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Listing
Listing may refer to:* the mathematician Johann Benedict Listing* a computer code listing, see listing * in corporate finance, the company's shares being on the list of stocks that are officially traded on a stock exchange, see listing * the gerund of the verb to list as used in nautical matters.* designation as a listed building Listing may refer to:* the mathematician Johann Benedict Listing* a computer code listing, see listing (computer)* in corporate finance, the company's shares being on the list (or board) of stocks that are officially traded on a stock exchange, see listing (finance)* the gerund of the verb to list as used in nautical matters.* designation as a listed building Listing may refer to:* the mathematician Johann Benedict Listing* a computer code listing, see listing (computer)* in corporate finance, the company's shares being on the list (or board) of stocks that are officially traded on a stock exchange, see listing (finance)* the gerund of the verb to list as used in nautical matters.* designation as a listed building (official recognition of

Listing (computer)
A listing or program listing is a printed list of lines of computer code or digital data . In the early days of programming, it was used to hand-check a program and as permanent storage. It was also common in 1980s computer enthusiast magazines

Listing (finance)
In corporate finance, a listing refers to the company's shares being on the list of stocks that are officially traded on a stock exchange. Normally the issuing company is the one that applies for a listing but in some countries the exchange can list a company, for instance because its stock is already being actively traded via informal channels

Listopad
Listopad may refer to:* František Listopad , Czech writer* Listopad , a 1992 Polish film by Łukasz Karwowski* Listopad, the Croatian month of October* Listopad, the Czech and Polish month of November

Lists of Melrose Place episodes
The following lists of Melrose Place episodes are available:* List of Melrose Place episodes, for the original FOX series* List of Melrose Place episodes, for The CW series

LIT
LIT is a three-letter abbreviation that may refer to:* Lambda Iota Tau, an honor society in literature* Laxminarayan Institute of Technology, Nagpur* Liaoning Institute of Technology, China* Limerick Institute of Technology, Ireland

Lit
Lit is an alternative rock band, based in Fullerton, California. They released several singles in the late 1990s and early 2000s including their #1 hit "My Own Worst Enemy", "Miserable", "Zip-Lock", "Over My Head", "Lipstick and Bruises", "Addicted", "Looks Like They Were Right" and "Times Like This".- As "Razzle" :The band was formed in 1989 under the name Razzle

LIT (video game)
LIT is a video game by WayForward Technologies for WiiWare. The game is directed by Adam Tierney and co-designed by Tierney and Mark Bozon

Lita
Liţa is a commune in Teleorman County, Romania. It is composed of a single village, Liţa.

Litany
A litany, in Christian worship and some forms of Jewish worship, is a form of prayer used in services and processions, and consisting of a number of petitions

Litany (album)
Litany is Vader's fourth studio album released on May 9, 2000.-Track listing:-Credits:*Piotr "Peter" Wiwczarek – guitars, vocals*Maurycy "Mauser" Stefanowicz – guitar*Leszek "Shambo" Rakowski – bass*Krzysztof "Doc" Raczkowski – drums

Lite
Lite is a variant spelling of "light", a concept of weight, and may refer to:*Diet food or diet beverages:**Diet soda, a diet version of soda pop**Low-alcohol beer or low-calorie beer ***Miller Lite, a brand of light beer

LITE (band)
-Biography:Formed in 2003 in Tokyo, Lite played many gigs around Tokyo and self-released two demo CDs. They have released one mini-album, Lite, and one full-length album, Filmlets, through Transduction in the UK and Cargo in Europe.

Literacy
Literacy has traditionally been described as the ability to read for knowledge, write coherently and think critically about printed material.Literacy represents the lifelong, intellectual process of gaining meaning from print

Literal
Literal may refer to:*Literal and figurative language, taken in a non-figurative sense*Literal translation, the close adherence to the forms of a source language text

Literal (mathematical logic)
In mathematical logic, a literal is an atomic formula or its negation.The definition mostly appears in proof theory , e.g

Literary Criticism (UIL)
Literary Criticism is one of several academic events sanctioned by the University Interscholastic League. The contest began with the 1986-87 school year.Literary Criticism is designed to test students' knowledge of literary history and of critical

Literati
Literati may refer to:*Intellectuals or those who read and comment on literature*The scholar-bureaucrats or literati of imperial China**Literati painting, also known as the Southern School of painting, developed by Chinese literati

Lithe
Lithe may refer to:* Lithe , an experimental programming language* Lithe , a fictional holiday in J. R. R. Tolkien's writings

Lithia
Lithia may refer to:*"Lithia" , an Outer Limits television episode*Lithia, Florida, U.S.*Lithia or lithium oxide, a chemical compound*Litha, a solstice festival, is also known as Lithia

Lithic
Lithic may refer to:*a stone tool*Lithic analysis*Lithic stage*Lithic core *Lithic reduction *Lithic technology *Lithic flake *Lithic fragment

Lithium carbonate
Lithium carbonate is a chemical compound of lithium, carbon, and oxygen with the formula Li2CO3. This colorless salt is widely used in the processing of metal oxides and has received attention for its use in psychiatry. It is found in nature as the rare mineral zabuyelite.-Properties:Like almost all other lithium compounds, Li2CO3 is polymeric. It is an ionic compound

Lithium tantalate (data page)
- Material Safety Data Sheet : The handling of this chemical may incur notable safety precautions. It is highly recommend that you seek the Material Safety Datasheet for this chemical from a reliable source such as , and follow its directions.

Lithophane
A lithophane is an etched or molded artwork in thin very translucent porcelain that can only be seen clearly when back lit with a light source

Lithuania (disambiguation)
Lithuania is a country in Europe.Lithuania can also refer to:*Lithuania *Sports teams listed in :Category:National sports teams of Lithuania, and called "Lithuania"

Lithuania (European Parliament constituency)
In European elections, Lithuania is a constituency of the European Parliament, currently represented by thirteen MEPs. It covers the member state of Lithuania.-Current MEPs:As of October 2007-2004:

Lithuanian
Lithuanian may refer to:* Lithuanian cuisine* Anything related to Lithuania* Anything related to the Grand Duchy of Lithuania* The Lithuanian people* The Lithuanian language

Litmus
Litmus or litmus test may refer to:* Litmus test, a common pH test* Litmus , a test case management tool maintained by Mozilla* "Litmus" , an episode in the first season of the television series

Lito
Lito is a given name, and may refer to:* Cláudio Aguiar, Cape Verde footballer known as "Lito"* José Carlos Fernandes Vidigal, Angolan footballer known as "Lito"* Lito Sheppard, American football player in the National Football League

Lito (Cape Verdean footballer)
Cláudio Zélito Fonseca Fernandes Aguiar, aka Lito , is a Cape Verdean footballer who plays for F.C. Arouca mainly as a forward.-Club career:

Litre
pic|200px|right|thumb|One litre is equivalent to this cubeEach side is 10 cm1 litre water = 1 kilogram water The litre is a metric system unit of volume equal to 1 cubic decimetre , to 1,000 cubic centimetres , and to 1/1,000 cubic metre

Litter
Litter consists of waste products such as containers, papers, wrappers or faeces which have been disposed of without consent. Litter can also be used as a verb

Little
Little is a surname in the English language. The name is ultimately derived from the Middle English littel, and the Old English lȳtel, which mean "little". In some cases the name was originally a nickname for a little man. In other cases, the name was used to distinguish the younger of two bearers of the same personal name

Little (automobile)
The Little was an automobile built in Flint, Michigan by the Little Motor Car Company from 1912-15. The Little first was available as a two-seater with a four-cylinder 20 hp engine, and had a wheelbase of . In 1914 a 3.6 L six-cylinder L-head engine was available in a later model that had a larger chassis

Little Brother
Little Brother was an American alternative hip hop group from Durham, North Carolina that consisted of rappers Phonte and Rapper Big Pooh , and DJ/producer 9th Wonder

Little Brother (Cory Doctorow novel)
Little Brother is a novel by Cory Doctorow, published by Tor Books. It was released on April 29, 2008. The novel is about several teenagers in San Francisco who, in the aftermath of a terrorist attack on the San Francisco – Oakland Bay Bridge and BART system, defend themselves against the Department of Homeland Security's attacks on the Bill of Rights

Little Brother (short story)
"Little Brother" is a short story by Walter Mosley that appeared in his 2001 book of dystopian short stories Futureland: Nine Stories of an Imminent World

Little by Little (The Rolling Stones song)
"Little by Little" was released by The Rolling Stones on the Decca label on February 21, 1964, as the B-side to their version of "Not Fade Away". Also included on their debut album The Rolling Stones in April 1964.

Little finger
The little finger, often called the pinky in American English, pinkie in Scottish English , or small finger in medicine, is the most ulnar and usually smallest finger of the human hand, opposite the thumb, next to the ring finger.-Muscles:There are four muscles that

Little Finger (mountain)
The Little Finger is a mountain in the Five Fingers Group, a group of summits on the divide between Pitt Lake and Coquitlam Lake and north of Widgeon Lake, in British Columbia, Canada.

Little Girl (With Blue Eyes)
"Little Girl " is a non-album single by British band Pulp, released in 1985. It features very dark songs, far from the acoustic feel of the first album It

Little Green Men (novel)
Little Green Men is a satirical novel by Christopher Buckley, first published in 1999. The novel follows a fictional "Inside the Beltway" talk-show host whose career and life is altered forever when he is abducted by aliens.-Plot:

Little Man (album)
Little Man is the fifth album by The Pineapple Thief.The album was remixed and re-mastered by Bruce Soord in 2009, as the first in a series of re-mastered reissues from the band’s back catalogue under the Kscope label

Little My
Little My is a character in the Moomin series of books by Tove Jansson. She first appears in the fourth book, The Exploits of Moominpappa . She is a small, determined and fiercely independent Mymble. When she wants something done, she does it straight away

Little Nemo: Adventures in Slumberland
Little Nemo: Adventures in Slumberland, known in Japan as simply Nemo, is a 1989 animated film directed by Masami Hata and William T. Hurtz. Loosely based on the comic strip Little Nemo in Slumberland by Winsor McCay, the film went through a lengthy development process with a number of screenwriters

Little Nicky
Little Nicky is a 2000 American comedy film directed by Steven Brill. It stars Adam Sandler as Nicky, one of Satan's three sons.-Plot:The story revolves around a struggle to determine which of Satan's three sons will succeed their father as ruler of Hell

Little Red Riding Hood (1995 film)
Little Red Riding Hood is a 48-minute direct-to-video animated film produced by Jetlag Productions. It was distributed by GoodTimes Home Video and originally released on VHS on July 31, 1995. The film was produced by Mark Taylor and directed by Toshiyuki Hiruma Takashi

Little Rock (Amtrak station)
The Little Rock Amtrak station is a train station in Little Rock, Arkansas, United States served by Amtrak, the national railroad passenger system.

Little Rock (Cheyenne chief)
Little Rock was a council chief of the Wutapiu band of Southern Cheyennes. He was the only council chief who remained with Black Kettle following the Sand Creek massacre of 1864.

Little Rock (Collin Raye song)
"Little Rock" is a song written by Tom Douglas and recorded by American country music singer Collin Raye. It was released in March 1994 as the second single released from his CD, Extremes, it peaked at number 2 on the U.S

Little Rock (disambiguation)
-Places:* Little Rock, Arkansas, capital of the U.S. state of Arkansas** The Little Rock-North Little Rock-Conway metropolitan area, a U.S. Census-defined statistical area

Little Sister
- Literature :* The Little Sister, a 1949 novel by Raymond Chandler* Kana: Little Sister, a 1999 Japanese visual novel- Film and television :* Little Sister , a 1992 comedy movie starring Jonathan Silverman and Alyssa Milano

Little Sister (film)
Little Sister is a 1992 American comedy film written and directed by Jimmy Zeilinger. Starring Jonathan Silverman and Alyssa Milano, the film was released in the UK under the title Mister Sister.-Plot:

Little Sister (Pomus/Shuman song)
"Little Sister" is a rock and roll song written by Doc Pomus & Mort Shuman. It was originally released as a single in 1961 by American singer Elvis Presley, who turned it into a #5 hit on the Billboard Hot 100

Littler
Littler is a surname, and may refer to:* Gene Littler , American golfer* John Littler , British writer* Littler , English professional cricketer* Matt Littler , English actor

Littler (Essex cricketer)
John Littler was an English professional cricketer who made 9 known appearances in major cricket matches from 1791 to 1793.-External sources:*

Littoral
The littoral zone is that part of a sea, lake or river that is close to the shore. In coastal environments the littoral zone extends from the high water mark, which is rarely inundated, to shoreline areas that are permanently submerged. It always includes this intertidal zone and is often used to mean the same as the intertidal zone

Littoral (military)
Littoral combat is a term in military and naval warfare. It refers to operations in and around the littoral zone, within a certain distance of shore, including surveillance, mine-clearing and support for landing operations and other types of combat shifting from water to ground, and back.The Littoral combat ship is being developed in a current U.S

Liturgy
Liturgy is either the customary public worship done by a specific religious group, according to its particular traditions or a more precise term that distinguishes between those religious groups who believe their ritual requires the "people" to do the "work" of responding to the priest, and those who do not .The word,

Liturgy (ballet)
Liturgy is a ballet made by New York City Ballet resident choreographer Christopher Wheeldon to music by Arvo Pärt. The premiere took place May 31, 2003 at the New York State Theater, Lincoln Center

S
S is the nineteenth letter in the ISO basic Latin alphabet.-History: Semitic Šîn represented a voiceless postalveolar fricative . Greek did not have this sound, so the Greek sigma came to represent

S Corporation
An S corporation, for United States federal income tax purposes, is a corporation that makes a valid election to be taxed under Subchapter S of Chapter 1 of the Internal Revenue Code.

S-Video
Separate Video, more commonly known as S-Video and Y/C, is often referred to by JVC as both an S-VHS connector and as Super Video. It is an analog video transmission scheme, in which video information is encoded on two channels: luma and chroma

S. E. Hinton
Susan Eloise Hinton is an American author best known for her young adult novel The Outsiders.While still in her teens, Hinton became a household name as the author of The Outsiders, her first and most popular novel, set in Oklahoma in the 1960s. She began writing it in 1965

S. J. Perelman
Sidney Joseph Perelman, almost always known as S. J. Perelman , was an American humorist, author, and screenwriter. He is best known for his humorous short pieces written over many years for The New Yorker

S. J. Simon
S.J. "Skid" Simon was a British author and bridge player. From 1937 until his death he collaborated with Caryl Brahms on a series of comic novels and short stories, mostly with a background of ballet or of English history

S. Janaki
S. Janaki is an Indian female playback singer. Renowned for her voice modulation abilities, she has sung in many Indian languages, most frequently in Kannada, Malayalam, Tamil, Telugu, and Hindi. Throughout a career spanning more than five decades, she has won four National Film Awards and 35 different State Film Awards. Her association with singer S. P

S. L. Bhyrappa
Santeshivara Lingannaiah Bhyrappa , is a Kannada novelist, whose works are immensely popular both within and beyond Karnataka. Bhyrappa is widely regarded as one of India's foremost modern-day writers. His novels are unique in terms of theme, structure, and characterization

S1m0ne
S1m0ne is a 2002 science fiction comedy film written, produced and directed by Andrew Niccol. It stars Al Pacino, Catherine Keener, Rachel Roberts, Evan Rachel Wood, Winona Ryder and Rebecca Romijn.-Plot:

S1W reactor
The S1W reactor was the first prototype naval reactor used by the United States Navy to prove that the technology could be used for electricity generation and propulsion on submarines

SA80
The SA80 is a British family of 5.56mm small arms. It is a selective fire, gas-operated assault rifle. SA80 prototypes were trialled in 1976 and production was completed in 1994.

Saab 105
-See also:-Bibliography:* Hewson, Robert. "Saab 105/Sk60 Variant Briefing". World Air Power Journal, Volume 23 Winter 1995. London:Aerospace Publishing. ISBN 1 874023 64 6. ISSN 0959-7050. pp. 40—49.

Saab 9-3
The first generation 9-3, a substantially improved 'new-generation' Saab 900 was launched in 1998 for the 1999 model year. Saab claimed that 1,100 changes were made, including a revised suspension in an attempt to tighten up the handling characteristics of its predecessor, the Saab 900

Saab 9-5
The Saab 9-5 is an executive car produced by the Swedish automobile maker Saab. The first generation was introduced in 1997 as the replacement to the Saab 9000 for the 1998 model year. At the time, the car represented a great leap forward for Saab

Saab 900
The Saab 900 was a car produced by Saab Automobile from 1978 until 1998 in two generations. The first generation from 1978 to 1993 is known as the "classic"; the generation from 1994 to 1998 is known as the "new generation" .

Saab H engine
The Saab H engine is a redesign of the Saab B engine. Despite the name it is not an H engine, but a slanted inline-4. The H engine was introduced in 1981 in the Saab 900 and was also used in the Saab 99 from 1982 onwards and the Saab 90. It continued in use in the 900/9-3, 9000, and 9-5

Saad Al-Abdullah Al-Salim Al-Sabah
Sheikh Saad Al-Abdullah Al-Salim Al-Sabah, KCMG was the Emir of Kuwait during a short reign of nine days , succeeding the late Sheikh Jaber.

Saad El Shazly
Saad Mohamed el-Husseiny el-Shazly ‎ was an Egyptian military personality. He was Egypt's chief of staff during the October War

Saad Hariri
Saad-eddine Rafiq Al-Hariri is a Saudi-Lebanese billionaire who served as the Prime Minister of Lebanon from 2009 until 2011. He is the second son of Rafiq Hariri, the former Lebanese Prime Minister who was assassinated in 2005

Saad Zaghlul
Saad Zaghloul was an Egyptian revolutionary, and statesman. He served as Prime Minister of Egypt from January 26, 1924 to November 24, 1924.-Education, activism and exile:

Saadat Hasan Manto
Saadat Hassan Manto was a short story writer of the Urdu language. He is best known for his short stories, 'Bu' , 'Khol Do' , 'Thanda Gosht' , and his magnum opus, 'Toba Tek Singh'.

Saarlooswolfhond
The Saarlooswolfhond is an established breed of wolf-dog hybrid.-History:In 1921, Dutch breeder Leendert Saarloos started crossbreeding a German Shepherd Dog male to a female Mackenzie Valley Wolf

Sabah
Sabah is one of 13 member states of Malaysia. It is located on the northern portion of the island of Borneo. It is the second largest state in the country after Sarawak, which it borders on its southwest. It also shares a border with the province of East Kalimantan of Indonesia in the south

Sabah Tshung Tsin Secondary School
Sabah Tshung Tsin Secondary School is located in Kota Kinabalu, Sabah, Malaysia. The principal is Hiew Hoh Shin. The school has two semesters each year. An academic year begins in January, with an approximately two weeks holiday in June, and ends in the beginning of November

Sabanci family
The Sabancı family is a dynasty of Turkish businesspeople founded by Hacı Ömer Sabancı, a self-made wealthy trader. Some second and third generation members of the family control today Turkey’s largest and prestigious group of companies, established mostly by the efforts of his son Sakıp Sabancı

Saber-toothed cat
Saber-toothed cat or Sabre-toothed cat refers to the extinct subfamilies of Machairodontinae , Barbourofelidae , and Nimravidae as well as two families related to marsupials that were found worldwide from the Eocene Epoch to the end of the Pleistocene Epoch ,

Sabine Lisicki
Sabine Lisicki is a German professional tennis player of Polish background.Lisicki has won three WTA singles tournaments in her career and one doubles tournament . She reached the semifinals of the 2011 Wimbledon Championships and also reached the quarterfinals of the 2009 Wimbledon Championships

Sabine River (Texas-Louisiana)
The Sabine River is a river, long, in the U.S. states of Texas and Louisiana. In its lower course, it forms part of the boundary between the two states and empties into Sabine Lake, an estuary of the Gulf of Mexico. The river formed part of the United States-Mexican international boundary during the early 19th century

Sable Antelope
The Sable Antelope is an antelope which inhabits wooded savannah in East Africa south of Kenya, and in Southern Africa.-Subspecies:There are four subspecies:* H. n. niger which is considered low risk conservation dependent

Sabratha
Sabratha, Sabratah or Siburata , in the Zawiya District in the northwestern corner of modern Libya, was the westernmost of the "three cities" of Tripolis. From 2001 to 2007 it was the capital of the former Sabratha wa Sorman District. It lies on the Mediterranean coast about west of Tripoli

Sabri Brothers
The Sabri Brothers are a Qawwali party from Pakistan.-Original members:The Sabri Brothers originally consisted of Ghulam Farid Sabri , Maqbool Ahmed Sabri , Kamal Sabri The Sabri Brothers (Urdu: صابری برادران) are a Qawwali party from Pakistan.-Original members:The Sabri Brothers originally consisted of Ghulam Farid Sabri (b. 1930 in Kalyana, East Punjab – d. April 5, 1994 in Karachi; lead vocals, harmonium), Maqbool Ahmed Sabri (b. October 12, 1945 in Kalyana – d. September 21, 2011 in South Africa; lead vocals, harmonium), Kamal Sabri The Sabri Brothers (Urdu: صابری برادران) are a Qawwali party from Pakistan.-Original members:The Sabri Brothers originally consisted of Ghulam Farid Sabri (b. 1930 in Kalyana, East Punjab – d. April 5, 1994 in Karachi; lead vocals, harmonium), Maqbool Ahmed Sabri (b. October 12, 1945 in Kalyana – d. September 21, 2011 in South Africa; lead vocals, harmonium), Kamal Sabri (d

Sabrina Lloyd
Sabrina Lloyd is an American film and television actress.She has played the roles of Wade Welles in the science fiction series Sliders, and Natalie Hurley in the ABC sitcom Sports Night.-Early life:

Sabrina Salerno
Sabrina Salerno , also known in her singing career as Sabrina, is an Italian singer, television hostess, model, actress and record producer

Sac spider
The sac spiders of the family Clubionidae have a very confusing taxonomic history. Once this family was a large catch-all taxon for a disparate collection of spiders, similar only in that they had eight eyes arranged in two rows, conical anterior spinnerets that touched and were wandering predators that built silken retreats, or sacs, usually on plant terminals, between leaves,

Sacagawea
Sacagawea ; was a Lemhi Shoshone woman, who accompanied the Lewis and Clark Expedition, acting as an interpreter and guide, in their exploration of the Western United States

Sacagawea dollar
The Sacagawea dollar is a United States dollar coin that has been minted every year since 2000. These coins have a copper core clad by manganese brass, giving them a distinctive golden color. The coin features an obverse by Glenna Goodacre. The reverse design has varied, from 2000 to 2008 featuring an eagle design by Thomas D. Rogers

Saccharin
Saccharin is an artificial sweetener. The basic substance, benzoic sulfilimine, has effectively no food energy and is much sweeter than sucrose, but has a bitter or metallic aftertaste, especially at high concentrations

Saccharomyces
Saccharomyces is a genus in the kingdom of fungi that includes many species of yeast. Saccharomyces is from Greek σάκχαρ and μύκης and means sugar fungus. Many members of this genus are considered very important in food production. One example is Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which is used in making wine, bread, and beer

Sacha Baron Cohen
Sacha Noam Baron Cohen is an English stand-up comedian, actor, writer, and voice artist. He is most widely known for his portrayal of three unorthodox fictional characters: Ali G, Borat, and Brüno

Sachin Tendulkar
Sachin Ramesh Tendulkar is an Indian cricketer widely regarded as one of the greatest batsmen in the history of cricket. He is the leading run-scorer and century maker in Test and one-day international cricket. He is the only male player to score a double century in the history of ODI cricket

Sachiya Mata Temple
Sachiya Mata , The mother goddess, is worshipped as Kuldevi by Marwadi Maheshwari, Panwar Rajputs/Parmar Rajputs, Oswal, Charans, Jains,Pareek [bhramin] and many other castes living in Rajasthan and Gujarat. Her temple is located in Ossian, near Jodhpur city of Rajasthan

Sachsenhausen concentration camp
Sachsenhausen or Sachsenhausen-Oranienburg was a Nazi concentration camp in Oranienburg, Germany, used primarily for political prisoners from 1936 to the end of the Third Reich in May, 1945. After World War II, when Oranienburg was in the Soviet Occupation Zone, the structure was used as an NKVD special camp until 1950

Sacile
Sacile is a town and comune in the province of Pordenone, in the Friuli-Venezia Giulia region of north-east Italy. It is known as the "Garden of the Serenissima" after the many palaces that were constructed along the river Livenza for the nobility of the Most Serene Republic of Venice.-Geography:The historic centre is located on two islands of the river Livenza

Sack of Rome (410)
The Sack of Rome occurred on August 24, 410. The city was attacked by the Visigoths, led by Alaric I. At that time, Rome was no longer the capital of the Western Roman Empire, replaced in this position initially by Mediolanum and then later Ravenna. Nevertheless, the city of Rome retained a paramount position as "the eternal city" and a spiritual center of the Empire

Saco (Amtrak station)
Saco Transportation Center, also referred to as Saco or Saco–Biddeford in some timetables, is a passenger transportation station in Saco, Maine served by Amtrak, the national railroad passenger system, and other transportation providers

Saco, Maine
Saco is a city in York County, Maine, United States. The population was 18,482 at the 2010 census. It is home to Ferry Beach State Park, Funtown Splashtown USA, Thornton Academy, as well as General Dynamics Armament Systems , a subsidiary of the defense contractor General Dynamics

Sacrament
A sacrament is a sacred rite recognized as of particular importance and significance. There are various views on the existence and meaning of such rites.-General definitions and terms:

Sacrament of Penance (Catholic Church)
In the teachings of the Roman Catholic Church, the Sacrament of Penance and Reconciliation is the method by which individual men and women may be freed from sins committed after receiving the sacrament of Baptism

Sacramento River
The Sacramento River is an important watercourse of Northern and Central California in the United States. The largest river in California, it rises on the eastern slopes of the Klamath Mountains, and after a journey south of over , empties into Suisun Bay, an arm of the San Francisco Bay, and thence to the Pacific Ocean

Sacramento, California
Sacramento is the capital city of the U.S. state of California and the county seat of Sacramento County. It is located at the confluence of the Sacramento River and the American River in the northern portion of California's expansive Central Valley. With a population of 466,488 at the 2010 census, it is the sixth-largest city in California

Sacraments of the Catholic Church
The Sacraments of the Catholic Church are, the Roman Catholic Church teaches, "efficacious signs of grace, instituted by Christ and entrusted to the Church, by which divine life is dispensed to us. The visible rites by which the sacraments are celebrated signify and make present the graces proper to each sacrament

Sacred Fig
The Sacred Fig, Ficus religiosa, or Bo-Tree , Peepal is a species of banyan fig native to India, Bangladesh, Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, southwest China and Indochina

Sacred Heart Catholic Church (Dubuque)
Sacred Heart Catholic Church is a Roman Catholic church in Dubuque, Iowa. It is part of the Archdiocese of Dubuque and located at 2215 Windsor Ave. The parish was one of the locations where the movie F.I.S.T. starring Sylvester Stallone was filmed.

Sacred Ibis
The African Sacred Ibis is a species of ibis.-Description:An adult individual is 68 cm long with all-white body plumage apart from dark plumes on the rump. The bald head and neck, thick curved bill and legs are black. The white wings show a black rear border in flight

Sacrifice
Sacrifice is the offering of food, objects or the lives of animals or people to God or the gods as an act of propitiation or worship.While sacrifice often implies ritual killing, the term offering can be used for bloodless sacrifices of cereal food or artifacts

Sacrifice fly
In baseball, a sacrifice fly is a batted ball that satisfies four criteria:* There are fewer than two outs when the ball is hit.* The ball is hit to the outfield.

Sacrificial lamb
A sacrificial lamb is a metaphorical reference to a person or animal sacrificed for the common good. The term is derived from the traditions of Abrahamic religion where a lamb is a highly valued possession, but is offered to God as a sacrifice for the forgiveness of Sin.-In politics:In politics, a sacrificial lamb candidate is a candidate chosen to

Sacristy
A sacristy is a room for keeping vestments and other church furnishings, sacred vessels, and parish records.The sacristy is usually located inside the church, but in some cases it is an annex or separate building

Sacrum
In vertebrate anatomy the sacrum is a large, triangular bone at the base of the spine and at the upper and back part of the pelvic cavity, where it is inserted like a wedge between the two hip bones. Its upper part connects with the last lumbar vertebra, and bottom part with the coccyx

Saddam Hussein
Saddam Hussein Abd al-Majid al-Tikriti was the fifth President of Iraq, serving in this capacity from 16 July 1979 until 9 April 2003

Saddle point
In mathematics, a saddle point is a point in the domain of a function that is a stationary point but not a local extremum. The name derives from the fact that in two dimensions the surface resembles a saddle that curves up in one direction, and curves down in a different direction

Saddleback Church
Saddleback Church is an evangelical Christian megachurch located in Lake Forest, California, situated in southern Orange County, affiliated with the Southern Baptist Convention. The church was founded in 1980 by pastor Rick Warren

Saddleworth Moor
Saddleworth Moor is an area of the South Pennines in northern England. It is a sparsely populated moorland and millstone grit divided between the metropolitan boroughs of Oldham and Kirklees, in Greater Manchester and West Yorkshire respectively.

Sadguru Sivananda Murty
Kandukuri Sivananda Murty is a well-known Indian scholar and a humanist with a wide following in India and in other countries, who writes about Indian heritage and culture, spirituality and philosophy. He has published many books and articles in newspapers and journals

Sadhana (actress)
Sadhana is an Indian Bollywood actress. She was one of the top stars in the 1960s and the early 1970s. Beside becoming the fashion icon for young Indian girls with her specific hair style, still known as Sadhana cut, she become famous as Mystery Girl with her three suspense thriller films namely "Woh Kaun Thi" [1964], "Mera Saaya" [1965] and "Anita" [1968]

Sadism and masochism
Sadomasochism broadly refers to the receiving of pleasure—often sexual—from acts involving the infliction or reception of pain or humiliation. The name originates from two authors on the subject, Marquis de Sade and Leopold von Sacher-Masoch

Sadiya
Sadiya is a small town in the Tinsukia district of the North-eastern Indian state of Assam. It stands on a grassy plain, nearly surrounded by forested Himalayan mountains, on the right bank of what is locally considered the main stream of the Brahmaputra river

Saeed Anwar
Saeed Anwar is a former Pakistani opening batsman. A left-hander, Anwar is most notable for scoring 194 runs against India in Chennai in 1997, then the highest, and now the joint second highest individual score in a One Day International.-Personal life:

Saeed bin Saqer bin Sultan Al-Qasimi
Sheikh Saeed bin Saqer bin Sultan Al-Qasimi is the son of the late Sheikh Saqer bin Sultan Alqassimi, Ruler of Sharjah, 1951-1965. Born January 25, 1962, he is a member of the ruling family of Sharjah, which is one of the Emirates that comprise the UAE. Sheikh Saeed is Deputy Chairman of the Amiri Court in Khorfakkan