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Jorma
Jorma is Finnish male given name. Jorma may refer to:* Jorma Etelälahti , former Finnish Nordic combined skier* Jorma Gallen-Kallela , Finnish artist* Jorma Härkönen , Finnish middle distance runner

Jorma (album)
Jorma is the second solo album by Jorma Kaukonen of Hot Tuna and Jefferson Airplane. Hot Tuna had stopped touring in 1977 and Jack Casady had moved on to the band SVT. Bill Thompson and the staff that had managed Hot Tuna and still managed Jefferson Starship in 1979 continued to manage Kaukonen. David Kahne was hired to produce and the new solo album was released on RCA

Joseki (disambiguation)
Joseki may refer to:*Joseki, a sequences of moves in game of Go*Joseki , a SPARQL server*JOSEKI , a pair of related algorithms from the National Security Agency for encrypting and decrypting of information stored in firmware

Joseki (RDF server)
Joseki is a servlet providing a web interface for performing SPARQL queries on an RDF graph. It has been developed by Hewlett Packard, and released under a license apparently equivalent to the MIT license.

Joseph
-Media:* YosepH, album by Luke Vibert* Josef , a Croatian television movie from 2011*Various works based on the life of Joseph in the Hebrew Bible:** Joseph and his Brethren, oratorio by George Frideric Handel

Joseph (name)
Joseph is a name originating from Hebrew, recorded in the Hebrew Bible, as יוֹסֵף, Standard Hebrew Yosef, Tiberian Hebrew and Aramaic Yôsēp̄. In Arabic, including in the Qur'an, the name is spelled يوسف or Yūsuf. The name can be translated from Hebrew יהוה להוסיף Yihoh Lhosif as signifying "YHWH will increase/add"

Joseph (opera)
Joseph is an opera in three acts by the French composer Étienne Méhul. The libretto, by Alexandre Duval, is based on the Biblical story of Joseph and his brothers. The work was first performed by the Opéra-Comique in Paris on 17 February 1807 at the Théâtre Feydeau

Josephine
Josephine is a female name, a feminine form of Joseph. It may refer to:-People:* Joséphine de Beauharnais, the first Empress of the French.* Josephine Brunsvik, Hungarian Countess, most likely Beethoven's Immortal Beloved* Josephine -Other:

Josh
Josh is a diminutive of the given name Joshua. "Josh" may also refer to:* Josh, the nom-de-plume of the poet Josh Malihabadi* "Josh", an early pseudonym of Samuel Clemens, better known as Mark Twain* Josh , a Canadian Indian/Pakistani fusion band

Josh (novel)
Josh is a young adult novel by Ivan Southall, about a clash of cultures. It was the winner of the Carnegie Medal for 1971, the first Australian novel to win the award.-Plot summary:

Joshua
Joshua , is a minor figure in the Torah, being one of the spies for Israel and in few passages as Moses's assistant. He turns to be the central character in the Hebrew Bible's Book of Joshua

Joshua (2002 film)
Joshua is a 2002 film based on the novel of the same name by Joseph F. Girzone. The movie was produced by Crusader Entertainment LLC and directed by Joseph Purdy.

Joshua (band)
Joshua is a Christian metal band that formed in 1980. The band re-formed many times under differing names, but has remained centered around guitarist Joshua Perahia

Joshua (film)
Joshua is a 2007 American psychological horror/thriller film about an affluent young Manhattan family and how they are torn apart by the increasingly sadistic behavior of their disturbed son, Joshua. The film was directed by George Ratliff and stars Sam Rockwell, Vera Farmiga and Jacob Kogan

Joshua (Handel)
Joshua is an oratorio by George Frideric Handel. It was composed in a month, between 19 July 1747 and 19 August 1747 and is Handel's fourth oratorio based on a libretto by Thomas Morell. The oratorio premiered on the 9th March, 1748 at the Covent Garden Theatre, London

Joshua (name)
Joshua is a Biblical given name derived from the Hebrew Yehoshua . Although it is often etymologized as related to the root for "salvation," e.g. as "Jehovah rescues" or "Jehovah is salvation"., the form of the word does not support this etymology. It is more likely Yeho-Shua, "YHWH's gift," with the same second element as Malki-Shua , Bat-Shua Joshua is a Biblical given name derived from the Hebrew Yehoshua . Although it is often etymologized as related to the root for "salvation," e.g. as "Jehovah rescues" or "Jehovah is salvation"., the form of the word does not support this etymology. It is more likely Yeho-Shua, "YHWH's gift," with the same second element as Malki-Shua (1 Sam. 14:49), Bat-Shua Joshua is a Biblical given name derived from the Hebrew Yehoshua . Although it is often etymologized as related to the root for "salvation," e.g. as "Jehovah rescues" or "Jehovah is salvation"., the form of the word does not support this etymology. It is more likely Yeho-Shua, "YHWH's gift," with the same second element as Malki-Shua (1 Sam. 14:49), Bat-Shua (1 Chron

Joshua tree (disambiguation)
Joshua Tree is a common name of Yucca brevifolia, a species of arborescent monocot native to North America.Joshua Tree may also refer to:-Placenames:

Josie
Josie may refer to:* Josie, the predecessor to Josie and the Pussycats ** Josie, stage name of Kathleen Dougherty, a.k.a. Cathy Dougher, lead singer of Josie and the Pussycats* Josie, a 1991 TV series starring Josie Lawrence

Josie (Josette Bynum)
Josette "Josie" Bynum is an American professional wrestler. Bynum is best known for her stint in Total Nonstop Action Wrestling under the name Sojournor Bolt

JOSS
JOSS was one of the very first interactive, time sharing programming languages.JOSS I, developed by J. Clifford Shaw at RAND was first implemented, in beta form, on the JOHNNIAC computer in May 1963

Joss
Joss may refer to:*JOSS, a time-sharing programming language*Joss Supercar, an Australian-built automobilePeople*Joss Ackland, British actor*Joss Possible, a fictional character*Joss Stone, British female soul singer

Jot
Jot or JOT may refer to:* Jot, Dreamfarm's hanging and holding suction cap hook* Iota and Jot, two esoteric computer languages* JOT , a syndicated, animated television series* JOT: Journal of Object Technology, an online journal

Jota (music)
The jota is a genre of music and the associated dance known throughout Spain, most likely originating in Aragon. It varies by region, having a characteristic form in Valencia, Aragon, Castile, Navarra, Cantabria, Asturias, Galicia and Murcia. Being a visual representation, the jota is danced and sung accompanied by castanets, and the interpreters tend to wear regional costumes

Jotter
This article is about the ballpoint pen, did you mean Notebook?The Parker Jotter is the Parker Pen Company's first and bestselling retracting refillable ballpoint pen. Later they added a fountain pen, mechanical pencil and rollerball pen that match its design. As with many other ballpoint pens, it can be turned into gel pen if its cartridge is changed

Jou
Jou may refer to:* Jō, a unit of measurement* Jou , a raja of Adonara, Indonesia

Jouhet
Jouhet is a commune in the Vienne department in the Poitou-Charentes region in western France.

Journal
__FORCETOC__A journal has several related meanings:* a daily record of events or business; a private journal is usually referred to as a diary.

Journalese
Journalese is the artificial or hyperbolic, and sometimes over-abbreviated, language regarded as characteristic of the popular media. Joe Grimm, formerly of the Detroit Free Press, likened journalese to a "stage voice": "We write journalese out of habit, sometimes from misguided training, and to sound urgent, authoritative and, well, journalistic

Journalism
Journalism is the practice of investigation and reporting of events, issues and trends to a broad audience in a timely fashion. Though there are many variations of journalism, the ideal is to inform the intended audience. Along with covering organizations and institutions such as government and business, journalism also covers cultural aspects of society such as arts and entertainment

Journalist
A journalist collects and distributes news and other information. A journalist's work is referred to as journalism.A reporter is a type of journalist who researchs, writes, and reports on information to be presented in mass media, including print media , electronic media , and digital media A journalist collects and distributes news and other information. A journalist's work is referred to as journalism.A reporter is a type of journalist who researchs, writes, and reports on information to be presented in mass media, including print media (newspapers and magazines), electronic media (television, radio, documentary film), and digital media A journalist collects and distributes news and other information. A journalist's work is referred to as journalism.A reporter is a type of journalist who researchs, writes, and reports on information to be presented in mass media, including print media (newspapers and magazines), electronic media (television, radio, documentary film), and digital media (such as online

Journalist (British magazine)
The Journalist is the monthly magazine of the United Kingdom's National Union of Journalists .Since April 2008, the magazine is available online.

Journalist (disambiguation)
A journalist is a person who practises journalism, the gathering and dissemination of information about current events, trends, issues and people.Journalist may also refer to:

Journalist (rapper)
Journalist is an underground hip hop rapper from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. He gives much of the credit for his success to his mother who worked hard to raise 5 other family members. After graduating he went out to get a recording contract

Journalist (Russian magazine)
Journalist is a Russian magazine founded in 1914 by literary critic Vladimir Friche aimed at newsworkers. With the growing number of periodicals in pre-World War I Russia, Friche recognised the need for a publication which served the people who worked in the industry and could help to strengthen their cohesion sense of identity.In 2004, Journalist celebrated its 90th year of operation.

Journey
Journey may refer to:* Travel* Road trip* Dodge Journey, a 2009 mid-sized "crossover" vehicle, the brand's first* Journeys, a shoe store brand owned by Genesco- Literature :* Journey , a 1989 historical novel by James Michener

Journey (comics)
Journey: The Adventures of Wolverine MacAlistaire was an independent comic book created by William Messner-Loebs about Michigan frontier life in the 19th century. An ensemble piece, it tells the story of the Fort Miami settlement and the characters, both real and fictional, that occupy it

Journey (W-inds. album)
Journey is the seventh studio album of J-Pop band W-inds.-Track listing:#"This Is Our Show"#"Top Secret"#"Is That You"#"Crazy for You"#"Devil"#"Trial"#"遠い記憶"#"Milky Way"#"Journey"#"メッセージ"#"地図なき旅路"#"Celebration"#"ブギウギ66"#"Triangle"#"ハナムケ"

Journey (Yeng Constantino album)
Journey is the second album by a Filipina singer - songwriter Yeng Constantino, released on February 29, 2008 via Star Records. The album contains twelve tracks: six were composed by Constantino, two were a collaboration of Constantino and Morning Glory

Journeyman
A journeyman is someone who completed an apprenticeship and was fully educated in a trade or craft, but not yet a master. To become a master, a journeyman had to submit a master work piece to a guild for evaluation and be admitted to the guild as a master.

Journeyman (TV series)
Journeyman is a 2007 American science fiction television drama created by Kevin Falls for 20th Century Fox Television which aired on the NBC television network. It starred Kevin McKidd as Dan Vasser, a San Francisco reporter who involuntarily travels through time

Joust (Gladiators)
Joust was an event played in several incarnations of the television series Gladiators. In this event, a contender and Gladiator engage in battle on mechanical skybikes

Jousters
The Jousters were a Chicago street gang that originally started on the South side of Chicago and then later branched out to the north side of Chicago as well. Their name is of course a reference to the medieval sport of jousting

Jovan
Jovan is a Serb male given name equivalent to English "John" or Slavic Ivan, from , and may refer to:*Jovan Vladimir, a Serbian monarch and saint, ruled Duklja ca

JOVE
JOVE is an open-source, Emacs-like text editor, primarily intended for Unix-like operating systems. It also supports MS-DOS and Microsoft Windows. JOVE was inspired by Gosling Emacs but is much smaller and simpler, lacking Mocklisp

Jove (disambiguation)
Jove usually refers to the god Jupiter .It may also refer to:* Journal of Visualized Experiments

JOVIAL
JOVIAL is a high-order computer programming language similar to ALGOL, but specialized for the development of embedded systems .JOVIAL is an acronym for "Jules Own Version of the International

Jovial
Jovial may refer to:* JOVIAL programming language* Jovial , a Swiss manufacturer of watches* Brice Jovial , French football striker* The archaic adjectival form of the god or planet Jupiter

Jovial (watch)
-Brand Jovial:Jovial is a Swiss manufacturer of watches, with headquarters in Biel, Switzerland. Formed in 1929, Mohamed Dabaan is the current CEO Jovial has its regional office in Dubai, UAE

Jovian
Jovian , was Roman Emperor from 363 to 364. Upon the death of emperor Julian during his campaign against the Sassanid Persians, Jovian was hastily declared emperor by his soldiers

Jovian (fiction)
-Jovians in literature:* In H. P. Lovecraft's Cthulhu Mythos , Jupiter was the one-time home of the flying polyps.* In Isaac Asimov's short story Victory Unintentional , human colonists on Ganymede send robots to Jupiter to contact the Jovians, who are planning a war with the humans.* In Poul Anderson's Three Worlds to Conquer, sympathtic Centaur-like Jovians are

Joy
Joy may refer to:* Happiness, an emotion* Joy , people with the given name or surname Joy-Music:Bands & performers* Joy * Joy Albums* Joy ; also the title track from that album

Joy (band)
Joy is an 80s Europop band from Austria, best known for their biggest hits Touch By Touch and Valerie.-History:The band Joy was formed in Bad Aussee, an Austrian town of 7500 citizens. Freddy Jaklitsch , Manfred Temmel and Andy Schweitzer were school friends, but after the graduation all three chose different careers

Joy (Marvin Gaye song)
"Joy" is a 1983 single released by Marvin Gaye, the final single issued from his Midnight Love album. The song, which was built around a funk vibe, was inspired by Gaye's religious background, which had also inspired songs such as "God is Love", "Everybody Needs Love" and "Praise"

Joy (Paul King album)
Joy is the only solo album by British singer Paul King, released in 1987, on CBS label, after King, the new wave band he was lead singer for, split up in 1986.

Joy (perfume)
Joy is a perfume created for Parisian couturier Jean Patou by perfumer Henri Alméras in 1929. It is considered to be one of the greatest fragrances created and is a landmark example of the floral genre in perfumery.

Joy (Psychic TV album)
Joy is a 12" vinyl single by Psychic TV. Although the album is credited to different sources, they are all aliases of Psychic TV.-Track listing:Side A#DJ Doktor Megatrip with Luv Bass: "Joy"#*Engineer: Richard Schiessl

Joy (Psychic TV VHS)
Joy is a VHS by Psychic TV which includes live and music videos. Joy was later paired with Black and released on DVD as Black Joy.-Chapters:#"Your Body"#"We Kiss"#"Candy Says"#"R.U. Experienced"#"Wicked"#"Just Like Arcadia"#"Joy"

Joy (Stalin album)
-Credits:*Musicians:**Michiro Endo - vocals**Shigeo Mihara - drums, electric devices**Naruhiko Yamamori - guitar**Yusuke Nishimura - bass*Guest Musicians:**Osamu Sakasai - guitar **Jun Ogura - Announcement *Producer:

Joy Ride (Bryan Duncan album)
Joy Ride is Contemporary Christian artist Bryan Duncan's 13th album.----# "I'd Like to Thank You Jesus "# "Maybe I'm Amazed"# "It Gets Better"# "Holiday 'N Heaven"# "Everything In the Garden"# "I'll Always Have Jesus"# "Clap Your Hands"

Joy Ride (Swiss film)
Joy Ride is a 2001 Swiss drama film written and directed by Martin Rengel that followed Lars von Trier's Dogme 95 manifesto. It is classified as the 14th dogme movie. Joy Ride employs a very realistic, near-documentary style, with a story based on the homicide of a 19-year-old girl in Zürich, Switzerland in 1992

Joya
Joya, De Joya, Dajoyag, Da Joya may refer to:* Joya, India, a town in Uttar Pradesh, India* Joya , a R&B singer* Joya , a 1997 album by Will Oldham* Joya , a Mexican fruit soda brand owned by The Coca-Cola Company.

Joya (album)
Joya is the fifth album by Will Oldham, but the first album billed to his name, rather than the Palace or Bonnie 'Prince' Billy monikers. It was released in 1997 on Drag City

Joya (drink)
Joya is a brand of fruit sodas introduced in 1942 in Monterrey, Mexico by mineral water producers Cia. Topo Chico Joya was available only in the Mexican states of Nuevo Leon and north of Tamaulipas, then in 2004 Joya distribution started in Coahuila, Sinaloa and part of San

Joyce
The name Joyce is used for females and rarely used by males. It derived from the Old French Masculine name Josse which derived from the Latin name Iudocus the Latinized form of the Breton name Judoc meaning "lord". The name became rare after the 14th century but later revived as a female name which derived from the Middle English joise meaning "rejoice"

Joyce
Joyce may refer to:Names of people:* Joyce * Joyce, Joyce Moreno , Brazilian * Joyce, writer James Joyce , Irish

Joyful
Joyful is the debut album by German singer–songwriter Ayọ, recorded in January 2006 within five days under live conditions. The album spawned four official singles as well as a promo single, "How Many Times?", released on 26 November 2007

Joyride
Joy Ride may refer to:* Joyride , a crime involving stealing vehicles- Music :* Joyride , 1965* Joyride , 1986* Joyride , 1991

Polybutadiene
Polybutadiene is a synthetic rubber that is a polymer formed from the polymerization process of the monomer 1,3-butadiene.It has a high resistance to wear and is used especially in the manufacture of tires, which consumes about 70% of the production

Polybutene
Polybutene and polyisobutylene are liquid oligomers widely used as plasticizers for high-molecular weight polymers, such as polyethylene. They are not to be confused with the high molecular weight polymer polybutene-1.-Properties:

Polycaprolactone
Polycaprolactone is a biodegradable polyester with a low melting point of around 60°C and a glass transition temperature of about −60°C. PCL is prepared by ring opening polymerization of ε-caprolactone using a catalyst such as stannous octoate. Recently a wide range of catalysts for the ring opening polymerization of caprolactone have been reviewed

Polycarbonate
PolycarbonatePhysical PropertiesDensity 1.20–1.22 g/cm3Abbe number 34.0Refractive index 1.584–1.586FlammabilityV0-V2Limiting oxygen index25–27%Water absorption – Equilibrium0.16–0.35%Water absorption – over 24 hours0.1%

Polycephaly
Polycephaly is a condition of having more than one head. The term is derived from the Greek stems poly- meaning 'much' and kephali- meaning "head", and encompasses bicephaly and dicephaly . A variation is an animal born with two faces on a single head, a condition known as diprosopus

Polychlorinated biphenyl
Polychlorinated biphenyls are a class of organic compounds with 2 to 10 chlorine atoms attached to biphenyl, which is a molecule composed of two benzene rings. The chemical formula for PCBs is C12H10-xClx

Polychlorotrifluoroethylene
Polychlorotrifluoroethylene is a fluoropolymer with the molecular formula n. It is chemically related to PTFE.

Polycrystalline
Polycrystalline materials are solids that are composed of many crystallites of varying size and orientation. The variation in direction can be random or directed, possibly due to growth and processing conditions. Fiber texture is an example of the latter.Almost all common metals, and many ceramics are polycrystalline

Polycythemia
Polycythemia is a disease state in which the proportion of blood volume that is occupied by red blood cells increases

Polydactyly
Polydactyly or polydactylism , also known as hyperdactyly, is a congenital physical anomaly in humans, dogs, and cats having supernumerary fingers or toes.

PolyDADMAC
Polydiallyldimethylammonium chloride, or shortened polyDADMAC is a homopolymer of diallyldimethylammonium chloride . The molecular weight of polyDADMAC is typically in the range of hundreds of thousands of grams per mole, and even up to a million for some products. PolyDADMAC is usually delivered as a liquid concentrate having a solids level in the range of 10 to 50%

Polydimethylsiloxane
Polydimethylsiloxane belongs to a group of polymeric organosilicon compounds that are commonly referred to as silicones. PDMS is the most widely used silicon-based organic polymer, and is particularly known for its unusual rheological properties. PDMS is optically clear, and, in general, is considered to be inert, non-toxic and non-flammable

Polydispersity index
In physical and organic chemistry, the polydispersity index , is a measure of the distribution of molecular mass in a given polymer sample. The PDI calculated is the weight average molecular weight divided by the number average molecular weight. It indicates the distribution of individual molecular masses in a batch of polymers

Polydor Records
Polydor is a record label owned by Universal Music Group, headquartered in the United Kingdom.-Beginnings:Polydor was originally an independent branch of the Deutsche Grammophon Gesellschaft. Its name was first used as an export label in 1924, the British and German branches of the Gramophone Company having severed their ties during World War I

Polyelectrolyte
Polyelectrolytes are polymers whose repeating units bear an electrolyte group. These groups will dissociate in aqueous solutions , making the polymers charged. Polyelectrolyte properties are thus similar to both electrolytes and polymers , and are sometimes called polysalts. Like salts, their solutions are electrically conductive

Polyester
Polyester is a category of polymers which contain the ester functional group in their main chain. Although there are many polyesters, the term "polyester" as a specific material most commonly refers to polyethylene terephthalate

Polyethylene
Polyethylene or polythene is the most widely used plastic, with an annual production of approximately 80 million metric tons

Polyethylene glycol
Polyethylene glycol is a polyether compound with many applications from industrial manufacturing to medicine. It has also been known as polyethylene oxide or polyoxyethylene , depending on its molecular weight, and under the tradename Carbowax.-Available forms:PEG, PEO, or POE refers to an oligomer or polymer of ethylene oxide

Polyethylene terephthalate
Polyethylene terephthalate , commonly abbreviated PET, PETE, or the obsolete PETP or PET-P, is a thermoplastic polymer resin of the polyester family and is used in synthetic fibers; beverage, food and other liquid containers; thermoforming applications; and engineering resins often in combination with glass fiber

Polygamy
Polygamy is a marriage which includes more than two partners

Polygon
In geometry a polygon is a flat shape consisting of straight lines that are joined to form a closed chain orcircuit.A polygon is traditionally a plane figure that is bounded by a closed path, composed of a finite sequence of straight line segments

POLYGON
The Multinational Aircrew Electronic Warfare Tactics Facility Polygone - POLYGON is an Electronic Warfare Tactics Range located on the border between Germany and France.- Purpose :

Polygraph
A polygraph measures and records several physiological indices such as blood pressure, pulse, respiration, and skin conductivity while the subject is asked and answers a series of questions

Polyharmonic spline
In mathematics, polyharmonic splines are used forfunction approximation and data interpolation.They are very useful for interpolation of scattered datain many dimensions.- Definition :Polyharmonic splines are a special case of radial basis functions and

Polyhedron model
A polyhedron model is a physical construction of a polyhedron, constructed from cardboard, plastic board, wood board or other panel material, or, less commonly, solid material.

Polyimide
Polyimide is a polymer of imide monomers. The structure of imide is as shown. Polyimides have been in mass production since 1955

Polyketide
Polyketides are secondary metabolites from bacteria, fungi, plants, and animals. Polyketides are usually biosynthesized through the decarboxylative condensation of malonyl-CoA derived extender units in a similar process to fatty acid synthesis

Polykleitos
Polykleitos ; called the Elder, was a Greek sculptor in bronze of the fifth and the early 4th century BCE

Polymer
A polymer is a large molecule composed of repeating structural units. These subunits are typically connected by covalent chemical bonds

Polymer clay
Polymer clay is a sculptable material based on the polymer polyvinyl chloride . It usually contains no clay minerals, and is only called "clay" because its texture and working properties resemble those of mineral clay

Polymer engineering
Polymer engineering is generally an engineering field that designs, analyses, and/or modifies polymer materials. Polymer engineering covers aspects of petrochemical industry, polymerization, structure and characterization of polymers, properties of polymers, compounding and processing of polymers and description of major polymers, structure property relations and

Polymerization
In polymer chemistry, polymerization is a process of reacting monomer molecules together in a chemical reaction to form three-dimensional networks or polymer chains

Polynesia
Polynesia is a subregion of Oceania, made up of over 1,000 islands scattered over the central and southern Pacific Ocean. The indigenous people who inhabit the islands of Polynesia are termed Polynesians and they share many similar traits including language, culture and beliefs

Polynesian mythology
Polynesian mythology is the oral traditions of the people of Polynesia, a grouping of Central and South Pacific Ocean island archipelagos in the Polynesian triangle together with the scattered cultures known as the Polynesian outliers

Polynomial interpolation
In numerical analysis, polynomial interpolation is the interpolation of a given data set by a polynomial: given some points, find a polynomial which goes exactly through these points.- Applications :

Polyol
A polyol is an alcohol containing multiple hydroxyl groups. In two technological disciplines the term "polyol" has a special meaning: food science and polymer chemistry.- Polyols in food science :

Polyp (medicine)
A polyp is an abnormal growth of tissue projecting from a mucous membrane. If it is attached to the surface by a narrow elongated stalk, it is said to be pedunculated. If no stalk is present, it is said to be sessile. Polyps are commonly found in the colon, stomach, nose, sinus, urinary bladder and uterus

Polyphase
Polyphase may refer to:* Polyphase matrix, in signal processing* Polyphase system, in electrical engineering* Polyphasic sleep

Polyphase system
A polyphase system is a means of distributing alternating current electrical power. Polyphase systems have three or more energized electrical conductors carrying alternating currents with a definite time offset between the voltage waves in each conductor. Polyphase systems are particularly useful for transmitting power to electric motors

Polyplectron
The peacock-pheasants are a bird genus, Polyplectron, of the family Phasianidae, consisting of eight species. They are colored inconspicuously, relying on heavily on crypsis to avoid detection. When threatened, peacock-pheasants will alter their shapes utilising specialised plumage that when expanded reveals numerous iridescent orbs

Polypore
Polypores are a group of tough, leathery poroid mushrooms similar to boletes, but typically lacking a distinct stalk. The technical distinction between the two types of mushrooms is that polypores do not have the spore-bearing tissue continuous along the entire underside of the mushroom. Many polypores are bracket fungi

Polypropylene
Polypropylene , also known as polypropene, is a thermoplastic polymer used in a wide variety of applications including packaging, textiles , stationery, plastic parts and reusable containers of various types, laboratory equipment, loudspeakers, automotive components, and polymer banknotes

Polypropylene glycol
Polypropylene glycol or polypropylene oxide is the polymer of propylene glycol. Chemically it is a polyether. The term polypropylene glycol or PPG is reserved for low to medium range molar mass polymer when the nature of the end-group, which is usually a hydroxyl group, still matters

Polypyrrole
Polypyrrole is a chemical compound formed from a number of connected pyrrole ring structures. For example a tetrapyrrole is a compound with four pyrrole rings connected. Methine-bridged cyclic tetrapyrroles are called porphyrins. Polypyrroles are conducting polymers of the rigid-rod polymer host family, all basically derivatives of polyacetylene

Polyrhythm
Polyrhythm is the simultaneous sounding of two or more independent rhythms.Polyrhythm in general is a nonspecific term for the simultaneous occurrence of two or more conflicting rhythms, of which cross-rhythm is a specific and definable subset.—Novotney Polyrhythms can be distinguished from irrational rhythms, which can occur within the context of a single part;

Polystyrene
Polystyrene ) also known as Thermocole, abbreviated following ISO Standard PS, is an aromatic polymer made from the monomer styrene, a liquid hydrocarbon that is manufactured from petroleum by the chemical industry

Polytechnic University of Turin
The Polytechnic University of Turin is an engineering university based in Turin, northern Italy. Established in 1859, Politecnico di Torino is Italy’s oldest Technical University. In 2011 it was ranked as the best engineering university in Italy in the Academic Ranking of World Universities.It is a member of*

Polytheism
Polytheism is the belief of multiple deities also usually assembled into a pantheon of gods and goddesses, along with their own mythologies and rituals.

Polythiophene
Polythiophenes result from the polymerization of thiophenes, a sulfur heterocycle, that can become conducting when electrons are added or removed from the conjugated π-orbitals via doping.

Polytonality
The musical use of more than one key simultaneously is polytonality . Bitonality is the use of only two different keys at the same time

Polytunnel
A polytunnel is a tunnel made of polyethylene used to grow plants that require a higher temperature and/or humidity than that which is available in the environment.

Polyurea
Polyurea is a type of elastomer that is derived from the reaction product of an isocyanate component and a synthetic resin blend component through step-growth polymerization. The isocyanate can be aromatic or aliphatic in nature. It can be monomer, polymer, or any variant reaction of isocyanates, quasi-prepolymer or a prepolymer

Polyurethane
A polyurethane is any polymer composed of a chain of organic units joined by carbamate links. Polyurethane polymers are formed through step-growth polymerization, by reacting a monomer with another monomer in the presence of a catalyst.Polyurethanes are

Polyurethane laminate
Polyurethane laminate is a compound fabric made by laminating a cloth fabric to a thin film of polyurethane. Polyurethane laminated fabrics have a wide range of applications in medical, automotive and garment uses, PUL generally refers to a specific type used makers of resuable incontinence products and accessories such as nappies, wet bags, and cloth menstrual pads.Most PUL

Polyuria
Polyuria is a condition usually defined as excessive or abnormally large production or passage of urine . Frequent urination is sometimes included by definition, but is nonetheless usually an accompanying symptom

Polyvinyl acetate
Polyvinyl acetate, PVA, PVAc, poly, is a rubbery synthetic polymer with the formula n. It belongs to the polyvinyl esters family with the general formula -[RCOOCHCH2]-

Polyvinyl alcohol
Polyvinyl alcohol is a water-soluble synthetic polymer .-Properties:

Polyvinyl fluoride
Polyvinyl fluoride or –n– is a polymer material mainly used in flammability-lowering coating of airplane interiors and photovoltaic module backsheets. It is also used in raincoats and metal sheeting

Polyxena
In Greek mythology, Polyxena was the youngest daughter of King Priam of Troy and his queen, Hecuba. She is considered the Trojan version of Iphigenia, daughter of Agamemnon and Clytemnestra. Polyxena is not in Homer's Iliad, appearing in works by later poets, perhaps to add romance to Homer's austere tale

Pomace
Pomace , or marc , is the solid remains of grapes, olives, or other fruit after pressing for juice or oil. It contains the skins, pulp, seeds, and stems of the fruit.

Pomade
Pomade is a greasy or waxy substance that is used to style hair. Pomade makes hair look slick and shiny. Unlike hair spray and hair gel, pomade does not dry and often takes several washes to remove

Pomegranate
The pomegranate , Punica granatum, is a fruit-bearing deciduous shrub or small tree growing between five and eight meters tall.Native to the area of modern day Iran, the pomegranate has been cultivated in the Caucasus since ancient times. From there it spread to Asian areas such as the Caucasus as well as the Himalayas in Northern India

Pomelo
The pomelo is a citrus fruit native to Southeast Asia. It is usually pale green to yellow when ripe, with sweet white flesh and very thick albedo . It is the largest citrus fruit, 15–25 cm in diameter, and usually weighing 1–2 kg

Pomeranian (dog)
The Pomeranian is a breed of dog of the Spitz type, named for the Pomerania region in Central Europe . Classed as a toy dog breed because of its small size, the Pomeranian is descended from the larger Spitz type dogs, specifically the German Spitz

Pomeranian Medical University
Pomeranian Medical University was established in 1948 in Szczecin, Poland. It is referred to as Pomorski Uniwersytet Medyczny in Polish.

Pommern (ship)
The Pommern, formerly the Mneme , is a windjammer. She is a four-masted barque that was built in 1903 in Glasgow at the J. Reid & Co shipyard.

Pomo people
The Pomo people are an indigenous peoples of California. The historic Pomo territory in northern California was large, bordered by the Pacific Coast to the west, extending inland to Clear Lake, and mainly between Cleone and Duncans Point

Pomology
Pomology is a branch of botany that studies and cultivates pome fruit, particularly from the genera Malus, Prunus and Pyrus belonging to the Rosaceae. The term is sometimes applied more broadly, to the cultivation of any type of fruit

Pompeii
The city of Pompeii is a partially buried Roman town-city near modern Naples in the Italian region of Campania, in the territory of the comune of Pompei. Along with Herculaneum, Pompeii was destroyed and completely buried during a long catastrophic eruption of the volcano Mount Vesuvius spanning two days in the year AD 79

Pompeii (novel)
Pompeii is a novel by author and journalist Robert Harris published by Random House in 2003. It is a blend of fictional characters with the real-life eruption of Mount Vesuvius on August 24, 79 that overwhelmed Pompeii and its surrounding towns. Pompeii is especially notable for the author's references to various aspects of volcanology and use of the Roman calendar

 
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