Signup       Login
 
Topic Index:
A   B   C   D   E   F   G   H   I   J   K   L   M   N   O   P   Q   R   S   T   U   V   W   X   Y   Z   
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23




Niagara Falls (band)
Niagara Falls is an experimental band from Philadelphia, PA that has ties to the recent psych folk resurgence as well as the burgeoning noise and neo-ambient or space music movements. They formed in 2004 as a quartet of Norman Fetter, Jeff Carpineta, Erich Breimhurst, and Jennifer Lee, and became known for their live improvised performances, and constantly shifting instrumentation

Niagara Falls (Chicago song)
"Niagara Falls" is the fourth single released by the American rock band, Chicago, from their 1986 album, Chicago 18. Lead vocals were shared by Jason Scheff and Bill Champlin.

Niagara Falls (composition)
Niagara Falls for Symphonic Band by American composer Michael Daugherty, is his first composition for the Concert band. It is a 10 minute, single-movement work, that explores the most visited waterfalls in the world. Niagara Falls was commissioned by the University of Michigan Bands in honor of its centennial, and dedicated to H

Niamh
Niamh is an Irish language feminine given name meaning "bright" or "radiant". Niav Neve, Neave, Neeve and Nieve are anglicised and phonetically spelled forms of the name. The Old Irish spelling is Niaṁ.

NIAS
NIAS may refer to:* National Institute of Advanced Studies* Netherlands Institute for Advanced Study* Nias is an island off the western coast of Sumatra, Indonesia.* Northern Ireland Ambulance ServiceNiAs may refer to:

NIB
NIB or nib may refer to:* N.I.B., a song by Black Sabbath* Neodymium magnet or NIB, a powerful magnet made from neodymium, iron, and boron* Nib, a type of variable in PBASIC which stores Nibble values in the range of 0 to 15

Nib (pen)
A nib is the part of a quill, dip pen or fountain pen which comes into contact with the writing surface in order to deposit ink. Different types of nibs vary in their purpose, shape and size, as well as the material they are made from.-Quill:

Nibble
In computing, a nibble is a four-bit aggregation, or half an octet

Nibble (disambiguation)
Nibble is a computing term for a four-bit aggregation.Nibble, nibbles or nibbler may also refer to:* Nibble , former publication for Apple II computer users with a focus on hobbyist programming

Nibbler
A nibbler is a tool for cutting sheet metal with minimal distortion. One type operates much like a punch and die, with a blade that moves in a linear fashion against a fixed die, removing small bits of metal and leaving a kerf approximately 6 mm wide

Nic
Nic is a male given name, often short for Nicholas or Dominic. It may refer to:-Music:* Nic Harcourt, the current Music Director for Santa Monica, California-based radio station KCRW

Nicaraguan
Nicaraguans are people inhabiting in, originating or having significant heritage from Nicaragua. Most Nicaraguans live in Nicaragua, although there is also a significant Nicaraguan diaspora, particularly in Costa Rica and the United States with smaller communities in other countries around the world

Nicaraguan
Nicaraguan may refer to:* Something of, from, or related to Nicaragua, the largest country in Central America** Nicaraguans, people from Nicaragua or of Nicaraguan descent or heritage. For information about the Nicaraguan people, see Demographics of Nicaragua and Culture of Nicaragua

Nice
Nice is the fifth most populous city in France, after Paris, Marseille, Lyon and Toulouse, with a population of 348,721 within its administrative limits on a land area of . The urban area of Nice extends beyond the administrative city limits with a population of more than 955,000 on an area of

NICE
NICE may refer to:* National Independent Cadres and Elites in Iraq* National Institute for Coordinated Experiments, a fictional organisation in C.S

Nice (album)
Nice is the seventh full-length studio album by Rollins Band, released in 2001, their first on Sanctuary Records. The band line-up was Henry Rollins fronting the blues rock band Mother Superior, whilst retaining the Rollins Band name.

Nice (Australian band)
Nice was an indie rock band from Sydney, Australia. The band was fronted by Randall Lee formerly of The Cannanes and currently of Ashtray Boy and Susannah Stewart-Lindsay, previously a member of the Adelaide based band, Rewind on the Paranoid Side

Nice (Nice album)
Nice is a 1994 studio album by the Australian band of the same name.The songs "Theme from Nice" and "Circuit Diagram" were featured in the 1990s Nickelodeon television series The Adventures of Pete & Pete.-Tracklisting:#"Dear John" – 3:00

Nice (song)
"Nice" is the 34th single by British pop band Duran Duran. Released in 2005 to radio in Europe and as download only, it was the third single to be lifted from the group's Astronaut album.-About the song:

Nice (The Nice album)
Nice was the third album by The Nice; it was titled Everything As Nice As Mother Makes It in the U.S. after Immediate's distribution changed from Columbia to Capitol. Nice had been initially released in the U.S. with a slightly longer version of Rondo 69 not available on the UK or on the Capitol distributed U.S. versions. The first U.S

Nice (WIPO)
The Nice Classification of Goods and Services is an Agreement resulting from the Diplomatic Conference of 1957 in Nice, France, and is updated every five years.

Nice guy
Nice guy is a term in the general public discourse and in popular culture describing an adult or teenage male with friendly yet unassertive personality traits in the context of a relationship with a woman. A typical nice guy is perceived to put the needs of others before his own, avoids confrontations, does favors, gives emotional support, and generally acts nicely towards women

Nicene Creed
The Nicene Creed is the creed or profession of faith that is most widely used in Christian liturgy. It is called Nicene because, in its original form, it was adopted in the city of Nicaea by the first ecumenical council, which met there in the year 325.The Nicene Creed has been normative to the Anglican Church, the Church of the East, the Eastern Orthodox Church,

Niche
Niche may refer to:*Niche , an exedra or an apse that has been reduced in size;*Niche , Colombian/Spanish football player, full name Víctor Manuel Micolta Armero*Niche , a British Thoroughbred racehorse

Nicholas
Nicholas or Nikolas is a male given name, derived from the Greek name Νικόλαος , a combination of the words for "victory" and "people" . The name can be understood to mean victory of the people or "power of the people"

Nicholas
Nicholas or Nikolas is a male given name, derived from the Greek name Νικόλαος , a combination of the words for "victory" and "people" . The name can be understood to mean victory of the people or "power of the people"

Nicholas (1958)
Nicholas is a 1958 Brazilian telenovela adapted from A. J. Cronin's 1950 novel, The Spanish Gardener. The series was directed by Julio Gouveia, the head of The Theatre School of São Paulo. It starred Ricardinho as Nicholas, and Roberto de Cleto as the gardener

Nicholas (Nicholas album)
Nicholas is Nicholas Teo first studio album released in Taiwan.- Track listing :#Introduction#當你孤單你會想起誰 Dang Ni Gu Dan Ni Hui Xiang Qi Shui #寂寞邊界 Ji Mo Bian Jie #Dream

Nicholas Tse discography
This is the discography of Cantopop artist Nicholas Tse. Tse has released over 30 CDs in his career since 1997, and some of his albums have a trend of releasing second editions, including the Me, and Release album.-Cantonese albums:

Nichrome
Nichrome is a non-magnetic alloy of nickel, chromium, and often iron, usually used as a resistance wire. Patented in 1905, it is the oldest documented form of resistance heating alloy. A common alloy is 80% nickel and 20% chromium, by mass, but there are many others to accommodate various applications

Nick
Nick may refer to:*A short form for Nicholas or Nikhil*Nick , an element of DNA structure*Nickelodeon , a television network**Nickelodeon , for other versions of Nickelodeon and their sister channels around the globe.

Nickel
Nickel is a chemical element with the chemical symbol Ni and atomic number 28. It is a silvery-white lustrous metal with a slight golden tinge. Nickel belongs to the transition metals and is hard and ductile

Nickel (band)
Nickel are an American-based band, best known for their cameo in the season 2 episode of Buffy the Vampire Slayer "School Hard", in which their songs "Stupid Thing" and "1000 Nights" are played in the Bronze.

Nickelodeon (Italy)
In 2004, Telecom Italia Media starts to broadcast the Italian version of Nickelodeon on SKY Italia.Since 1997 Rai Sat 2 has broadcast Nickelodeon cartoons for three hours a day.-Current:*SpongeBob SquarePants*iCarly*Rugrats

Nickelodeon (Netherlands)
The Dutch version of Nickelodeon, seen in the Netherlands and Flanders, launched on September 1, 2002. Nickelodeon is on air 24 hours a day CET .

Nicki (singer)
Nicki Nicki Nicki (born Doris Andrea Hrda on November 2, 1966 in the town of Plattling (in the Deggendorf district of Bavaria, Germany) is a German pop singer and composer. She currently lives with her life partner and their two daughters in Plattling.- Career :

Nickname
A nickname is "a usually familiar or humorous but sometimes pointed or cruel name given to a person or place, as a supposedly appropriate replacement for or addition to the proper name.", or a name similar in origin and pronunciation from the original name.

Nico (given name)
Nico is the given name, and is also used as a shortened form of the name Nicholas, particularly in Spanish and French, but also occasionally in English

Nico (Romanian singer)
Nicoleta Matei, known by her stage name Nico, is a Romanian singer. She represented Romania along with Vlad in the Eurovision Song Contest 2008.-Musical career:Nico started singing since she was a child

Nicola (chief)
Nicola , also Nkwala or N'kwala, was an important First Nations political figure in the fur trade era of the British Columbia Interior as well as into the colonial period

Nicolai (given name)
Nicolai is a forename, and may refer to:In music:* Nicolai Gedda, Swedish tenor / famous opera singer and recitalist* Nicolai Kielstrup, Danish Singer / DancerIn literature:Other:

Nicolai (surname)
Nicolai is a surname, and may refer to:In music:* Mark R. Nicolai, American blues guitarist, inspired by Joe Bonamassa* Bruno Nicolai, Italian film music composer, orchestra director, and musical editor

Nicole (film)
Nicole is a 1978 American thriller directed by Istvan Ventilla and starring Leslie Caron.-Plot:

Nicole (given name)
Nicole is a feminine given name and a surname.The given name Nicole is of Greek origin and means "victorious people". It's evolved into a French feminine derivative of the masculine given name Nicholas. There are many variants.

Nicole (name)
Nicole is a feminine given name and a surname.The given name Nicole is of Greek origin and means "victorious people". It's evolved into a French feminine derivative of the masculine given name Nicholas. There are many variants.

Nicole Scherzinger
Nicole Prescovia Elikolani Valiente Scherzinger is an American singer-songwriter, dancer, record producer, model, and actress. Scherzinger is perhaps best known for being the lead vocalist of the Pussycat Dolls.

Nicolette (album)
Nicolette by Nicolette Larson was released by Warner Bros. Records in 1978. It reached #15 on the US pop charts and was certified gold in the US and Canada.

Nicolette (novel)
Orczy's Nicolette is a re-telling of the medieval French story Aucassin and Nicolette.

Nicosia
Nicosia from , known locally as Lefkosia , is the capital and largest city in Cyprus, as well as its main business center. Nicosia is the only divided capital in the world, with the southern and the northern portions divided by a Green Line

Nicotiana
Nicotiana is a genus of herbs and shrubs of the nightshade family indigenous to North and South America, Australia, south west Africa and the South Pacific. Various Nicotiana species, commonly referred to as tobacco plants, are cultivated and grown to produce tobacco. Of all Nicotiana species, Cultivated Tobacco Nicotiana is a genus of herbs and shrubs of the nightshade family (Solanaceae) indigenous to North and South America, Australia, south west Africa and the South Pacific. Various Nicotiana species, commonly referred to as tobacco plants, are cultivated and grown to produce tobacco. Of all Nicotiana species, Cultivated Tobacco Nicotiana is a genus of herbs and shrubs of the nightshade family (Solanaceae) indigenous to North and South America, Australia, south west Africa and the South Pacific. Various Nicotiana species, commonly referred to as tobacco plants, are cultivated and grown to produce tobacco. Of all Nicotiana species, Cultivated Tobacco (N

Nicotina
Nicotina is a six-time Ariel Award winning and six-time nominated 2003 Mexican - Argentine gangster film directed by Hugo Rodríguez. The film is about a computer geek who becomes involved with the Russian mafia.

Nicotinamide
Nicotinamide, also known as niacinamide and nicotinic acid amide, is the amide of nicotinic acid . Nicotinamide is a water-soluble vitamin and is part of the vitamin B group

Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide
Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, abbreviated NAD, is a coenzyme found in all living cells. The compound is a dinucleotide, since it consists of two nucleotides joined through their phosphate groups. One nucleotide contains an adenine base and the other nicotinamide.In metabolism, NAD is involved in redox reactions, carrying electrons from one reaction to another

Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate
Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate, abbreviated NADP or TPN in older notation , is a coenzyme used in anabolic reactions, such as lipid and nucleic acid synthesis, which require NADPH as a reducing agent.

Nidana
Nidana is a Sanskrit word . It means 'chain of causation,' and is attributed to Shakyamuni Buddha. It has two specific meanings within Buddhism

Nido
NIDO is a powdered milk supplement manufactured by Nestlé. Although there is no age recommendation, marketing is featured around children over three years of age with the tagline "Nutritious Milk for Growing Kids"

Nidus
Nidus may refer to:* Nest, for insects or small animals* Locus of infection, the point on the body where a pathogen enters* The natural reservoir for a pathogen* The characteristic lesion in osteoid osteoma* The centre of a Bladder stone

Nier
NIER or Nier can refer to:* National Institute Economic Review, a British economics journal* National Institute of Environmental Research, a national research center in Korea.* Alfred O. C. Nier , American physicist

Niese
Niese is a surname, and may refer to:*Benedikt Niese , German classical scholar*Danielle de Niese , Australian-born soprano*Charlotte Niese , German writer, poet and teacher*Jon Niese , American baseball player

Niesen
The Niesen is a mountain, located in the Bernese Oberland region of the Swiss Alps, overlooking Lake Thun and is often called the Swiss Pyramid.-Overview:

Niet
Niet is a punk rock and hardcore punk band from Ljubljana, Slovenia. They were one of the most iconic and influential music groups of the Slovenian punk movement and the Punk in Yugoslavia in general

Niete
Niete is a town in the Océan division, South Province of Cameroon.

Nieves
Nieves is a Spanish surname and a female given name from the title of the Virgin Mary Nuestra Señora de las Nieves meaning "Our Lady of the Snows".-People:Notable people with the surname Nieves:* Ángel Nieves Díaz* José Alvarado Nieves

Nifty
Nifty may refer to:* Nifty Comics* the Nifty Erotic Stories Archive, an online repository of alternative erotica, originally hosted on Usenet

Nigel
Nigel is an English masculine given name. The name is derived from the Latin Nigellus. This Latin word would seem to derive from the Latin niger, meaning "black"; however this is thought to be an example of an incorrect etymology created by French speaking clerics, who knew Latin as well, to translate the Norman first name Neel in the Latin written documents

Torpedo tube
A torpedo tube is a device for launching torpedoes. There are two main types of torpedo tube: underwater tubes fitted to submarines and some surface ships, and deck-mounted units installed aboard surface vessels

Torque wrench
A torque wrench is a tool used to precisely apply a specific torque to a fastener such as a nut or bolt. It is usually in the form of a socket wrench with special internal mechanisms. It was invented by Conrad Bahr in 1918 while working for the New York City Water Department

Torquhil Campbell, 13th Duke of Argyll
Torquhil Ian Campbell, 13th and 6th Duke of Argyll , known as Earl of Campbell before 1973 and as Marquess of Lorne between 1973 and 2001, is a Scottish Peer

Torresian Crow
The Torresian Crow , also occasionally called the Australian Crow or Papuan Crow in those respective countries, is an Australasian member of the crow genus

Torrey Canyon
The Torrey Canyon was a supertanker capable of carrying a cargo of 120,000 tons of crude oil, which was shipwrecked off the western coast of Cornwall, England in March 1967 causing an environmental disaster

Torsion (gastropod)
Torsion is an anatomical event which takes place during the very early part of the life of snails and slugs of all kinds. In other words, torsion is a gastropod synapomorphy which occurs in all gastropods during larval development. Torsion is the rotation of the visceral mass, mantle and shell 180˚ with respect to the head and foot of the gastropod

Tortilla
In Mexico and Central America, a tortilla is a type of thin, unleavened flat bread, made from finely ground maize

Tortilla Flat
Tortilla Flat is an early John Steinbeck novel set in Monterey, California. The novel was the author's first clear critical and commercial success.

Tortoise
Tortoises are a family of land-dwelling reptiles of the order of turtles . Like their marine cousins, the sea turtles, tortoises are shielded from predators by a shell. The top part of the shell is the carapace, the underside is the plastron, and the two are connected by the bridge. The tortoise has both an endoskeleton and an exoskeleton

Tortola
Tortola is the largest and most populated of the British Virgin Islands, a group of islands that form part of the archipelago of the Virgin Islands. Local tradition recounts that Christopher Columbus named it Tortola, meaning "land of the Turtle Dove". Columbus named the island Santa Ana

Tortuguero National Park
Tortuguero National Park is a National Park within the Tortuguero Conservation Area. The reserve is also included in the Humedal Caribe Noreste, a wetland of international importance under the Ramsar Convention. The park is located in the Limón Province of northeastern Costa Rica

Torture
Torture is the act of inflicting severe pain as a means of punishment, revenge, forcing information or a confession, or simply as an act of cruelty. Throughout history, torture has often been used as a method of political re-education, interrogation, punishment, and coercion

Torus
In geometry, a torus is a surface of revolution generated by revolving a circle in three dimensional space about an axis coplanar with the circle

Torvill and Dean
Torvill and Dean are British ice dancers and former British-, European-, Olympic- and World champions

Tory Island
Toraigh is an inhabited island 14.5 km off the northwest coast of County Donegal, Ireland. It is also known in Irish as Oileán Thoraigh, Oileán Thoraí or Oileán Thúr Rí.-Language:The main spoken language on the island is Irish, but English is also understood

Tosca
Tosca is an opera in three acts by Giacomo Puccini to an Italian libretto by Luigi Illica and Giuseppe Giacosa. It premiered at the Teatro Costanzi in Rome on 14 January 1900

Toshiba Satellite
The Toshiba Satellite is Toshiba's line of consumer-grade notebook computers. Models in the Satellite family vary greatly, ranging from entry-level models to full-fledged media center-class notebooks

Toshiro Mifune
Toshirō Mifune was a Japanese actor who appeared in almost 170 feature films. He is best known for his 16-film collaboration with filmmaker Akira Kurosawa, from 1948 to 1965, in works such as Rashomon, Seven Samurai, Throne of Blood, and Yojimbo

Total coloring
In graph theory, total coloring is a type of coloring on the vertices and edges of a graph.When used without any qualification, a total coloring is always assumed to be proper in the sense that no adjacent vertices, no adjacent edges, and no edge and its endvertices are assigned the same color.The total chromatic number χ″ a graph G is the least number of

Total depravity
Total depravity is a theological doctrine that derives from the Augustinian concept of original sin

Total dissolved solids
Total Dissolved Solids is a measure of the combined content of all inorganic and organic substances contained in a liquid in: molecular, ionized or micro-granular suspended form. Generally the operational definition is that the solids must be small enough to survive filtration through a sieve the size of two micrometer

Total Fertility Rate
The total fertility rate of a population is the average number of children that would be born to a woman over her lifetime if she were to experience the exact current age-specific fertility rates through her lifetime, and she

Total Gym
The "Total Gym" is a brand name and product line of exercise machines used for strength training, stretching, and pilates training designed by EFI Sports Medicine Incorporated of San Diego, California. The various models are manufactured for 3 different types of customers: Medical Facilities, Fitness Facilities, and Home Consumers

Total Quality Management
Total quality management or TQM is an integrative philosophy of management for continuously improving the quality of products and processes.

Total station
A total station is an electronic/optical instrument used in modern surveying. The total station is an electronic theodolite integrated with an electronic distance meter to read slope distances from the instrument to a particular point.

Total Wipeout
Total Wipeout is a British game show, hosted by Richard Hammond and Amanda Byram, which first aired on 3 January 2009. Each week 20 contestants compete in a series of challenges in an attempt to win £10,000. These challenges are based in large pools of water or mud and generally involve large assault courses that participants must cross

Tote gote
The Tote Gote is an off-road motorcycle that was produced from 1958 to 1970. It was developed by Ralph Bonham, who is credited with inventing the off-road motorcycle.- History :

Totem pole
Totem poles are monumental sculptures carved from large trees, mostly Western Red Cedar, by cultures of the indigenous peoples of the Pacific Northwest Coast of North America

Tottenham
Tottenham is an area of the London Borough of Haringey, England, situated north north east of Charing Cross.-Toponymy:Tottenham is believed to have been named after Tota, a farmer, whose hamlet was mentioned in the Domesday Book; hence Tota's hamlet became Tottenham

Totto-chan, the Little Girl at the Window
Totto-chan, the Little Girl at the Window is a children's book written by Japanese television personality and UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador Tetsuko Kuroyanagi. The book was published originally as in 1981, and became an instant bestseller in Japan

Toucan
Toucans are members of the family Ramphastidae of near passerine birds from the Neotropics. The family is most closely related to the American barbets. They are brightly marked and have large, often colorful bills. The family includes five genera and about forty different species

Touch (60s band)
Touch were a '60s rock group who recorded just one album, 1968's eponymous and extremely rare Touch. They consisted of John Bordonaro , Don Gallucci , Bruce Hauser , Jeff Hawks , and Joey Newman AKA Vern Kjellberg .-History:Gallucci will probably always be best known

Touché Turtle and Dum Dum
Touché Turtle and Dum Dum is one of the segments from The New Hanna-Barbera Cartoon Series, produced by Hanna-Barbera in 1962.This show was originally on the The New Hanna-Barbera Cartoon Series along with Wally Gator and Lippy the Lion & Hardy Har Har.-History:Touché Turtle and Dum Dum were a pair of heroic fencers

Touching the Void
Touching the Void is a 1988 book by Joe Simpson, recounting his and Simon Yates's disastrous and nearly fatal climb of the 6,344-metre Siula Grande in the Peruvian Andes in 1985.

Touchscreen
A touchscreen is an electronic visual display that can detect the presence and location of a touch within the display area. The term generally refers to touching the display of the device with a finger or hand. Touchscreens can also sense other passive objects, such as a stylus

Touchstone (As You Like It)
Touchstone is an interesting fictional character in Shakespeare's play As You Like It. Touchstone is the court fool or jester, portrayed as a wise man with a dry, cynical wit. Throughout the play he comments on the other characters of the play and thus, contributes to a better understanding of the play

Toughened glass
Toughened or tempered glass is a type of safety glass processed by controlled thermal or chemical treatments to increase its strength compared with normal glass. Tempering creates balanced internal stresses which cause the glass, when broken, to crumble into small granular chunks instead of splintering into jagged shards

Toul-Rosieres Air Base
Toul-Rosières Air Base is a reserve French Air Force base. It is located in the Meurthe-et-Moselle département of France, 10 miles northeast of the city of Toul, on the west side of the Route nationale 411 Highway about one mile southeast of Rosières-en-Haye.Toul Air Base was used by American fighter and bomber aircraft during World War II

Tour of Britain
The Tour of Britain is a cycle race, conducted over several stages, in which participants race from place to place across parts of Great Britain.

Tour of Duty (TV series)
Tour of Duty is an American drama television series on CBS. It ran for three seasons from September 1987 to April 1990 as 58 one–hour episodes. The show was created by Steve Duncan and L. Travis Clark, and produced by Zev Braun.

Tourism
Tourism is travel for recreational, leisure or business purposes. The World Tourism Organization defines tourists as people "traveling to and staying in places outside their usual environment for not more than one consecutive year for leisure, business and other purposes".Tourism has become a popular global leisure activity

Tourism in France
France attracted 78.95 million foreign tourists in 2010, making it the most popular tourist destination in the world. France offers mountain ranges, coastlines such as in Brittany or along the Mediterranean Sea, cities with a rich cultural heritage, châteaux like Versailles, and vineyards

Tourism in Switzerland
Tourists are drawn to Switzerland's Alpine climate and landscapes, in particular for skiing and mountaineering.As of 2006, tourism accounted for an estimated 3.6% of Switzerland's gross domestic product.- History :

Tourism in the United States
Tourism in the United States is a large industry that serves millions of international and domestic tourists yearly. Tourists visit the US to see natural wonders, cities, historic landmarks and entertainment venues

Tournament (graph theory)
A tournament is a directed graph obtained by assigning a direction for each edge in an undirected complete graph. That is, it is a directed graph in which every pair of vertices is connected by a single directed edge.

Toussaint L'Ouverture
François-Dominique Toussaint Louverture , also Toussaint Bréda, Toussaint-Louverture was the leader of the Haitian Revolution. His military genius and political acumen led to the establishment of the independent black state of Haiti, transforming an entire society of slaves into a free, self-governing people

Toussaint-Guillaume Picquet de la Motte
Count Toussaint-Guillaume Picquet de la Motte was a French admiral.Aged fifteen, he joined the navy as a midshipman and served in Morocco, the Baltic Sea, the Caribbean Islands and in India. Noted for his strategic skills, he was called to Paris in 1775 to help the Secretary of State prepare the order to reorganise the Navy

Tower Bridge
Tower Bridge is a combined bascule and suspension bridge in London, England, over the River Thames. It is close to the Tower of London, from which it takes its name

Tower of Babel
The Tower of Babel , according to the Book of Genesis, was an enormous tower built in the plain of Shinar .According to the biblical account, a united humanity of the generations following the Great Flood, speaking a single language and migrating from the east, came to the land of Shinar, where they resolved to build a city with a tower "with its top in the heavens...lest we be

Tower of London
Her Majesty's Royal Palace and Fortress, more commonly known as the Tower of London, is a historic castle on the north bank of the River Thames in central London, England. It lies within the London Borough of Tower Hamlets, separated from the eastern edge of the City of London by the open space known as Tower Hill

Towing
Towing is the process of pulling or drawing behind a chain, line, bar or some other form of couplings. Towing is most visibly performed by road vehicles, but anything from waterborne vessels to tractors to people can tow cargo. Troop carrying and cargo carrying gliders were towed behind powered aircraft during WWII and remains a popular means for modern leisure gliders to take off

Town and Country Planning (Use Classes) Order 1987
The Town and Country Planning Order 1987 is a Statutory Instrument which revoked and replaced the Town and Country Planning Order 1972 as amended by the Town and Country Planning Order 1983. The 1987 order has since been amended, in 1991, 1992, 2005 , 2006 and 2010

Town crier
A town crier, or bellman, is an officer of the court who makes public pronouncements as required by the court . The crier can also be used to make public announcements in the streets

Town Hall railway station, Sydney
Town Hall railway station is the second-busiest railway station on the CityRail network , located in Sydney, Australia. Located underground, it is situated in the Sydney central business district, under the street in front of the Sydney Town Hall, about 1.2 km north of Central.- History :The station is built on the site of Sydney's earliest colonial

Town twinning
Twin towns and sister cities are two of many terms used to describe the cooperative agreements between towns, cities, and even counties in geographically and politically distinct areas to promote cultural and commercial ties.- Terminology :

Towner Gallery
Towner is Eastbourne's museum of art. Since it opened in 1923 the Towner Art Gallery was located in an 18th-century manor house in Manor Gardens, in the Old Town district of Eastbourne

Townes Van Zandt
John Townes Van Zandt , best known as Townes Van Zandt, was an American Texas Country-folk music singer-songwriter, performer, and poet

Townhouse
A townhouse is the term historically used in the United Kingdom, Ireland and in many other countries to describe a residence of a peer or member of the aristocracy in the capital or major city. Most such figures owned one or more country houses in which they lived for much of the year

Township (South Africa)
In South Africa, the term township and location usually refers to the urban living areas that, from the late 19th century until the end of Apartheid, were reserved for non-whites . Townships were usually built on the periphery of towns and cities

Towson University
Towson University, often referred to as TU or simply Towson for short, is a public university located in Towson in Baltimore County, Maryland, U.S

Toxic waste
Toxic waste is waste material that can cause death or injury to living creatures. It spreads quite easily and can contaminate lakes and rivers. The term is often used interchangeably with “hazardous waste”, or discarded material that can pose a long-term risk to health or environment.Toxic waste may be produced by heavy industry, but also comes from residential use Toxic waste is waste material that can cause death or injury to living creatures. It spreads quite easily and can contaminate lakes and rivers. The term is often used interchangeably with “hazardous waste”, or discarded material that can pose a long-term risk to health or environment.Toxic waste may be produced by heavy industry, but also comes from residential use Toxic waste is waste material that can cause death or injury to living creatures. It spreads quite easily and can contaminate lakes and rivers. The term is often used interchangeably with “hazardous waste”, or discarded material that can pose a long-term risk to health or environment.Toxic waste may be produced by heavy industry, but also comes from residential use (e.g

Toxteth riots
The Toxteth riots of July 1981 were a civil disturbance in Toxteth, inner-city Liverpool, which arose in part from long-standing tensions between the local police and the black community

Toy block
Toy blocks , are wooden, plastic or foam pieces of various shapes and colors that are used as building toys

Toy dog
Toy dog traditionally refers to a very small dog or a grouping of small and very small breeds of dog. A toy dog may be of any of various dog types. Types of dogs referred to as toy dogs may include Spaniels, Pinschers and Terriers that have been bred down in size. Not all toy dogs are lapdogs, although that is an important and ancient type of toy dog

Toy Fox Terrier
The Toy Fox Terrier is a small terrier breed of dog, directly descended from the larger Fox Terrier but considered a separate breed.-Appearance:

Toy theater
Toy theater, also called paper theater and model theater, is a form of miniature theater dating back to the early 19th century in Europe. Toy theaters were often printed on paperboard sheets and sold as kits at the concession stand of an opera house, playhouse, or vaudeville theater

Toy wagon
A toy wagon has the same structure as the traditional, larger wagon, but is much smaller and has an open top. An average wagon is able to seat one child, and is generally propelled by human power through a handle at the front. Some famous brands are Radio Flyer, Red Rider, Northern Tool and Equipment, Lowes, and Speedway Express

Toynbee tiles
The Toynbee tiles are messages of mysterious origin found embedded in asphalt of streets in about two dozen major cities in the United States and four South American capitals. Since the 1980s, several hundred tiles have been discovered. They are generally about the size of an American license plate, but sometimes considerably larger

Toyon
Heteromeles arbutifolia , and commonly known as Toyon, is a common perennial shrub native to California down to Baja California.

 
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23