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Metalloid
Metalloid is a term used in chemistry when classifying the chemical elements. On the basis of their general physical and chemical properties, each element can usually be classified as a metal or a nonmetal. However, some elements with intermediate or mixed properties can be harder to characterize

Metallurgy
Metallurgy is a domain of materials science that studies the physical and chemical behavior of metallic elements, their intermetallic compounds, and their mixtures, which are called alloys. It is also the technology of metals: the way in which science is applied to their practical use

Metamorfosi (band)
Metamorfosi are an Italian symphonic rock band from Rome.They have released three albums, ...E Fu Il Sesto Giorno , Inferno and Paradiso . The two latter are concept albums based on Dante's The Divine Comedy. Inferno in particular has received critical acclaim amongst progressive rock fans.

Metamorfosis (Cenobita album)
Metamorfosis is a 2002 album by Mexico City aggrotech/cyberpunk band Cenobita.-Track listing:# “On Line Trinity”# “Estrellas”# “Slaves”# “Indiferencia”# “Imperios”# “Human Racing”# “Destino Final ”# “Aliens”

Metamorphic rock
Metamorphic rock is the transformation of an existing rock type, the protolith, in a process called metamorphism, which means "change in form". The protolith is subjected to heat and pressure causing profound physical and/or chemical change

Metamorphism
Metamorphism is the solid-state recrystallization of pre-existing rocks due to changes in physical and chemical conditions, primarily heat, pressure, and the introduction of chemically active fluids. Mineralogical, chemical and crystallographic changes can occur during this process

Metamorphism (disambiguation)
Metamorphism, in geology, is the solid state recrystallisation of rocks under environmental forces.Metamorphism may also refer to:* Metamorphism * Metamorphism , the categorical dual of a hylomorphism

Metamorphism (Merzbow album)
Metamorphism is a studio album by Japanese noise musician Merzbow. The release was limited to 1000 copies with the first 500 packaged in a heavy duty marble box and 500 in a slimline jewel case.-Track listing:-Personnel:

Metamorphoses (film)
is a Japanese animated film, originally released by Sanrio in the United States on May 3, 1979. The film is a retelling of stories from Metamorphoses by the Roman poet Ovid, set to rock music by Arthur Simms and Pattie Brooks

Metamorphosis (Culture Beat album)
- Track listing :#"Pay no mind"#"You belong"#"Faith in your heart"#"Blue skies"#"Rendez-vous"#"Guardian angel"#"Electrify me"#"Pray for redemption"#"This is my time"#"Do you really know"#"Language of love"#"Metamorphosis"

Metamorphosis (Papa Roach album)
Metamorphosis is the sixth album by California rock band Papa Roach. It was released by DGC/Interscope on March 24, 2009. The album was originally planned to be titled Days of War, Nights of Love, which is a lyrical quote from the song "No More Secrets" on the band's previous album, The Paramour Sessions

Metamorphosis (Papa Roach album)
Metamorphosis is the sixth album by California rock band Papa Roach. It was released by DGC/Interscope on March 24, 2009. The album was originally planned to be titled Days of War, Nights of Love, which is a lyrical quote from the song "No More Secrets" on the band's previous album, The Paramour Sessions

Metamorphosis (Pillar album)
Metamorphosis is the independent debut album of Christian rock band Pillar, released on June 1, 1999. Only 1000 copies of this album were made available

Metamorphosis (Star Trek: The Original Series)
"Metamorphosis" is a second season episode of Star Trek: The Original Series first broadcast November 10, 1967 and repeated July 19, 1968. It is episode #38, production #31, written by Gene L

Metamorphosis (TV series)
Metamorphosis is a Singaporean Chinese action thriller drama which is being telecast on Singapore's free-to-air channel, MediaCorp TV Channel 8. It made its debut on 18 September 2007, screening at 2100 hours every night on weekdays. The serial consists of 20 episodes

Metanoia (disambiguation)
Metanoia may refer to:*Metanoia , repentance*Metanoia , correction, a rhetorical device*Metanoia , the process of experiencing a psychotic "break down" and subsequent, positive psychological re-building or "healing"

Metaphase
Metaphase, from the ancient Greek μετά and φάσις , is a stage of mitosis in the eukaryotic cell cycle in which condensed & highly coiled chromosomes, carrying genetic information, align in the middle of the cell before being separated into each of the two daughter cells

Metaphor
A metaphor is a literary figure of speech that uses an image, story or tangible thing to represent a less tangible thing or some intangible quality or idea; e.g., "Her eyes were glistening jewels." Metaphor may also be used for any rhetorical figures of speech that achieve their effects via association, comparison or resemblance

Metaphosphate
A metaphosphate ion is an oxyanion that has the empirical formula PO3−. The structure of a metaphosphate ion can be described as being made up of PO4 structural units in which each unit shares two corners with another unit

Metaphysical
Metaphysical may refer to:*Metaphysics, a branch of philosophy dealing with aspects of existence and the theory of knowledge*The supernatural

Metastability
Metastability describes the extended duration of certain equilibria acquired by complex systems when leaving their most stable state after an external action.

Metastasis
Metastasis, or metastatic disease , is the spread of a disease from one organ or part to another non-adjacent organ or part. It was previously thought that only malignant tumor cells and infections have the capacity to metastasize; however, this is being reconsidered due to new research

Metatarsus
The metatarsus or metatarsal bones are a group of five long bones in the foot located between the tarsal bones of the hind- and mid-foot and the phalanges of the toes. Lacking individual names, the metatarsal bones are numbered from the medial side : the first, second, third, fourth, and fifth metatarsal

Metatheria
Metatheria is a grouping within the animal class Mammalia. First proposed by Thomas Henry Huxley in 1880, it is nearly synonymous with the earlier taxon Marsupialia though it is slightly wider since it also contains the nearest fossil relatives of marsupial mammals.The earliest known representative, Sinodelphys, is from the Lower Cretaceous of China.The closest

Metathesis
Metathesis may refer to:* Metathesis , in phonology, a sound change that alters the order of phonemes in a word

Metazocine
Metazocine is an opioid analgesic related to pentazocine. While metazocine has significant analgesic effects, mediated through a mixed agonist-antagonist action at the mu opioid receptor, its clinical use is limited by dysphoric and hallucinogenic effects which are most likely caused by activity at kappa opioid receptors and sigma receptors.

Metcalf (surname)
Metcalf is a surname, and may refer to:* Barbara Metcalf, American historian* Chris Perry-Metcalf, British actor* Donald Metcalf, Australian physiologist* Dorothy Metcalf-Lindenburger, American trainee astronaut* Eric Metcalf, American football player

Metcalfe (surname)
Metcalfe is a surname, originating in Dentdale, Yorkshire, and is very common in places such as Wensleydale and Swaledale.It may refer to* Ben Metcalfe, Canadian journalist and environmentalist

METEOR
METEOR is a metric for the evaluation of machine translation output. The metric is based on the harmonic mean of unigram precision and recall, with recall weighted higher than precision

METeOR
METeOR , Australia’s repository for national metadata standards for health, housing and community services statistics and information. METeOR is a Metadata registry based on the 2003 version of the ISO/IEC 11179 Information technology - Metadata registries standard

Meteor (St. Louis-San Francisco Railway)
The Meteor was a named passenger train operated by the St. Louis-San Francisco Railway . It ran overnight between Oklahoma City and St. Louis via Tulsa. The name was shared with a branch line Meteor running between Monett, Missouri, and Paris, Texas. Later this line was truncated to terminate at Fort Smith, Arkansas

Meter (hymn)
A hymn meter or metre indicates the number of syllables for the lines in each stanza of a hymn. This provides a means of marrying the hymn's text with an appropriate hymn tune for singing.-Hymn and poetic meter:

Meter (music)
Meter or metre is a term that music has inherited from the rhythmic element of poetry where it means the number of lines in a verse, the number of syllables in each line and the arrangement of those syllables as long or short, accented or unaccented

Metethoheptazine
Metethoheptazine is an opioid analgesic from the phenazepine family. It was invented in the 1960s.Metethoheptazine produces similar effects to other opioids, including analgesia, sedation, dizziness and nausea.

Meth (disambiguation)
Meth or meths may refer to:* Methamphetamine, a psychostimulant stimulant drug* Methanol, a simple alcohol with formula CH3OH* Methylated spirit, ethanol that has additives to make it more poisonous or unpalatable* Methadone, a synthetic opioid

Methacrylate
Methacrylates are the salts or esters of methacrylic acid.Methacrylates contain methyl-vinyl groups, that is, two carbon atoms double bonded to each other, directly attached to the carbonyl carbon, and wherein the vinyl group is substituted with a non-terminal methyl group.Methacrylates are common monomers in polymer plastics, forming the acrylate polymers

Methacrylic acid
Methacrylic acid, abbreviated MAA, is an organic compound. This colourless, viscous liquid is a carboxylic acid with an acrid unpleasant odor. It is soluble in warm water and miscible with most organic solvents. Methacrylic acid is produced industrially on a large scale as a precursor to its esters, especially methyl methacrylate and poly

Methanation
Methanation is a physical-chemical process to generate Methane from a mixture of various gases out of biomass fermentation or thermo-chemical gasification. The main components are carbon monoxide and hydrogen

Methane
Methane is a chemical compound with the chemical formula . It is the simplest alkane, the principal component of natural gas, and probably the most abundant organic compound on earth. The relative abundance of methane makes it an attractive fuel

Methanesulfonic acid
Methanesulfonic acid is a colorless liquid with the chemical formula CH3SO3H. It is the simplest of the alkylsulfonic acids. Salts and esters of methanesulfonic acid are known as mesylates. Methanesulfonic acid is used as an acid catalyst in organic reactions because it is non-volatile, strong acid that is soluble in organic solvents

Methanolamine
Methanolamine, with a chemical formula of CH5NO, also called aminomethanol, is the simplest aminoalcohol. It contains both a primary amine and a primary alcohol. Like other amines, methanolamine acts as a weak base.

Metheptazine
Metheptazine is an opioid analgesic from the phenazepine family.Metheptazine produces similar effects to other opioids, including analgesia, sedation, dizziness and nausea.

Methionine
Methionine is an α-amino acid with the chemical formula HO2CCHCH2CH2SCH3. This essential amino acid is classified as nonpolar. This amino-acid is coded by the codon AUG, also known as the initiation codon, since it indicates mRNA's coding region where translation into protein begins.-Function:Together with cysteine, methionine is one of two sulfur-containing proteinogenic amino

Methionine (data page)
-References:# # #

Method
Method may refer to:* Scientific method, a series of steps taken to acquire knowledge* Method , a piece of code associated with a class or object to perform a task

Method (film)
Method is a 2004 thriller film directed by Duncan Roy. The international co-production is a film within a film about a cast and crew who are in Romania to make a film about serial killer, Belle Gunness.-Plot:

Method of lines
The method of lines is a technique for solving partial differential equations in which all but one dimension is discretized. MOL allows standard, general-purpose methods and software, developed for the numerical integration of ODEs and DAEs, to be used

Methopholine
Methopholine is an opioid analgesic drug discovered in the 1950s by a team of Swiss researchers at Hoffmann-La Roche.Methopholine is an isoquinoline derivative which is not structurally related to most other opioids. It has around the same efficacy as an analgesic as codeine, and was evaluated for the treatment of postoperative pain

Methyl acrylate
Methyl acrylate is a volatile chemical compound classified as a methyl ester. It has a characteristic acrid odor used in the preparation of polyamidoamine dendrimers typically by Michael addition with a primary amine.

Methylated spirit
Denatured alcohol or methylated spirits is ethanol that has additives to make it more poisonous or unpalatable, and thus, undrinkable. In some cases it is also dyed.

Methylene
Methylene is a chemical species in which a carbon atom is bonded to two hydrogen atoms. Three different possibilities present themselves:* the -CH2- substituent group: e.g., dichloromethane .

Methylketobemidone
Methylketobemidone is an opioid analgesic that is an analogue of ketobemidone. It was developed in the 1950s during research into analogues of pethidine and was assessed by the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime but was not included on the list of drugs under international control, probably because it was not used in medicine or widely available.Methylketobemidone is so named

METI
METI may refer to:*Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry, Japan*Messaging to Extra-Terrestrial Intelligence

Meti
Meti is a town in southwestern Ethiopia. Located in Godere woreda of the Gambela Region, this town has a latitude and longitude of with an elevation of 1266 meters above sea level.

Metis
Metis meant "cunningness" or "wisdom, craft, skill" in Ancient Greek.Metis may also refer to:* Métis people , a mixed-race people of Canada* Metis , a Titaness and the first wife of Zeus

Stinky tofu
Stinky tofu or chòu dòufu is a form of fermented tofu that has a strong odor. It is a popular snack in East and Southeast Asia, particularly mainland China, Taiwan and Hong Kong and in East Asian enclaves elsewhere where it is usually found homemade, at night markets or roadside stands, or as a side dish in lunch bars rather than in restaurants

Stinson Aircraft Company
The Stinson Aircraft Company was an aircraft manufacturing company in the United States between the 1920s and the 1950s.-The Company:The Stinson Aircraft Company was founded in Dayton, Ohio, in 1920 by aviator Edward “Eddie” Stinson, brother to Katherine Stinson. After five years of business ventures, Stinson made Detroit, Michigan the focus for his future flying endeavors

Stinson Reliant
The Stinson Reliant was a popular single-engine four to five seat high-wing monoplane manufactured by the Stinson Aircraft Division of the Aviation Manufacturing Corporation of Wayne, Michigan.-Design and development:

Stippling
Stippling is the creation of a pattern simulating varying degrees of solidity or shading by using small dots. Such a pattern may occur in nature and these effects are frequently emulated by artists.-Art:

Stipule
In botany, stipule is a term coined by Linnaeus which refers to outgrowths borne on either side of the base of a leafstalk

Stirling
Stirling is a city and former ancient burgh in Scotland, and is at the heart of the wider Stirling council area. The city is clustered around a large fortress and medieval old-town beside the River Forth

Stirling Castle
Stirling Castle, located in Stirling, is one of the largest and most important castles, both historically and architecturally, in Scotland. The castle sits atop Castle Hill, an intrusive crag, which forms part of the Stirling Sill geological formation. It is surrounded on three sides by steep cliffs, giving it a strong defensive position

Stirling engine
A Stirling engine is a heat engine operating by cyclic compression and expansion of air or other gas, the working fluid, at different temperature levels such that there is a net conversion of heat energy to mechanical work.

Stirlingshire
Stirlingshire or the County of Stirling is a registration county of Scotland, based around Stirling, the former county town. It borders Perthshire to the north, Clackmannanshire and West Lothian to the east, Lanarkshire to the south, and Dunbartonshire to the south-west.Until 1975 it was a county

Stochastic process
In probability theory, a stochastic process , or sometimes random process, is the counterpart to a deterministic process

Stochastic tunneling
Stochastic tunneling is an approach to global optimization based on the Monte Carlo method-sampling of the function to be minimized.- Idea :

Stock broker
A stock broker or stockbroker is a regulated professional broker who buys and sells shares and other securities through market makers or Agency Only Firms on behalf of investors

Stock car (rail)
In railroad terminology, a stock car or cattle wagon is a type of rolling stock used for carrying livestock to market

Stock car racing
Stock car racing is a form of automobile racing found mainly in the United States, Canada, New Zealand, Great Britain, Brazil and Argentina. Traditionally, races are run on oval tracks measuring approximately in length

Stock exchange
A stock exchange is an entity that provides services for stock brokers and traders to trade stocks, bonds, and other securities. Stock exchanges also provide facilities for issue and redemption of securities and other financial instruments, and capital events including the payment of income and dividends

Stock market
A stock market or equity market is a public entity for the trading of company stock and derivatives at an agreed price; these are securities listed on a stock exchange as well as those only traded privately.The size of the world stock market was estimated at about $36.6 trillion

Stock market crash
A stock market crash is a sudden dramatic decline of stock prices across a significant cross-section of a stock market, resulting in a significant loss of paper wealth. Crashes are driven by panic as much as by underlying economic factors

Stock market cycles
Stock market cycles are the long-term price patterns of the stock market.-Description:There are many types of business cycles including those that impact the stock market.

Stock valuation
In financial markets, stock valuation is the method of calculating theoretical values of companies and their stocks. The main use of these methods is to predict future market prices, or more generally potential market prices, and thus to profit from price movement – stocks that are judged undervalued are bought, while stocks that are judged

Stockholm
Stockholm is the capital and the largest city of Sweden and constitutes the most populated urban area in Scandinavia. Stockholm is the most populous city in Sweden, with a population of 851,155 in the municipality , 1.37 million in the urban area , and around 2.1 million in the metropolitan area

Stockholm Public Library
Stockholm Public Library is a rotunda library building in Stockholm, Sweden, designed by Swedish architect Gunnar Asplund. The library was prepared from 1918 and onwards by a committee in which Asplund himself took part. Construction began in 1924, and the library was completed in 1928

Stockholm Stock Exchange
The Stockholm Stock Exchange is a stock exchange located in Stockholm, Sweden. Founded in 1863 it is the primary securities exchange of the Nordic Countries.

Stockholm syndrome
In psychology, Stockholm Syndrome is an apparently paradoxical psychological phenomenon wherein hostages express empathy and have positive feelings towards their captors, sometimes to the point of defending them

Stockholm University
Stockholm University is a state university in Stockholm, Sweden. It has over 28,000 students at four faculties, making it one of the largest universities in Scandinavia. The institution is also frequently regarded as one of the top 100 universities in the world

Stockland Bay Village
Stockland Bay Village is a shopping centre located on The Entrance Road at Bateau Bay on the Central Coast of New South Wales, Australia. It is owned and operated by Stockland, a major property developer in Australia.- Stores :

Stockmann
Stockmann is a Finnish listed company which was established in 1862 and is engaged in the retail trade. Stockmann's three divisions are the department store division, Hobby Hall, which specialises in mail order and online sales, and Seppälä, a chain of fashion stores

Stockton, California
Stockton, California, the seat of San Joaquin County, is the fourth-largest city in the Central Valley of the U.S. state of California. With a population of 291,707 at the 2010 census, Stockton ranks as this state's 13th largest city

Stockton-on-Tees
Stockton-on-Tees is a market town in north east England. It is the major settlement in the unitary authority and borough of Stockton-on-Tees. For ceremonial purposes, the borough is split between County Durham and North Yorkshire as it also incorporates a number of smaller towns including Billingham, Yarm and Thornaby

Stoicism
Stoicism is a school of Hellenistic philosophy founded in Athens by Zeno of Citium in the early . The Stoics taught that destructive emotions resulted from errors in judgment, and that a sage, or person of "moral and intellectual perfection," would not suffer such emotions.Stoics were concerned with the active relationship between cosmic determinism and human

Stoke Military Hospital
Stoke Military Hospital in Plymouth, England, was completed in 1797. It was built for the British Army on the north side of Stonehouse Creek, to match the Royal Naval hospital on the south side. The workforce was made up of Napoleonic prisoners of war who were housed in prison ships on the Hamoaze.The hospital was used by the army for 148 years, until the end of World War II in 1945

Stokes
-Science:* Stokes , a measure of viscosity*Stokes flow*Stokes law*Stokes' law *Stokes parameters*Stokes radius*Stokes relations*Stokes shift*Stokes' theorem*Navier-Stokes equations-Places:* Stokes

Stokes parameters
The Stokes parameters are a set of values that describe the polarization state of electromagnetic radiation. They were defined by George Gabriel Stokes in 1852, as a mathematically convenient alternative to the more common description of incoherent or partially polarized radiation in terms of its total intensity , degree of polarization , and the shape parameters

Stokes radius
The Stokes radius, Stokes-Einstein radius, or hydrodynamic radius RH, named after George Gabriel Stokes, is not the effective radius of a hydrated molecule in solution as often mentioned. Rather it is the radius of a hard sphere that diffuses at the same rate as the molecule. The behavior of this sphere includes hydration and shape effects

STOL
STOL is an acronym for short take-off and landing, a term used to describe aircraft with very short runway requirements.-Definitions:There is no one accepted definition of STOL and many different definitions have been used by different authorities and nations at various times and for a myriad of regulatory and military purposes

Stolac
Stolac is a town and municipality in Bosnia and Herzegovina, located in the southern part of Herzegovina. Administratively, it is part of the Herzegovina-Neretva Canton in the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

Stole
The stole is a liturgical vestment of various Christian denominations, particularly within the Catholic Church and among the various Protestant communions of Anglicanism and Lutheranism. It consists of a band of colored cloth, formerly usually of silk, about seven and a half to nine feet long and three to four inches wide, whose ends may be straight or may broaden out

Stolen Generation
The Stolen Generations were the children of Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander descent who were removed from their families by the Australian Federal and State government agencies and church missions, under acts of their respective parliaments

Stoma
In botany, a stoma is a pore, found in the leaf and stem epidermis that is used forgas exchange. The pore is bordered by a pair of specialized parenchyma cells known as guard cells that are responsible for regulating the size of the opening

Stomach
The stomach is a muscular, hollow, dilated part of the alimentary canal which functions as an important organ of the digestive tract in some animals, including vertebrates, echinoderms, insects , and molluscs. It is involved in the second phase of digestion, following mastication .The stomach is located between the esophagus and the small intestine

Stomach cancer
Gastric cancer, commonly referred to as stomach cancer, can develop in any part of the stomach and may spread throughout the stomach and to other organs; particularly the esophagus, lungs, lymph nodes, and the liver

Stompers
Stompers were first created in 1980 by Schaper Toys. These toys were battery-powered vehicles that ran on a single AA battery and featured all-wheel drive. They were driven by a single motor that turned both axles.

Stone Age
The Stone Age is a broad prehistoric period, lasting about 2.5 million years , during which humans and their predecessor species in the genus Homo, as well as the earlier partly contemporary genera Australopithecus and Paranthropus, widely used exclusively stone as their hard material in the manufacture of implements with a sharp edge, a point, or a percussion surface

Stone carving
Stone carving is an ancient activity where pieces of rough natural stone are shaped by the controlled removal of stone. Owing to the permanence of the material, evidence can be found that even the earliest societies indulged in some form of stone work.

Stone circle
A stone circle is a monument of standing stones arranged in a circle. Such monuments have been constructed across the world throughout history for many different reasons.

Stone Mountain
Stone Mountain is a quartz monzonite dome monadnock in Stone Mountain, Georgia, United States. At its summit, the elevation is 1,686 feet amsl and 825 feet above the surrounding area. Stone Mountain granite extends underground at its longest point into Gwinnett County

Stone of Scone
The Stone of Scone , also known as the Stone of Destiny and often referred to in England as The Coronation Stone, is an oblong block of red sandstone, used for centuries in the coronation of the monarchs of Scotland and later the monarchs of England, Great Britain and the United Kingdom

Stone put
The stone put is one of the main Scottish heavy athletic events at modern-day Highland games gatherings. Similar to the shot put, the stone put more frequently uses an ordinary stone or rock instead of a steel ball

Stone soup
Stone Soup is an old folk story in which hungry strangers persuade local people of a town to give them food. It is usually told as a lesson in cooperation, especially amid scarcity. In varying traditions, the stone has been replaced with other common inedible objects, and therefore the fable is also known as button soup, wood soup, nail soup, and axe soup

Stone tool
A stone tool is, in the most general sense, any tool made either partially or entirely out of stone. Although stone tool-dependent societies and cultures still exist today, most stone tools are associated with prehistoric, particularly Stone Age cultures that have become extinct

Stonefish
Synanceia verrucosa is a fish species, sometimes lethal to humans, which is known as the reef stonefish or simply stonefish. They are carnivorous ray-finned fish with venomous spines that lives on reef bottoms, camouflaged as a rock

Stonehenge
Stonehenge is a prehistoric monument located in the English county of Wiltshire, about west of Amesbury and north of Salisbury. One of the most famous sites in the world, Stonehenge is composed of a circular setting of large standing stones set within earthworks

Stonemasonry
The craft of stonemasonry has existed since the dawn of civilization - creating buildings, structures, and sculpture using stone from the earth. These materials have been used to construct many of the long-lasting, ancient monuments, artifacts, cathedrals, and cities in a wide variety of cultures

Stonewall Jackson
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Stonewall riots
The Stonewall riots were a series of spontaneous, violent demonstrations against a police raid that took place in the early morning hours of June 28, 1969, at the Stonewall Inn, in the Greenwich Village neighborhood of New York City

Stono Rebellion
The Stono Rebellion was a slave rebellion that commenced on 9 September 1739, in the colony of South Carolina

Stonyhurst College
Stonyhurst College is a Roman Catholic independent school, adhering to the Jesuit tradition. It is located on the Stonyhurst Estate near the village of Hurst Green in the Ribble Valley area of Lancashire, England, and occupies a Grade I listed building

Stop sign
A Stop sign is a traffic sign to notify drivers that they must stop before proceeding.-Specifications:The Vienna Convention on Road Signs and Signals proposed standard stop sign diameters of 0.6, 0.9 or 1.2 metres. UK and New Zealand stop signs are 750, 900 or 1200 mm, according to sign location and traffic speeds

Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening
"Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening" is a poem written in 1922 by Robert Frost, and published in 1923 in his New Hampshire volume. Imagery and personification are prominent in the work

Storage heater
A storage heater or heat bank is an electrical heater which stores thermal energy during the evening, or at night when base load electricity is available at lower cost, and releases the heat during the day as required.-Principle of operation:

Stord
Stord is a municipality in the county of Hordaland, Norway. Stord is sometimes called "Norway in miniature" - as it has such a variety of landscapes: coastline, fjords, forests, agricultural land, and mountain areas.

Storm
A storm is any disturbed state of an astronomical body's atmosphere, especially affecting its surface, and strongly implying severe weather

Storm chasing
Storm chasing is broadly defined as the pursuit of any severe weather condition, regardless of motive, which can be curiosity, adventure, scientific exploration or for news professions/media coverage.

Storm surge
A storm surge is an offshore rise of water associated with a low pressure weather system, typically tropical cyclones and strong extratropical cyclones. Storm surges are caused primarily by high winds pushing on the ocean's surface. The wind causes the water to pile up higher than the ordinary sea level

Storm-petrel
Storm petrels are seabirds in the family Hydrobatidae, part of the order Procellariiformes. These smallest of seabirds feed on planktonic crustaceans and small fish picked from the surface, typically while hovering. The flight is fluttering and sometimes bat-like.Storm petrels have a cosmopolitan distribution, being found in all oceans

Stormbreaker (novel)
Stormbreaker is the first novel in the Alex Rider series by British author Anthony Horowitz. It was released in the United Kingdom on 4 September 2000 and in the United States on 21 May 2001

Storming of the Bastille
The storming of the Bastille occurred in Paris on the morning of 14 July 1789. The medieval fortress and prison in Paris known as the Bastille represented royal authority in the centre of Paris. While the prison only contained seven inmates at the time of its storming, its fall was the flashpoint of the French Revolution

Storms in Africa
"Storms in Africa" is a song by the Irish singer Enya, featured on her 1988 album Watermark. The song was released as a single in the UK in June 1989 and reached #41.

Stormtrooper
Stormtroopers were specialist soldiers of the German Army in World War I. In the last years of the war, Stoßtruppen were trained to fight with "infiltration tactics", part of the Germans' new method of attack on enemy trenches

Story Teller
Story Teller was a magazine partwork published by Marshall Cavendish between 1982 and 1985.-Publishing history: