a member of Nothing Painted Blue since its inception in 1986....

  • Ian Buruma
    Ian Buruma
    Buruma is a nephew of the English film director John Schlesinger, a series of interviews with whom he published in book form.-Works:*The Japanese Tattoo with Donald Richie ISBN 978-0-8348-0228-5...

  • Mary Caponegro
    Mary Caponegro
    Mary Caponegro is an American experimental fiction writer whose collections include Tales from the Next Village, The Star Cafe, Five Doubts, The Complexities of Intimacy, and All Fall Down. Her stories appear regularly in Conjunctions and in other periodicals...

  • Caleb Carr
    Caleb Carr
    Caleb Carr is an American novelist and military historian.-Biography:A son of Lucien Carr, a former UPI editor and a key Beat generation figure, he was born in Manhattan and lived for much of his life on the Lower East Side. He attended Kenyon College and New York University, earning a B.A. in...

  • Bruce Chilton
    Bruce Chilton
    Bruce Chilton is a scholar of early Christianity and Judaism, now Bernard Iddings Bell Professor of Religion at Bard College, and formerly Lillian Claus Professor of New Testament at Yale University. He holds a degree in New Testament from Cambridge University...

  • Mark Danner
    Mark Danner
    Mark David Danner is a prominent American writer, journalist, and educator. He is a former staff writer for The New Yorker and frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books. Danner specializes in U.S. foreign affairs, war and politics, and has written extensively on Haiti, Central America,...

  • Tim Davis
    Tim Davis (artist and poet)
    Tim Davis is an American visual artist and poet. His photographic work delves into formal aspects of photography as well as socially engaged documentary...

  • John Esposito
    John Esposito (pianist)
    John Esposito is an American jazz pianist of advanced bebop tendencies. Known as a composer for his own groups and a versatile sideman capable of all styles from stride piano to free improvisation, he is a pianist highly influenced by modernism , and capable of playing off of several rhythmic and...

  • Kyle Gann
    Kyle Gann
    Kyle Eugene Gann is an American professor of music, critic and composer born in Dallas, Texas. As a critic for The Village Voice and other publications he has been a supporter of progressive music including such Downtown movements as postminimalism and totalism.- As composer :As a composer his...

  • Jackie Goss
    Jackie Goss
    Jackie Goss is an American media artist, utilising videos and web-based projects, often featuring Flash animation techniques.. Goss graduated from Brown University and received an M.F.A from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute...

  • Apo Hsu
    Apo Hsu
    Apo Hsu is a conductor born in Taiwan and resident of both Taiwan and the United States. Hsu served as music director of the National Taiwan Normal University Symphony Orchestra and the Springfield Symphony Orchestra in Springfield, Missouri...

  • Peter Hutton
    Peter Hutton
    Peter Hutton is an experimental filmmaker, known primarily for his silent cinematic portraits of cities and landscapes around the world. He has also worked as a professional cinematographer, most notably for his former student Ken Burns. Hutton studied painting, sculpture and film at the San...

  • Robert Kelly
    Robert Kelly (poet)
    Robert Kelly is an American poet associated with the deep image group.-Early life and education:Kelly was born in Brooklyn, New York, to Samuel Jason and Margaret Rose Kelly née Kane, in 1935. He did his undergraduate studies at the City College of the City University of New York, graduating in 1955...

  • Verlyn Klinkenborg
    Verlyn Klinkenborg
    Verlyn Klinkenborg is an American non-fiction author. Since 1997, he has been a member of the editorial board of The New York Times. His books include The Rural Life, Making Hay, The Last Fine Time, and Timothy; or, Notes of an Abject Reptile...

  • Ann Lauterbach
    Ann Lauterbach
    Ann Lauterbach is an American poet, essayist, and professor. Her most recent poetry collection is Or to Begin Again , a 2009 National Book Award finalist. Her other honors include fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the Ingram Merrill Foundation, the John D. and Catherine C. MacArthur...

  • Erica Lindsay
    Erica Lindsay
    Erica Lindsay is an American saxophone player and composer. Erica Lindsay is an American jazz - saxophonist and composer....

  • Ken Lum
    Ken Lum
    Ken Lum is a Canadian artist of Chinese heritage who lives and works in Vancouver, British Columbia. Working in a number of media including painting, sculpture and photography, his art is conceptually oriented, and generally concerned with issues of identity in relation to the categories of...

  • Norman Manea
    Norman Manea
    Norman Manea is a Jewish Romanian writer and author of short fiction, novels, and essays about the Holocaust, daily life in a communist state, and exile. He is a Francis Flournoy Professor of European Culture and writer in residence at Bard College...

  • Walter Russell Mead
    Walter Russell Mead
    Walter Russell Mead is James Clarke Chace Professor of Foreign Affairs and Humanities at Bard College and Editor-at-Large of The American Interest magazine, and is recognized as one of the country's leading students of American foreign policy . Until 2010, Mead was the Henry A. Kissinger Senior...

  • Edie Meidav
    Edie Meidav
    -Life:She graduated with a B.A., Yale University, and M.F.A., Mills College.Her fiction, poetry, and criticism have appeared in Writing on Air , On Globalization , Now Write! Fiction Writing Exercises from Today's Best Teachers and Writers , and other anthologies, and in Village Voice,...

  • Daniel Mendelsohn
    Daniel Mendelsohn
    -Life and career:Mendelsohn was born on Long Island. He graduated with a B. A. in Classics from the University of Virginia, which he attended from 1978 to 1982 as an Echols Scholar, and received his M. A. and Ph. D. in Classics from Princeton University, where he was a Mellon Fellow in the...

  • Bradford Morrow
    Bradford Morrow
    Bradford Morrow is an American novelist, editor, essayist, poet, and children's book writer. Professor of literature and Bard Center Fellow at Bard College, he is the founding editor of Conjunctions literary magazine.-Life:...

  • Salahuddin Mustafa Muhammad
    Salahuddin Mustafa Muhammad
    Salahuddin Mustafa Muhammad is an American imam. He is the imam of the Masjid al-Ikhlas mosque in Newburgh, New York. He is also the Muslim chaplain of Bard College and has been a chaplain by the New York State Department of Corrections since 1985....

    , Chaplain
  • An-My Lê
  • Jacob Neusner
    Jacob Neusner
    Jacob Neusner is an American academic scholar of Judaism who lives in Rhinebeck, New York.-Biography:Born in Hartford, Connecticut, Neusner was educated at Harvard University, the Jewish Theological Seminary of America , the University of Oxford, and Columbia University.Neusner is often celebrated...

  • Orhan Pamuk
    Orhan Pamuk
    Ferit Orhan Pamuk , generally known simply as Orhan Pamuk, is a Turkish novelist. He is also the Robert Yik-Fong Tam Professor in the Humanities at Columbia University, where he teaches comparative literature and writing....

  • Zeena Parkins
    Zeena Parkins
    Zeena Parkins is a harpist active in rock music, free improvisation and jazz. Parkins plays standard harps, as well as several custom-made one-of-a kind electric harps; she also plays piano and accordion...

  • Judy Pfaff
    Judy Pfaff
    Judy Pfaff, born 1946 in London, England, is an American artist, known mainly for Installation art. Pfaff has received numerous awards for her work, including a John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Award and fellowships from the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation and the National...

  • Francine Prose
    Francine Prose
    Francine Prose is an American writer. Since March 2007 she has been the president of PEN American Center. She graduated from Radcliffe College in 1968 and received a Guggenheim fellowship in 1991....

  • Kelly Reichardt
    Kelly Reichardt
    Kelly Reichardt is a screenwriter and film director working within American indie cinema. Her debut film River of Grass was released in 1994. It was nominated for three Independent Spirit Awards, as well as the Grand Jury Prize at the Sundance Film Festival. In 1999, she completed her sophomore...

  • Jennifer Ringo
  • Luc Sante
    Luc Sante
    -Early life:Born in Verviers, Belgium, Sante emigrated to the United States in the early 1960s. He attended school in New York City, first at Regis High School in Manhattan and then at Columbia University.-Writing:...

  • Stephen Shore
    Stephen Shore
    Stephen Shore is an American photographer known for his deadpan images of banal scenes and objects in the United States, and for his pioneering use of color in art photography.- Life and work :...

  • Amy Sillman
    Amy Sillman
    Amy Sillman is an American painter living and working in New York.In a 2007 article in Artforum, Linda Norden wrote of Amy Sillman’s “fearless, tenacious pursuit of a painting that might accurately register the discomfort, incoherence, and absurdity that can characterize painterly experience—and...

  • Mona Simpson
  • Richard Teitelbaum
    Richard Teitelbaum
    Richard Teitelbaum is an American composer, keyboardist, and improvisor. Born in New York, he is a former student of Allen Forte, Mel Powell, and Luigi Nono. He is best known for his live electronic music and synthesizer performance. For example, he brought the first moog synthesizer to Europe...

  • William Terry
  • Michael Tibbetts
    Michael Tibbetts
    Michael Tibbetts is a Professor of Biology at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson, New York, 12504.-Degrees and Professional Interests:B.S., Southeastern Massachusetts University; Ph.D., Wesleyan University. Teaching assistant, Peterson Fellowship, Wesleyan University. Adjunct lecturer, postdoctoral...

  • Joan Tower
    Joan Tower
    Joan Tower is a Grammy-winning contemporary American composer, concert pianist and conductor. Lauded by the New Yorker as "one of the most successful woman composers of all time", her bold and energetic compositions have been performed in concert halls around the world...

  • George Tsontakis
    George Tsontakis
    George Tsontakis is an American composer and conductor.Tsontakis studied composition with Hugo Weisgall and Roger Sessions at the Juilliard School from 1974 to 1978, and later with Franco Donatoni at the Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia in Rome...

  • Dawn Upshaw
    Dawn Upshaw
    Dawn Upshaw is an American soprano described as "one of the most consequential performers of our time" by the Los Angeles Times. The recipient of several Grammy Awards and Edison Prize-winning discs, Upshaw is at home both in opera and art song, and in repertoire from Baroque to contemporary...

  • Lawrence Weschler
    Lawrence Weschler
    Lawrence Weschler is an author of works of creative nonfiction.A graduate of Cowell College of the University of California, Santa Cruz , Weschler was for over twenty years a staff writer at The New Yorker, where his work shuttled between political tragedies and cultural comedies...



}}

Former faculty


{{refimprove|section|date=April 2008}}
{{columns-list|4|
  • Chinua Achebe
    Chinua Achebe
    Albert Chinụalụmọgụ Achebe popularly known as Chinua Achebe is a Nigerian novelist, poet, professor, and critic...

     http://news.brown.edu/pressreleases/2009/09/achebe
  • Andre Aciman
    André Aciman
    -External links:***...

  • Artine Artinian
    Artine Artinian
    Artine Artinian was a French literature scholar of Armenian descent, notable for his manuscript collection, who was immortalized as a fictional character by Gore Vidal.-Background:...

  • Alfred Jules Ayer
  • Saul Bellow
    Saul Bellow
    Saul Bellow was a Canadian-born Jewish American writer. For his literary contributions, Bellow was awarded the Pulitzer Prize, the Nobel Prize for Literature, and the National Medal of Arts...

  • Heinrich Blücher
    Heinrich Blücher
    Heinrich Blücher was a German poet and philosopher. He was the second husband of Hannah Arendt.Blücher was born in Berlin. He was a member of the Communist Party of Germany until 1928, but soon rejected Stalinism and left the party in protest of its Stalinist policies...

     (buried in the Bard Cemetery with his wife, Hannah Arendt
    Hannah Arendt
    Hannah Arendt was a German American political theorist. She has often been described as a philosopher, although she refused that label on the grounds that philosophy is concerned with "man in the singular." She described herself instead as a political theorist because her work centers on the fact...

    )
  • Benjamin Boretz
    Benjamin Boretz
    Benjamin Boretz is an American composer and music theorist.-Life and work:Boretz was born in Brooklyn, New York and graduated with a degree in music from Brooklyn College...

  • James Chace
    James Chace
    James Clarke Chace was an eminent historian, writing on American diplomacy and statecraft. His 12 books include the critically acclaimed Acheson: The Secretary of State Who Created the American World , the definitive biography of former Secretary of State Dean Acheson. In a debate during the...

  • Paul de Man
    Paul de Man
    Paul de Man was a Belgian-born deconstructionist literary critic and theorist.He began teaching at Bard College. Later, he completed his Ph.D. at Harvard University in the late 1950s...

  • Jacob Druckman
    Jacob Druckman
    Jacob Druckman was an American composer born in Philadelphia. A graduate of the Juilliard School, Druckman studied with Vincent Persichetti, Peter Mennin, and Bernard Wagenaar. In 1949 and 1950 he studied with Aaron Copland at Tanglewood and later continued his studies at the École Normale de...

  • Ralph Ellison
    Ralph Ellison
    Ralph Waldo Ellison was an American novelist, literary critic, scholar and writer. He was born in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Ellison is best known for his novel Invisible Man, which won the National Book Award in 1953...

  • Harvey Fite
    Harvey Fite
    Harvey Fite was a pioneering American sculptor, painter and earth artist best known for his monumental land sculpture Opus 40. A teacher, innovator and Woodstock artist of many talents, he was primarily a sculptor of wood and stone...

  • Heinz Insu Fenkl
    Heinz Insu Fenkl
    - Academic work :Fenkl is an associate professor of English and Asian Studies at SUNY New Paltz. He previously served as coordinator of the school's Creative Writing Program and was director of the now-defunct ISIS: The Interstitial Studies Institute .Before his appointment to his current position...

  • Ryszard Frelek
  • William Gaddis
    William Gaddis
    William Thomas Gaddis, Jr. was an American novelist. He wrote five novels, two of which won National Book Awards and one of which, The Recognitions , was chosen as one of TIME magazine's 100 best novels from 1923 to 2005...

  • Leah Gilliam
    Leah Gilliam
    Leah Gilliam is an American filmmaker and media artist who deals with issues of race, gender, and sexual orientation in her art. Gilliam is the Director of Projects and Community Catalyst at gamelab's Institute of Play and a visiting faculty member at the Vermont College of Fine Arts.- Early life...

  • Daron Hagen
    Daron Hagen
    Daron Aric Hagen , is an American composer, conductor, pianist, educator, librettist, and stage director of contemporary classical music and opera.- Early life and education :...

  • Bob Holman
    Bob Holman
    Bob Holman is a poet and poetry activist in the United States.- Career :After graduating from Columbia University in 1970, Bob Holman founded, with Sara Miles and Susie Timmons, the NYC Poetry Calendar, a free monthly publication with all the readings and poets "on the same page"...

  • William Humphrey
    William Humphrey (writer)
    William Humphrey was an American novelist who wrote about small-town family life in rural Texas.-Biography:...

  • Mat Johnson
    Mat Johnson
    Mat Johnson is an American writer of literary fiction.-Biography:Born and raised in the Germantown and Mount Airy, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Johnson writes primarily about the lives of African-Americans, using fiction, nonfiction and graphic novels as mediums...

  • Joel Kovel
    Joel Kovel
    Joel Kovel is an American politician, academic, writer, and eco-socialist. A practicing psychiatrist and psychoanalyst until the mid-1980s, he has lectured in psychiatry, anthropology, political science and communication studies. He has published many books on his work in psychiatry,...

  • Harvey J. Levin
    Harvey J. Levin
    Harvey Joshua Levin was an American economist. He was University Research Professor in the Department of Economics at Hofstra University , Augustus B. Weller Professor of Economics at Hofstra , and Founder and Director of its Public Policy Workshop . He was also a Senior Research Associate at the...

  • Roy Lichtenstein
    Roy Lichtenstein
    Roy Lichtenstein was a prominent American pop artist. During the 1960s his paintings were exhibited at the Leo Castelli Gallery in New York City and along with Andy Warhol, Jasper Johns, James Rosenquist and others he became a leading figure in the new art movement...

  • Mary McCarthy
    Mary McCarthy (author)
    Mary Therese McCarthy was an American author, critic and political activist.- Early life :Born in Seattle, Washington, to Roy Winfield McCarthy and his wife, the former Therese Preston, McCarthy was orphaned at the age of six when both her parents died in the great flu epidemic of 1918...

  • Allan McCollum
    Allan McCollum
    Allan McCollum is a contemporary American artist who was born in Los Angeles, California in 1944, and now lives and works in New York City. He has spent over forty years exploring how objects achieve public and personal meaning in a world constituted in mass production, focusing most recently on...

  • Adolfas Mekas
    Adolfas Mekas
    Adolfas Mekas was a Lithuanian-born film director, and brother of Jonas Mekas. He is principally known for his work in the United States....

  • Toni Morrison
    Toni Morrison
    Toni Morrison is a Nobel Prize and Pulitzer Prize-winning American novelist, editor, and professor. Her novels are known for their epic themes, vivid dialogue, and richly detailed characters. Among her best known novels are The Bluest Eye, Song of Solomon and Beloved...

  • Vik Muniz
    Vik Muniz
    Vicente José de Oliveira Muniz, known as Vik Muniz , is a visual artist living in New York City.-Early career:Muniz began his career as a sculptor in the late 1980s after relocating from Brazil to Chicago and later to New York. His early work grew out of a post-Fluxus aesthetic and often involved...

  • Elizabeth Murray
    Elizabeth Murray (artist)
    Elizabeth Murray was an American painter, printmaker and draughtsman. Her works are in many major public collections, including those of the Solomon R...

  • Albert Jay Nock
    Albert Jay Nock
    Albert Jay Nock was an influential United States libertarian author, educational theorist, and social critic of the early and middle 20th century.- Life and work :...

  • Arthur Penn
    Arthur Penn
    Arthur Hiller Penn was an American film director and producer with a career as a theater director as well. Penn amassed a critically acclaimed body of work throughout the 1960s and 1970s.-Early years:...

  • Paul Ramirez Jonas
    Paul Ramirez Jonas
    Paul Ramirez Jonas is a contemporary artist whose work currently explores the potential between artist and audience, artwork and public. Many of Ramirez Jonas' projects use pre-existing texts, models, or materials to reenact or prompt actions and reinsert himself into his own audience...

  • David Rieff
    David Rieff
    David Rieff is an American polemicist and pundit. His books have focused on issues of immigration, international conflict, and humanitarianism...

  • Roswell Rudd
    Roswell Rudd
    Roswell Rudd is a Grammy Award-nominated American jazz trombonist and composer....

  • Mary Lee Settle
    Mary Lee Settle
    Mary Lee Settle was an American writer and winner of the National Book Award for her 1978 novel Blood Tie...

  • Isaac Bashevis Singer
    Isaac Bashevis Singer
    Isaac Bashevis Singer – July 24, 1991) was a Polish Jewish American author noted for his short stories. He was one of the leading figures in the Yiddish literary movement, and received the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1978...

  • Wadada Leo Smith
    Wadada Leo Smith
    Ishmael Wadada Leo Smith is a trumpeter and composer working primarily in the fields of avant-garde jazz and free improvisation.-Biography:...

  • Wilhelm Sollmann
    Wilhelm Sollmann
    Friedrich Wilhelm Sollmann was a German journalist, politician, and interior minister of the Weimar Republic. In 1919 he was a member of the German delegation to the Treaty of Versailles...

  • Joseph Somers
    Joseph Somers
    Joseph Somers is an American artist and painter most famous for his canvases, three-dimensional in both their structure and illusion.His work was featured at International Art Show Las Vegas. The artwork at this show moved and created another dimension of art...

  • William Weaver
    William Weaver
    William Fense Weaver is an English language translator of modern Italian literature.-Biography:William Weaver is perhaps best known for his translations of the work of Umberto Eco and Italo Calvino, and has translated many other Italian authors over the course of a career spanning more than fifty...

  • Ted Weiss
  • Werner Wolff

}}

Notable alumni


{{refimprove|section|date=April 2008}}
{{columns-list|2|
  • Walter Becker
    Walter Becker
    Walter Carl Becker is an American musician, songwriter and record producer. He is best known as the co-founder, guitarist, bassist and a co-writer of Steely Dan.-Career:...

    , musician and co-founder of Steely Dan
    Steely Dan
    Steely Dan is an American rock band; its core members are Donald Fagen and Walter Becker. The band's popularity peaked in the late 1970s, with the release of seven albums blending elements of jazz, rock, funk, R&B, and pop...

  • Sadie Benning
    Sadie Benning
    Sadie Benning is a video maker, visual artist, and musician.She first made her name in the early 1990s as a teenage video maker from Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Raised by her mother in inner-city Milwaukee, Benning left school at age 16, primarily due to the homophobia she experienced...

    , video artist
  • Jedediah Berry
    Jedediah Berry
    Jedediah Berry is an American writer. He is the author of a novel, The Manual of Detection .-Background and education:Berry was born in Randolph, Vermont, and spent his childhood in Catskill, New York. He attended Bard College, and earned a graduate degree from the MFA Program for Poets & Writers...

    , writer
  • Harvey Bialy
    Harvey Bialy
    Harvey Bialy is an American molecular biologist and AIDS denialist. He was one of the signatories to a letter to the editor by a group of AIDS denialists calling themselves the Group for the Scientific Reappraisal of the HIV-AIDS Hypothesis...

    , molecular biologist
  • László Z. Bitó
    Laszlo Z. Bito
    László Z. Bitó is a physiologist and a writer. As a researcher he has developed a medicine for glaucoma. As a writer he writes novels and essays.-Biography:...

    , scientist and novelist
  • John Joseph Bittner
    John Joseph Bittner
    John Joseph Bittner was a geneticist and cancer biologist, who made many contributions on the genetics of breast cancer research, which were of value, not only in cancer research, but also in a variety of other biological investigations.- Biography :Bittner was born in Meadville, Pennsylvania, on...

     (1925), Cancer geneticist.
  • Ran Blake
    Ran Blake
    Ran Blake is an American pianist and composer from Springfield, Massachusetts. In a career that spans five decades, Blake has created a unique niche in improvised music as an artist and educator...

    , pianist
  • Anne Bogart
    Anne Bogart
    -Biography:She earned her Bachelor of Arts degree from Bard College in 1974, followed by a Master of Arts degree from New York University's Tisch School of the Arts in 1977. She served as Artistic Director of the Trinity Repertory Company for its 1989-90 season...

    , theater director
  • Keith Botsford
    Keith Botsford
    Keith Botsford is an American/European writer, Professor Emeritus at Boston University, and current editor of News from the Republic of Letters.-Biography:...

    , author, editor, journalist, translator, composer
  • Nelson Bragg
    Nelson Bragg
    Nelson Bragg is a drummer-percussionist-vocalist from Rockport, Massachusetts.-Early years:Nelson Bragg played in several bands from 1979 to 1999 including positions as a pit drummer for over 20 stage musicals...

    , percussionist/vocalist with Brian Wilson Band
  • Jordan Bridges
    Jordan Bridges
    -Early life:Bridges was born in California, and is the son of actor Beau Bridges and wife Julie Landfield. He is the nephew of Jeff Bridges and grandson of Lloyd Bridges and Dorothy Bridges.-Career:...

    , actor
  • EJ Bonilla, actor
  • Mary Caponegro
    Mary Caponegro
    Mary Caponegro is an American experimental fiction writer whose collections include Tales from the Next Village, The Star Cafe, Five Doubts, The Complexities of Intimacy, and All Fall Down. Her stories appear regularly in Conjunctions and in other periodicals...

    , writer
  • Paul Chan
    Paul Chan
    Paul Chan Mo Po, MH, JP is the member of the Legislative Council of Hong Kong . He is an accountant and the former President of the Hong Kong Institute of Certified Public Accountants . He holds a BBA and a MBA degree from the Chinese University of Hong Kong...

    , artist
  • Ronald Chase
    Ronald Chase
    Ronald Chase is an American artist, photographer, educator, independent film maker and opera designer. His work with projection and film has been called "one of the most exciting developments in the history of opera stage presentation."...

    , artist, director & educator
  • Phyllis Chesler
    Phyllis Chesler
    Phyllis Chesler is an American writer, psychotherapist, and professor emerita of psychology and women's studies at the College of Staten Island...

    , author
  • Bruce Chilton
    Bruce Chilton
    Bruce Chilton is a scholar of early Christianity and Judaism, now Bernard Iddings Bell Professor of Religion at Bard College, and formerly Lillian Claus Professor of New Testament at Yale University. He holds a degree in New Testament from Cambridge University...

    , Biblical scholar
  • Chris Claremont
    Chris Claremont
    Chris Claremont is an award-winning American comic book writer and novelist, known for his 17-year stint on Uncanny X-Men, far longer than any other writer, during which he is credited with developing strong female characters, and with introducing complex literary themes into superhero...

    , writer (X-Men
    X-Men
    The X-Men are a superhero team in the . They were created by writer Stan Lee and artist Jack Kirby, and first appeared in The X-Men #1...

    )
  • David Cote (writer)
    David Cote (writer)
    David Cote is a member of the New York Drama Critics Circle and the theater editor and chief drama critic for Time Out New York. He has also written freelance articles for The New York Times, The New York Sun, Opera News and Maxim...

    , critic and writer
  • Blythe Danner
    Blythe Danner
    Blythe Katherine Danner is an American actress. She is the mother of actress Gwyneth Paltrow and director Jake Paltrow.-Early life:...

    , actress
  • Michael Deibert
    Michael Deibert
    Michael Deibert is an American journalist, author and a Visiting Fellow at the Centre for Peace and Reconciliation Studies at Coventry University....

    , journalist and author
  • Drop the Lime
    Drop the Lime
    Drop the Lime, is an electronic producer and DJ and founder of dance label Trouble & Bass. Drop the Lime's new material and DJ sets also feature live vocals on original compositions....

    , electronic dance musician
  • Rikki Ducornet
    Rikki Ducornet
    Rikki Ducornet is an American postmodernist, writer, poet, and artist.-Biography:...

    , writer
  • Mark Ebner
    Mark Ebner
    Mark Charles Ebner is an American investigative journalist and the host of TruTV's Rich and Reckless. Ebner writes primarily about issues in the Los Angeles area, including pit bull fighting in South Central, Scientology, and celebrity scandal. He has covered celebrity culture for Spy, Rolling...

  • Asher Edelman
    Asher Edelman
    Asher Edelman began his career on Wall Street in 1961. In 1969 he formed Mack, Bushnell and Edelman where he was CEO. Edelman’s Wall Street businesses included Investment Banking, Money Management, and Derivatives Trading...

    , investment banker, served as the basis for the character Gordon Gekko
    Gordon Gekko
    Gordon Gekko is the main antagonist of the 1987 film Wall Street and the antihero of the 2010 film Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps, both by director Oliver Stone...

     in Wall Street due to his 1985 takeover of Datapoint
    Datapoint
    Datapoint Corporation, originally known as Computer Terminal Corporation , was a computer company based in San Antonio, Texas, United States. Founded in 1967 by Phil Ray and Gus Roche, its first products were, as the company's initial name suggests, computer terminals...

    .
  • Donald Fagen
    Donald Fagen
    Donald Jay Fagen is an American musician and songwriter, best known as the co-founder, lead singer, and the principal songwriter of the rock band Steely Dan ....

    , musician and co-founder of Steely Dan
    Steely Dan
    Steely Dan is an American rock band; its core members are Donald Fagen and Walter Becker. The band's popularity peaked in the late 1970s, with the release of seven albums blending elements of jazz, rock, funk, R&B, and pop...

  • Theodore J. Flicker
    Theodore J. Flicker
    Theodore Jonas "Ted" Flicker is an American playwright, theatrical producer, television and film director, actor, screenwriter, author, and sculptor.-Early life:...

    , sculptor/film director
  • Lola Glaudini
    Lola Glaudini
    Lola Glaudini is an American actress best known for her portrayal of Elle Greenaway on the hit CBS series Criminal Minds, and for her role as Agent Deborah Ciccerone on the award winning HBO series The Sopranos....

    , actor (The Sopranos
    The Sopranos
    The Sopranos is an American television drama series created by David Chase that revolves around the New Jersey-based Italian-American mobster Tony Soprano and the difficulties he faces as he tries to balance the often conflicting requirements of his home life and the criminal organization he heads...

    )
  • Joanne Greenbaum
    Joanne Greenbaum
    Joanne Greenbaum is an artist based in New York.Greenbaum received her BA in 1975 from Bard College in New York....

    , painter
  • Ken Grimwood
    Ken Grimwood
    Kenneth Milton Grimwood was an American author who was born in Dothan, Alabama. In his fantasy fiction Grimwood combined themes of life-affirmation and hope with metaphysical concepts, themes found in his best-known novel, the highly popular Replay...

    , author
  • Christopher Guest
    Christopher Guest
    Christopher Haden-Guest, 5th Baron Haden-Guest , better known as Christopher Guest, is an American screenwriter, composer, musician, director, actor and comedian. He is most widely known in Hollywood for having written, directed and starred in several improvisational "mockumentary" films that...

    , actor/director (This is Spinal Tap
    This Is Spinal Tap
    This Is Spinal Tap is an American 1984 rock musical mockumentary directed by Rob Reiner about the fictional heavy metal band Spinal Tap...

    , Waiting for Guffman
    Waiting for Guffman
    Waiting for Guffman is a mockumentary starring, co-written and directed by Christopher Guest that was released in 1997. Its cast included Catherine O'Hara, Eugene Levy, Fred Willard, Parker Posey and others who would appear in several of the subsequent mockumentaries directed by Guest.The title of...

    , Best in Show
    Best in Show (film)
    Best in Show is a 2000 independent film that follows five entrants in a prestigious dog show. The film focuses on the slightly surreal interactions among the various owners and handlers as they travel to the show and compete. Much of the dialogue was improvised.Christopher Guest directed; he also...

    )
  • Larry Hagman
    Larry Hagman
    Larry Martin Hagman is an American film and television actor, producer and director known for playing J.R. Ewing in the 1980s primetime television soap opera Dallas and Major Anthony "Tony" Nelson in the 1960s sitcom I Dream of Jeannie.-Early life and career:Hagman was born in Fort Worth, Texas...

    , actor
  • Robert Harrison, photographer
  • Todd Haynes
    Todd Haynes
    Todd Haynes is an American independent film director and screenwriter. He is best known for his feature films Superstar: The Karen Carpenter Story, Poison, Velvet Goldmine, Safe, and the Academy Award-nominated Far from Heaven and I'm Not There.- Style and themes :The writes that "Haynes is...

    , filmmaker
  • Anthony Hecht
    Anthony Hecht
    Anthony Evan Hecht was an American poet. His work combined a deep interest in form with a passionate desire to confront the horrors of 20th century history, with the Second World War, in which he fought, and the Holocaust being recurrent themes in his work.-Early years:Hecht was born in New York...

    , poet
  • Peter Hobbs
    Peter Hobbs (actor)
    Peter Hobbs was a French-born American character actor, known for roles on Broadway, television and film.Hobbs was born on January 19, 1918, in Étretat, France, to Dr. Austin L. Hobbs and Mabel Foote Hobbs. However, he was raised in New York City...

    , actor
  • Gaby Hoffmann
    Gaby Hoffmann
    Gabriella Mary "Gaby" Hoffmann is an American actress.-Birth:Hoffmann was born in New York City. Her mother, Viva , is an actress and writer and appeared in many of Andy Warhol's movies during the 1960s...

    , actor
  • Wayne L. Horvitz
    Wayne L. Horvitz
    See Wayne Horvitz for the musician.Wayne Louis Horvitz was an American labor negotiator, who served as director of the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service, where he played a major role in resolving and preventing major strikes in business and industries nationwide.-Early life and...

    , labor mediator.
  • David Horvitz
    David Horvitz
    David Horvitz is a Brooklyn-based watercolor painter, photographer and performance artist, known for his often bizarre and absurdist DIY instructional projects, including work on Wikipedia. He was born in Los Angeles, California in 1980, and educated at Milton Avery Graduate School of the Arts...

    , artist
  • Howard Koch
    Howard Koch (screenwriter)
    Howard E. Koch was an American playwright and screenwriter who was blacklisted by the Hollywood movie studio bosses in the 1950s.-Early Years:...

    , screenwriter (Casablanca
    Casablanca
    Casablanca is a city in western Morocco, located on the Atlantic Ocean. It is the capital of the Grand Casablanca region.Casablanca is Morocco's largest city as well as its chief port. It is also the biggest city in the Maghreb. The 2004 census recorded a population of 2,949,805 in the prefecture...

    , Letter from an Unknown Woman
    Letter from an Unknown Woman (1948 film)
    Letter from an Unknown Woman is a film directed by Max Ophüls. It was based on the novella of the same name, which was written by Stefan Zweig...

    )
  • Pierre Joris
    Pierre Joris
    Pierre Joris, born in Strasbourg, France in 1946 and raised in Ettelbruck, Luxembourg, is a poet and translator. He left Luxembourg at nineteen and since then has lived in the US, Great Britain, North Africa and France...

    , poet and translator
  • Jeanne Lee
    Jeanne Lee
    Jeanne Lee was an American jazz singer, poet and composer. Best known for a wide range of vocal styles she mastered, Lee collaborated with numerous distinguished composers and performers which included Gunter Hampel, Ran Blake, Carla Bley, Anthony Braxton, Marion Brown, and many...

    , jazz singer, poet and composer.
  • Jack Lewis
    Jack Lewis (musician)
    Jack Lewis is an American musician, beat poet and artist. He was born and raised on the Lower East Side of Manhattan. He is the younger brother of Jeffrey Lewis, whom he often performs and records with...

    , musician (known as "Lesser Lewis")
  • Jamie Livingston
    Jamie Livingston
    Jamie Livingston was a New York-based photographer, film-maker and circus performer. Between March 31, 1979 and October 25, 1997, the day of his death, he took a single picture nearly every day with a Polaroid SX-70 camera....

    , photographer/cinematographer
  • Rhoda Levine
    Rhoda Levine
    Rhoda Levine is an opera-director, choreographer and a faculty-member at several schools of music.Levine was born in New York, NY. She wrote the libretto for Opus Zoo by Luciano Berio and has also written children's books. She is the artistic director of Play It By Ear, an improvisational opera...

    ,choreographer, theatre and opera director (NYC Opera)"Play it By Ear", children's book writer
  • Malerie Marder
    Malerie Marder
    -Life and career:Malerie Marder is an American photographer and artist who lives and works in Los Angeles, California. Her work centers on vivid color and black-and-white nude photographs, and has gained attention in the first decade of the new century because of its disquieting personal, sexual,...

    , photographer
  • Dominick Mazetti, Greek and Roman Classicism
  • Susan Mernit
    Susan Mernit
    Susan Mernit is the CEO of Peoples Software Company, a Web 2.0 social media startup devoted to making it easier for people to connect with each other...

    , Netscape
    Netscape
    Netscape Communications is a US computer services company, best known for Netscape Navigator, its web browser. When it was an independent company, its headquarters were in Mountain View, California...

     and America Online executive
  • Hal Niedzviecki
    Hal Niedzviecki
    Hal Niedzviecki is a Canadian novelist and cultural critic.Born into a Jewish family, he was raised in Ottawa, Ontario and Potomac, Maryland, did his undergraduate studies at the University of Toronto and his graduate studies at Bard College...

    , novelist
  • Albert Jay Nock
    Albert Jay Nock
    Albert Jay Nock was an influential United States libertarian author, educational theorist, and social critic of the early and middle 20th century.- Life and work :...

    , author and theorist
  • Olde English, sketch comedy group
  • Alexis Papahelas
    Alexis Papahelas
    Alexis Papahelas is a Greek investigative journalist and the current editor in chief of Kathimerini newspaper. He is the creator and principal presenter of the weekly news program in Skai TV called "Oi Neoi Fakeloi" , which is a continuation of his show in Mega Channel called "Oi Fakeloi "...

    , journalist
  • Ellen Parker
    Ellen Parker (actress)
    Ellen Parker is an American actress.-Stage work:Parker is a well regarded New York stage actress; among her credits was the original production of the Wendy Wasserstein play The Heidi Chronicles, as well as Equus, David Hare's Plenty, and the play "Strangers". She also had a role in the film...

    , actress, the Guiding Light.
  • Zeena Parkins
    Zeena Parkins
    Zeena Parkins is a harpist active in rock music, free improvisation and jazz. Parkins plays standard harps, as well as several custom-made one-of-a kind electric harps; she also plays piano and accordion...

    , avant-garde harpist
  • Daniel Pinkwater
    Daniel Pinkwater
    Daniel Manus Pinkwater is an author of mostly children's books and is an occasional commentator on National Public Radio. He attended Bard College. Well-known books include Lizard Music, The Snarkout Boys and the Avocado of Death, Fat Men from Space, Borgel, and the picture book The Big Orange...

    , novelist and NPR
    NPR
    NPR, formerly National Public Radio, is a privately and publicly funded non-profit membership media organization that serves as a national syndicator to a network of 900 public radio stations in the United States. NPR was created in 1970, following congressional passage of the Public Broadcasting...

     commentator
  • Rosalie Purvis
    Rosalie Purvis
    Rosalie Purvis is a Dutch-American theatre director and choreographer. She earned her Bachelor of Arts degree from Bard College, followed by a Master of Arts degree from Brooklyn College. During the late 1990s, she gained a considerable following in the Netherlands...

    , theater director
  • Herb Ritts
    Herb Ritts
    Herbert "Herb" Ritts was an American fashion photographer who concentrated on black-and-white photography and portraits, often in the style of classical Greek sculpture.-Early life and career:...

    , photographer
  • Gary Robinson
    Gary Robinson
    Gary Robinson is an American software engineer notable for his mathematical algorithms to fight spam.-Fighting spam with algorithms:In 2003, Robinson published an article in Linux Journal which discussed mathematical approaches for fighting spam which led to work along with Tim Peters on the...

    , software engineer
    Software engineer
    A software engineer is an engineer who applies the principles of software engineering to the design, development, testing, and evaluation of the software and systems that make computers or anything containing software, such as computer chips, work.- Overview :...

    , graduated 1979, developed anti-spam algorithms

Miles Kreuger, author, film and musical theatre scholar
  • Thomas Rockwell
    Thomas Rockwell
    Thomas Rhodes Rockwell is the author of a number of books for young readers. He was the recipient of the Mark Twain Award, the California Young Reader Medal, and the Sequoyah Book Award for How to Eat Fried Worms, which was made into a TV movie in 1985 and was filmed as a theatrical release in 2006...

     author, "How to Eat Fried Worms", Shakespeare Scholar
  • Robert Rose, physician
  • Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Jonathan Rosenbaum
    Jonathan Rosenbaum is an American film critic. Rosenbaum was the head film critic for the Chicago Reader from 1987 until 2008, when he retired at the age of 65...

    , film critic
  • Richard Rovere
    Richard Rovere
    Richard Halworth Rovere was an American journalist.-Biography:He was born in Jersey City, New Jersey. He graduated from The Stony Brook School in 1933 and graduated from Bard College, then a branch of Columbia University. During the Great Depression, he joined the Communist movement and wrote for...

    , journalist, author
  • Eric Schaeffer
    Eric Schaeffer
    Eric Schaeffer is an American actor, writer and director.-Early life and education:He was born in New York City, New York....

    , writer, director, actor
  • Carolee Schneeman, artist
  • Elliott Sharp
    Elliott Sharp
    Elliott Sharp is an American multi-instrumentalist, composer, and performer.A central figure in the avant-garde and experimental music scene in New York City since the late 1970s, Sharp has released over eighty-five recordings ranging from blues, jazz, and orchestral music to noise, no wave rock,...

    , musician
  • Rachel Sherman, author
  • Richard M. Sherman
    Richard M. Sherman
    Richard Morton Sherman is an American songwriter who specializes in musical film with his brother Robert Bernard Sherman....

    , songwriter and screenwriter
  • Robert B. Sherman
    Robert B. Sherman
    Robert Bernard Sherman is an American songwriter who specializes in musical films with his brother Richard Morton Sherman...

    , songwriter and screenwriter
  • Amy Sillman
    Amy Sillman
    Amy Sillman is an American painter living and working in New York.In a 2007 article in Artforum, Linda Norden wrote of Amy Sillman’s “fearless, tenacious pursuit of a painting that might accurately register the discomfort, incoherence, and absurdity that can characterize painterly experience—and...

    , painter
  • Juliana Spahr
    Juliana Spahr
    Juliana Spahr is an American poet, critic, and editor. She is the recipient of the 2009 Hardison Poetry Prize awarded by the Folger Shakespeare Library to honor a U.S...

    , poet and critic
  • Peter Schmidt, playwright
  • Matt Taibbi
    Matt Taibbi
    Matthew C. "Matt" Taibbi is an American author and journalist reporting on politics, media, finance, and sports for Rolling Stone and Men's Journal, often in a polemical style. He has also edited and written for The eXile, the New York Press, and The Beast.- Early years :Taibbi grew up in the...

    , journalist (The Nation, The eXile
    The eXile
    The eXile was a Moscow-based English-language biweekly free tabloid newspaper, aimed at the city's expatriate community, which combined outrageous, sometimes satirical, content with investigative reporting...

    , The NY Press
    New York Press
    New York Press was a free alternative weekly in New York City, that was published from 1988 to 2011. During its lifetime, it was the main competitor to the Village Voice...

    , Rolling Stone
    Rolling Stone
    Rolling Stone is a US-based magazine devoted to music, liberal politics, and popular culture that is published every two weeks. Rolling Stone was founded in San Francisco in 1967 by Jann Wenner and music critic Ralph J...

    )
  • Michael Tolkin
    Michael Tolkin
    Michael L. Tolkin is an American filmmaker and novelist. He has written numerous screenplays, including The Player , which he adapted from his 1988 book by the same name, and for which he received the 1993 Edgar Award for Best Motion Picture Screenplay...

    , filmmaker, novelist
  • Arthur Tress
    Arthur Tress
    Arthur Tress is a notable American photographer born on November 24, 1940 in Brooklyn, New York. He is well known for his staged surrealism and exposition of the human body.- Education :* Abraham Lincoln High School, Coney Island, New York* B.F.A...

    , photographer
  • Alexandra Wentworth
    Alexandra Wentworth
    Alexandra Wentworth is an American comedienne, actress and author who starred in Head Case on Starz.-Early life:...

    , actor/comedian
  • John Yau
    John Yau
    John Yau is an American poet and critic who lives in New York City. He received his B.A. from Bard College in 1972 and his M.F.A. from Brooklyn College in 1978...

    , poet, publisher
  • Sherman Yellen
    Sherman Yellen
    Sherman Yellen is a playwright and screenwriter.- Biography :Sherman Yellen was born in 1932 to Nathan and Lillian Yellen. He attended the High School of Music & Art in Harlem and graduated from Bard College on the Hudson in 1953 where he met his future wife, Joan Fuhr...

    , screenwriter/playwright/lyricist; political essayist on Huffington Post and The Environmentalist
  • Nick Zinner
    Nick Zinner
    Nicholas Joseph Zinner is the guitarist for the New York rock band Yeah Yeah Yeahs. He is known for his "unmistakable" wild hair, skinny physique, and pale appearance...

    , musician (Yeah Yeah Yeahs
    Yeah Yeah Yeahs
    Yeah Yeah Yeahs are an American indie rock band formed in New York City in 2000. The group is composed of vocalist and pianist Karen O, guitarist and keyboardist Nick Zinner, and drummer Brian Chase. They are complemented in live performances by second guitarist David Pajo, who joined as a touring...

    , Head Wound City
    Head Wound City
    Head Wound City is an American noisegrind supergroup consisting of Jordan Blilie and Cody Votolato of The Blood Brothers, Nick Zinner from Yeah Yeah Yeahs, and Justin Pearson and Gabe Serbian, both from The Locust and Holy Molar...

    )
  • Frances Bean Cobain
    Frances Bean Cobain
    Frances Bean Cobain is the daughter of Nirvana frontman Kurt Cobain and Hole singer Courtney Love.-Childhood and youth:...

    , artist (daughter of Kurt Cobain)

Notable dropouts/transferees


{{refimprove|section|date=April 2008}}
  • Salvador Carrasco
    Salvador Carrasco
    -Short biography:Director/writer Salvador Carrasco was born in Mexico City and now resides in Santa Monica, California. He graduated in 1991 with a degree in Film and Television from New York University's Tisch School of the Arts, receiving the Founders Day Honors Award...

    , film director/writer (The Other Conquest); transferred to NYU
  • Chevy Chase
    Chevy Chase
    Cornelius Crane "Chevy" Chase is an American comedian, writer, and television and film actor, born into a prominent entertainment industry family. Chase worked a plethora of odd jobs before moving into comedy acting with National Lampoon...

    , actor
  • David Frankel
    David Frankel
    David Frankel is an American director, screenwriter and executive producer. He is the son of Max Frankel, a former executive editor of The New York Times...

    , film director (The Devil Wears Prada
    The Devil Wears Prada (film)
    The Devil Wears Prada is a 2006 comedy-drama film, a loose screen adaptation of Lauren Weisberger's 2003 novel of the same name. It stars Anne Hathaway as Andrea Sachs, a recent college graduate who goes to New York City and gets a job as a co-assistant to powerful and demanding fashion magazine...

    , Marley & Me
    Marley & Me (film)
    Marley & Me is a 2008 American comedy-drama film directed by David Frankel. The screenplay by Scott Frank and Don Roos is based on the memoir of the same name by John Grogan...

    )
  • Adrian Grenier
    Adrian Grenier
    Adrian Grenier is an American actor, musician and director. He is best known for his lead role on the HBO original series, Entourage, as Vincent Chase.-Early life:...

    , actor (Entourage
    Entourage (TV series)
    Entourage is an American comedy-drama television series that premiered on HBO on July 18, 2004 and concluded on September 11, 2011, after eight seasons...

    )
  • Robie Macauley
    Robie Macauley
    Robie Mayhew Macauley was an editor, novelist and critic whose literary career spanned over 50 years.-Early life:...

    , novelist and editor of Playboy
    Playboy
    Playboy is an American men's magazine that features photographs of nude women as well as journalism and fiction. It was founded in Chicago in 1953 by Hugh Hefner and his associates, and funded in part by a $1,000 loan from Hefner's mother. The magazine has grown into Playboy Enterprises, Inc., with...

  • Thom Mount
    Thom Mount
    Thom Mount is the former President of Universal Pictures and one of America's well-known independent producers.In the course of his thirty-five year career in the film industry, producer and studio head Thom Mount has made an indelible mark on the American film industry. He studied film at the...

    , former president of Universal Pictures
    Universal Pictures
    -1920:* White Youth* The Flaming Disc* Am I Dreaming?* The Dragon's Net* The Adorable Savage* Putting It Over* The Line Runners-1921:* The Fire Eater* A Battle of Wits* Dream Girl* The Millionaire...

  • Trey Phillips, original member of MTV's Laguna Beach cast
  • Lynn Samuels
    Lynn Samuels
    Lynn Margaret Samuels is an American radio personality based in New York City who currently hosts a weekend talk show on Sirius XM Stars channel 107.-External links:****...

    , radio personality (Sirius Radio)
  • Peter Sarsgaard
    Peter Sarsgaard
    John Peter Sarsgaard is an American film and stage actor. He landed his first feature role in the movie Dead Man Walking in 1995. He then appeared in the 1998 independent films Another Day in Paradise and Desert Blue. That same year, Sarsgaard received a substantial role in The Man in the Iron...

    , actor (Garden State
    Garden State (film)
    Garden State is a 2004 comedy-drama film written by, directed by, and starring Zach Braff, with Natalie Portman, Peter Sarsgaard, and Sir Ian Holm. The film centers on Andrew Largeman , a 26-year-old actor/waiter who returns to his hometown in New Jersey after his mother dies...

    , Kinsey
    Kinsey (film)
    Kinsey is a 2004 biographical film written and directed by Bill Condon. It describes the life of Alfred Kinsey , a pioneer in the area of sexology. His 1948 publication, Sexual Behavior in the Human Male was one of the first recorded works that tried to scientifically address and investigate...

    , Jarhead
    Jarhead (film)
    Jarhead is a 2005 biographical drama war film based on U.S. Marine Anthony Swofford's 1991 Gulf War memoir of the same name, directed by Sam Mendes, starring Jake Gyllenhaal as Swofford with co-stars Jamie Foxx, Peter Sarsgaard, and Chris Cooper. The title comes from the slang term used to refer to...

    )
  • Billy Steinberg
    Billy Steinberg
    William Endfield "Billy" Steinberg is an American songwriter. He has achieved most of his success as part of a song writing team, most notably with Tom Kelly. He has also co-written several hit songs with Rick Nowels.-Biography:...

    , American songwriter
  • Larry Wachowski, filmmaker (The Matrix
    The Matrix
    The Matrix is a 1999 science fiction-action film written and directed by Larry and Andy Wachowski, starring Keanu Reeves, Laurence Fishburne, Carrie-Anne Moss, Joe Pantoliano, and Hugo Weaving...

    )
  • Adam Yauch
    Adam Yauch
    Adam Nathaniel Yauch , , is a founding member of hip hop trio the Beastie Boys. He is frequently known by his stage name, MCA, and other pseudonyms such as Nathanial Hörnblowér.-Early life:...

    , musician (Beastie Boys
    Beastie Boys
    Beastie Boys are an American hip hop trio from New York City. The group consists of Mike D who plays the drums, MCA who plays the bass, and Ad-Rock who plays the guitar....

    )
  • Frances Bean Cobain
    Frances Bean Cobain
    Frances Bean Cobain is the daughter of Nirvana frontman Kurt Cobain and Hole singer Courtney Love.-Childhood and youth:...

    , model/actress

In media and popular culture

  • In the X-Men
    X-Men
    The X-Men are a superhero team in the . They were created by writer Stan Lee and artist Jack Kirby, and first appeared in The X-Men #1...

     comics, Jean Grey
    Jean Grey
    Jean Grey-Summers is a fictional comic book superheroine appearing in comic books published by Marvel Comics. She has been known under the aliases Marvel Girl, Phoenix, and Dark Phoenix and is best known as one of five original members of the X-Men, for her relationship with Cyclops, and for her...

    's father John is mentioned as being a professor of history at Bard. The hamlet of Annandale-On-Hudson is known as Jean Grey's hometown and where her parents have resided for the entire duration of the series. According to the comics, Professor X
    Professor X
    Professor Charles Francis Xavier, also known as Professor X, is a fictional character, a Marvel Comics superhero known as the leader and founder of the X-Men....

    avier is also an alum of Bard, where Professor Grey taught him history. Jean Grey's gravesite was at the chapel, following her supposed death after the Dark Phoenix saga. The character of Senator Robert Kelly is reportedly named after the famed Bard poetry professor.
  • Mary McCarthy
    Mary McCarthy (author)
    Mary Therese McCarthy was an American author, critic and political activist.- Early life :Born in Seattle, Washington, to Roy Winfield McCarthy and his wife, the former Therese Preston, McCarthy was orphaned at the age of six when both her parents died in the great flu epidemic of 1918...

    's novel, The Groves of Academe
    The Groves of Academe
    The Groves of Academe is the title of a novel by American writer Mary McCarthy. Considered to be one of the first academic novels, it concerns the sequence of events that take place after Henry Mulcahy, a literary instructor at the fictive Jocelyn College, learns that his teaching appointment will...

    , is ostensibly set in Bard during the late forties, when she taught there.
  • Charles Rosen's book Players and Pretenders: The Basketball Team that Couldn't Shoot Straight chronicles the author's experience coaching basketball at Bard College in 1979-80.
  • The online satirical newspaper The Onion
    The Onion
    The Onion is an American news satire organization. It is an entertainment newspaper and a website featuring satirical articles reporting on international, national, and local news, in addition to a non-satirical entertainment section known as The A.V. Club...

     parodied Bard in their article "Bard College Named Nation's No. 1 Dinner Party School".
  • In July 2011, The Huffington Post
    The Huffington Post
    The Huffington Post is an American news website and content-aggregating blog founded by Arianna Huffington, Kenneth Lerer, and Jonah Peretti, featuring liberal minded columnists and various news sources. The site offers coverage of politics, theology, media, business, entertainment, living, style,...

     listed Bard College 4th in its list of "The MOST RADICAL Colleges" in America.
  • The American jazz-rock group Steely Dan
    Steely Dan
    Steely Dan is an American rock band; its core members are Donald Fagen and Walter Becker. The band's popularity peaked in the late 1970s, with the release of seven albums blending elements of jazz, rock, funk, R&B, and pop...

     formed at Bard in the era when Chevy Chase
    Chevy Chase
    Cornelius Crane "Chevy" Chase is an American comedian, writer, and television and film actor, born into a prominent entertainment industry family. Chase worked a plethora of odd jobs before moving into comedy acting with National Lampoon...

     and Blythe Danner
    Blythe Danner
    Blythe Katherine Danner is an American actress. She is the mother of actress Gwyneth Paltrow and director Jake Paltrow.-Early life:...

     attended, and make reference to being so angry about the college refusing to bail one of their girlfriends out after a raid by local police that they reference it in the song "My Old School
    My Old School
    My Old School is the 6th song on Steely Dan's 1973 album Countdown to Ecstasy.In its March 24, 2006 edition, Entertainment Weekly details a return trip to Bard College in Annandale-on-Hudson, New York by Donald Fagen, in which he describes a raid by sheriff's deputies in May 1969...

    " from their 1973 album Countdown to Ecstasy
    Countdown to Ecstasy
    Countdown to Ecstasy is the second album by rock group Steely Dan, released in July 1973. The album was written and recorded in rushed sessions between live concerts and produced two Billboard Hot 100 hits, "Show Biz Kids" and "My Old School".-History:...

    . "My Old School" is considered an homage to their collegiate life at Bard College.

External links


{{Commons category|Bard College}}

{{Skyline Conference}}
{{Annapolis Group}}