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Different

Different

WordNet



adjective


(1)   Differing from all others; not ordinary
"Advertising that strives continually to be different"
"This new music is certainly different but I don't really like it"
(2)   Marked by dissimilarity
"For twins they are very unlike"
"People are profoundly different"
(3)   Unlike in nature or quality or form or degree
"Took different approaches to the problem"
"Came to a different conclusion"
"Different parts of the country"
"On different sides of the issue"
"This meeting was different from the earlier one"
(4)   Distinctly separate from the first
"That's another (or different) issue altogether"
(5)   Distinct or separate
"Each interviewed different members of the community"
Wiktonary



Etymology


< < , present active participle of ; see differ.

Adjective



  1. Not the same.
    Mona is different from Eloise.
  2. Various, assorted, diverse.
    • 2006, Delbert S. Elliott et al., Good Kids from Bad Neighborhoods: Successful Development in Social Context, Cambridge University Press, ISBN 9780521863575, page 19:
      In any case, poor black respondents living in high-poverty neighborhoods are most likely to view their neighborhood as a single block or block group and to use this definition consistently when asked about different neighborhood characteristics and activities.
  3. Distinct, separate; .
    Several different scientists all reached this conclusion at about the same time.
  4. Unlike most others; unusual.

Usage notes

Depending on dialect, time period, and register, the adjective may be construed with one of the prepositions , , and , or with the subordinating conjunction .
Pleasure is different from/than/to happiness.
It's different than (or from what) I expected.
Of these, is more common in formal registers than in informal ones, and more common in the U.S. than elsewhere; is more common in the U.S. than elsewhere; and is more common in the U.K., in Australia, and in New Zealand than in the U.S. Style guides often advocate , by analogy with (rather than } or }).