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Differential
-Mathematics:* Differential comprises multiple related meanings of the word, both in calculus and differential geometry, such as an infinitesimal change in the value of a function* Differential algebra* Differential calculus

Differential calculus
In mathematics, differential calculus is a subfield of calculus concerned with the study of the rates at which quantities change. It is one of the two traditional divisions of calculus, the other being integral calculus.

Differential diagnosis
A differential diagnosis is a systematic diagnostic method used to identify the presence of an entity where multiple alternatives are possible , and may also refer to any of the included candidate alternatives A differential diagnosis (sometimes abbreviated DDx, ddx, DD, D/Dx, or ΔΔ) is a systematic diagnostic method used to identify the presence of an entity where multiple alternatives are possible (and the process may be termed differential diagnostic procedure), and may also refer to any of the included candidate alternatives A differential diagnosis (sometimes abbreviated DDx, ddx, DD, D/Dx, or ΔΔ) is a systematic diagnostic method used to identify the presence of an entity where multiple alternatives are possible (and the process may be termed differential diagnostic procedure), and may also refer to any of the included candidate alternatives (which may also be termed

Differential thermal analysis
Differential thermal analysis is a thermoanalytic technique, similar to differential scanning calorimetry. In DTA, the material under study and an inert reference are made to undergo identical thermal cycles, while recording any temperature difference between sample and reference

Differentiation
Differentiation may refer to:* Differentiation , the process of finding a derivative* Differentiated instruction in education* Cellular differentiation in biology* Planetary differentiation in planetary science

Differentiation
Differentiation may refer to:* Differentiation , the process of finding a derivative* Differentiated instruction in education* Cellular differentiation in biology* Planetary differentiation in planetary science

Differentiation (linguistics)
Differentiation in semantics is defined by Löbner as a meaning shift reached by "adding concepts to the original concepts". His example is James Joyce is hard to understand, where understand is differentiated from "perceiving the meaning" to "interpret the text meaning".A related meaning shift is metonymy, where one builds a new concept out of an element of the original

Differentiation (sociology)
Differentiation is a term in system theory From the viewpoint of this theory, the principal feature of modern society is the increased process of system differentiation as a way of dealing with the complexity of its environment. This is accomplished through the creation of subsystems in an effort to copy within a system the difference between it and the environment

Difficulty
Difficulty may refer to:*a problem*the difficulty level in a video game*Countermajoritarian difficultyFictional:*Hill Difficulty, in Pilgrim's Progress

Diffraction
Diffraction refers to various phenomena which occur when a wave encounters an obstacle. Italian scientist Francesco Maria Grimaldi coined the word "diffraction" and was the first to record accurate observations of the phenomenon in 1665

Diffusion
Diffusion describes the spread of particles through random motion from regions of higher concentration to regions of lower concentration. The time dependence of the statistical distribution in space is given by the diffusion equation

Diffusivity (biology)
Diffusivity or diffusion coefficient is a proportionality constant between the molar flux due to molecular diffusion and the gradient in the concentration of the species . Diffusivity is encountered in Fick's law and numerous other equations of physical chemistry.It is generally prescribed for a given pair of species

Dig
-Music:* Dig , an American rock bandAlbums* Dig , or the title song* Dig * Dig * Dig , or the title song* Dig

Dig (Boz Scaggs album)
Dig is a Rhythm and Blues album recorded by Bozz Scaggs in February 2001. It was re-released on the Gray Cat record label in 2001.-Track listing:#"Payday" – 4:43

Dig (Incubus song)
"Dig" is the second single released by American alternative rock band Incubus from their sixth studio album Light Grenades . Receiving huge airplay from alternative rock radio stations throughout the United States, "Dig" peaked at number four on the Modern Rock Tracks chart

Dig (magazine)
Dig is a children's magazine published by Cobblestone Publishing and associated with the Archaeological Institute of America.Each issue of Dig is 48 pages, and the magazine comes out eight times per year. Most issues are theme-based, collecting a group of articles relating to archaeological finds from around the world

Dig (Miles Davis album)
Dig is an album by Miles Davis on Prestige Records, catalogue number 7012. Initially released in the ten-inch format in 1951, Dig was later reissued as a twelve-inch LP with additional tracks

Dig (Mudvayne song)
"Dig" is the first and debut single from Mudvayne's 2000 album, L.D. 50. The song won the first ever MTV2 Award in 2001.-Music video:A music video was produced for the song which was featured in a "Making of" video

Dig (Toshiko Akiyoshi album)
Dig is a small combo jazz album recorded by Toshiko Akiyoshi in 1993 and released on the Nippon Crown record label.-Track listing:#"Dig" – 7:58#"Lament" – 7:10#"Lazy Days" – 7:04#"Harlequin Tears" – 6:46

Dig In
"Dig In" is the lead-single by Lenny Kravitz from his sixth studio album, Lenny. It was released in October 2001. It was used in promos by the National Basketball Association for the 2002 NBA Playoffs, as well as the ending theme for the film Returner.

Digallane
Digallane is a chemical compound of gallium and hydrogen with the formula Ga2H6. It is the dimer of the monomeric compound gallane. The eventual preparation of the pure compound, reported in 1989,

Digest
Digest can refer to any of the following:*A condensed collection or compendium of writings:**Pandects, or "The Digest", a digest of Roman law**A tax digest

Digestive
Digestive may refer to:*Digestion, biological process of metabolism*Digestive biscuit, a British semi-sweet biscuit*Digestif, small beverage at the end of a meal

Digger
Digger and Diggers may refer to:*Digger , a punk band*Digger , a Beanie Baby crab produced by Ty, Inc.*Digger , a comic book character owned by Marvel Comics*Digger , a classic computer game from 1983

Digger (band)
-History:Digger formed in the Lehigh Valley in the mid-1990s and signed to Hopeless Records in 1996. Upon the event of Digger's live recording being played on WMUH the word of the band spread quickly, which led to the band's sign to Hopeless Records. The band released their first LP, Powerbait, and toured until the band came back to the studio to record The Promise of an Uncertain Future

Digger (Bottom episode)
"Digger" is the first episode of the second series of British TV sitcom Bottom. It was first broadcast on 1 October 1992.-Synopsis :After visiting a dating agency, Richie and his 'Butler', Jives prepare to entertain aristocracy, with Richie having sold his kidney on the black market to afford the caviar and the dinner jackets.- Plot :The episode begins with the pair in

Digger (comics)
Digger is a fictional comic book character in the Marvel Comics universe. He first appeared as a story narrator/host in the horror anthology series Tower of Shadows #1 Digger (Roderick Krupp) is a fictional comic book character in the Marvel Comics universe. He first appeared as a story narrator/host in the horror anthology series Tower of Shadows #1 Digger (Roderick Krupp) is a fictional comic book character in the Marvel Comics universe. He first appeared as a story narrator/host in the horror anthology series Tower of Shadows #1 (Sept

Diggers (computer game)
Diggers is a puzzle video game for the Amiga CD32 in which the player takes control of a mining team excavating a planet for precious minerals. It was later released for the Amiga 1200 and DOS. Diggers was bundled with the CD32 at launch, along with a 2D platformer entitled Oscar on the same CD

Digging
Digging may refer to:* A form of excavation* Cave digging* Clam digging* Double digging, gardening technique* Dump digging* Gold digging** Gold-digging* Gum digging* Historical digging* Privy digging* Well digging

Digit
Digit may refer to:* Digit , one of several most distal parts of a limb—fingers, thumbs, and toes on hands and feet* Numerical digit, as used in mathematics or computer science* Hexadecimal, representing a four-bit number

Digit (anatomy)
A digit is one of several most distal parts of a limb, such as fingers or toes, present in many vertebrates.- Names:Some languages have different names for hand and foot digits .

Digital
A digital system is a data technology that uses discrete values. By contrast, non-digital systems use a continuous range of values to represent information

Digital (Joy Division song)
"Digital" is a song by the band Joy Division that is featured on the compilation albums Substance, Heart and Soul, and Still.The track was recorded in the band's first session with Martin Hannett as producer

Digital camera
A digital camera is a camera that takes video or still photographs, or both, digitally by recording images via an electronic image sensor. It is the main device used in the field of digital photography

Digital video (disambiguation)
Digital Video may refer to:*Digital Video a Digital Video tape format.*Digital video a type of video recording system.*Digital cinematography the process of shooting motion pictures.

Digitigrade
A digitigrade is an animal that stands or walks on its digits, or toes. Digitigrades include walking birds , cats, dogs, and many other mammals, but not plantigrades or unguligrades

Dignitas
Dignitas may refer to:*Dignitas , the Roman virtue*Dignitas , the assisted death charity*Dignitas International, the humanitarian organisation*Team Dignitas, the British e-sports team

Dignity
Dignity is a term used in moral, ethical, and political discussions to signify that a being has an innate right to respect and ethical treatment. It is an extension of the Enlightenment-era concepts of inherent, inalienable rights

Dignity (album)
Dignity is the fourth studio album by American recording artist Hilary Duff. The album was released on April 3, 2007 by Hollywood Records. Between the releases of her previous studio album, Hilary Duff , and Dignity, she had an eventful personal life; she was stalked by a man who threatened her life, her parents separated and she broke up with her boyfriend

Dignity (album)
Dignity is the fourth studio album by American recording artist Hilary Duff. The album was released on April 3, 2007 by Hollywood Records. Between the releases of her previous studio album, Hilary Duff , and Dignity, she had an eventful personal life; she was stalked by a man who threatened her life, her parents separated and she broke up with her boyfriend

Dignity (Bob Dylan song)
"Dignity" is a song by Bob Dylan, first released on Bob Dylan's Greatest Hits Volume 3 in 1994. It was recorded during the Oh Mercy studio sessions but didn't make it on to the album. The version released on Bob Dylan's Greatest Hits Volume 3 was remixed and overdubbed by Brendan O'Brien

Dignity (Deacon Blue song)
"Dignity" is a song by Deacon Blue, which was the band's first official release. It is one of their most popular songs and is often played as the final song at concerts. "Dignity", particularly the original version, appears on almost every Deacon Blue compilation or greatest hits collection

Dignity (disambiguation)
Dignity may refer to:Concepts:* Dignitas, an ancient Roman political idea to do with the influence of a citizen* Dignitatis Humanae, the Second Vatican Council's Declaration on religious freedom* Four Dignities of Shambhala Buddhism

Digraph
Digraph may refer to:* Digraph , a pair of characters used together to represent a single sound, such as "sh" in English* Typographical ligature, the joining of two letters as a single glyph, such as "æ"

Dihedral (disambiguation)
Dihedral or polyhedral may refer to:* Dihedral angle, the angle between two mathematical planes* Dihedral , the upward angle of a fixed-wing aircraft's wings where they meet at the fuselage, dihedral effect of an aircraft, longitudinal dihedral angle of a fixed-wing aircraft* Dihedral group, the group of symmetries of the n-sided polygon in abstract algebra**

Dihydroetorphine
Dihydroetorphine was developed by K.W.Bentley at McFarlan-Smith in the 1960s and is a potent analgesic drug , which is used mainly in China

DiI
DiI is a hydrophobic and lipophilic cyanine dye used for scientific purposes, such as single molecule imaging, Fate mapping, and neuronal tracing . Its chemical name is 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3'3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate, the chemical formula is C59H89ClN2O4

Dike (mythology)
In ancient Greek culture, Dikē was the spirit of moral order and fair judgement based on immemorial custom, in the sense of socially enforced norms and conventional rules. According to Hesiod In ancient Greek culture, Dikē (Greek: Δίκη, English translation: "justice") was the spirit of moral order and fair judgement based on immemorial custom, in the sense of socially enforced norms and conventional rules. According to Hesiod In ancient Greek culture, Dikē (Greek: Δίκη, English translation: "justice") was the spirit of moral order and fair judgement based on immemorial custom, in the sense of socially enforced norms and conventional rules. According to Hesiod (Theogony, l

Diketene
Diketene is an organic compound formed by dimerization of ketene. Diketene is a member of the oxetane family. It is used as a chemical reagent in organic chemistry. It is a colorless liquid and heating regenerates the ketene monomer

DIL
DIL may refer to:* Debian-Installer Loader* Deed in lieu* Developments in Literacy, a non-profit organization that builds schools in Pakistan* Developmental Informatics Lab, a research lab at IIT Bombay* Deutsches Institut für Lebensmitteltechnik e. V

Dilapidation
Dilapidation is a term meaning in general a falling into decay, but more particularly used in the plural in English law for# the waste committed by the incumbent of an ecclesiastical living

Dilate
Dilate is the seventh studio album by singer-songwriter Ani DiFranco, released in 1996. Dilate is her highest-selling and critically acclaimed record, with U.S

Dilate (Bardo Pond album)
Dilate is the fifth album by Bardo Pond. It was released on April 24, 2001 on Matador Records.-Track listing:#"Two Planes - 7:26#"Sunrise" - 5:26#"Inside" - 11:43#"Aphasia" - 6:02#"Favorite Uncle" - 5:58#"Swig" - 4:22#"Despite the Roar" - 7:07

Dilation
Dilation refers to an enlargement or expansion in bulk or extent, the opposite of contraction. It derives from the Latin dilatare, "to spread wide".In physiology:* Pupillary dilation, dilation of the pupil of the eye

Dilation (morphology)
Dilation is one of the basic operations in mathematical morphology. Originally developed for binary images, it has been expanded first to grayscale images, and then to complete lattices

Dilation and curettage
Dilation and curettage refers to the dilation of the cervix and surgical removal of part of the lining of the uterus and/or contents of the uterus by scraping and scooping . It is a diagnostic gynecological procedure.D&C normally is referred to a procedure involving a curette, also called sharp curettage

Dilator
Dilator is a medical term with a number of uses, including:*A surgical instrument or medical implement used to induce dilation, that is, to expand an opening or passage such as the cervix, urethra, esophagus, or vaginal introitus.

Dildo
A dildo is a sex toy, often explicitly phallic in appearance, intended for bodily penetration during masturbation or sex with partners.- Description and uses :

Dilemma
A dilemma |proposition]]") is a problem offering two possibilities, neither of which is practically acceptable. One in this position has been traditionally described as "being on the horns of a dilemma", neither horn being comfortable

Dilemma (disambiguation)
A dilemma is a double proposition in logics.Dilemma may also refer to:* "Dilemma" , by Kelly Rowland and Nelly* Dilemma , a genus of bivalves

Harpers Ferry, West Virginia
Harpers Ferry is a historic town in Jefferson County, West Virginia, United States. In many books the town is called "Harper's Ferry" with an apostrophe.

Harpsichord
A harpsichord is a musical instrument played by means of a keyboard. It produces sound by plucking a string when a key is pressed.In the narrow sense, "harpsichord" designates only the large wing-shaped instruments in which the strings are perpendicular to the keyboard

Harrak
Harrak refers to the last name carried by the Northern Moroccan families that descend from the sons of Al-Harrak; one of the direct descendents of Islamic prophet Muhammad through Imam Ali and Fatima Zahra.-Other spellings used for Harrak:

Harrier (bird)
A harrier is any of the several species of diurnal hawks forming the Circinae sub-family of the Accipitridae family of birds of prey. Harriers characteristically hunt by flying low over open ground, feeding on small mammals, reptiles, or birds.

Harrier Jump Jet
The Harrier, informally referred to as the Jump Jet, is a family of British-designed military jet aircraft capable of vertical/short takeoff and landing operations

Harriet Beecher Stowe
Harriet Beecher Stowe was an American abolitionist and author. Her novel Uncle Tom's Cabin was a depiction of life for African-Americans under slavery; it reached millions as a novel and play, and became influential in the United States and United Kingdom

Harriet Brooks
Harriet Brooks was the first Canadian woman nuclear physicist. She is most famous for her research on nuclear transmutations and radioactivity. Ernest Rutherford, who guided her graduate work, regarded her as being next to Marie Curie in the calibre of her aptitude.She was born in Exeter, Ontario in 1876. She graduated with B.A

Harriet Martineau
Harriet Martineau was an English social theorist and Whig writer, often cited as the first female sociologist.

Harriet Powers
Harriet Powers was an African American slave, folk artist and quilt maker from rural Georgia. She used traditional appliqué techniques to record local legends, Bible stories, and astronomical events on her quilts

Harriet Tubman
Harriet Tubman Harriet Tubman Harriet Tubman (born Araminta Harriet Ross; (1820 – 1913) was an African-American abolitionist, humanitarian, and Union spy during the American Civil War. After escaping from slavery, into which she was born, she made thirteen missions to rescue more than 70 slaves using the network of antislavery activists and safe houses known as the Underground Railroad

Harriman State Park
At , Harriman State Park is the second largest state park in New York. Located in Rockland and Orange counties north of New York City, it is a haven for hikers with over of hiking trails. The park is also known for its 31 lakes, multiple streams, public camping area, and great vistas

Harriman, Tennessee
Harriman is a city in the U.S. state of Tennessee, primarily in Roane County, with a small extension into Morgan County. It is the principal city of and is included in the Harriman Micropolitan Statistical Area, which consists of Roane County and is a component of the Knoxville-Sevierville-La Follette, TN Combined Statistical Area

Harringay Arena
Harringay Arena was a sporting and events venue on Green Lanes in Harringay, North London, England. Built in 1936, it lasted as a venue until 1958.-Construction:

Harris matrix
The Harris matrix is a tool used to depict the temporal succession of archaeological contexts and thus the sequence of deposition on a 'dry land' archaeological site. The matrix reflects the relative position and stratigraphic contacts of observable stratigraphic units, or contexts. The Matrix was developed in 1974 in Winchester, England, by Dr. Edward C

Harris Publications
Harris Publications Inc. is an American consumer-magazine publisher in New York City, New York, that publishes over 75 titles, including Juicy, XXL, King, Dog News, 0-60, Guns & Weapons for Law Enforcement, Small Business Opportunities, Men's Workout, Exercise & Health, Celebrity Hairstyles, and many more

Harrison Bergeron
"Harrison Bergeron" is a satirical, dystopian science fiction short story written by Kurt Vonnegut Jr. and first published in October 1961. Originally published in The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, the story was re-published in the author's collection Welcome to the Monkey House in 1968.- Plot summary :The plot is set in the year 2081

Harrison County, Texas
Harrison County is a county of the U.S. state of Texas. In 2000, its population was 62,110. It is named for Jonas Harrison, a lawyer and Texas revolutionary. It is located in the Ark-La-Tex region

Harrison Ford (silent film actor)
Harrison Ford was an American stage and film actor. He was a leading Broadway theatre performer and a star of the silent film era.-Career:

Harrison Meeting House Site and Cemetery
The Harrison Meeting House Site and Cemetery, also known as the Germantown Church Site and Cemetery, is located on NY 416 right at its northern terminus with NY 211, across from Orange County Airport just outside the village of Montgomery, New York.

Harrison Schmitt
Harrison Hagan "Jack" Schmitt is an American geologist, a retired NASA astronaut, university professor, and a former U.S. senator from New Mexico.

Harrison, New Jersey
Harrison is a town in Hudson County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the town's population was 13,620. The town is a suburb of the nearby city of Newark, New Jersey.-Geography:Harrison is located at .

Harrods
Harrods is an upmarket department store located in Brompton Road in Brompton, in the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea, London. The Harrods brand also applies to other enterprises undertaken by the Harrods group of companies including Harrods Bank, Harrods Estates, Harrods Aviation and Air Harrods, and to Harrods Buenos Aires, sold by Harrods in 1922 and closed , with plans

Harrow and Wealdstone rail crash
The Harrow and Wealdstone rail crash was a major railway disaster and collision on the British railway system on 8 October 1952.The accident took place from central London

Harrow and Wealdstone station
Harrow & Wealdstone station is in Wealdstone, Greater London. It is served by London Overground, London Midland, Southern and London Underground Bakerloo Line services. The station is located between The Bridge, Wealdstone, and Sandridge Close, Harrow with entrances leading to both

Harrow School
Harrow School, commonly known simply as "Harrow", is an English independent school for boys situated in the town of Harrow, in north-west London.. The school is of worldwide renown. There is some evidence that there has been a school on the site since 1243 but the Harrow School we know today was officially founded by John Lyon under a Royal Charter of Elizabeth I in 1572

Harry A. Ironside
Henry Allen "Harry" Ironside was a Canadian-American Bible teacher, preacher, theologian, pastor, and author.-Biography:

Harry Arminius Miller
Harry Arminius Miller was an influential and famous American race car builder, most active in the 1920s and 1930s

Harry Belafonte
Harold George "Harry" Belafonte, Jr. is an American singer, songwriter, actor and social activist. He was dubbed the "King of Calypso" for popularizing the Caribbean musical style with an international audience in the 1950s

Harry Blackstone, Sr.
Harry Blackstone was a famed stage magician and illusionist of the 20th century. Blackstone was born Harry Bouton in Chicago, Illinois, he began his career as a magician in his teens and was popular through World War II as a USO entertainer. He was often billed as The Great Blackstone. His son Harry Blackstone, Jr

Harry Boland
Harry Boland was an Irish Republican politician and member of the First Dáil.-Early life:Boland was born in Phibsboro, Dublin on 27 April 1887. He was active in GAA circles in early life, and ultimately joined the Irish Republican Brotherhood

Harry Bridges
Harry Bridges was an Australian-American union leader, in the International Longshore and Warehouse Union , a longshore and warehouse workers' union on the West Coast, Hawaii and Alaska which he helped form and led for over 40 years

Harry Browne
Harry Browne was an American libertarian writer, politician, and free-market investment analyst. He ran for President of the United States as the nominee of the Libertarian Party in 1996 and 2000.

Harry Butler
William Henry "Harry" Butler CBE is an Australian naturalist and environmental consultant. He is a populariser of science and natural history for both child and adult audiences and, as conservation consultant to the Barrow Island oilfield and many other projects, has played a major role in environmental conservation and restoration in Australia

Harry Chapin
Harry Forster Chapin was an American singer-songwriter best known in particular for his folk rock songs including "Taxi", "W*O*L*D", and the number-one hit "Cat's in the Cradle". Chapin was also a dedicated humanitarian who fought to end world hunger; he was a key player in the creation of the Presidential Commission on World Hunger in 1977

Harry Cooper (veterinarian)
Harold Leonard Cooper , is an Australian vet and well known in the media.Cooper began his media career in a veterinary segment on a morning television talk show in Sydney. Later he became known as the resident veterinarian on the long-running series Burke's Backyard

Harry Crosby (actor)
Harry Lillis Crosby III is an American actor, singer and investment banker.Crosby was born in Hollywood, California, at Queen of Angels Hospital. He is the fifth son of actor and singer Bing Crosby, the eldest from Bing's second marriage to Kathryn Crosby

Harry Douglas
Harry Douglas, IV is an American football wide receiver for the Atlanta Falcons of the National Football League. He was drafted by the Falcons in the third round of the 2008 NFL Draft. He played college football at Louisville.

Harry G. Haskell, Jr.
Harry Garner Haskell, Jr. is an American businessman and politician from Wilmington, in New Castle County, Delaware. He is a member of the Republican Party, who served as U.S. Representative from Delaware.-Early life and family:

Harry Hamlin
Harry Robinson Hamlin is an American film and television actor, known for his role as Perseus in the 1981 fantasy film Clash of the Titans, and as Michael Kuzak in the legal drama series L.A

Harry Hammond Hess
Harry Hammond Hess was a geologist and United States Navy officer in World War II.Considered one of the "founding fathers" of the unifying theory of plate tectonics, Rear Admiral Harry Hammond Hess was born on May 24, 1906 in New York City

Harry Harlow
Harry Frederick Harlow was an American psychologist best known for his maternal-separation and social isolation experiments on rhesus monkeys, which demonstrated the importance of care-giving and companionship in social and cognitive development

Harry Hay
Henry "Harry" Hay, Jr. was a labor advocate, teacher and early leader in the American LGBT rights movement. He is known for his roles in helping to found several gay organizations, including the Mattachine Society, the first sustained gay rights group in the United States.Hay was exposed early in life to the principles of Marxism and to the idea of

Harry Hill
Harry Hill , is a Perrier Award–winning English comedian, author and television presenter. A former medical doctor , Hill began his career in comedy with the popular radio show Harry Hill's Fruit Corner.-Personal life:Hill was born in Woking,

Harry Houdini
Harry Houdini was a Hungarian-born American magician and escapologist, stunt performer, actor and film producer noted for his sensational escape acts

Harry James
Henry Haag “Harry” James was a trumpeter who led a jazz swing band during the Big Band Era of the 1930s and 1940s. He was especially known among musicians for his astonishing technical proficiency as well as his superior tone.-Biography:He was born in Albany, Georgia, the son of a bandleader of a traveling circus

Harry Lauder
Sir Henry Lauder , known professionally as Harry Lauder, was an international Scottish entertainer, described by Sir Winston Churchill as "Scotland's greatest ever ambassador!"-Early life:

Harry Locke
Harry Locke was a British character actor.He was born and died in London. He was a familiar face in three decades of British cinema, with appearances including Passport to Pimlico , Reach for the Sky , Carry On Nurse , The Devil-Ship Pirates and The Family Way .In 1969 he appeared in Randall

Harry M. Wurzbach
Harry McLeary Wurzbach was the first Republican since Reconstruction to represent Texas for more than two terms in the U.S. House of Representatives. Rep. Robert B. Hawley had previously served as a Republican for a Galveston based congressional district from 1897-1901

Harry Michaels
Harry Michaels is an Australian television producer and director. he is also a former actor and television host. He has been involved in the companies Harry Michaels Productions and zer0-1-zer0 . His wife, Effie Michaels, was one of the aerobics demonstrators on the Aerobics Oz Style television series

Harry Osborn
Harry Osborn is a fictional character, a supporting character of Spider-Man in the . In addition to being Peter Parker's best friend, Harry was the second Green Goblin and is the son of Norman Osborn

Harry Payne Whitney
Harry Payne Whitney was an American businessman, thoroughbred horsebreeder, and member of the prominent Whitney family.- Early years :

Harry Pearce
Sir Henry James "Harry" Pearce KBE is the fictional head of the Counter-Terrorism department of MI5, featured in the British television series, Spooks

Harry Potter
Harry Potter is a series of seven fantasy novels written by the British author J. K. Rowling. The books chronicle the adventures of the adolescent wizard Harry Potter and his best friends Ron Weasley and Hermione Granger, all of whom are students at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry

Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets
Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets is the second novel in the Harry Potter series written by J. K. Rowling. The plot follows Harry's second year at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry, during which a series of messages on the walls on the school's corridors warn that the "Chamber of Secrets" has been opened and that the "heir of Slytherin" will kill all pupils who

Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets (film)
Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets is a 2002 fantasy film directed by Chris Columbus and based on the novel of the same name by J. K. Rowling. It is the second instalment in the Harry Potter film series, written by Steve Kloves and produced by David Heyman

Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix (film)
Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix is a 2007 fantasy film directed by David Yates and based on the novel of the same name by J. K. Rowling. It is the fifth instalment in the Harry Potter film series, written by Michael Goldenberg and produced by David Heyman and David Barron

Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone
Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone is the first novel in the Harry Potter series written by J. K. Rowling and featuring Harry Potter, a young wizard

Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone (film)
Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone, released in the United States and India as Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone, is a 2001 fantasy film directed by Chris Columbus and based on the novel of the same name by J. K. Rowling. The film is the first instalment in the Harry Potter film series, written by Steve Kloves and produced by David Heyman

Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban
Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban is the third novel in the Harry Potter series written by J. K. Rowling. The book was published on 8 July 1999. The novel won the 1999 Whitbread Book Award, the Bram Stoker Award, the 2000 Locus Award for Best Fantasy Novel, and was short-listed for other awards, including the Hugo

Harry Potter Lexicon
The Harry Potter Lexicon is a fan-created online encyclopedia of the Harry Potter series.-Overview:The site was created by school librarian Steve Vander Ark. It contains detailed information for all seven published Harry Potter books

Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center
The Harry Ransom Center is a library and archive at the University of Texas at Austin, specializing in the collection of literary and cultural artifacts from the United States and Europe. The Ransom Center houses 36 million literary manuscripts, 1 million rare books, 5 million photographs, and more than 100,000 works of art

Harry Roberts (murderer)
Harry Maurice Roberts is a career criminal who instigated the Shepherd's Bush Murders in which three police officers were shot dead in 1966. The killings happened after the plain-clothed officers approached the van which Roberts and two other men were sitting in, in Braybrook Street, near Wormwood Scrubs prison in London

Harry S. Truman
Harry S. Truman was the 33rd President of the United States . As President Franklin D. Roosevelt's third vice president and the 34th Vice President of the United States , he succeeded to the presidency on April 12, 1945, when President Roosevelt died less than three months after beginning his unprecedented fourth term.During World War

Harry S. Truman Dam and Reservoir
The Truman Reservoir is located in the state of Missouri, United States. It is the largest man-made lake in Missouri and the dam that created and manages the lake's water level. It is located between Clinton and Warsaw, on the Osage River and extends south to Osceola

Harry Secombe
Sir Harry Donald Secombe CBE was a Welsh entertainer with a talent for comedy and a noted fine tenor singing voice. He is best known for playing Neddie Seagoon, the central character in the BBC radio comedy series The Goon Show

Harry Stack Sullivan
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