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Andrews University

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Andrews University is a Seventh-day Adventist university in Berrien Springs
Berrien Springs, Michigan
Berrien Springs is a village in Berrien County in the U.S. state of Michigan. The population was 1,862 at the 2000 census. The village is located within Oronoko Charter Township. Berrien Springs is best known for its Seventh-day Adventist community and Andrews University...

, Michigan
Michigan
Michigan is a U.S. state located in the Great Lakes Region of the United States of America. The name Michigan is the French form of the Ojibwa word mishigamaa, meaning "large water" or "large lake"....

, United States. Founded in 1874 as Battle Creek College in Battle Creek
Battle Creek, Michigan
Battle Creek is a city in the U.S. state of Michigan, in northwest Calhoun County, at the confluence of the Kalamazoo and Battle Creek Rivers. It is the principal city of the Battle Creek, Michigan Metropolitan Statistical Area , which encompasses all of Calhoun county...

, Michigan
Michigan
Michigan is a U.S. state located in the Great Lakes Region of the United States of America. The name Michigan is the French form of the Ojibwa word mishigamaa, meaning "large water" or "large lake"....

, it was the first higher education facility started by Seventh-day Adventists, and is the flagship university of the Seventh-day Adventist school system
Seventh-day Adventist education
The Seventh-day Adventist educational system is the second-largest Christian school system in the world, after the Roman Catholic system ....

.

1874-1901 Battle Creek College


(This Seventh-day Adventist 'Battle Creek College' should not be confused with Dr. Kellogg's 'Battle Creek College' founded in 1923 and operated until 1938.)

Andrews University was founded as a small Seventh-day Adventist school called Battle Creek College in 1874.

1901-1959 Emmanuel Missionary College


In 1901, the school moved from Battle Creek
Battle Creek, Michigan
Battle Creek is a city in the U.S. state of Michigan, in northwest Calhoun County, at the confluence of the Kalamazoo and Battle Creek Rivers. It is the principal city of the Battle Creek, Michigan Metropolitan Statistical Area , which encompasses all of Calhoun county...

, Michigan
Michigan
Michigan is a U.S. state located in the Great Lakes Region of the United States of America. The name Michigan is the French form of the Ojibwa word mishigamaa, meaning "large water" or "large lake"....

 to its current location in Berrien Springs
Berrien Springs, Michigan
Berrien Springs is a village in Berrien County in the U.S. state of Michigan. The population was 1,862 at the 2000 census. The village is located within Oronoko Charter Township. Berrien Springs is best known for its Seventh-day Adventist community and Andrews University...

. It is said that everything the school had was packed up in 16 boxcars and sent on its way. The school was renamed "Emmanuel Missionary College", or EMC for short.
In the summer of 1901, Percy T. Magan, the director of the General Conference Education Department, reported on the choice of the name:
    "The board of trustees has decided to christen the new institution 'Emmanuel Missionary College' by which name it will henceforth be known. This is the first school among us having a distinctive Biblical name, and it is the earnest prayer and wish of all concerned that the thought and the spirit of this blessed title may be the life experience of the school."


The school continued to grow slowly through the early 20th century. In the 1940s, Nethery Hall, the current location of the College of Arts and Sciences, was built as the administration building. Its construction marked the culmination of an aggressive building program. In 1942, L. N. Holm, then Business Manager for EMC, wrote:

    "In 1937 it became apparent that a building program must be launched in earnest. There were certain things that must be done without delay. The library was small and inadequate, the power plant was rapidly going to pieces, the vocational program was poorly housed, classrooms were far too few and too small for efficient handling of the class program, and the Normal Training School would certainly need attention before long. Under the able leadership of Elder J. J. Nethery as Chairman of the Board, the work has gone steadily forward and the fall of 1941 found the library, power plant, and vocational buildings finished, and work in progress on the new administration and classroom building. The opening of the war has created many problems, but every effort is being put forth to get the building finished so that it can be used to relieve the very congested housing situation. At this writing, the basement of the new building is finished and the brick walls are laid up about five feet..."

1959-1974 Andrews University


In 1959 the graduate program and theological seminary of Potomac University were relocated from Washington, D.C.
Washington, D.C.
Washington, D.C., formally the District of Columbia and commonly referred to as Washington, "the District", or simply D.C., is the capital of the United States. On July 16, 1790, the United States Congress approved the creation of a permanent national capital as permitted by the U.S. Constitution....

 and joined with the school in Berrien Springs.

SDA Theological Seminary


In the 1930s Seventh-day Adventist leaders established a Theological Seminary. At first it was a part of Pacific Union College. Later it was moved to Washington, D.C. and located near the denominational headquarters. For 16 years the seminary had trained Seventh-day Adventist ministers to serve throughout the world.

Potomac University




In 1956, denominational leaders decided to organize a university in order to further train both teachers and ministers. It was felt that it would be much better to train elementary and secondary teachers in an Adventist school than to send them to an unaffiliated university which did not promote a denominational perspective.."



Church leaders recognized the need for continual upgrading in the level of education. They noted that the graduates of Adventist colleges were going on to take graduate studies in other universities. Thus denomination leaders realized the renewed need to emphasize the Seventh-day Adventist philosophy of Christian education especially in graduate study. ."

At the 1956 Autumn Council of the church, it was recommended,

    "1. That the denomination at this time move forward with plans to offer graduate training on a wider scale than heretofore within the denominational school framework.

    "2. That the first step in this plan be the organizing of a university type General Conference educational institution, involving the following:



      "a. An organic union of the Seventh-day Adventist Theological Seminary and a new graduate school to be established, plus an affiliation with Washington Missionary College as the undergraduate institution (it being understood that Washington Missionary College would continue to operate as at present with its own Board of Trustees, officers, and constituency),

      "b. The Seminary to retain, within the framework of the larger institution, its unique identity as the single ministerial training school above the college level, of the entire world field, but that its Board of Trustees be that of the new institution.

      "c. The university to have one board of trustees, with representation from the General Conference, union conferences, educational institutions, and lay members.



      "d. The General Conference Committee to be charged with the practical working out of this plan, presenting the matter to the respective boards of the Seminary and Washington Missionary College, and proceeding with the legal incorporation of the institution and providing necessary officers and a name.


      "e. The university administration to consist of a president, a business manager, a dean of the graduate school, registrar, plus the president and dean of the Seminary. (The president of the Seminary and the president of the university may be the same person. )



      "f. The establishing of an affiliation committee to coordinate the work of Washington Missionary College with the university, to regulate such details as charges for faculty members time, apportionment of tuitions, use of facilities, etc. This committee to consist of the chairman of the Board of trustees of the university, the chairman of the Board of Trustees of Washington Missionary College, the administrative officers of the university and the administrative officers of Washington Missionary College.



      "g. Initially the graduate program to be authorized for majors in religion and education (in addition to the majors now being offered) with supporting fields and future majors to be authorized by the General Conference Committee.



      "h. Financial responsibility for the graduate programs to be carried as determined and outlined by the General Conference. Financial responsibility for the graduate programs to be carried as
      determined and outlined by the General Conference. Financial responsibility for the undergraduate program and all things pertaining thereunto to remain, as hitherto, the responsibility of Washington Missionary College and the Columbian-Union Conference."




In 1956 a charter was granted. The new school was named Potomac University. Earlier, Ellen White, cofounder of the Adventist Church, had advised that Adventist schools locate in rural settings. Church leaders looked for a suitable rural location where the new university could be near to, and in affiliation with, Washington Missionary College, now Washington Adventist University. Over a period of two years effort was put forth to find such a location. Finally the idea was abandoned. Too much expense was involved in making such a move.

At the 1958 Autumn Council, held in Washington, the board of Emmanuel Missionary College invited the General Conference to locate Potomac University on its campus. After careful deliberation, the council voted unanimously to accept the offer and move the institution to the EMC campus.

Arrangements similar to those envisioned for Washington Missionary College were made with EMC. Emmanuel Missionary College did not lose its identity. It remained the college for the youth of the Lake Union Conference, but was affiliated with the new Seventh-day Adventist university.

In 1959, H. L. Rudy, a vice-president for the SDA General Conference, described the relationship of the new graduate university with Emmanuel Missionary College:

    "Potomac University (a new name is under study) has been founded to meet the graduate needs of
    students, teachers, ministers, and^ other workers of the church. As a "university-type General Conference institution" it draws students from the entire world field. The undergraduate school—Emmanuel Missionary College—will continue to recruit its students from its own territory, but the Seminary and the School of Graduate Studies may recruit students from the entire world field."


Renamed Andrews University


Because of the addition of the graduate programs and the seminary in 1960, the school was renamed "Andrews University" in honor of John Nevins Andrews
John Nevins Andrews
John Nevins Andrews , was a Seventh-day Adventist minister, missionary, writer, editor, and scholar...

, an Adventist scholar and the first officially sponsored overseas missionary for the Seventh-day Adventist Church. Over the past three years, church leaders had discussed an appropriate new name for this graduate university.


On April 18, 1957, the Minutes of the General Conference Committee report:

    "A recommendation was presented from the SDA Theological Seminary Board of Trustees, to whom the naming of the graduate school of studies had been referred, that it be named Andrews University. A general discussion followed on the point of the wisdom of our using a well-known denominational personal name, or our denominational name, in naming the university. It was unanimously

    VOTED, That the name of the graduate school be Adventist University.


Three years later, the April 5, 1960, Minutes of the General Conference Committee's Spring Meeting record:

    "NAME — EASTERN UNIVERSITY: R. R. Figuhr, Chairman of the Potomac University Board of Trustees, presented the recommendation of the Board that the University be renamed a more fitting name for the eastern university since it has been transferred to Berrien Springs, Michigan, the name chosen being Andrews University. This name was chosen because it honors our first missionary, a scholarly, dedicated man, J. N, Andrews, and is a name that has a very strong Adventist appeal.

    VOTED, To approve the name Andrews University, for the eastern denominational university, formerly known as Potomac University; and to authorize a meeting of the Constituency as may be necessary to adopt this name legally."

Six months later, for the October 26 meeting of the Autumn Council the record states:

    "WEST COAST UNIVERSITY: VOTED, That the West Coast University be named Loma Linda University."


These minutes reveal a growing awareness among church leaders that the Seventh-day Adventist Church had two, rather than just one, developing universities; one in the East and one on the West Coast.

Today the seminary is known as the Seventh-day Adventist Theological Seminary
Seventh-day Adventist Theological Seminary
The Seventh-day Adventist Theological Seminary is the seminary located at Andrews University in Michigan, the Seventh-day Adventist Church's flagship university...

.

1974-Present


In 1974, the undergraduate school was reorganized into the College of Arts and Sciences and the College of Technology. The School of Business was established in 1980, and the School of Education in 1983. In 2007 the architecture
Architecture
Architecture is both the process and product of planning, designing and construction. Architectural works, in the material form of buildings, are often perceived as cultural and political symbols and as works of art...

 department was organized into the School of Architecture, and has since established itself as one of the leading architecture schools of the new urbanism
New urbanism
New Urbanism is an urban design movement, which promotes walkable neighborhoods that contain a range of housing and job types. It arose in the United States in the early 1980s, and has gradually continued to reform many aspects of real estate development, urban planning, and municipal land-use...

 in the United States.

On Thursday, April 11, 2007, President Niels-Erik Andreasen announced at a special chapel assembly that the university had just received a gift totalling $8.5 million. The anonymous donors requested the money be spent on the following: Construction of the new entrance on Old US 31 (officially opened on June 2, 2008 and named J. N. Andrews Blvd.), Two endowed chairs: one for the Marketing Department in the School of Business Administration and the second in the Seventh-day Adventist Theological Seminary's Christian Ministry Department, Construction of a milking parlor for the Andrews Dairy, Refurbish the kitchen and dining facilities in the Campus Center, and Support for the educational program of the Aeronautics Department.

Campus


Andrews University is located next to the Village of Berrien Springs
Berrien Springs, Michigan
Berrien Springs is a village in Berrien County in the U.S. state of Michigan. The population was 1,862 at the 2000 census. The village is located within Oronoko Charter Township. Berrien Springs is best known for its Seventh-day Adventist community and Andrews University...

 in southwest Michigan. The entire campus is actually located within the Oronoko Charter Township
Oronoko Charter Township, Michigan
Oronoko Charter Township is a charter township of Berrien County in the U.S. state of Michigan. The population was 9,843 at the 2000 census.The Village of Berrien Springs is the only incorporated municipality within the township. Much of the eastern portion of the township is considered to be part...

, adjacent to the St. Joseph River
St. Joseph River (Lake Michigan)
The St. Joseph River is a river, approximately long, in southern Michigan and northern Indiana in the United States. It drains a primarily rural farming area in the watershed of Lake Michigan...

 and 12 miles (19.3 km) away from the shores of Lake Michigan
Lake Michigan
Lake Michigan is one of the five Great Lakes of North America and the only one located entirely within the United States. It is the second largest of the Great Lakes by volume and the third largest by surface area, after Lake Superior and Lake Huron...

. South Bend
South Bend, Indiana
The city of South Bend is the county seat of St. Joseph County, Indiana, United States, on the St. Joseph River near its southernmost bend, from which it derives its name. As of the 2010 Census, the city had a total of 101,168 residents; its Metropolitan Statistical Area had a population of 316,663...

, Indiana
Indiana
Indiana is a US state, admitted to the United States as the 19th on December 11, 1816. It is located in the Midwestern United States and Great Lakes Region. With 6,483,802 residents, the state is ranked 15th in population and 16th in population density. Indiana is ranked 38th in land area and is...

, home of the University of Notre Dame
University of Notre Dame
The University of Notre Dame du Lac is a Catholic research university located in Notre Dame, an unincorporated community north of the city of South Bend, in St. Joseph County, Indiana, United States...

, is 25 miles (40.2 km) away; thus, several Andrews faculty members hold joint appointments with Notre Dame.

The 1600 acres (6.5 km²) campus was originally designated as an arboretum. The campus maintains a variety of indigenous trees, especially around the quad
Quadrangle (architecture)
In architecture, a quadrangle is a space or courtyard, usually rectangular in plan, the sides of which are entirely or mainly occupied by parts of a large building. The word is probably most closely associated with college or university campus architecture, but quadrangles may be found in other...

 in the center of the campus. The campus is composed of 27 instructional buildings, the Howard Performing Arts Center, an airpark, four single-sex residence halls and four apartment complexes.

The four dormitories on campus are Lamson Hall, the undergraduate women's hall, Damazo Hall, the graduate women's hall, Meier Hall, the undergraduate men's hall, and Burman Hall, primarily for men who are either graduate or seminary students. The residence halls strictly enforce a curfew depending on a student's age, as well as a visitation policy which does not allow students of the opposite sex in dorm rooms at any time. Students living on-campus are also required to attend a number of worship services.

Academics


The university is made up of six schools/colleges, offering 130 undergraduate majors and 70 graduate majors. In addition, post-baccalaureate degrees offered by all but the College of Technology are supervised by the School of Graduate Studies.

The university's freshmen retention rate is 83.9% while the graduation rate is 53.3%.

School of Architecture


School of Architecture began as a simple architecture
Architecture
Architecture is both the process and product of planning, designing and construction. Architectural works, in the material form of buildings, are often perceived as cultural and political symbols and as works of art...

 program in 1974 as an associates degree and the program received full accreditation as a bachelors program in 1987. In 2002 the program was approved to offer a 5 and half year National Architectural Accrediting Board
National Architectural Accrediting Board
The National Architectural Accrediting Board is the sole authority for accredited US professional degree programs for architecture in the United States, developing standards and procedures to verify that each accredited program meets standards for the appropriate education of architects...

 (NAAB)-accredited masters of architecture. On October 29, 2007, the Board of Trustees voted the Division of Architecture to be reclassified as the School of Architecture. It advocates the building and preservation of rural and urban landscapes which promote civility, healthy living and environmental stewardship.

The mission of the Urban Design Studio is to assist real communities and its citizens in developing sound growth strategies and specific design solutions for redevelopment
Redevelopment
Redevelopment is any new construction on a site that has pre-existing uses.-Description:Variations on redevelopment include:* Urban infill on vacant parcels that have no existing activity but were previously developed, especially on Brownfield land, such as the redevelopment of an industrial site...

 purposes. The studio is led by Assistant Professor Andrew von Maur, who professionally collaborates with some of the world’s leading town planning offices, including Duany Plater-Zyberk & Company. The Urban Design Studio has been recognized with a 2007, 2008, and 2009 Charter Award of Excellence by the Congress for the New Urbanism for its urban design
Urban design
Urban design concerns the arrangement, appearance and functionality of towns and cities, and in particular the shaping and uses of urban public space. It has traditionally been regarded as a disciplinary subset of urban planning, landscape architecture, or architecture and in more recent times has...

 and planning work in communities in Saucier, Mississippi and Michigan City, Indiana. Past projects have led to municipal adoption as well as implementation. Previous projects by the School of Architecture include community plans for Palmer (Alaska), Empire, Suttons Bay, Traverse City and Wayne (Michigan), Billings (Montana), Michigan City and Plymouth (Indiana), Henderson Point and Saucier (Mississippi). The Andrews University School of Architecture is one of five accredited architecture programs in the United States located at a Christian university.

College of Arts and Sciences


The College of Arts and Sciences, which was officially organized in 1974, is the largest of the six schools. It is divided into twenty departments specializing in a wide range of areas in the fine arts, science, the humanities
Humanities
The humanities are academic disciplines that study the human condition, using methods that are primarily analytical, critical, or speculative, as distinguished from the mainly empirical approaches of the natural sciences....

, and the social sciences. The CAS also offers a variety of pre-professional programs in the fields of health, medicine, and pre-law. Many students opt to attend Loma Linda University
Loma Linda University
Loma Linda University is a Seventh-day Adventist coeducational health sciences university located in Loma Linda, California, United States. The University comprises eight schools and the Faculty of Graduate Studies...

 to pursue a professional education in medicine.

School of Business


The School of Business first began to offer graduate education in business
Business
A business is an organization engaged in the trade of goods, services, or both to consumers. Businesses are predominant in capitalist economies, where most of them are privately owned and administered to earn profit to increase the wealth of their owners. Businesses may also be not-for-profit...

 in 1964. It has been housed in its current location in Chan Shun Hall since 1989 and offers Bachelor of Business Administration
Bachelor of Business Administration
The Bachelor of Business Administration is a bachelor's degree in Commerce and business administration. In most universities, the degree is conferred upon a student after four years of full-time study in one or more areas of business concentrations; see below...

, Master of Science in Administration
Master of Science in Administration
The Master of Science in Administration is a post-graduate degree that is a relatively new field of study that came into existences in the mid-to-late 1970s. The MSA provides broad preparation for a variety of administrative positions in a wide range of organizations...

 and Master of Business Administration
Master of Business Administration
The Master of Business Administration is a :master's degree in business administration, which attracts people from a wide range of academic disciplines. The MBA designation originated in the United States, emerging from the late 19th century as the country industrialized and companies sought out...

 degrees. The school is a member of the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs.

School of Distance Education


The School of Distance Education (formerly Grigg's University/Griggs International Academy ) was formally transferred to the ownership of Andrews University's on Nov 1, 2010. It is housed in Grigg's Hall (formerly the Lake Union Building ) near the main campus entrance on Old US-31.

School of Education


The School of Education offers bachelors (BA, BS), masters (MA, MAT), education specialist (EdS) and doctoral degree (EdD & PhD) programs in thirty-one (31) different programs of education.

School of Technology


The College of Technology is divided into four departments: Aeronautics
Aeronautics
Aeronautics is the science involved with the study, design, and manufacturing of airflight-capable machines, or the techniques of operating aircraft and rocketry within the atmosphere...

, Agriculture, Digital Media & Photography, and Engineering & Computer Science. Additionally, a degree in aviation
Aviation
Aviation is the design, development, production, operation, and use of aircraft, especially heavier-than-air aircraft. Aviation is derived from avis, the Latin word for bird.-History:...

 flight is offered through the Department of Aeronautics.

Seventh-day Adventist Theological Seminary



The Seventh-day Adventist Theological Seminary was voted into existence in 1936 by action of the General Conference of the Seventh-day Adventist Church
General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists
The General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists is the governing organization of the Seventh-day Adventist Church. It is located in Silver Spring, Maryland, United States, where it moved in 1989...

. It operated in Washington, D.C. until it was transferred to Berrien Springs, Michigan, in 1960. There it became a school in the newly established Andrews University. The seminary is fully accredited by The Association of Theological Schools
Association of Theological Schools in the United States and Canada
The Association of Theological Schools in the United States and Canada is an organization of seminaries and other graduate schools of theology. ATS has its headquarters in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania and has more than 250 member institutions...

 in the United States and Canada.

The primary mission of the Seminary is to prepare ministers for the Seventh-day Adventist Church
Seventh-day Adventist Church
The Seventh-day Adventist Church is a Protestant Christian denomination distinguished by its observance of Saturday, the original seventh day of the Judeo-Christian week, as the Sabbath, and by its emphasis on the imminent second coming of Jesus Christ...

. This is done especially by means of the 3-year Master of Divinity program. There are also 2-year master’s programs in Youth Ministry and in Pastoral Ministry. In addition, the Seminary offers the 1-2 year academic Master of Arts in Religion program and the Master of Theology. Three doctoral programs are also offered: Doctor of Ministry, Doctor of Philosophy in Religion, and Doctor of Theology. Andrews University was the first institution to offer a PhD in Adventist studies.

The Seminary has six departments: Christian Ministry, Church History, New Testament, Old Testament, Theology and Christian Philosophy, and World Mission.

Diversity


The international population includes 885 students representing 98 countries. Andrews is ranked sixth in the nation for largest proportion of international students, and 7th in the nation for campus diversity (compared to other national universities according to U.S. News & World Report 2008).

Study abroad opportunities


Andrews University co-sponsors Adventist Colleges Abroad, a program in which qualified students study overseas while completing requirements for graduation at Andrews. This language and cultural immersion is available in nine locations: Argentina, Austria, Brazil, France, Greece, Italy, Singapore, Spain, and Taiwan. Undergraduate students may also study abroad in the Andrews University Year in England at Newbold College. Affiliation and Extension Programs are offered in Chile, Peru, Trinidad and Tobago, Kenya, Nigeria, England, Italy, Romania, Russia, Lebanon, Hong Kong, and South Korea.

Administrative changes in 2006


An official briefing on the university website states that during a March 6, 2006 meeting of the university's Board of Trustees an executive session of the Board - one which "includes only its non-university members" - decided that "perhaps the best way to achieve new strategic directions for the university was through the opportunities that might be offered by new leadership at the school.". During a break in that meeting the leadership of the board asked the university president for his resignation. Dr. Niels-Erik Andreasen
Niels-Erik Andreasen
Niels-Erik Andreasen is professor of Old Testament studies at the Seventh-day Adventist Theological Seminary and president of Andrews University, Berrien Springs, Michigan. He joined the faculty in 1994.-Work:...

 (President), Dr. Patricia Mutch (vice president of academic administration), and Dr. Ed Wines (vice president of financial administration) immediately offered their resignations. President Andreasen's resignation letter included the phrase "effective immediately", but three weeks later, the board announced that Andreasen would continue to serve as President until June 30, 2006, and the position of University Provost
Provost (education)
A provost is the senior academic administrator at many institutions of higher education in the United States, Canada and Australia, the equivalent of a pro-vice-chancellor at some institutions in the United Kingdom and Ireland....

 would be created to serve as the university's Chief Operating Officer
Chief operating officer
A Chief Operating Officer or Director of Operations can be one of the highest-ranking executives in an organization and comprises part of the "C-Suite"...

. The official explanation for the board action was that student enrollment - and the resulting revenue - had increased much more modestly than expected, but there has been speculation about other possible causes. Dr. Andreasen has spoken publicly about these events.

In its March 30 meeting, the Board of Trustees of Andrews University met and took two significant actions. First, the creation of the position of University Provost was voted, which is intended to function as the Chief Operations Officer of the University, focusing on day-to-day operations and execution of strategy. Second, the Board asked Dr. Niels-Erik Andreasen to continue his service to the University as President, and he agreed.

On July 17, 2009 the university announced that Dr. Heather Knight
Heather Knight (educator)
Heather Joy Knight is an American educator, who currently serves as President of Pacific Union College. She is the first woman to serve in that role and the only African-American woman to lead a college affiliated with the Adventist Church in the North America. Born in Jamaica, her family moved to...

 accepted a position to serve as a president of Pacific Union College, a small liberal arts college in Angwin, California. Statement on the university website stated that Bill Richardson, formerly a dean of College of Arts and Sciences will serve as an interim provost while the search for a new provost is conducted.

On March 3, 2010 the university announced that Dr. Andrea Luxton would be serving as the new provost. Dr. Luxton was previously the president of Canadian University College
Canadian University College
Canadian University College is an independent publicly funded university located in Lacombe. It is sponsored by the Seventh-day Adventist Church in Canada and is affiliated with the Association of Theological Schools...

.

Notable alumni


Alumni include:
  • Sir Patrick Allen
  • Samuele Bacchiocchi
    Samuele Bacchiocchi
    Samuele R. Bacchiocchi was a Seventh-day Adventist author and theologian, best known for his work on the Sabbath in Christianity, particularly in the historical work From Sabbath to Sunday, based on his doctoral thesis from the Pontifical Gregorian University...

  • Delbert Baker
    Delbert Baker
    Delbert W. Baker is a Seventh-day Adventist minister, author, educator, and administrator. He is currently a vice president of the General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists.-Education and Family:Baker was born in 1953 in Oakland, California...

  • Barry Black
    Barry Black
    Barry C. Black is the 62nd Chaplain of the United States Senate. He was elected to this position on June 27, 2003, becoming the first African-American, the first Seventh-day Adventist, and the first military chaplain to hold the office of chaplain to the United States Senate...

  • Donovan Courville
    Donovan Courville
    Donovan Amos Courville , was a graduate of Andrews University. He taught at Pacific Union College from 1935 to 1949 before moving to Loma Linda University from 1949 to 1970 where he was emeritus professor of biochemistry at the School of Medicine...

  • Clifton Davis
    Clifton Davis
    Clifton Duncan Davis is an American actor, songwriter and minister. He has appeared on the television shows as A World Apart, That's My Mama and Amen...

  • Homer Drew
    Homer Drew
    Homer Drew is a former American college basketball coach, most recently for Valparaiso University Crusaders men's basketball team. His younger son, Bryce Drew, succeeded him as the head coach in May 2011...

  • Jon Dybdahl
    Jon Dybdahl
    Jon L. Dybdahl is a professor of theology and a college administrator. Inaugurated in 2002, he is the immediate past president of Walla Walla University in College Place, Washington...

  • Benjamin Wilkinson
  • Desmond Ford
    Desmond Ford
    Desmond "Des" Ford is an evangelical Christian and an Australian theologian. He is the father of pornography gossip columnist Luke Ford....

  • Gary Hamel
    Gary Hamel
    Dr. Gary P. Hamel is an American management expert. He is a founder of Strategos, an international management consulting firm based in Chicago.-Early life:...

  • Michael G. Hasel
  • George R. Knight
    George R. Knight
    George Raymond Knight is a Seventh-day Adventist historian and educator. He is emeritus professor of church history at Andrews University.- Biography :Knight joined the Adventist church through the ministry of Ralph Larson...

  • Morihiko Nakahara
    Morihiko Nakahara
    is a Japanese conductor.Born in Kagoshima, Japan, Nakahara is the Associate Conductor of the Spokane Symphony. Nakahara received a Master of Music degree in Instrumental Conducting from the University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music, where he studied with Rodney Winther. In 1998 he...

  • Julius Nam
    Julius Nam
    Julius Juhyeok Nam is an associate professor of religion at Loma Linda University School of Religion in California, and a commissioned minister of the Seventh-day Adventist Church. He teaches Adventist history and theology. He is active in the American Academy of Religion, Adventist Society for...

  • Ole Andres Olsen
    Ole Andres Olsen
    Ole Andres Olsen was a Seventh-day Adventist minister and administrator. He was General Conference president from 1888 to 1897....

  • Arthur Patrick
    Arthur Patrick
    Arthur Nelson Patrick is a Seventh-day Adventist theologian and historian. He is an honorary senior research fellow at Avondale College in New South Wales, Australia...

  • Jan Paulsen
    Jan Paulsen
    Dr. Jan Paulsen was elected President of the General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists on March 1, 1999, at the age of 64...

  • Shirley Neil Pettis
    Shirley Neil Pettis
    Shirley Neil Pettis was a U.S. Representative from California, wife of her predecessor, Jerry Pettis.- Early Life and Education :...

  • Samuel Koranteng-Pipim
    Samuel Koranteng-Pipim
    Samuel Koranteng Pipim is a US-based Ghanaian author, speaker, and theologian. Trained in engineering and systematic theology, he based his office in Ann Arbor, Michigan, where, up until 2011, he ministered to students, faculty, and staff at the University of Michigan. He has authored and...

  • Andrew Price
    Andrew Price
    Andrew Price was a U.S. Representative from Louisiana.Born on Chatsworth plantation, near Franklin, St. Mary Parish, Louisiana, Price attended various private schools....

  • Ángel Manuel Rodríguez
    Ángel Manuel Rodríguez
    Ángel Manuel Rodríguez is a Seventh-day Adventist theologian and director of the Biblical Research Institute . His special research interests include Old Testament, Sanctuary and Atonement, and Old Testament Theology...

  • Bill Shadel
    Bill Shadel
    Bill Shadel was an American news anchor for CBS Radio and ABC Television.Edward R. Murrow recruited Shadel while he was working in Europe as a correspondent for the National Rifle Association. During World War II, Shadel covered the June 6, 1944, D-Day invasion for CBS Radio. During his years at...

  • John Luis Shaw
    John Luis Shaw
    John Luis Shaw was a Seventh-day Adventist missionary, educator, and treasurer. He graduated from the scientific course at Battle Creek College in 1893 and became dean of men at Union College. In 1897 he became principal of Claremont Union College in South Africa...

  • Philip T. Sica
    Philip T. Sica
    Philip Theodore Sica is the President of Wise Choice Realty who, in 2005, made an unsuccessful bid for Queens borough president in New York City. He was the nominee for the Republican and Conservative parties ultimately losing to incumbent Borough President Helen Marshall.Sica's earliest...

  • George Speight
    George Speight
    George Speight , occasionally known as Ilikimi Naitini, was the principal instigator of the Fiji coup of 2000, in which he kidnapped thirty-six government officials and held them from May 19, 2000 to July 13, 2000...

  • Edwin R. Thiele
    Edwin R. Thiele
    Edwin R. Thiele was an American missionary in China, an editor, archaeologist, writer, and Old Testament professor. He is best known for his chronological studies of the Hebrew kingdom period.- Biography :...

  • Alden Thompson
    Alden Thompson
    Alden Lloyd Thompson is a Seventh-day Adventist Christian theologian, author and popular speaker and seminar presenter. He is the professor of biblical studies at Walla Walla University in Washington, United States...

  • Juan Carlos Viera
    Juan Carlos Viera
    Juan Carlos Viera Rossano is a Seventh-day Adventist and was director of the Ellen G. White Estate from 1995 to 2000. A native of Uruguay, Viera was the first director of the White Estate to come from outside the North American Division. He holds an M.A. in Religion from Andrews University and a...

  • Will Keith Kellogg
    Will Keith Kellogg
    Will Keith Kellogg, generally referred to as W.K. Kellogg was an American industrialist in food manufacturing, best known as the founder of the Kellogg Company, which to this day produces a wide variety of popular breakfast cereals...

     - founder of Kellogg's (Kellogg's Frosted Flakes manufactures)
  • Ellet J. Waggoner
    Ellet J. Waggoner
    E.[llet] J.[oseph] Waggoner was a Seventh-day Adventist particularly known for his impact on the theology of the church, along with friend and associate Alonzo T. Jones.- Biography :...

  • Neal C. Wilson
    Neal C. Wilson
    Neal C. Wilson, served as General Conference president of the Seventh-day Adventist Church from 1979 through to 1990. Wilson was head of the North American Division when elected on January 3, 1979, to take the place of the ailing former General Conference president Robert Pierson, who had resigned...


See also

  • Seventh-day Adventist Church
    Seventh-day Adventist Church
    The Seventh-day Adventist Church is a Protestant Christian denomination distinguished by its observance of Saturday, the original seventh day of the Judeo-Christian week, as the Sabbath, and by its emphasis on the imminent second coming of Jesus Christ...

  • Seventh-day Adventist Theological Seminary
    Seventh-day Adventist Theological Seminary
    The Seventh-day Adventist Theological Seminary is the seminary located at Andrews University in Michigan, the Seventh-day Adventist Church's flagship university...

  • Andrews University Seminary Studies
    Andrews University Seminary Studies
    Andrews University Seminary Studies is a refereed scholarly Christian journal published by the Seventh-day Adventist Theological Seminary at Andrews University. It is issued twice a year from Berrien Springs, MI. The journal was founded in 1963 and currently has a circulation of 600 copies...

  • Andrews University Press
    Andrews University Press
    Andrews University Press is an academic publishing authority operated under the auspices of Andrews University in Berrien Springs, Michigan. Established with minimal funding in 1969, a permanent director was appointed in 1979...

  • John Nevins Andrews
    John Nevins Andrews
    John Nevins Andrews , was a Seventh-day Adventist minister, missionary, writer, editor, and scholar...

  • Andrews Academy
    Andrews Academy
    Andrews Academy is a Seventh-day Adventist secondary school located in Berrien Springs, Michigan. Andrews Academy's sister school, Ruth Murdoch Elementary School, handles students in grades K-8...

  • List of Seventh-day Adventist colleges and universities
  • List of Seventh-day Adventist hospitals
  • List of Seventh-day Adventist medical schools
  • List of Seventh-day Adventist secondary schools
  • Sidney Brownsberger

External links