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Fool's Paradise
Fool's Paradise is a 1921 romance film directed by Cecil B. DeMille. Survives in a preservation copy Library of Congress.-Cast:* Dorothy Dalton - Poll Patchouli* Conrad Nagel - Arthur Phelps* Mildred Harris - Rosa Duchene

Fool's Paradise (song)
"Fools Paradise" is a single released in 1996 by Welsh singer Donna Lewis taken from her debut album, Now in a Minute.-Tracklisting:# "Fools Paradise" - # "Fools Paradise" -

Foolish
Foolish may refer to:* the derived term Foolishness* "Foolish" * "Foolish" * "Foolish", a song by Tyler James * Foolish , an album by Superchunk* Foolish , a 1999 film

Foolish (Shawty Lo song)
"Foolish" is the third single from Shawty Lo's debut album Units in the City. The song was officially released and added on iTunes on June 17, 2008.-Music video:

Foolproof
Foolproof is a 2003 Canadian heist film directed by William Phillips and starring Ryan Reynolds, David Suchet, Kristin Booth, Joris Jarsky, and James Allodi. It was the first attempt by a Canadian studio to create a heist movie, in the same vein as Ocean's Eleven

Foolproof (disambiguation)
* Foolproof is similar to idiot proofIt may also refer to:* Foolproof, a 2003 Canadian heist film* FoolProof, a financial education initiative

Foolscap
Foolscap may refer to:* Foolscap folio, a paper size of 8½ × 13½ inches * A paper size of 17 × 13½ inches * A book by Michael Malone-See also:*Jester, an entertainer employed by a European monarch, often wearing a fool's cap

Foot
The foot is an anatomical structure found in many vertebrates. It is the terminal portion of a limb which bears weight and allows locomotion. In many animals with feet, the foot is a separate organ at the terminal part of the leg made up of one or more segments or bones, generally including claws or nails.-Anatomy:The human foot and ankle is a strong and complex mechanical structure

Foot-poundal
The Foot-poundal is a unit of energy that is part of the foot-pound-second system of units, in Imperial units introduced in 1879, and is from the specialized subsystem of English Absolut .

Footage
In filmmaking and video production, footage is the raw, unedited material as it had been originally filmed by movie camera or recorded by a video camera which usually must be edited to create a motion picture, video clip, television show or similar completed work

Football
Football may refer to one of a number of team sports which all involve, to varying degrees, kicking a ball with the foot to score a goal. The most popular of these sports worldwide is association football, more commonly known as just "football" or "soccer"

Football
Football may refer to one of a number of team sports which all involve, to varying degrees, kicking a ball with the foot to score a goal. The most popular of these sports worldwide is association football, more commonly known as just "football" or "soccer"

Footbridge
A footbridge or pedestrian bridge is a bridge designed for pedestrians and in some cases cyclists, animal traffic and horse riders, rather than vehicular traffic. Footbridges complement the landscape and can be used decoratively to visually link two distinct areas or to signal a transaction

Footer
Footer may refer to:* Colloquialism for association football or rugby football* Abbreviation for Page footer * The unit of measure of difficulty of a particular song in the video game Dance Dance Revolution. ex

Footfall
Footfall is a 1985 science fiction novel written by Larry Niven and Jerry Pournelle. It was nominated for the both the Hugo and Locus Awards in 1986, and was a No

Foothills
Foothills are geographically defined as gradual increases in elevation at the base of a mountain range. They are a transition zone between plains and low relief hills to the adjacent topographically high mountains.-Examples:

Footing
The word footing has a number of meanings:*Architecture, Foundation *Translation Science, Footing *Bookkeeping, Footing *Sexuality, Footing *Jogging

Footlocker
Footlocker may refer to:* a Footlocker , a type of trunk or chest* Foot Locker, an American sportswear and footwear retailer* Operation Footlocker, an activity for military children developed by Mary Edwards Wertsch, Reta Jones Nicholson, and Gene Moser. Gene is the current Operations Officer for the project.

Footlocker (luggage)
A Footlocker is a storage box used in the military in which soldiers store their belongings. They came to be known as "footlockers" because they were essentially a type of locker which was usually located at the "foot" of a soldier's bunk or bed

Footloose
Footloose is a 1984 American musical-drama film directed by Herbert Ross. It tells the story of Ren McCormack , an upbeat Chicago teen who moves to a small town in which, as a result of the efforts of a local minister , dancing and rock music have been banned.The film is loosely based on events that took place in the small, rural, and religious community

Footman
A footman is a male servant, notably as domestic staff.-Word history:The name derives from the attendants who ran beside or behind the carriages of aristocrats, many of whom were chosen for their physical attributes. They ran alongside the coach to make sure it was not overturned by such obstacles as ditches or tree roots

Footman (furniture)
The footman is a British term for a metal stand, usually of polished steel or brass, and either oblong or oval in shape, for keeping plates and dishes hot before a dining room fire. A footman was useful prior to the early 20th century, before hot water was easily obtained, and when open fires were common

Footnote
A note is a string of text placed at the bottom of a page in a book or document or at the end of a text. The note can provide an author's comments on the main text or citations of a reference work in support of the text, or both

Footpad
A footpad is an archaic term for a robber or thief specializing in pedestrian victims. The term was used widely from the 16th century until the 19th century, but gradually fell out of common use

Footpath (disambiguation)
A footpath is a thoroughfare that is intended for pedestrian use.Footpath may also refer to:* Footpath , a Hindi film written and directed by Zia Sarhadi* Footpath , a Hindi film directed by Vikram Bhatt

Footprint
Footprints are the impressions or images left behind by a person walking. Hoofprints and pawprints are those left by animals with hooves or paws rather than feet, while "shoeprints" is the specific term for prints made by shoes

Footstep
- Music :* "Footsteps" , 1992* "Footsteps" , 2007* "Footsteps", a 1960 hit song by Steve Lawrence* "Footsteps", a 1994 rock song by Stiltskin from their album The Mind's Eye

Footsteps (Dardanelles song)
"Footsteps" is the only single taken from Melbourne Indie rock band Dardanelles' debut album Mirror Mirror released in 2007.-Background:The band claim the song was written in about 10 minutes and is the simplest track off the album. Originally planning to scrap the song, their producer convinced them to record it

Footstone
A footstone is a marker at the foot of a grave. The footstone thus lies opposite the headstone, which is usually the primary grave marker. As indicated, these markers are usually stone, though modern footstones are often made of concrete, or some metal in the form of a cast plate, which may or may not be set in concrete

Footstool
A footstool is a piece of furniture, the purpose of which is to support one's feet. There are two main types of footstools, which can be loosely categorized into two categories, those designed for comfort and those designed for function.

Footwear
Footwear consists of garments worn on the feet, for fashion, protection against the environment, and adornment. Being barefoot is commonly associated with poverty, but some cultures chose not to wear footwear at least in some situations.

Footwork
Footwork may refer to one of the following.*A technique of foot usage in various sports and arts:**Footwork **Footwork **Footwork *Juke house, a type of Chicago music*Footwork , a Formula 3000 team

Footy (model yacht)
The Footy is a very small radio-control sailboat whose length is a mere 12 inches . The hull can be made from a fiberglass mold or simply with thin sheets of plywood fitted together. Two servos are used, one to control the sail and one for the rudder.-History: Magazine]]"

Fop
Fop became a pejorative term for a foolish man over-concerned with his appearance and clothes in 17th century England. Some of the very many similar alternative terms are: "coxcomb", fribble, "popinjay" , fashion-monger, and "ninny"

FOP
Formatting Objects Processor is a Java application that converts XSL Formatting Objects files to PDF or other printable formats.FOP was originally developed by James Tauber who donated it to the Apache Software Foundation in 1999

FOR
FOR may refer to* Fellowship of Reconciliation* Field of Research, a component of the Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification

For Blood and Empire
-Variations:*Some Australian and European releases add "Corporate Rock" – 1:53 as track 14.*The Japanese release adds "The New Millennium Generation" - 3:08 as track 14

For Good
"For Good" is a musical number from the hit musical Wicked. It is sung as a duet between Elphaba and Glinda, as a farewell to each other. The song's music and lyrics were written by composer Stephen Schwartz.-Context:

For Heaven's Sake
For Heaven's Sake may refer to:*For Heaven's Sake , a comedy starring Harold Lloyd*For Heaven's Sake , a fantasy starring Clifton Webb*For Heaven's Sake , a film starring Florence Henderson

For Heaven's Sake (1950 film)
For Heaven's Sake is a 1950 fantasy film starring Clifton Webb as an angel trying to save the marriage of a couple played by Joan Bennett and Robert Cummings

For Heaven's Sake (comic strip)
For Heaven's Sake is a comic strip by Mike Morgan with a religious humor theme. It is syndicated by Creators Syndicate.-External links:* at Creators Syndicate*

For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology
FIRST is an organization founded by inventor Dean Kamen in 1989 to develop ways to inspire students in engineering and technology fields

For Keeps
For Keeps may refer to:*For Keeps , an album by The Field Mice*For Keeps , a 1988 film starring Randall Batinkoff and Molly Ringwald*For Keeps , a 1994 book by film critic Pauline Kael

For Keeps (album)
-Track listing:# "Five Moments" – 5:16# "Star of David" – 5:22# "Coach Station Reunion" – 3:10# "This Is Not Here" – 4:58# "Of the Perfect Kind" – 6:11# "Tilting at Windmills" – 4:38# "Think of These Things" – 4:17# "Willow" – 4:20

For Love or Money (1963 film)
For Love or Money is a 1963 romantic comedy film starring Kirk Douglas, Mitzi Gaynor and Thelma Ritter.-Plot summary:Lawyer Donald Kenneth "Deke" Gentry is given the task of playing matchmaker for the three daughters of his wealthy client Chloe Brasher .-Cast:* Kirk Douglas as Donald Kenneth "Deke" Gentry* Mitzi Gaynor as Kate Brasher* Thelma

For Real (There's Nothing Quite Like the Blinding Light)
"For Real " is a 2005 single by indie band Okkervil River, released prior to Black Sheep Boy. It's related to that release in the following ways: the version of "For Real" is longer, "The Next Four Months" is an outtake from Black Sheep Boy, and "For the Enemy" is a live version with the band members admittedly "very drunk." -Track

For Sale
-Track listing:# "Who Are You?"# "Allright"# "Suzy"# "Missing"# "Save Me"# "She's So Happy To Be"# "It Can Happen"# "Interlude"# "In The Name"# "Still"# "Pure"#*Lead vocals: Volker Hinkel# "Monday Morning Girl"# "Noone's Song"

For the Birds
For the Birds may refer to:* For the Birds , a 2000 animated short by Pixar Animation Studios* For the Birds * For the Birds * "For the Birds" , a short story by Isaac Asimov

For the Birds (album)
For the Birds is the fourth studio album by Dublin based band The Frames. The album was first released in Ireland on 2 April 2001 on Plateau Records, the Frames' own indie label

For the Birds (short story)
For the Birds is a science fiction short story by Isaac Asimov. The editor of a proposed fashion magazine wanted a science fiction story about a clothing designer. Asimov agreed, and wrote the story in November 1978. It was accepted, but the proposed magazine never appeared, and Asimov sold the story to Asimov's Science Fiction

For the Hell of It
For the Hell of It is Hell Rell's debut solo studio album. It was released on September 25, 2007. It features guest spots from rappers Young Dro, Styles P, Cam'ron, J.R. Writer, Juelz Santana and Lil Fame. The first single released is "Show Off"

For the Record
For the Record is a two-disc, 44-track greatest hits package released by the American country music band Alabama.The album chronicles the biggest hits from Alabama released between 1980 and 1998. The lineup includes all 33 of their Billboard magazine Hot Country Singles & Tracks No

For the Time Being
For the Time Being: A Christmas Oratorio, is a long poem by W. H. Auden, written 1941-42, and first published in 1944. It was one of two long poems included in Auden's book also titled For the Time Being, published in 1944; the other poem included in the book was "The Sea and the Mirror".The poem is a series of dramatic monologues spoken by the characters in the Christmas story

Forage
Forage is plant material eaten by grazing livestock.Historically the term forage has meant only plants eaten by the animals directly as pasture, crop residue, or immature cereal crops, but it is also used more loosely to include similar plants cut for fodder and carried to the animals, especially as hay or silage.While the term forage has a broad

Foramen
In anatomy, a foramen is any opening. Foramina inside the body of humans and other animals typically allow muscles, nerves, arteries, veins, or other structures to connect one part of the body with another.-Skull:

Forasti
Forăşti is a commune located in Suceava County, Romania. It is composed of nine villages: Antoceni, Boura, Forăşti, Manolea, Oniceni, Roşiori, Ruşi, Ţoleşti and Uideşti.

Foray
A foray was a traditional method of law enforcement in Grand Duchy of Lithuania and Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth. In view of the weakness of the executive in the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, it was used by members of the szlachta to defend their rights.

Foray (surname)
Foray is a surname, and may refer to:* Cyril Foray , Sierra Leonean educator, politician, diplomat and historian* Dominique Foray , French economist* June Foray , American voice actress

Forbearance
In the context of a mortgage process, forbearance is a special agreement between the lender and the borrower to delay a foreclosure. The literal meaning of forbearance is “holding back.”

Forbes (band)
Forbes was a Swedish dansband of the 1970s.The band represented Sweden in the Eurovision Song Contest 1977 with the entry "Beatles". The song is about the British band of the same name. Despite the popular topic of the song, Forbes ended in 18th and last place and mustered only two points

Forbidden
To forbid is to prohibit something. Forbidden may also refer to:-Films:*Forbidden , directed by Frank Capra*Forbidden , directed by George King*Forbidden , directed by Rudolph Maté

Forbidden (1932 film)
Forbidden is a 1932 American melodrama film directed by Frank Capra and starring Barbara Stanwyck as a librarian who falls in love with a married man played by Adolphe Menjou, with tragic consequences.-Cast :*Barbara Stanwyck as Lulu

Forbidden fruit
Forbidden fruit is any object of desire whose appeal is a direct result of knowledge that cannot or should not be obtained or something that someone may want but is forbidden to have.

Forbidden Fruit
Forbidden Fruit is an album by Jazz singer/pianist/songwriter Nina Simone . It was her second studio album for Colpix.-Information about songs on this album:

Forbidden Fruit (1921 film)
Forbidden Fruit is a 1921 drama film directed by Cecil B. DeMille. It is a remake of the 1915 film The Golden Chance, which was also directed by DeMille. The film survives in prints at George Eastman House and the Library of Congress.-Cast:

Forbidden Fruit (1952 film)
Forbidden Fruit is a 1952 drama film directed by Henri Verneuil and starring Fernandel.-Cast:* Fernandel - Dr. Charles Pellegrin* Françoise Arnoul - Martine Englebert* Jacques Castelot - Boquet, le propriétaire du 'Poker bar'

Lawn mower
A lawn mower is a machine that uses a revolving blade or blades to cut a lawn at an even length.Lawn mowers employing a blade that rotates about a vertical axis are known as rotary mowers, while those employing a blade assembly that rotates about a horizontal axis are known as cylinder or reel mowers.Many different designs have been made, each suited to a particular

Lawra District
The Lawra District is a district of Ghana in the Upper West Region.-Sources:*

Lawrence Bell
Lawrence Dale "Larry" Bell was an American industrialist and founder of Bell Aircraft Corporation.Bell was born in Mentone, Indiana and lived there until 1907, when his family moved to Santa Monica, California. He joined his older brother Grover and stunt pilot Lincoln Beachey as a mechanic in 1912

Lawrence Hargrave
Lawrence Hargrave was an engineer, explorer, astronomer, inventor and aeronautical pioneer.- Early life :Hargrave was born in Greenwich, England, the second son of John Fletcher Hargrave and was educated at Queen Elizabeth's Grammar School, Kirkby Lonsdale, Westmorland

Lawrence Kohlberg
Lawrence Kohlberg was a Jewish American psychologist born in Bronxville, New York, who served as a professor at the University of Chicago, as well as Harvard University. Having specialized in research on moral education and reasoning, he is best known for his theory of stages of moral development

Lawrence School, Lovedale
The Lawrence School, Lovedale is an educational institution in Lovedale, located near Ootacamund, Tamil Nadu, India and named for its founder, Sir Henry Montgomery Lawrence. Lawrence had mooted the idea about the establishment of a chain of schools with a view to provide education to the children of the deceased and serving soldiers and officers of the British army

Lawrence School, Sanawar
The Lawrence School is situated in Sanawar, adjacent to Kasauli in Himachal Pradesh, India. It was founded by Sir Henry Montgomery Lawrence of the Indian Army of British India and was established on 15 April 1847.The school has educated many notable people

Lawrence Sullivan Ross
Lawrence Sullivan "Sul" Ross was the 19th Governor of Texas , a Confederate States Army general during the American Civil War, and a president of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas, now called Texas A&M University.Ross was raised in the Republic of Texas, which was later annexed to the United States

Lawrence textile strike
The Lawrence Textile Strike was a strike of immigrant workers in Lawrence, Massachusetts in 1912 led by the Industrial Workers of the World. Prompted by one mill owner's decision to lower wages when a new law shortening the workweek went into effect in January, the strike spread rapidly through the town, growing to more than twenty thousand workers at nearly every mill within a week

Lawrence Washington (1718-1752)
Lawrence Washington was a soldier and prominent landowner in colonial Virginia. As a founding member of the Ohio Company of Virginia, and a member of the colonial legislature representing Fairfax County, he was chiefly responsible for securing the establishment of the town of Alexandria, Virginia on the banks of the Potomac River in 1749

Laws of cricket
The laws of cricket are a set of rules established by the Marylebone Cricket Club which describe the laws of cricket worldwide, to ensure uniformity and fairness. There are currently 42 laws, which outline all aspects of how the game is played from how a team wins a game, how a batsman is dismissed, through to specifications on how the pitch is to be prepared and maintained

Lawson, New South Wales
Lawson is a town in the Blue Mountains area of New South Wales, Australia. It is located on the Great Western Highway between Hazelbrook in the north east and Bullaburra in the west. At the 2006 census, Lawson had a population of 2,419 people. It has a station on the Main Western line

Lawsuit
A lawsuit or "suit in law" is a civil action brought in a court of law in which a plaintiff, a party who claims to have incurred loss as a result of a defendant's actions, demands a legal or equitable remedy. The defendant is required to respond to the plaintiff's complaint

Lawyer
A lawyer, according to Black's Law Dictionary, is "a person learned in the law; as an attorney, counsel or solicitor; a person who is practicing law." Law is the system of rules of conduct established by the sovereign government of a society to correct wrongs, maintain the stability of political and social authority, and deliver justice

LaxmiNarayan Dev Gadi
The Laxminarayan Dev Gadi is one of the two Gadis that together form the Swaminarayan Sampraday. It is headquartered at the Shri Swaminarayan Mandir, Vadtal and controls the Dakshin Vibhag.

Layla and Majnun
Layla and Majnun, also known as The Madman and Layla – in Arabic مجنون ليلى or قيس وليلى , in , Leyli və Məcnun in Azeri, Leyla ile Mecnun in Turkish, in Urdu and Hindi – is a classical Arab story, popularized by Persian poet Nizami Ganjavi's

Layne Staley
Layne Thomas Staley was an American musician who served as the lead singer and co-lyricist of the rock group Alice in Chains, which was formed in Seattle, Washington in 1987 by Staley and guitarist Jerry Cantrell. Alice in Chains rose to international fame as part of the grunge movement of the early 1990s

Layyah District
Layyah District is a district in the Punjab, Pakistan. It is located in the southern part of the province. The capital is Layyah.-History:

Lazarillo de Tormes
The Life of Lazarillo de Tormes and of His Fortunes and Adversities is a Spanish novella, published anonymously because of its heretical content

Lazarus
Lazarus may refer to:*Lazarus , a surname and given name -People:* Lazarus of Bethany, a figure in the Gospel of John, which describes him being raised by Jesus from the dead

Lazarus (department store)
F&R Lazarus & Company — commonly known as Lazarus — was a regional department store retail chain operating primarily in the U.S. Midwest, and based in Columbus, Ohio

Lazarus (software)
Lazarus is a free cross-platform IDE which provides a Delphi-like development experience for Pascal and Object Pascal developers. It is developed for, and supported by, the Free Pascal compiler. Since early 2008, Lazarus has been available for Microsoft Windows, several Linux distributions, FreeBSD, and Mac OS X

LC circuit
An LC circuit, also called a resonant circuit or tuned circuit, consists of an inductor, represented by the letter L, and a capacitor, represented by the letter C

LCD shutter glasses
Liquid crystal shutter glasses are glasses used in conjunction with a display screen to create the illusion of a three dimensional image, an example of stereoscopy. Each eye's glass contains a liquid crystal layer which has the property of becoming dark when voltage is applied, being otherwise transparent

LDS Conference Center
The Conference Center, located in Salt Lake City, Utah, is the premier meeting hall for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Completed in spring 2000 in time for the church's April 2000 general conference, the 21,000-seat Conference Center replaced the traditional use of the nearby Salt Lake Tabernacle, built in 1868, for semiannual LDS Church general conferences and major

LDV Convoy
The LDV Convoy is a panel van that was manufactured by LDV Limited between 1997 and 2006.The Convoy was a development of the Leyland DAF 400 Series, which in turn was based on the Freight Rover 300 Series

LDV Pilot
The LDV Pilot is a panel van that was produced by LDV Limited from 1997 until 2006, and closely based on preceding models dating back to 1974 .

Le Château de ma mère
My Mother's Castle is a 1957 autobiographical novel by Marcel Pagnol, the second in the four-volume series Souvenirs d'enfance and the sequel to My Father's Glory

Le Corbusier
Charles-Édouard Jeanneret, better known as Le Corbusier , was a Swiss-born French architect, designer, urbanist, writer and painter, famous for being one of the pioneers of what now is called modern architecture. He was born in Switzerland and became a French citizen in 1930

Le Cordon Bleu
Le Cordon Bleu is the world's largest hospitality education institution, with 35 schools on five continents serving 20,000 students annually. Its primary education focus is on hospitality management and the culinary arts

Le Mans
Le Mans is a city in France, located on the Sarthe River. Traditionally the capital of the province of Maine, it is now the capital of the Sarthe department and the seat of the Roman Catholic diocese of Le Mans. Le Mans is a part of the Pays de la Loire region.Its inhabitants are called Manceaux and Mancelles

Lea Michele
Lea Michele Sarfati , known professionally as Lea Michele, is an American actress and singer. Michele began working professionally as a child actress on Broadway in productions such as Ragtime and Les Misérables. She originated the role of Wendla in the musical Spring Awakening and currently plays Rachel Berry in the Fox television series Glee

Lead paint
Lead paint or lead-based paint is paint containing lead, a heavy metal, that is used as pigment, with lead chromate and lead carbonate being the most common. Lead is also added to paint to speed drying, increase durability, retain a fresh appearance, and resist moisture that causes corrosion

Lead shot
Lead shot is a collective term for small balls of lead. These were the original projectiles for muskets and early rifles, but today lead shot is fired primarily from shotguns. It is also used for a variety of other purposes

Lead tree
Leucaena leucocephala is a species of small Mimosoid tree that is native to southern Mexico and northern Central America but now naturalized throughout the tropics. Common names include White Leadtree, Jumbay, and White Popinac

Lead(II) chloride
Lead chloride is an inorganic compound which is a white solid under ambient conditions. It is poorly soluble in water. Lead chloride is one of the most important lead-based reagents

Lead(II) iodide
Lead iodide or plumbous iodide is a bright yellow solid at room temperature, that reversibly becomes brick red by heating. In its crystalline form it is used as a detector material for high energy photons including x-rays and gamma rays.

Lead(II) nitrate
Lead nitrate is an inorganic compound with the chemical formula Pb2. It commonly occurs as a colourless crystal or white powder and, unlike most other lead salts, is soluble in water.

Lead(II) sulfide
Lead sulfide is an inorganic compound with the formula Pb. It finds limited use in electronic devices. PbS, also known as galena, is the principal ore and most important compound of lead.

Lead-acid battery
Lead–acid batteries, invented in 1859 by French physicist Gaston Planté, are the oldest type of rechargeable battery. Despite having a very low energy-to-weight ratio and a low energy-to-volume ratio, their ability to supply high surge currents means that the cells maintain a relatively large power-to-weight ratio

Leading wheel
The leading wheel or leading axle of a steam locomotive is an unpowered wheel or axle located in front of the driving wheels. The axle or axles of the leading wheels are normally located in a truck

Leadtek
Leadtek Research, Inc. is a Taiwanese company, founded in 1986, which focuses on research and development that is specialized in the design and manufacture of graphics cards.- Products :

Leadville Trail 100
Leadville Trail 100 Ultramarathon is an ultramarathon held annually on trails and dirt roads near Leadville, Colorado, through the heart of the Rocky Mountains. First run in 1983, runners in the race climb and descend , with elevations ranging between 9,200-12,620 feet

Leaf
A leaf is an organ of a vascular plant, as defined in botanical terms, and in particular in plant morphology. Foliage is a mass noun that refers to leaves as a feature of plants.

Leaf mold
Leaf mold is a form of compost produced by the fungal breakdown of shrub and tree leaves, which are generally too dry, acidic, or low in nitrogen for bacterial decomposition.-Description:

Leaf spring
Originally called laminated or carriage spring, a leaf spring is a simple form of spring, commonly used for the suspension in wheeled vehicles

Leaf vegetable
Leaf vegetables, also called potherbs, green vegetables, greens, leafy greens or salad greens, are plant leaves eaten as a vegetable, sometimes accompanied by tender petioles and shoots

Leafhopper
Leafhopper is a common name applied to any species from the family Cicadellidae. Leafhoppers, colloquially known as hoppers, are minute plant-feeding insects in the superfamily Membracoidea in the order Hemiptera

Leafy sea dragon
The leafy seadragon or Glauert's seadragon, Phycodurus eques, is a marine fish in the family Syngnathidae, which also includes the seahorses. It is the only member of the genus Phycodurus. It is found along the southern and western coasts of Australia. The name is derived from the appearance, with long leaf-like protrusions coming from all over the body

League of German Girls
The League of German Girls or League of German Maidens , was the girl's wing of the overall Nazi party youth movement, the Hitler Youth. It was the only female youth organization in Nazi Germany.

League of Nations
The League of Nations was an intergovernmental organization founded as a result of the Paris Peace Conference that ended the First World War. It was the first permanent international organization whose principal mission was to maintain world peace

Leah
Leah , as described in the Hebrew Bible, is the first of the two concurrent wives of the Hebrew patriarch Jacob and mother of six of sons whose descendants became the Twelve Tribes of Israel, along with at least one daughter, Dinah. She is the daughter of Laban and the older sister of Rachel, whom Jacob originally wanted to marry

Leah Goldberg
Leah Goldberg was a prolific Hebrew poet, author, playwright, literary translator, and comparative literary researcher. Her writings are considered classics of Israeli literature and remain very popular among Hebrew speaking Israelis.-Biography:

Leak Detection
Pipeline networks are the most economic and safest pipeline transport for mineral oil, gases and other fluid products. As a means of long-distance transport, pipelines have to fulfill high demands of safety, reliability and efficiency. Most pipelines, regardless of what they transport, are designed with a typical life span of 25 years

Leak-down tester
A leak-down tester is a measuring instrument used to determine the condition of internal combustion engines by introducing compressed air into the cylinder and measuring the rate at which it leaks out.

Leamington, Ontario
Leamington is a municipality in Essex County, southern Ontario, Canada, and has a population of 31,113. It includes Point Pelee, the southernmost point of mainland Canada. It has a large H. J. Heinz Company factory and is known as the "Tomato Capital of Canada", with 4 km² of this crop in the vicinity

Leamon King
Leamon King was an American athlete who jointly held the world record for the 100 metre sprint for men from 1956 to 1960.

Lean Back
"Lean Back" is a 2004 single from the Terror Squad's album True Story. It features Fat Joe and Remy Ma, and was produced by Scott Storch. Fat Joe raps verses one and three, and Remy handles verse two

Lean on Me (film)
Lean on Me is a 1989 dramatized biographical written by Michael Schiffer, directed by John G. Avildsen and starring Morgan Freeman. Lean on Me is loosely based on the story of Joe Louis Clark, a real life inner city high school principal in Paterson, New Jersey, whose school is at risk of being taken over by the New Jersey state government unless students improve their test

Leander J. McCormick
Leander James McCormick was an American farmer, inventor, manufacturer, and businessman. Although born in rural Virginia, he later owned vast amounts of real estate in downtown Chicago.-Life:

Leandro Locsin
Leandro V. Locsin was a Filipino architect, artist, and interior designer, known for his use of concrete, floating volume and simplistic design in his various projects. An avid collector, he was fond of modern painting and Chinese ceramics. He was proclaimed a National Artist of the Philippines for Architecture in 1990 by President Corazon C

Leaning Tower of Pisa
The Leaning Tower of Pisa or simply the Tower of Pisa is the campanile, or freestanding bell tower, of the cathedral of the Italian city of Pisa

Leap Castle
Leap Castle is an Irish castle in County Offaly, about four miles north of the town of Roscrea on the R421. It was built in the late 15th century by the O'Bannon family and was originally called "Léim Uí Bhanáin," or "Leap of the O'Bannons." The O'Bannons were the "secondary chieftains" of the territory, and were subject to the ruling O'Carroll clan.The Annals of the Four Masters

Leap second
A leap second is a positive or negative one-second adjustment to the Coordinated Universal Time time scale that keeps it close to mean solar time. UTC, which is used as the basis for official time-of-day radio broadcasts for civil time, is maintained using extremely precise atomic clocks

Lear's Macaw
The Lear's Macaw , also known as the Indigo Macaw, is a rare Brazilian parrot with a highly restricted range. It is metallic blue with a faint, often barely visible, tinge of green, and a yellow patch of skin at the base of the heavy, black bill. It weighs around 950 g and is 75 cm long

Learjet 25
|-See also:-References:* Taylor, John W. R. Jane's All The World's Aircraft 1976–77. London:Jane's Yearbooks, 1976. ISBN 0-354-00538-3.-External links:**

Learning object metadata
Learning Object Metadata is a data model, usually encoded in XML, used to describe a learning object and similar digital resources used to support learning

Learning sciences
The term Learning Sciences refers to an interdisciplinary field that works to further scientific understanding of learning as well as to engage in the design and implementation of learning innovations, and improvement of instructional methodologies

Least Developed Countries
Least developed country is the name given to a country which, according to the United Nations, exhibits the lowest indicators of socioeconomic development, with the lowest Human Development Index ratings of all countries in the world

Least squares
The method of least squares is a standard approach to the approximate solution of overdetermined systems, i.e., sets of equations in which there are more equations than unknowns. "Least squares" means that the overall solution minimizes the sum of the squares of the errors made in solving every single equation.The most important application is in data fitting